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AIDS facing the second decade edited by Peter Aggleton, Peter Davies and Graham Hart

Author:
Aggleton, Peter  Search this
Davies, Peter (Peter M.)  Search this
Hart, Graham 1957-  Search this
UK Conference on Social Aspects of AIDS (6th : 1992 : London, England)  Search this
Physical description:
vii, 215 pages 25 cm
Type:
Congresses
Congrès
Congress
Conference papers and proceedings
Actes de congrès
Date:
1993
Topic:
AIDS (Disease)--Social aspects  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Social history  Search this
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome  Search this
Sexual Behavior  Search this
Social Conditions  Search this
Sida--Aspect social  Search this
Sida  Search this
Histoire sociale  Search this
social history  Search this
Aids  Search this
Soziologie  Search this
Kongress  Search this
AIDS  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_474588

Oral history interview with Lyle Ashton Harris

Interviewee:
Harris, Lyle Ashton, 1965-  Search this
Interviewer:
Fialho, Alex, 1989-  Search this
Names:
American Academy in Rome -- Students  Search this
California Institute of the Arts -- Students  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Wesleyan University (Middletown, Conn.) -- Students  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Baker, Houston A., Jr., 1943-  Search this
Barton, Nancy, (Artist)  Search this
Basquiat, Jean-Michel, 1960-1988  Search this
Butler, Cornelia H.  Search this
Carby, Hazel V.  Search this
Collier, Jim  Search this
Gates, Henry Louis, Jr.  Search this
Geer, Tommy  Search this
Goldin, Nan, 1953-  Search this
Gonzalez-Torres, Felix, 1957-1996  Search this
Gray, Todd, 1954-  Search this
Grayson, John, 1943-  Search this
Hemphill, Essex  Search this
Julien, Isaac  Search this
Lord, Catherine, 1949-  Search this
Mapplethorpe, Robert  Search this
Mays, Vickie M.  Search this
O'Dench, Ellen  Search this
O'Meally, Jackie  Search this
O'Meally, Robert G., 1948-  Search this
Riggs, Marlon T.  Search this
Seeley, J.  Search this
Sekula, Allan  Search this
Tate, Greg  Search this
Tilton, Jack  Search this
Watson, Simon  Search this
Wilson, Millie  Search this
Woodman, Francesca, 1958-1981  Search this
Extent:
6 Items (Sound recording: 6 sound files (8 hr., 6 min.), digital, wav)
95 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
England -- London -- Description and Travel
Ghana -- Description and Travel
Netherlands -- Amsterdam -- Description and Travel
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and Travel
Tanzania -- Description and Travel
Date:
2017 March 27-29
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Lyle Ashton Harris, conducted 2017 March 27 and 29, by Alex Fialho, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Harris's studio and home in New York, New York.
Harris speaks of his childhood in the Bronx; his family's influence on his race-consciousness; living in Tanzania for two years as a child and the effects on his understanding of race and sexuality; his grandfather's extensive photographic archive; contact with the South African diaspora through his step-father; attending Wesleyan University; formative experiences in London, Amsterdam, and New York in the mid-1980s; his education and development as a photographer; attending CalArts and encountering West Coast AIDS activism; encountering systemic racism in Los Angeles; close friendships with Marlon Riggs and Essex Hemphill; exhibitions of his work in New York in the early 1990s; the production of his Ektachrome Archive and his impulse to photograph daily life; his work on the Black Community AIDS Research and Education (Black C.A.R.E.) project in Los Angeles; participating in the Whitney Museum's Independent Study Program; being diagnosed with HIV and remaining asymptomatic; attending the Dia Black Popular Culture Conference in 1992; photographing and mounting "The Good Life" in 1994 and "The Watering Hole" in 1996; issues of blackness and queerness in his photographic work; his residency at the American Academy in Rome in 2000; moving to Accra, Ghana for seven years in 2005; his pedagogy as an art professor; his thoughts on the lack of voices of color in the Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic Oral History Project and in the larger power structures of the art world; and his hope that his artistic legacy will be evaluated in its proper context. Harris also recalls Jackie and Robert O'Meally, Jay Seeley, Ellen O'Dench, Francesca Woodman, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Jim Collier, Robert Mapplethorpe, Allan Sekula, Hazel Carby, Isaac Julien, Catherine Lord, Millie Wilson, Todd Gray, John Grayson, Tommy Gear, Marlon Riggs, Essex Hemphill, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Nancy Barton, Vickie Mays, Connie Butler, Greg Tate, Henry Louis Gates, Houston Baker, Nan Goldin, Jack Tilton, Simon Watson, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Lyle Ashton Harris (1965- ) is an artist who works in video, photography, and performance in New York, New York. Alex Fialho (1989- ) is a curator and arts writer and works as Programs Director for Visual AIDS in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Performance artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Video artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
AIDS activists  Search this
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Racism  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
African American art -- African influences  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American photographers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.harris17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9559d7597-04b4-4644-b6ae-bca2bdb27f88
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-harris17
Online Media:

James Huber, Michael Hossner, and Dino Vinti papers

Creator:
Huber, James, 1950-1988  Search this
Hossner, Michael, 1954-1990  Search this
Dino Vinti, 1958-1989  Search this
Extent:
3.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1950-1993
bulk 1983-1989
Summary:
The papers of Bay Area figurative artists James Huber and Michael Hossner measure 3.1 linear feet and date from 1950 to 1993. This collection documents both James Huber and Michael Hossner's art careers in the San Francisco art scene in the 1970s and 1980s. Also included is material regarding Dino Vinti, an independent curator and curator at Footworks Studio, an alternative center for visual and performing arts. A bulk of this collection is comprised of personal correspondence, personal photographs, and photographs used as studies for works of art, and exhibition announcements and catalogs. The papers document the Bay Area art scene in the 1970s and 1980s of which Huber and Hossner were a part of, alternative spaces, and the devastation of the AIDS epidemic.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Bay Area Figurative artists James Huber and Michael Hossner measure 3.1 linear feet and date from 1950-1993. Included are personal correspondence; legal documents including a will; personal photographs and photographs used as studies for works of art; DVDs of annotated photographs, master paintings and drawings; printed material consisting of exhibition invitations and programs; and biographical information including artists' statements and address books. Also included is material regarding Dino Vinti, an independent curator and curator at Footworks Studio, an alternative center for visual and performing arts. The papers document the Bay Area art scene in the 1970s and 1980s of which Huber and Hossner were a part of, alternative spaces, and the devastation of the AIDS epidemic.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 3 series.

Series 1: James Huber papers (1.0 linear foot; Box 1, OV 5)

Series 2: Michael Hossner papers (0.7 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 3: Dino Vinti papers (1.4 linear feet; Box 2-3, OV 6-7)
Biographical / Historical:
James Huber (1950-1988) and Michael Hossner (1954-1990) were Bay Area Figurative artists in San Francisco, California. Dino Vinti (1958-1989) was a independent curator and curator at Footworks Studio.

James Huber (1950-1988) was a Bay Area Figurative artist in San Francisco, California. His art is representative of the Bay Area Figurative Style and gay community. Huber's works can be categorized into three themes: Figurative, Abstract, and Landscape. Huber co-founded (along with Phil Linhares and David McClay) Open Studios in San Francisco. Open Studios is a national movement of artist-driven presentation of their work. James Huber created more than 900 paintings and sculptures before passing from complications from AIDS.

Michael Hossner (1954-1990) was also was a Bay Area Figurative artist in San Francisco, California. Hossner was greatly influenced by his mentor and lover, James Huber, and the Bay Area Figurative Style. Hossner drew inspiration from autobiographical sources for most of his art. Many of his paintings chronicle his experiences with the AIDS pandemic. He exhibited his paintings in more than a dozen galleries and non profit spaces throughout the Bay Area between 1985 and 1989. Michale Hossner passed of complications from AIDS in 1990.

Dino Vinti (1958-1989) was a close friend and former lover of James Huber. He was an independent curator and curator at Footworks Studio, an alternative center for visual and performing arts. Vinti collaborated on the initiation of the Edge Festival. He designed and installed many exhibitions, including "Urban Expressions" show in 1987. Dino Vinti passed from complications from AIDS in 1989.
Provenance:
Donated in 2021 by Lee Draper, a museum professional and consultant to philanthropy groups and non-profits, who was friends with Huber and Hossner.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Curators -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Citation:
James Huber, Michael Hossner, and Dino Vinti papers, 1950-1993. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hubejame
See more items in:
James Huber, Michael Hossner, and Dino Vinti papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9eaeb9976-7e3b-4841-a898-852a875bf46b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hubejame

Oral history interview with Jack Waters, 2018 February 21-22

Interviewee:
Waters, Jack, 1954-  Search this
Interviewer:
Fialho, Alex, 1989-  Search this
Subject:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Jack Waters, 2018 February 21-22. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Filmmakers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Performance artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17547
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)392753
AAA_collcode_waters18
Theme:
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_392753
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jack Waters

Interviewee:
Waters, Jack  Search this
Interviewer:
Fialho, Alex, 1989-  Search this
Names:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (sound files (5 hr., 59 min.) Audio, digital, wav)
72 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Date:
2018 February 21-22
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Jack Waters, conducted 2018 February 21 and 22, by Alex Fialho, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at the Visual AIDS office in New York, New York.
Waters speaks of his early exposure to the arts through his family and their frequent visitors and boarders; the beginnings of his political consciousness, race consciousness, sex consciousness, and self-identity during the 1960s; his dance education at the Miquon School in Philadelphia; teaching at Miquon after briefly dancing in California; his dance and choreography education at the Julliard School and the Ailey School; his experience of the Lower East Side in the 1980s; the genesis and development of the Performing On One Leg collective; the start of the AIDS epidemic; collaborations with Gordon Kurtti and Brian Taylor, and their AIDS-related deaths; the importance of art-making and documentary practice during the AIDS epidemic; the beginning and development of his film and video work; collaborating with Peter Cramer on Black and White Study as both film and performance; receiving his HIV-positive diagnosis; the beginning and development of his work as a writer and journalist; his involvement in AIDS activist and queer activist organizations; a formative period in Ibiza during the fall 1983; his films The Male GaYze and Short Memory/No History; changes in queer activism he has observed since the 1980s, and the lack of historical memory about them; his experience of intergenerational queer dialogue; his involvement with Visual AIDS; and his thoughts on the idea of artistic legacy, both generally and in his particular case.
Biographical / Historical:
Jack Waters (1954- ) is a visual artist in New York, New York. Alex Fialho (1989- ) is a curator and arts writer and works as Programs Director for Visual AIDS in New York, New York.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the papers of First name Last name.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Filmmakers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Performance artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.waters18
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93959ab94-2a42-4116-84ce-cd4187eb6cec
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-waters18
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Mark Bradford

Interviewee:
Bradford, Mark, 1961-  Search this
Interviewer:
Chow, Nyssa, 1980-  Search this
Names:
Pandemic Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Item ((1 hr., 13 min.), digital, mp4)
23 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Video recordings
Date:
2020 August 14
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Mark Bradford conducted 2020 August 14, by Nyssa Chow, for the Archives of American Art's Pandemic Oral History Project at Bradford's home in Los Angeles, California.
Biographical / Historical:
Mark Bradford (1961- ) is a conceptual artist working in multiple mediums in Los Angeles, Calif.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its Oral History Program interviews available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. Quotation, reproduction and publication of the audio is governed by restrictions. If an interview has been transcribed, researchers must quote from the transcript. If an interview has not been transcribed, researchers must quote from the audio recording. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Conceptual artists -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
COVID-19 (Disease)  Search this
Pandemics  Search this
COVID-19 (Disease) -- Social aspects  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.bradfo20
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw99bece7d4-2695-4365-83b2-186331e3d3a0
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bradfo20
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Frederick Weston

Interviewee:
Weston, Frederick, Frederick, 1946-2020  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore  Search this
Names:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (sound files (5 hrs., 28 min.), digital, wav)
130 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2016 August 31-September 5
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Frederick Weston, conducted 2016 August 31 and September 5, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Weston's home in New York, N.Y.
Weston speaks of his childhood in Detroit; early understandings of his gender; attending Ferris State University in Michigan; moving to New York in 1973; New York nightclub culture before the AIDS crisis; studying at FIT and working in the fashion industry; beginning to consider himself an artist in the late 1990s after years of collage work in street settings; being diagnosed with HIV in the mid-1990s; imbuing his art with his personal experience; his body of work in photography, installations, and poetry; his health care and regiment since being diagnosed with HIV; evolutions in his personal outlook since being diagnosed; the trajectory of his sex life from adolescence; moving into his current apartment in Chelsea; and reflections on America's racial situation. Weston also recalls Claude Payne, Apollonia, Billy Blair, Stephanie Crawford, Franz Renard Smith, Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, Bruce Benderson, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Frederick Weston (1946- ) is a multimedia artist in New York, N.Y. Interviewer Theodore Kerr (1979- ) is a writer and organizer in New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Multimedia (Art)  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.weston16
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9621d1dde-6c2a-4ea5-a26d-967b128fc504
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-weston16
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Sur Rodney (Sur)

Interviewee:
Rodney, Sur  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore  Search this
Names:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
2 Items (Sound recording: 2 sound files (5 hr., 50 min.), digital, wav)
83 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2016 July 12 and 15
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Sur Rodney (Sur) conducted 2016 July 12 and 15, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Rodney's studio in New York, New York.
Sur speaks of his cosmopolitan upbringing in Montreal; attending the Montreal Museum School of Art and Design; adopting a "freak" aesthetic; moving to New York in 1976; the confluence of his Canadian, gay, and black identities; helping to establish Gracie Mansion Gallery; contemporary erasure of the impact of AIDS and queerness on the 1980s East Village; caring for HIV-positive friends in the 1980s and 90s; the impact of AIDS on intergenerational exchange in the gay community; the ostracizing of HIV-positive artists in the art world; working to preserve HIV-positive artists's archives before their deaths; developing a more explicit black consciousness in the mid-1990s; public silences around issues of sexuality and drug use in the art world; his body of work with Visual AIDS; the impact of effective medication for AIDS on the art world; his observations on contemporary intersections of AIDS and the art world; and his vision for a world when AIDS is over. Sur also recalls J.A. Holm, Fred Wilson, Lyle Ashton Harris, Lorraine O'Grady, David Hammons, Gregg Bordowitz, Al Hansen, Buster Cleveland, Tim Greathouse, Nicolas Moufarrege, Jeffrey Deitch, Michael McDonough, Yasmin Ramirez, Keith Davis, Mysoon Rizk, Andreas Senser, David Wojnarowicz, Gil Rankin, Frank Moore, Nick Debs, AA Bronson, Alex Greenfield, and Hunter Reynolds.
Biographical / Historical:
Sur Rodney (Sur) (1954- ) is a performance artist and arts administrator in New York, New York. Theodore Kerr (1979- ) is a writer and organizer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Performance artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.rodney16
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw99bd537b6-a6be-4b06-9e69-95f097e474fc
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rodney16
Online Media:

Priscilla Reining papers

Creator:
Reining, Priscilla  Search this
Extent:
2 Flat boxes
60.25 Linear feet (145 boxes)
23 Computer storage devices (floppy discs, zip discs, data tapes, and magnetic tape)
6 Sound recordings
2 Map drawers
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Kikuyu (African people)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Minnesota Chippewa [Red Lake, Minnesota]  Search this
Haya (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Computer storage devices
Sound recordings
Map drawers
Correspondence
Photographs
Electronic records
Place:
Tanganyika
Tanzania
Kenya
Uganda
Niger
Burkina Faso
Bukoba District (Tanzania)
Date:
1916-2007
bulk 1934-2007
Summary:
The Priscilla Reining papers, 1916-2007, primarily document the professional life of Reining, a social anthropologist and Africanist who worked for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from 1974 to 1989. Her area of specialty was sub-Saharan Africa, specializing in desertification, land tenure, land use, kinship, population, fertility, and HIV/AIDS. During the 1970s, she pioneered the use of satellite imagery in conjunction with ethnographic data. She is also known for her ground-breaking research in the late 1980s that showed that uncircumcised men were more susceptible to contracting HIV/AIDS than circumcised men.

The collection contains correspondence, field research, research files, writings, day planners, teaching files, student files, photographs, maps, sound recordings, and electronic records. Reining's research files, particularly on the Red Lake Ojibwa, the Haya, HIV/AIDS, and satellite imagery, form a significant portion of the collection.
Scope and Contents:
These papers primarily document the professional life of Priscilla Reining. The collection contains correspondence, field research, research files, writings, day planners, teaching files, student files, photographs, maps, sound recordings, and electronic records.

Reining's research files, particularly on the Red Lake Ojibwa, the Haya, HIV/AIDS, and satellite imagery, form a significant portion of the collection. Her consultancy work is also well-represented, as well as her involvement in a large number of professional organizations. The collection also contains a great deal of material relating to her work on different programs and projects at AAAS, including the Committee on Arid Lands, Ethnography of Reproduction Project, and Cultural Factors in Population Programs. Also present in the collection are materials from her time as Urgent Anthropology Program Coordinator at the Smithsonian Institution, her files as an instructor and professor, and her files as a student at University of Chicago. Materials from her personal life can also be found in the collection, such as correspondence and childhood mementos.
Arrangement:
The Priscilla Reining papers are organized in 13 series: 1. Correspondence, 1944-2007; 2. Research, 1955-1970; 3. AAAS, 1971-1990; 4. Professional Activities, 5. 1957-2007; Daily Planners and Notebooks, 1960-2002; 6. Writings, 1952-1996; 7. Smithsonian Institution, 1964-1971; 8. University, 1958-1994; 9. Student, 1937-1975; 10. Biographical and Personal Files, 1934-2004; 11. Maps, 1916-1989, undated; 12. Photographs, circa 1950-1987, undated; 13. Electronic records.
Biographical / Historical:
Priscilla Copeland Reining was a social anthropologist and Africanist who worked for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from 1974 to 1989. Her area of specialty was sub-Saharan Africa, specializing in desertification, land tenure, land use, kinship, population, fertility, and HIV/AIDS. During the 1970s, she pioneered the use of satellite imagery in conjunction with ethnographic data. She is also known for her ground-breaking research in the late 1980s that showed that uncircumcised men were more susceptible to contracting HIV/AIDS than circumcised men.

Reining was born on March 11, 1923 in Chicago, Illinois. She studied anthropology at University of Chicago, where she earned both her A.B. (1945) and Ph.D. (1967) in anthropology. During her graduate studies, she studied peer group relations among the Ojibwa of the Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota (1947, 1950-51). Her husband, Conrad Reining, accompanied her to the field, an experience that inspired him to also become an anthropologist.

In 1951-53 and 1954-55, Reining conducted fieldwork among the Haya of Bukoba District, Tanganyika (now known as Tanzania) as a Fellow of the East African Institute of Social Research. While research for her dissertation focused on the agrarian system of the Haya, Reining also conducted fertility surveys for the East African Medical Survey, studying the relationship between STDs and fertility in Buhaya and Buganda. During the 1980s, Reining became interested in AIDS when she observed that the Haya were dying from the disease at a much higher rate than neighboring groups. When she learned of a possible link between circumcision and the spread of HIV, she drew a map of circumcision practice among the ethnic groups of Africa and found that uncircumcised men were 86% more likely to contract HIV than circumcised men. These results were published in "The Relationship Between Male Circumcision and HIV Infection in African Populations" (1989), which she coauthored with John Bongaarts, Peter Way, and Francis Conant.

Beginning in the 1970s, Reining began exploring the use of satellite imagery in ethnographic research. In 1973, she used Landsat data to identify individual Mali villages, the first use of satellite data in anthropology (Morán 1990). That same year, as a consultant for USAID, she also used ERTS-1 imagery to estimate carrying capacity in Niger and Upper Volta (now known as Burkino Faso). She continued to apply satellite data in her research throughout her career, including in 1993, when she returned to Tanzania to study the environmental consequence of population growth and HIV/AIDS among the Haya.

In 1974, Reining joined the Office of International Science of AAAS as a research associate. She stayed on to become Project Director for the Cultural Factors in Population Programs and to direct a number of projects under the Committee on Arid Lands. She also served as Project Director of the Ethnography of Reproduction project, for which she conducted fieldwork in Kenya in 1976. In 1990, she left AAAS for an appointment as Courtesy Professor of African Studies at University of Florida.

Prior to working for AAAS, Reining worked at the Smithsonian Institution (1966, 1968-70), during which she was the coordinator for the Urgent Anthropology Program in the now defunct Center for the Study of Man. She also taught at University of Minnesota (1956-59), American University (1959-60), and Howard University (1960-64). In addition, she worked as a consultant for various organizations, including Department of Justice, Peace Corps, International Bank for Reconstruction & Development (IBRD), Food and Agriculture Organization, and Carrying Capacity Network.

Reining was also actively involved in various organizations. She served as Secretary of the AAAS Section H (Anthropology) and was a founding member of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) Task Force on AIDS. She was also a fellow of the African Studies Association, AAA, AAAS, East African Academy, Society for Applied Anthropology, and Washington Academy of Science. In 1990, she was honored with a Distinguished Service Award from AAA.

Reining died of lung cancer at the age of 84 on July 19, 2007.

Sources Consulted

PR Vita. Series 10. Biographical and Personal Files. Priscilla Reining Papers. National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

Morán, Emilio F. 2000. The Ecosystem Approach in Anthropology: From Concept to Practice. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan. Page 359

Schudel, Matt. 2007. Anthropologist Broke Ground on AIDS, Satellite Mapping. Washington Post, July 29. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/28/AR2007072801190.html (accessed December 8, 2011).

1923 -- Born March 11 in Chicago, Illinois

1944 -- Marries Conrad C. Reining

1945 -- Earns A.B. from University of Chicago

1947, 1950-51 -- Conducts field research on the Ojibwa of Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota.

1949 -- Earns A.M. from University of Chicago

1951-1953, 1954-1955 -- Field research on Haya of Tanzania

1967 -- Earns Ph.D. from University of Chicago

1972 -- Returns to Tanzania for IBRD consultancy work

1974 -- Begins working at AAAS as a research associate in the Office of International Science

1975 -- Project Director, AAAS

1976 -- Field research on Kikuyu of Kenya for Ethnography of Reproduction

1986-89 -- Program Director, AAAS

1990 -- Courtesy Professor of African Studies at University of Florida Receives Distinguished Service Award from AAA

1993 -- Field research in Tanzania studying environmental consequences of population growth and HIV/AIDS among the Haya

2007 -- Dies of lung cancer at the age of 84 on July 19
Related Materials:
Additional materials at the NAA relating to Priscilla Reining can be found in the papers of Gordon Gibson and John Murra, as well as in the records of the Center for the Study of Man and the records of the Department of Anthropology. Photo Lot 97 contains two Haya photos taken by Reining that are not duplicated in this collection. The papers of her husband, Conrad Reining, are also at the NAA.

The archives of the American Association for the Advancement of Science also holds Reining's papers relating to her work for the organization.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Priscilla Reining's sons, Robert Reining and Conrad Reining, in 2009.
Restrictions:
The Priscilla Reining papers are open for research.

Some materials from the East African Medical Survey and Ethnography of Reproduction project contain personal medical history and are thus restricted. Grant applications sent to Reining to review are also restricted as well as her students' grades, and recommendation letters Reining wrote for her students. Electronic records are also restricted.

A small portion of the materials relating to Reining's Haya research, Ethnography of Reproduction project, and IBRD ujamaa research suffered severe mold damage. These materials have been cleaned and may be accessed. The legibility of some of the documents, however, is limited due to water and mold stains. Mold odor is also still present.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Human ecology  Search this
Fertility, Human  Search this
Kinship  Search this
population  Search this
Landsat satellites  Search this
Remote sensing  Search this
Desertification  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Photographs
Electronic records
Citation:
Priscilla Reining Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2009-25
See more items in:
Priscilla Reining papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34d98c2cd-c075-443f-b007-9dd7cea86fe2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2009-25

Jerome Caja papers, 1920-1995

Creator:
Caja, Jerome D., 1958-1995  Search this
Type:
Sketchbooks
Moving images
Sound recordings
Citation:
Jerome Caja papers, 1920-1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Gay artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Drag queens  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Theme:
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6515
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)215774
AAA_collcode_cajajero
Theme:
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_215774

James Huber, Michael Hossner, and Dino Vinti papers, 1950-1993, bulk 1983-1989

Creator:
Huber, James, 1950-1988  Search this
Hossner, Michael, 1954-1990  Search this
Subject:
Dino Vinti, 1958-1989  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Citation:
James Huber, Michael Hossner, and Dino Vinti papers, 1950-1993, bulk 1983-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Curators -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Theme:
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)22097
AAA_collcode_hubejame
Theme:
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_22097

Ryan White [trading card]

Names:
White, Ryan, 1971-1990  Search this
Series Donor:
Becker, John M.  Search this
Gay Officers Action League. GOAL  Search this
Heritage of Pride (HOP)  Search this
Rohrbaugh, Richard  Search this
Series Creator:
Hirsch, Leonard  Search this
Guest, Barbara  Search this
Barna, Joseph T.  Search this
Guest, Michael E.  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Ink on paper., 3-1/2" x 2-1/2".)
Type:
Archival materials
Collecting cards
Place:
Kokomo (Ind.)
Scope and Contents:
Color portrait of Ryan White on trading card, from a series of AIDS Awareness cards.
Arrangement:
Box No. 11.
Biographical / Historical:
One of those personalities depicted is Ryan White, a young man with hemophilia. Born in Kokomo, Indiana in 1971, White caught HIV through contaminated blood products. He was diagnosed with AIDS in 1985. He became a vocal and visible symbol of AIDS. Through his illness he became friends with Elton John and Michael Jackson, among others. He died of AIDS in 1990. The Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act of 1990 was named for him. On verso: "He was taunted and ostracized at school and was finally expelled. Neighbors pelted the Whites' car, and a bullet was fired into their home. Fleeing Kokomo, the family moved to nearby Cicero, where they were welcomed, and Ryan attended school for the rest of his short life."
Local Numbers:
AC1146-0000061.tif (AC Scan No.)
Series Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.

Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow.

Do not use original materials when available on reference video or audio tapes.
Series Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Hemophilia  Search this
Diseases  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Collecting cards
Series Citation:
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Collection
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Collection / Series 3: Community Life, Subjects, and Subject Files / 3.6: HIV and AIDS, Ephemera and Photographs / AIDS Awareness: The Fight Against AIDS, trading cards
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8836c1b41-b57a-405a-9a4d-f7f2ac02e383
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-1146-ref2735

BLK Vol. 3 No. 9

Published by:
Alan Bell, American  Search this
Edited by:
Alan Bell, American  Search this
Interview of:
Patti Labelle, American, born 1944  Search this
Subject of:
Phil Reed, American, 1949 - 2008  Search this
Magic Johnson, American, born 1959  Search this
Clarence Thomas, American, born 1948  Search this
Donna Summer, American, 1948 - 2012  Search this
Dionne Warwick, American, born 1940  Search this
Gladys Knight, American, born 1944  Search this
Arsenio Hall, American, born 1956  Search this
Debbie Allen, American, born 1950  Search this
Diahann Carroll, American, 1935 - 2019  Search this
Anita Hill, American, born 1956  Search this
National Association of Black and White Men Together, American, founded 1980  Search this
Jewel's Catch One, American, founded 1973  Search this
Rue's House, American, 1989 - 1997  Search this
Gay Men of African Descent, American, founded 1986  Search this
Steven Corbin, American, 1953 - 1995  Search this
Salsa Soul Sisters, American, founded 1974  Search this
GMHC, American, founded 1981  Search this
Audre Lorde, American, 1934 - 1992  Search this
Kurt L. Schmoke, American, born 1949  Search this
Ku Klux Klan, 3rd, American, founded 1946  Search this
Dr. Marjorie Hill, American  Search this
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, American, founded 1909  Search this
Professor Griff, American, born 1960  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper (fiber product)
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 10 13/16 × 8 1/4 × 1/8 in. (27.4 × 20.9 × 0.3 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place made:
Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Seattle, King County, Washington, United States, North and Central America
Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, United States, North and Central America
New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
San Francisco, San Francisco county, California, United States, North and Central America
Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, United States, North and Central America
Malibu, Los Angeles County, California, United States, North and Central America
Baltimore, Maryland, United States, North and Central America
Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, United States, North and Central America
Alexandria, Virginia, United States, North and Central America
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Sacramento, Sacramento County, California, United States, North and Central America
Christiansted, Virgin Islands of the United States, United States, North and Central America
Long Beach, Los Angeles County, California, United States, North and Central America
Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States, North and Central America
Miami, Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States, North and Central America
Vacaville, Solano County, California, United States, North and Central America
Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida, United States, North and Central America
Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, United States, North and Central America
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America
West Hollywood, Los Angeles County, California, United States, North and Central America
Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, United States, North and Central America
Date:
October 1991
Topic:
African American  Search this
Activism  Search this
Black Press  Search this
Communities  Search this
Health  Search this
Identity  Search this
Labor  Search this
Law  Search this
LGBTQ  Search this
Literature  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Police brutality  Search this
Politics  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Sexuality  Search this
Sports  Search this
U.S. History, 1969-2001  Search this
Violence  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Alan Bell
Object number:
2018.108.34ab
Restrictions & Rights:
© BLK Publishing Company, Inc.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Movement:
HIV/AIDS Activist Movement
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5bcad8647-5969-4401-8f5d-1cd333d00f33
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2018.108.34ab

Oral history interview with Avram Finkelstein, 2016 April 25-May 23

Interviewee:
Finkelstein, Avram, 1952-  Search this
Interviewer:
Carr, C.  Search this
Subject:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Avram Finkelstein, 2016 April 25-May 23. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Activists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17347
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)380480
AAA_collcode_finkel16
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_380480
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Sur Rodney (Sur), 2016 July 12 and 15

Interviewee:
Rodney, Sur, 1954-  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore, 1979-  Search this
Subject:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Sur Rodney (Sur), 2016 July 12 and 15. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Performance artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17369
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)381361
AAA_collcode_rodney16
Theme:
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_381361
Online Media:

Witchcraft and a life in the new South Africa Isak Niehaus

Author:
Niehaus, Isak A  Search this
Physical description:
xxi, 239 pages illustrations, maps 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
South Africa
Date:
2017
20th century
Topic:
Witchcraft  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Sida  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1154957

Oral history interview with Avram Finkelstein

Interviewee:
Finkelstein, Avram, 1952-  Search this
Interviewer:
Carr, C.  Search this
Names:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
23 Items (sound files (7 hrs.), digital, wav)
148 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2016 April 25-May 23
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Avram Finkelstein conducted 2016 April 25-May 23, by Cynthia Carr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Finkelstein's home and studio in Brooklyn, New York.
Finkelstein speaks of his childhood on Long Island; attending the School of the Museum of fine Arts in Boston; moving to New York in the late 1970s; losing his first partner, Don Yowell, to AIDS; the genesis and distribution of his many AIDS activist posters; the beginnings and actions of ACT UP and Gran Fury; the context of the 1990s culture wars; the mishandling of HIV/AIDS as a public health issue in the 1980s and 1990s; his personal transformation as a result of living through the AIDS crisis; and his work on Flash Collective. Finkelstein also recalls Nan Goldin, David Armstrong, P.L. DiCorcia, Jorge Socarras, Lou Molette, Richard Goldstein, Larry Kramer, Chris Lione, Simon Doonan, Mark Simpson, Don Moffett, Todd Haynes, Robert Vasquez, Loring McAlpin, Michael Nesline, Tom Kalin, Amy Heard, Mark Harrington, Richard Deagle, Julie Tolentino, Lola Flash, Davod Meieran, Patrick Moore, Maria Maggenti, Sean Strub, Eric Sawyer, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Avram Finkelstein (1952- ) is an artist, writer, and activist in New York, New York. Cynthia Carr (1950- ) is a writer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Activists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.finkel16
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9cecf516f-a5a3-42f6-ace6-8ffb2ca641c9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-finkel16
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jim Hodges

Interviewee:
Hodges, Jim, 1957-  Search this
Interviewer:
Carr, C.  Search this
Names:
Fort Wright College of the Holy Names  Search this
Pratt Institute -- Students  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Arning, Bill  Search this
Chatham, Rhys  Search this
Feher, Tony, 1956-  Search this
Fuller, Marnie  Search this
Gonzalez-Torres, Felix, 1957-1996  Search this
Hoffman, Nancy, 1944-  Search this
Kaiser, Karen  Search this
McCarty, Lynn  Search this
Montano, Linda, 1942-  Search this
Morris, Bob  Search this
Nechvatal, Joseph  Search this
Nyzio, David, 1958-  Search this
Reynolds, Hunter, 1959-  Search this
Safranek, Doug, 1956-  Search this
Smith, Scott  Search this
Vallenciano, Robert  Search this
Extent:
16 Items (Sound recording: 16 sound files (3 hr., 44 min.), digital, wav)
87 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 March 9-May 25
Scope and Contents:
Oral history interview with Jim Hodges, conducted 2017 March 9 and May 25, by Cynthia Carr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Hodges' studio in Queens, New York.
Hodges speaks of his childhood in Spokane, Washington; exposure to art-making in high school and at Fort Wright College; attending Pratt Institute in 1983; his first New York gallery job in 1984; discovering his sexuality and becoming interested in queer life and history; the early years of the AIDS crisis; taking a studio with the Dannheisser Foundation; his body of work in mixed media; his gallery exhibitions in the late 1980s and early '90s; becoming sober in 1990; and the influence of the AIDS crisis on his artwork and art-making process. Hodges also recalls Karen Kaiser, Scott Smith, Marnie Fuller, Davie Nyzio, Lynn McCarty, Robert Vallenciano, Bob Morris, Linda Montano, Joseph Nechvatal, Rhys Chatham, Nancy Hoffman, Hunter Reynolds, Tony Feher, Bill Arning, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Doug Safranek, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Jim Hodges (1957- ) is an installation artist in New York, New York. Cynthia Carr (1950- ) is a writer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Art -- Exhibitions  Search this
Artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Installations (Art)  Search this
Mixed media (Art)  Search this
Artists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.hodges17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9b9961c06-6188-4bf5-85b8-65197d690c0b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hodges17
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Hunter Reynolds

Interviewee:
Reynolds, Hunter, 1959-  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore  Search this
Names:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
10 Items (sound files (6 hrs., 1 min.), digital, wav)
87 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2016 August 10-September 7
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Hunter Reynolds, conducted 2016 August 10-September 7, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Fales Library in New York, New York.
Reynolds speaks of his childhood in Minnesota, Florida, and California; early sexual experiences; attending Otis College of Art and Design; moving to New York in 1984 and becoming part of the East Village scene; the beginning of the AIDS crisis and safe sex discourse; his involvement in ACT UP; being diagnosed with HIV and starting ART+ Positive in Los Angeles in 1989; his body of artwork, performances, exhibitions, and activist actions; resonances between AIDS activism of the 1980s and '90s and contemporary activism around the Black Lives Matter movement; the politics of identifying as an HIV-positive artist; experimenting with drag and developing his alter ego Patina du Prey; performances with "Memorial Dress," "The Banquet," "Dervish Dress;' "Mummification" performance; living and working in Germany in the 1990s; and his personal struggle with long-term HIV survivorship; his "disaster" series and "Survial AIDS" series; and making his life, past and present, his personal masterpiece. Reynolds also recalls Kathy Burkhart, Susan Silas, Fred Tomaselli, Scott Hill, Leslie Dahlgren, Paula Cooper, Ray Navarro, Mark Kostabi, Bill Dobbs, Dread Scott, Kim Levin, Simon Watson, Maxine Henryson, Herr Vishka, Tony Feher, Jim Hodges, Dylan Nayler, Kathleen White, Krista Naylor, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Hunter Reynolds (1959-2022) was a performance artist and activist in New York, New York. Interviewer Theodore Kerr (1979- ) is a writer and organizer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Political activists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Performance art  Search this
Performance artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.reynol16
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw906242372-a58b-4e05-927a-e5744866442c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-reynol16
Online Media:

Tale of 1000 Condoms/Geisha and Skeleton

Artist:
Masami Teraoka, born Onomichi, Japan 1936  Search this
Medium:
watercolor and sumi-e ink on canvas
Dimensions:
133 x 83 in. (337.9 x 210.9 cm.)
Type:
Painting
Date:
1989
Topic:
Figure female\full length  Search this
Japanese  Search this
Occupation\other\prostitute  Search this
Figure\fragment\skeleton  Search this
Dress\Japanese dress  Search this
State of being\illness\AIDS  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase through the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment
Copyright:
© 1989, Masami Teraoka
Object number:
1996.105
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Department:
Painting and Sculpture
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/vk722a48348-dffb-43d4-9410-9322f607ed68
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:saam_1996.105

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