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Berenice Abbott letter to John Henry Bradley Storrs

Creator:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Storrs, John Henry Bradley, 1885-1956  Search this
Type:
Correspondence
Date:
1921 July 19
Topic:
Illustrated letters  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)15033
See more items in:
John Henry Bradley Storrs papers, 1790-2007, bulk 1900-1956
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_15033
Online Media:

Berenice Abbott letter, Berlin, Germany, to John Henry Bradley Storrs, Paris, France

Creator:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Storrs, John Henry Bradley, 1885-1956  Search this
Type:
Correspondence
Place:
Berlin, Germany
Date:
1921 Oct. 16
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)15034
See more items in:
John Henry Bradley Storrs papers, 1790-2007, bulk 1900-1956
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_15034
Online Media:

#4, #6, and #8 on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Subject:
Abbott, Berenice  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
1936 Mar 20
Topic:
Photographers  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)16274
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_16274
Online Media:

A view of the McGraw-Hill building from 42nd St and 9th Avenue looking east

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Subject:
Abbott, Berenice  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
1936 May 25
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Photography  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)16275
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_16275
Online Media:

A view of the Blossom Restaurant at 103 Bowery in Manhattan

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Subject:
Abbott, Berenice  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
1935 Oct 24
Topic:
Photographers  Search this
Photography  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)16276
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_16276
Online Media:

The chicken market at 55 Hester Street in Manhattan

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Subject:
Abbott, Berenice  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
1937 Feb 11
Topic:
Photographers  Search this
Photography  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)16277
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_16277
Online Media:

Tri-Boro Barber School at 246 Bowery in Manhattan

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Subject:
Abbott, Berenice  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
1935 Oct 24
Topic:
Photographers  Search this
Photography  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)16278
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_16278
Online Media:

"El Train" station at 72nd St and Columbus Avenue

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
1936 February 6
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)16279
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_16279
Online Media:

Murray Hill Hotel from Park Avenue and 40th Street

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Subject:
Abbott, Berenice  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
1935 Nov 19
Topic:
Photographers  Search this
Photography  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)16280
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_16280
Online Media:

Elizabeth McCausland at her printing press

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Subject:
McCausland, Elizabeth  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Date:
ca. 1935
Topic:
Artists at or with their work  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)7597
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_7597

Photograph of Elizabeth McCausland

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Subject:
McCausland, Elizabeth  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Date:
1935 January
Topic:
Art critics  Search this
Portraits  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)7943
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_7943

Changing New York cover proposal

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Subject:
Abbott, Berenice  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
1938
Topic:
Photography  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)9810
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_9810
Online Media:

City Arabesque

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
1938 June 9
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)856
See more items in:
Changing New York / Berenice Abbott, 1936-1938
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_856
Online Media:

Manhattan Bridge looking up

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Subject:
Federal Art Project  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
1936 Nov. 11
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)857
See more items in:
Changing New York / Berenice Abbott, 1936-1938
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_857
Online Media:

Stone and William Streets

Photographer:
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
1936 May 12
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)858
See more items in:
Changing New York / Berenice Abbott, 1936-1938
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_858
Online Media:

Focus Gallery records

Creator:
Focus Gallery  Search this
Names:
George Eastman House  Search this
Torren Gallery  Search this
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Adams, Ansel, 1902-1984  Search this
Brandt, Bill  Search this
Bullock, Wynn  Search this
Caponigro, Paul, 1932-  Search this
Cunningham, Imogen, 1883-1976  Search this
Dater, Judy  Search this
Heinecken, Robert, 1931-  Search this
Hosoe, Eikō, 1933  Search this
Johnston, Helen, 1916-1989  Search this
Leibovitz, Annie, 1949-  Search this
Porter, Eliot, 1901-  Search this
Siskind, Aaron  Search this
Uelsmann, Jerry, 1934-  Search this
Weston, Brett  Search this
Extent:
11.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
1963-1987
Summary:
The records of San Francisco Focus Gallery measure 11.8 linear feet and date from 1963-1987. The bulk of the collection consists of exhibition files. There are also artists files, sales information, correspondence, and scattered records of the gallery's companion bookshop.
Scope and Contents:
The records of San Francisco's Focus Gallery measure 11.8 linear feet and date from 1963-1987. The bulk of the collection consists of exhibition files. There are also artists files, sales information, correspondence, and scattered records of the gallery's companion bookshop.

Exhibition files comprise the bulk of the collection and generally contain a wide range of materials including correspondence, short biographies, forms requesting artists' background information, flyers, booklets, brochures, checklists, loan agreements, sales records, news releases, and photographs and negatives. Among the many photographers exhibited were Ansel Adams, Berenice Abbott, Bill Brandt, Wynn Bullock, Paul Caponigro, Imogen Cunningham, Judy Dater, Robert Heinecken, Eikoh Hosoe, Annie Leibovitz, Eliot Porter, Aaron Siskind, Jerry Uelsmann, and Brett Weston.

A relatively small amount of general business correspondence includes orders and payments for photographic prints, books, and magazine subscriptions, some personal notes, and requests for information about how to submit for exhibitions and for exhibition schedules. Correspondents include customers, photographers, publishers, law firms, museum, and colleges and universities. Correspondence from the founding year contains Johnston's letters to various venues prominent in art photography, such as George Eastman House. There is also a letter to Ansel Adams requesting prints to sell or for a small opening exhibit.

Additional records include artists' files; sales and inventory records containing print and bookshop inventories, general pricing information and receipts for photographs; and printed materials including flyers and brochures, bookshop catalogs and news releases. There are also scattered administrative records, including gallery history, a file on the Toren Gallery and five owner's notebooks, as well as The Imogen Cunningham Trust files documenting Focus Gallery's interactions with the trust before and after Cunningham's death regarding photographs printed and signed by her; financial and legal files; and guest books.

Documents in the collection that pre-date the founding of the gallery are found in the Toren Gallery file and a few of the exhibition files.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Series 1: Administrative Records, 1963-1985 (Box 1; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1966-1987 (Boxes 1-2; 1 linear foot)

Series 3: Exhibition Files, 1966-1985 (Boxes 2-10; 8.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Artists Files, 1966-1978 (Boxes 10-11; 0 .5 linear feet)

Series 5: Financial and Legal Files, 1966-1987 (Box 11; 0 .2 linear feet)

Series 6: Sales and Inventories, 1966-1987 (Box 11; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Materials, 1966-1987 (Boxes 11-12; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 8: Guest Books, 1966-1970, 1978-1985 (Boxes 12-13; 0.6 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Focus Gallery was founded by Helen Head Johnson (1916-1989) in 1966 on Union Street in San Francisco. The gallery exhibited and sold primarily art photographs and other contemporary art.

Helen Head Johnston believed that photography deserved its own exhibition space. As stated in the gallery's first press release, "in seeking to encourage print collecting it (the gallery) offers not only a show place but also a market place for photographers." While retaining an emphasis on Bay Area photographers, the gallery's exhibitions soon became international in scope, featuring little known and well-established photographers through both solo and group exhibitions. With few exceptions, the gallery's policy was to feature an artist only once. To help keep the gallery going in its early days, Johnston started a bookshop mail-order business. At the time of its closing in August 1985, Focus Gallery was the longest continuously operating photography gallery in the country. The bookshop continued in another location for an additional two years.

The collection is arranged as 8 series

Series 1: Administrative records, 1963-1985, (Box 1 8 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1966-1987, undated (Box 1-2 1 linear foot)

Series 3: Exhibition files, 1966-1985 (Box 2-10 8.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Artists files, 1966-1978, undated (Box 10-11, 9 folders)

Series 5: Financial and Legal files, 1966-1987 (Box 11 6 folders)

Series 6: Sales and Inventories, 1966-1987, undated (Box 11 11 folders)

Series 7: Printed Materials, 1966-1987, undated (Box 11 and Hol 12 7 folders)

Series 8: Guest Books, 1966-1985 (Hol 12-13 6 folders)
Related Materials:
Among the holding of the Archives of American Art is an untranscribed interview of Helen Johnston by Louise Katzman or Irene Borger in the collection Interviews of California Photographers 1981 Jun.-Nov.20.

Helen Johnston left her private photography collection to the de Saisset Museum, the Oakland Museum of California, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
Provenance:
The Focus Gallery records were donated by the estate of owner Helen Johnston, care of Gerald O'Conner, executor.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Visitors' books  Search this
Women photographers  Search this
Photography -- Exhibitions  Search this
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Photographic art galleries -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Photographers -- United States  Search this
Gallery owners -- local  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Focus Gallery records, 1963-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.focugall
See more items in:
Focus Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-focugall
Online Media:

Federal Art Project, Photographic Division collection

Creator:
Federal Art Project. Photographic Division  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (N.Y.)  Search this
Federal Art Project (Wash.)  Search this
Federal Art Project -- Photographs  Search this
Federal Art Project. Easel Division  Search this
Federal Art Project. Graphic Arts Division  Search this
Federal Art Project. Poster Division  Search this
Federal Music Project (U.S.) -- Photographs  Search this
Federal Theatre Project (U.S.) -- Photographs  Search this
Federal Writers' Project (U.S.) -- Photographs  Search this
Harlem Art Center  Search this
United States. Work Projects Administration  Search this
United States. Works Progress Administration  Search this
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Alston, Charles Henry, 1907-1977  Search this
Arenal, Luis  Search this
Barthé, Richmond, 1901-1989  Search this
Benson, John Howard, 1901-1956  Search this
Berger, Andrew  Search this
Blanch, Lucile, 1895-1981  Search this
Bloch, Lucienne, 1909-1999  Search this
Bolotowsky, Ilya, 1907-1981  Search this
Brann, Louise, 1906-  Search this
Burke, Selma, 1900-  Search this
Cahill, Holger, 1887-1960  Search this
Calapai, Letterio, 1902-1993  Search this
Chodorow, Eugene, 1910-2000  Search this
Criss, Francis, 1901-1973  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
De Rivera, José Ruiz, 1904-1985  Search this
Dehn, Adolf, 1895-1968  Search this
Dehn, Virginia E. (Virginia Engleman), 1922-2005  Search this
Ennis, George Pearse, d. 1936  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Gershoy, Eugenie, 1901?-1983 or 6  Search this
Goodman, Bertram, 1904-1988  Search this
Gorky, Arshile, 1904-1948  Search this
Greenwood, Marion, 1909-1970  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Herman, Andrew  Search this
Hord, Donal, 1902-1966  Search this
Horn, Sol  Search this
Hovell, Joseph, 1897-  Search this
Karp, William, 1905-  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo, 1889-1953  Search this
Laning, Edward, 1906-1981  Search this
Levi, Julian E. (Julian Edwin), 1900-1982  Search this
McMahon, Audrey, 1900?-1981  Search this
Olds, Elizabeth, 1896-1991  Search this
Refregier, Anton, 1905-  Search this
Robbins, David  Search this
Seltzer, Leo, 1916-  Search this
Shuster, Will  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Extent:
12.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1920-1965
bulk 1935-1942
Summary:
The Federal Art Project, Photographic Division collection dates from circa 1920-1965, with the bulk of the records spanning the active years of the Federal Art Project (FAP), 1935-1942. The collection comprises 12.4 linear feet of mostly photographic prints and negatives that document primarily artwork produced by artists employed by the FAP. A smaller number of photographs also document other programs of the FAP, such as art classes and community centers, exhibitions by children and adults, artwork installed in public buildings, project divisions, and demonstrations of art processes by FAP artists.
Scope and Content Note:
The Federal Art Project (FAP), Photographic Division collection dates from circa 1920-1965, with the bulk of the records spanning the active years of the FAP: 1935-1942. The collection comprises 12.4 linear feet of photographic prints and negatives, including photos of FAP artists and the artwork created by them, and other activities of the FAP in communities throughout New York City and other states. Photographers include Andrew Herman, Sol Horn, David Robbins, Leo Seltzer, and others.

Artist files comprise three-quarters of the collection and consist primarily of photographs of artwork, as well as scattered photos of artists at work, including: Charles Alston, Luis Arenal, Richmond Barthe, John Benson, Andrew Berger, Lucille Blanch, Lucienne Bloch, Ilya Bolotowsky, Luise Brann, Selma Burke, Letterio Calapai, Eugene Chodorow, Francis Criss, Stuart Davis, Adolf Dehn, Virginia Dehn, Jose de Rivera, George Pearse Ennis, Philip Evergood, Eugenie Gershoy, Bertram Goodman, Arshile Gorky, Marion Greenwood, Philip Guston, Donal Hord, Joseph Hovell, William Karp, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Edward Laning, Julian Levi, Audrey McMahon, Elizabeth Olds, Anton Refregier, Will Shuster, William Zorach, and others.

The remainder of the collection consists of files documenting related activities and programs of the FAP, arranged by subject. The bulk of these files document the activities of the New York City FAP, including free art classes and art exhibitions for adults and children, exhibitions at the Harlem Art Center, and the work of FAP branches including the Easel Division, the Graphic Arts Division, and the Poster Division.

Other subjects documented include federal and community art centers in eleven states, most extensively Washington State; other WPA projects such as the Federal Theater Project, the Federal Music Project, and the Federal Writers' Project; buildings decorated with FAP artwork; art processes as demonstrated by FAP artists; special events; and people involved with the FAP, including director Holger Cahill.

One folder contains images that appear to have been taken by Berenice Abbott for the exhibition Changing New York (1935), for the Museum of the City of New York in collaboration with the WPA.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 2 series:

Series 1: Artist Files, circa 1920-1965 (Boxes 1-24; 9.6 linear feet)

Series 2: Subject Files, 1934-1956 (Boxes 25-32; 2.8 linear feet)
Historical Note:
The Federal Art Project (FAP) was one of the Depression-era work-relief programs of the Federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). The program was founded in August 1935 to provide employment for artists and to implement visual arts programs in local communities across the country.

Together with the Federal Music Project, the Federal Theater Project, and the Federal Writers' Project, the FAP formed part of the WPA's Federal Project No. 1. The WPA became the Work Projects Administration in 1939 when it fell under the administrative hand of the newly created Federal Works Agency; concurrently the Federal Art Project was officially re-named the Federal Art Program.

Under the direction of Holger Cahill, the goals of the FAP fell into three main areas: production of artwork, art education through art classes and community centers, and art research through the Index of American Design. During the course of the program, artists created murals and other works of art for many non-Federal government buildings such as schools, hospitals, and libraries. Separate photographic divisions were set up in several states, most notably in New York City, to document the work of artists employed by the program, activities in art education such as classes for children and adults, community center outreach programs, and other "Federal 1" projects, including the Federal Theater and Music Projects. Employees of the photographic division were also involved in other assignments, such as creating exhibitions and photo murals.

The Federal Art Project ended in 1943.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are related collections, including the Federal Art Project of the Work Projects Administration records, 1935-1948. Additional FAP records are held by the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington D.C.
Provenance:
The collection was anonymously donated to the Archives of American Art in the late 1950s.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Children's art  Search this
Photography  Search this
Art -- United States -- Exhibitions -- Photographs  Search this
Art -- United States -- Study and teaching -- Photographs  Search this
Art centers  Search this
Federal aid to the public welfare -- Photographs  Search this
Theater and state -- United States -- Photographs  Search this
Music and state -- United States -- Photographs  Search this
Federal aid to the arts -- Photographs  Search this
Art and state -- United States -- Photographs  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Artists -- United States -- Photographs  Search this
Art -- Exhibitions  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Federal Art Project, Photographic Division collection, circa 1920-1965, bulk 1935-1942. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.fedeartp14
See more items in:
Federal Art Project, Photographic Division collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-fedeartp14
Online Media:

Holger Cahill papers

Creator:
Cahill, Holger, 1887-1960  Search this
Names:
American Artists' Congress  Search this
American Council of Learned Societies  Search this
American Federation of Arts  Search this
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Cartoonists Guild  Search this
Federal Art Project (U.S.)  Search this
Federal Music Project (U.S.)  Search this
Federal Theatre Project (U.S.)  Search this
Index of American Design  Search this
New York World's Fair (1939-1940 : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Shakers  Search this
The Design Laboratory (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Treasury Relief Art Project  Search this
United States. Work Projects Administration  Search this
United States. Works Progress Administration  Search this
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Brown, Samuel Joseph, 1907-  Search this
De Rivera, José Ruiz, 1904-1985  Search this
Halpert, Edith Gregor, 1900-1970  Search this
Hopkins, Harry Lloyd, 1890-1946  Search this
Knaths, Karl, 1891-1971  Search this
Miller, Dorothy Canning, 1904-2003  Search this
Morris, Carl, 1911-1993  Search this
Olds, Elizabeth, 1896-1991  Search this
Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962  Search this
Rowan, Edward Beatty, 1898-1946  Search this
Scaravaglione, Concetta, 1900-1975  Search this
Segal, George, 1924-2000  Search this
Speck, Walter, 1895-  Search this
Ward, Lynd, 1905-1985  Search this
Weisenborn, Rudolph, b. 1881  Search this
Extent:
15.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Government records
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Photograph albums
Drawings
Place:
United States -- Economic conditions -- 1918-1945
United States -- Social conditions -- 1933-1945
Date:
1910-1993
bulk 1910-1960
Summary:
The papers of Holger Cahill (1887-1960) date from 1910 to 1993, with the bulk of the material dating from 1910-1960, and measure 15.8 linear feet. The collection offers researchers fairly comprehensive documentation of Cahill's directorship of the Works Progress/Projects Administration's (WPA) Federal Art Project (FAP) in addition to series documenting his work as a writer and art critic. Material includes correspondence, reports, artist files, scrapbooks, printed material, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Holger Cahill (1887-1960) date from 1910 to 1993, bulk 1910-1960, and measure 15.8 linear feet. The collection offers researchers fairly comprehensive documentation of Cahill's directorship of the FAP in addition to series documenting his work as a writer and art critic. FAP records include national and state administrative reports, records of community art centers, photographic documentation of state activities, artist files, divisional records about teaching, crafts, murals, and poster work, files concerning the Index of American Design, scrapbooks, and printed material.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into nine series:

Series 1: Biographical Material and Personal Papers, 1931-1988 (Box 1; 19 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence Files, 1922-1979, 1993 (Boxes 1-2; 1.5 linear ft.)

Series 3: Works Progress Administration Federal Art Project, 1934-1970 (Boxes 2-14, 18, MMs009; 10.75 linear ft.)

Series 4: Writings, Lectures and Speeches, 1916-1960 (Boxes 14-15, 18; 1.0 linear ft.)

Series 5: Minutes of Meetings and Panel Discussions, Non-FAP, 1939-1947 (Box 15; 5 folders)

Series 6: Notes and Research Material, 1935-1970 (Boxes 15-16; 0.25 linear ft.)

Series 7: Artwork, undated (Boxes 16, 18; 2 folders)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1910-1985 (Boxes 16-17; 1.8 linear ft.)

Series 9: Photographs, circa 1917-1960 (Box 17; 6 folders)
Biographical Note:
Holger Cahill was born Sveinn Kristjan Bjarnarson in Iceland in a small valley near the Arctic Circle, on January 13, 1887. His parents, Bjorn Jonson and Vigdis Bjarnadottir, immigrated to the United States from Iceland sometime later in the 1880s. In 1904, his father deserted the family, forcing Sveinn to be separated from his mother and sister to work on a farm in North Dakota. He ran away and wandered from job to job until settling in an orphanage in western Canada, where he attended school and became a voracious reader.

As a young man, he worked at many different jobs and attended night school. While working on a freighter, he visited Hong Kong, beginning his life-long interest in the Orient. Returning to New York City, he eventually became a newspaper reporter, continued his studies at New York University, and changed his name to Edgar Holger Cahill. In 1919 he married Katherine Gridley of Detroit. Their daughter, Jane Ann, was born in 1922, but the couple divorced in 1927.

Cahill met John Sloan circa 1920, and they shared a residence. Cahill also wrote publicity (until 1928) for the Society of Independent Artists, through which he made many friends in the arts. From 1922 to 1931, he worked under John Cotton Dana at the Newark Museum, where he received his basic experience in museum work, organizing the first large exhibitions of folk art.

From 1932 to 1935, he was the director of exhibitions for the Museum of Modern Art. In 1935, Cahill was appointed director of the Works Progress/Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Project (FAP), until its end in June 1943. In 1938, Cahill organized a countrywide exhibition "American Art Today" for the New York World's Fair. He also married MoMa curator Dorothy Canning Miller in that year.

Profane Earth, Cahill's first novel, was published in 1927, followed by monographs on Pop Hart and Max Weber, miscellaneous short stories, and a biography of Frederick Townsend Ward, entitled A Yankee Adventurer: The Story of Ward and the Taiping Rebellion. Following the end of the Federal Art Project, Cahill wrote two novels, Look South to the Polar Star (1947) and The Shadow of My Hand (1956).

Holger Cahill died in Stockbridge, Massachusetts in July 1960.
Provenance:
The Holger Cahill papers were donated to the Archives of American Art through a series of gifts by Cahill's widow, Dorothy C. Miller, between 1964 and 1995.
Restrictions:
The microfilm of this collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the public welfare  Search this
Art and state  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
New Deal, 1933-1939  Search this
Public officers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Prints
Government records
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Photograph albums
Drawings
Citation:
Holger Cahill papers, 1910-1993, bulk 1910-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cahiholg
See more items in:
Holger Cahill papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cahiholg
Online Media:

Elizabeth McCausland papers

Topic:
Springfield Republican
Creator:
McCausland, Elizabeth, 1899-1965  Search this
Names:
American Art Research Council  Search this
Barnard College -- Faculty  Search this
Federal Art Project (U.S.)  Search this
United States. Farm Security Administration  Search this
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Dove, Arthur Garfield, 1880-1946  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Hawthorne, Charles Webster, 1872-1930  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Henry, Edward Lamson, 1841-1919  Search this
Hine, Lewis Wickes, 1874-1940  Search this
Inness, George, 1825-1894  Search this
Kleinholz, Frank, 1901-  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Maurer, Alfred Henry, 1868-1932  Search this
Morgan, Barbara Brooks, 1900-1992  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Weegee, 1899-1968  Search this
Weston, Edward, 1886-1958  Search this
Extent:
45 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Prints
Drawings
Photographs
Watercolors
Place:
New York N.Y. -- Pictorial works -- Photographs
Date:
1838-1995
bulk 1920-1960
Summary:
The papers of art critic, writer, and historian Elizabeth McCausland measure 45 linear feet and date from 1838 to 1995, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920 to 1960. The collection provides a vast accumulation of research data on various artists and aspects of American art, especially the early American modernists and the Federal Arts Projects. Papers include McCausland's extensive research and writing files, particularly on Marsden Hartley, E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, and Alfred H. Maurer. McCausland's correspondence with artists includes a substantial amount with Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz. Her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs is well-documented within the collection. Also found are general writings, subject files, files relating to exhibitions, teaching, and committees, photographs, art work, personal papers, and printed material. Additional McCausland material donated later from the estate of Berenice Abbott include biographical materials, project files, writings, and printed materials.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of art critic, writer, and historian Elizabeth McCausland measure approximately 45 linear feet and date from 1838 to 1995, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920 to 1995. The collection provides a vast accumulation of data on various artists and aspects of American art, especially the early American modernists and the Federal Arts Projects. Papers include McCausland's extensive research and writing files, particularly on Marsden Hartley, E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, and Alfred H. Maurer. McCausland's correspondence with artists includes a substantial amount with Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz. Her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs is well-documented within the collection. Also found are general writings, subject files, files relating to exhibitions, teaching, and committees, photographs, art work, personal papers, and printed material. Additional McCausland material from the estate of Berenice Abbott include biographical materials, project files, writings, and printed materials.

McCausland's personal papers consist of appointment books and engagement calendars, scrapbooks, student papers, works printed on her private press, financial records, biographical material, and scattered memorabilia, which together document other aspects of her life apart from her work. Correspondence includes incoming and outgoing letters along with enclosures, dating from McCausland's time as a journalist for The Springfield Republican in the 1920s and 1930s to her time as a freelance writer, art critic, and historian (1940s-1960s) and mostly concerning professional matters. Also included is a substantial amount of correspondence with artists, particularly Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz, and some personal correspondence with her mother. General writings consists primarily of copies of McCausland's speeches and lectures on various art topics in addition to her early poems (dating from the 1930s) and scattered essays and articles.

The most extensive part of the collection is comprised of McCausland's research and writing files pertaining to large research and curatorial projects, such as ones on the artists Alfred H. Maurer and Marsden Hartley (which was begun by the American Art Research Council and subsequently taken over by McCausland), and one for the American Processional exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery in 1950. A wide variety of smaller projects are also well-documented in the series Other Research and Writing Files, including ones on E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs. Numerous other artists and art topics are covered as well, such as Arthur Dove, Robert Henri, Jacob Lawrence, Charles Hawthorne, film, and photography. Files for her book Careers in Art (1950), her many speaking and lecture engagements, and editing work are also found in this series. Files consist primarily of correspondence, notes, research material, manuscripts, bibliographies, photographs of works of art, completed research forms for works of art, card index files, and printed material.

Also found are subject files containing printed material, scattered notes and correspondence, and photographs, which may have been used for reference and/or collected in the course of McCausland's research activities; files relating to various exhibitions organized by McCausland from 1939 to 1944, including ones of silk screen prints and modern photography; files relating to courses on art history taught by McCausland, especially the one she taught at Barnard College in 1956; and files stemming from her participation in various art organizations and committees, especially during the time period just before and during the Second World War.

Printed material consists primarily of clippings and tear sheets of McCausland's newspaper articles and columns, which document her contributions to The Springfield Republican from 1923 to 1946, in addition to scattered exhibition catalogs, announcements, books, and miscellaneous publications. Photographs include ones of various artists and works of art, ones from the Farm Security Administration, and ones by photographers, such as Berenice Abbott (including ones from the Federal Art Project book, Changing New York), Barbara Morgan, Weegee, and Edward Weston, among others. Photographs, sometimes annotated or including notes, are scattered throughout her research files. Also included are photographs of McCausland, dating from her childhood. Art work found in the collection includes drawings, prints, and watercolors that were either given to McCausland by the artist or collected by her in the course of her work as an art critic and historian.

Additional material belonging to Elizabeth McCausland and donated by the estate of Berenice Abbott includes biographical material; business and personal correspondence; professional project files and writings, including drafts and research materials related to the book projects Art in America, Conversations with March, and Frank Kleinholz; and printed materials, including reprints of critical essays and articles by McCausland.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 15 series:

Series 1: Personal Papers, 1838, 1920-1951 (Boxes 1-2, 34; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1923-1960 (Boxes 2-5; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 3: General Writings, circa 1930-1954 (Boxes 5-6; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 4: Alfred H. Maurer, 1851-1951, bulk 1948-1950 (Boxes 6-9; 3.7 linear feet)

Series 5: American Processional, 1949-1951 (Boxes 10-11; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 6: Marsden Hartley, 1900-1964, bulk 1944-1964 (Boxes 11-21, OV 37; 10 linear feet)

Series 7: Other Research and Writing Files, 1896, 1926-1958 (Boxes 21-25, 31; 4.6 linear feet)

Series 8: Subject Files, 1927-1954 (Boxes 25-26; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 9: Other Exhibition Files, 1939-1941, 1944 (Box 26; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 10: Teaching Files, 1939-1965 (Box 27; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Committee Files, 1936-1960 (Box 27; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 12: Printed Material, 1923-1953 (Boxes 28-32, 34, OV 38, BV 44-47; 4.6 linear feet)

Series 13: Photographs, circa 1905-1950 (Boxes 32-36, OV 37; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 14: Art Work, 1887-1942 (Boxes 33-34, OV 39-43; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 15: Elizabeth McCausland Material from the Estate of Berenice Abbott, 1920-1995 (Boxes 48-53; 5.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Elizabeth McCausland, the art critic and writer, was born in Wichita, Kansas in 1899. She attended Smith College, receiving her Bachelor's degree in 1920 and her Master's in 1922. Beginning in 1923, she worked as a general reporter for The Springfield Republican (Springfield, Massachusetts). After several years, she began to review art exhibitions and soon became an established art critic. In the course of her work, she began to develop friendships with artists, such as Alfred Stieglitz and Arthur Dove. During these early years, she also wrote poetry and designed and printed limited edition publications on her private press.

McCausland moved to New York in 1935, but continued to contribute a weekly art column to The Springfield Republican until it suspended publication in 1946. From the mid-1930s on, she worked primarily as a freelance writer and art critic, contributing articles to publications such as Parnassas, The New Republic, and Magazine of Art. In the latter part of her career, her writings focused more on art history and special studies on artists.

In the late-1930s, McCausland collaborated with the photographer Berenice Abbott on the Federal Art Project book, Changing New York, for which she provided the text to Abbott's now-famous photographs of New York City neighborhoods, architecture, and street scenes. She studied and wrote about photography, including numerous articles on the photographer Lewis Hine (of whose work she organized a retrospective exhibition at the Riverside Museum in 1939), and was appointed to the Advisory Committee of the Museum of Modern Art's Department of Photography in 1944.

McCausland went on to organize other exhibitions, including a show of contemporary work, "The World of Today" (Berkshire Museum, 1939), shows of silk screen prints (Springfield Museum of Fine Arts, March 1940 and New York State Museum, Summer 1940), and a photography show, "Photography Today" (A.C.A. Gallery, 1944). In the late 1930s, she embarked upon a study of "the status of the artist in America from colonial times to the present, with especial attention to the relation between art and patronage," which continued over twenty years (and was never completed) and for which she received a Guggenheim fellowship in 1943.

In addition to her other writing, during the 1940s, McCausland carried out studies on the artists, E. L. Henry and George Inness, which resulted in exhibitions at the New York State Museum in 1942 and the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum in 1946, respectively and publications (a report on Henry and a book on Inness). From 1948 to 1949, she carried out an extensive study of the painter, Alfred H. Maurer, organizing an exhibition, "A. H. Maurer: 1868-1932," which showed at the Walker Art Center and the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1949, and publishing the biography, A. H. Maurer, in 1951. In 1950, she worked as a special consultant on the American Processional exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery and as editor of the accompanying book. Shortly thereafter, she began a study of Marsden Hartley for a monograph, which was published in 1952, and she helped organize the Hartley exhibition at the University of Minnesota that same year. She continued the Hartley study on larger scale for a planned biography and catalogue raisonne; although she continued to work on it off and on for the next decade, the project was never completed.

McCausland published other books, including Careers in the Arts (1951), and undertook other research and consulting projects, such as photo-editing Carl Sandburg's Poems of the Midwest (1946), conducting surveys of art and advertising for an article in Magazine of Art and of art education for Cooper Union Art School, and contributing yearly articles on art to various encyclopedias. At different times throughout her career, she supplemented her income by taking teaching positions. She taught courses on art history at Sarah Lawrence College from 1942 to 1944 and at Barnard College in 1956, as well as courses at the Design Laboratory (1939) and the New School for Social Research (1946). She also gave numerous lectures and speeches on various art topics, and regularly participated in conferences and symposiums. Towards the end of her career, she was publishing less, but was still involved in many projects, most notably the Hartley study.

McCausland was a tireless promoter of the arts, and often an advocate for artists. Even though her work was well-known among certain art circles, she never received the recognition as a writer that she deserved. Nor was she ever able to free herself from the pressure of writing for a living. Continually suffering from poor health, she died on May 14, 1965.
Related Material:
Related material found in the Archives includes a sound recording from a symposium on Marsden Hartley, of which McCausland was a participant, held at the Portland Museum of Art in 1961. The Frank Kleinholz papers contain a recorded interview of McCausland done in 1944-1945 for radio station WNYC. Some of McCausland's correspondence is found in the G. Alan Chidsey papers; Chidsey served as a trustee of the Marsden Hartley estate.
Separated Material:
Material separated from the collection includes some issues of Camera Work (Vol. 30, 47, 49/50), which were combined with other issues in an artificial collection created by the Archives at some earlier point.
Provenance:
Elizabeth McCausland donated the bulk of her papers in several installments from 1956 to 1961. An unknown donor, perhaps her literary executor, donated additional papers sometime after her death in 1965. It appears that McCausland originally donated her research files on Marsden Hartley, measuring 10 linear feet, to the Whitney Museum, who then lent them to the Archives for microfilming in 1966, and donated them sometime thereafter. McCausland originally donated files of newspaper clippings and offprints of her articles to the The New York Public Library, who gave them to the Archives in 1968. Additional McCausland material from the estate of Berenice Abbott was donated to the Archives in 2009.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Art criticism -- United States  Search this
Documentary photography -- United States  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Exhibitions -- United States  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Art -- Societies, etc. -- United States  Search this
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Prints
Drawings
Photographs
Watercolors
Citation:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccaeliz
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mccaeliz
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Edward Landon

Interviewee:
Landon, Edward, 1911-1984  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Artists' Congress  Search this
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Federal art project (Mass.)  Search this
National Serigraph Society  Search this
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Bridgman, George Brant, 1864-1943  Search this
Dove, Arthur Garfield, 1880-1946  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry, 1895-  Search this
Hartley, Dennis  Search this
Hughes, Marian  Search this
Lozowick, Louis, 1892-1973  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Mark, Henry  Search this
Mauer, Alfred  Search this
McCausland, Elizabeth, 1899-1965  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia , 1887-1986  Search this
Olds, Elizabeth, 1896-1991  Search this
Perry, Marvo  Search this
Rebay, Hilla, 1890-1967  Search this
Rogers, William T.  Search this
Sabbath, Bernie  Search this
Stein, Gertrude, 1874-1946  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Strand, Paul, 1890-1976  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Extent:
39 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1975 Apr. 17-May 28
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Edward Landon conducted 1975 Apr. 17-May 28, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Landon speaks of working with the local theater in high school; leaving Hartford at age 17 or 18 for Greenwich Village in New York and the Art Students League; studying figure drawing with George Bridgman; getting married and moving to Springfield, Mass.; exhibiting with the Springfield Art League; the Artist Union and the Artist Congress in the 1930s; spending a summer with Georgia O'Keeffe and Paul Strand in Taos, N.M.; the cooperation amongst artists that lasted into the 1950s to establish serigraphs as an American fine art print medium; when he received the Solomon Guggenheim Scholarship for Non-objective Art in 1939; when he made furniture and picture frames and the publishing of his book on making picture frames in 1946; when he began working as an easel painter in the Massachusetts Federal Art Project of the WPA in 1933; becoming president of the Western Chapter of the Artists Union in 1934; when he corresponded and visited Arthur Dove; his friendship with Elizabeth McCausland; his introduction to Harry Gottlieb and silk screen printing; the love of color and currently trying for emotional effects in his work; initiating silk screen exhibitions in the Springfield Museum; the beginning of the National Serigraph Society and his work as the exhibition secretary; his teaching approach; the first class held in his garage with fellow artists; more on his relationship with Elizabeth McCausland; Arthur Dove's influence on a recent painting Landon finished; his trip to Taos in 1930 and the importance of artist colonies for him early on; the feeling of not having roots, but being comfortable with the idea; the purpose of the National Serigraph Society; his feelings about printmakers moving away from traditional printing; organized exhibitions for the United States Information Service; his enjoyment in organizing things; the commercialization of creating "prints;" how photo-realism does not translate well in the print medium; the importance of trying to convey an idea in his work; his success in covering small boxes, address books and other items, as well as book binding; his preference for printing small editions of 25 to 35 prints; of a description of his method of printing; his Fulbright Fellowship in 1950 to travel to Norway and lecture; an interest in early Scandinavian art; publishing a silkscreen portfolio of pre-Viking art for the American Scandinavian Foundation; traveling through Europe; his influence as an innovator in France and Scandinavia; meeting with silk screen artists in Oslo; art forms in his work at this time; his inclusion in "Who's Who in American Art;" the avoidance of art movements; how by the 1950s the reason for the National Serigraph Society no longer existed because the medium was popular by that time; his move to Vermont in 1957 or 1958; work as a color mixer, book binder, and returning to framing because of health reasons; his second illness changing what he found important in his life; and how the content of his work became more emotional. Landon also recalls Louie Lozowick, Gertrude Stein, Marian Hughes, Elizabeth Olds, John Marin, Alfred Stieglitz, Berenice Abbott, Marvo Perry, Hilla Rebay, Sir William T. Rogers, Max Weber, Dennis Hartley, Alfred Maurer, Bernie Sabbath, and Henry Mark.
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Landon (1911-1984) was a printmaker from Weston, Vt.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 39 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Printmakers -- Vermont -- Weston -- Interviews  Search this
Artist colonies  Search this
Printing -- Technique  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.landon75
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-landon75

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