Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
31 documents - page 1 of 2

Nomenclator avium Musei zoologici berolinensis = Namenverzeichniss der in der zoologischen Sammlung der Königlichen Universität zu Berlin aufgestellten Arten von Vögeln nach den in der neueren Systematik am meisten zur Geltung gekommenen Namen der Gattungen und ihrer Unterabtheilungen

Title:
Namenverzeichniss der in der zoologischen Sammlung der Königlichen Universität zu Berlin aufgestellten Arten von Vögeln
Zoologisches Museum, Berlin. Catalogues, 1816-1856 DSI
Author:
Lichtenstein, Hinrich 1780-1857  Search this
Zoologisches Museum (Berlin, Germany)  Search this
Inscriber:
Lichtenstein, Hinrich 1780-1857 DSI  Search this
Former owner:
Leverkühn, Paul 1867-1905 DSI  Search this
Ripley, S. Dillon (Sidney Dillon) 1913-2001 DSI  Search this
Fischer DSI  Search this
Zoologisches Museum in Berlin DSI  Search this
Library of Congress DSI  Search this
Subject:
Zoologisches Museum (Berlin, Germany)  Search this
Physical description:
viii, 123 p. ; 22 cm
Type:
Catalogs and collections
Catalogs
Nomenclature
Place:
Germany
Berlin
Date:
1854
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Call number:
QL71.B5 A2X 1816
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_791489

Histoire abregée des insectes : qui se trouvent aux environs de Paris : dans laquelle ces animaux sont rangés suivant un ordre méthodique ..

Title:
Histoire des insectes
Author:
Geoffroy M (Etienne-Louis) 1725?-1810  Search this
Engraver:
Prévost, Benoît Louis approximately 1735-1804?  Search this
Defehrt, A. J.  Search this
Wood-engraver:
Papillon, Jean-Michel 1698-1776  Search this
Printer:
Chardon, Jean-François-Louis 1739?-approximately 1795  Search this
Former owner:
Drake, Carl J (Carl John) 1885-1965 DSI  Search this
Castelnau, Francis comte de 1812-1880 DSI  Search this
Sabrosky, Curtis W (Curtis Williams) 1910- DSI  Search this
Portland Society of Natural History (Me.) DSI  Search this
Physical description:
2 v., [1], XXII folded leaves of plates : ill. ; 27 cm. (4to)
Type:
Early works to 1800
Classification
Place:
France
Paris
Date:
1762
Topic:
Insects  Search this
Call number:
QL463 .G34 1762
QL463.G34 1762
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_436094

Verzeichniss der Doubletten des Zoologischen Museums der Königl. Universität zu Berlin : nebst Beschreibung vieler bisher unbekannter Arten von Säugethieren, Vögeln, Amphibien und Fischen / herausgegben von H. Lichtenstein

Title:
Doubletten Zoologischen Museums, Berlin DSI
Zoologisches Museum, Berlin. Catalogues, 1816-1856 DSI
Author:
Lichtenstein, Hinrich 1780-1857  Search this
Zoologisches Museum (Berlin, Germany)  Search this
Printer:
Starcke, Johann Friedrich  Search this
Former owner:
Baird, Spencer Fullerton 1823-1887 DSI  Search this
Library of Congress DSI  Search this
Subject:
Zoologisches Museum (Berlin, Germany)  Search this
Physical description:
X, 118 p., [1] leaf of plates: 1 ill. ; 22 cm
Type:
Catalogs and collections
Catalogs
Sales catalogs
Place:
Germany
Berlin
Date:
1823
Topic:
Zoological specimens  Search this
Museums--Collection management  Search this
Call number:
QL71.B5 A2v 1823
QL71.B5 A2X 1816
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_241959

Verzeichniss einer Sammlung von Säugethieren und Vögeln aus dem Kaffernlande : nebst einer Käfer-Sammlung, welche am 14ten März 1842 durch den Königl. gerichtlichen Auctions-Commissarius Rauch öffentlich meistbietend verkauft werden sollen

Title:
Zoologisches Museum, Berlin. Catalogues, 1816-1856 DSI
Author:
Lichtenstein, Hinrich 1780-1857  Search this
Rauch (Firm)  Search this
Former owner:
Library of Congress DSI  Search this
Physical description:
24 p. ; 21 cm
Type:
Catalogs and collections
Auction catalogs
Place:
South Africa
Mexico
Germany
Berlin
Date:
1842
Topic:
Mammals  Search this
Birds  Search this
Natural history  Search this
Zoological specimens  Search this
Beetles  Search this
Call number:
QL72 .V57
QL71.B5 A2X 1816
QL72.V57
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_158397

Alexander Wetmore Papers, circa 1848-1983 and undated

Creator:
Wetmore, Alexander 1886-1978  Search this
Uniform title:
Birds of the Republic of Panama  Search this
Birds of the Republic of Panama  Search this
Subject:
Xántus, János 1825-1894  Search this
Wetmore, Alexander 1886-1978  Search this
Elliot, Daniel Giraud 1835-1915  Search this
Harris, Harry  Search this
American Committee for International Wild Life Protection  Search this
Inter-American Committee of Experts on Nature Protection and Wild Life Preservation  Search this
National Association of Audubon Societies  Search this
United States National Museum  Search this
American Ornithologists' Union  Search this
American Philosophical Society  Search this
Cosmos Club (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Explorers Club  Search this
George Washington University  Search this
Gorgas Memorial Institute of Tropical and Preventive Medicine  Search this
National Geographic Society (U.S.)  Search this
Washington Biologists' Field Club  Search this
National Academy of Sciences (U.S.)  Search this
National Academy of Sciences (U.S.) Daniel Giraud Elliot Fund  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Office of the Secretary  Search this
National Zoological Park (U.S.)  Search this
United States Bureau of Biological Survey  Search this
United States Department of Agriculture  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Assistant Secretary in charge of the United States National Museum  Search this
International Ornithological Congress  Search this
Eighth American Scientific Congress (1940: Washington, D. C.)  Search this
Physical description:
116.34 cu. ft. (206 document boxes) (10 half document boxes) (1 12x17 box) (2 16x20 boxes) (29 3x5 boxes) (13 5x8 boxes) (oversize materials)
Culture:
Portraits  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Motion pictures (visual works)
Date:
1848
1848-1983
1848-1983 and undated
Topic:
Ornithology  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU007006
See more items in:
Expedition History 1932-1934 [Walter Rathbone Bacon Travelling Scholarship Expedition (1932-1934: Siberia)]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217206

South American trip, 1939

Collection name:
William M. Mann and Lucile Quarry Mann field books, 1914-1940
Physical Description:
1 folder
Physical Location:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Sublocation:
Box 24
Record type:
Fieldbook record
Object Type:
Field notes
Scrapbooks
Place:
Brazil
Argentina
Rio de Janeiro
Córdoba
Buenos Aires
La Plata
Nahuel Huapí, lago
Date Range:
1939
Start Date:
19390400
End Date:
19391212
Topic:
Zoos  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Wild animal collecting  Search this
Accession #:
SIA RU007293
Access Information:
Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu.
See more records from this collection:
William M. Mann and Lucile Quarry Mann field books, 1914-1940
See more records associated with this person:
Mann, Lucile Quarry, 1897-1986
Mann, William M., 1886-1960
Shippen, William H.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Field Book Project
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fbr_item_MODSI75
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View South American trip, 1939 digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Random records of a lifetime, 1846-1931 [actually 1932] volume V, Europe 1879-80; Grand Canyon of the Colorado; explorations in Mexico with Jackson and the Chains; Colorado with Powell and Langley, 1887

Title:
Random records, vol. 5
Creator:
Holmes, William Henry 1846-1933  Search this
Author:
Hayden, F. V (Ferdinand Vandeveer) 1829-1887  Search this
Dutton, Clarence E (Clarence Edward) 1841-1912  Search this
Langley, S. P (Samuel Pierpont) 1834-1906  Search this
Powell, John Wesley 1834-1902  Search this
Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories (U.S.)  Search this
World's Columbian Exposition (1893 : Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Subject:
Holmes, William Henry 1846-1933  Search this
Smithsonian Institution History  Search this
Geological Survey (U.S.) History  Search this
Physical description:
1 volume illustrations, clippings, letters. 27 cm
Type:
Electronic resources
Place:
America
Mexico
Date:
1879
1879-1932
Topic:
Paleontology  Search this
Discovery and exploration  Search this
Call number:
CT275.H75 A1 v. 5
CT275.H75 A1
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1063442
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Random records of a lifetime, 1846-1931 [actually 1932] volume V, Europe 1879-80; Grand Canyon of the Colorado; explorations in Mexico with Jackson and the Chains; Colorado with Powell and Langley, 1887 digital asset number 1

Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978

Alternate Name:
Wetmore, Alexander  Search this
Forename:
Alexander  Search this
Surname:
Wetmore  Search this
Occupation:
Ornithologists
Paleontologists
Record type:
Personal name
Birth Date:
1886
Death Date:
1978
See more records related to affiliations:
United States Dept. of Agriculture
Smithsonian Institution
See more records associated with this person:
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978
Data Source:
Smithsonian Field Book Project
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:auth_per_fbr_EACP26

Stejneger, Leonhard, 1851-1943

Forename:
Leonhard  Search this
Middle Initial:
Hess  Search this
Surname:
Stejneger  Search this
Occupation:
Zoologists
Herpetologists
Ornithologists
Natural history museum curators
Record type:
Personal name
Birth Date:
1851
Death Date:
1943
See more records related to affiliations:
Smithsonian Institution
See more records associated with this person:
Stejneger, Leonhard, 1851-1943
Data Source:
Smithsonian Field Book Project
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:auth_per_fbr_EACP40

Curators' Annual Reports

Creator::
United States National Museum  Search this
Extent:
49 cu. ft. (98 document boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Date:
1881-1964
Descriptive Entry:
The administration of the United States National Museum required curators to submit regular reports on the activities of the departments, divisions, and sections. Prior to about 1900 these reports were often made monthly and semiannually as well as annually. The reports were traditionally submitted to the Director of the National Museum to be used in preparing the published Annual Report of the United States National Museum. The individual reports, however, were not reproduced in their entirety in the published Annual Report and generally contain more information than is to be found in the published version.

Reports were stored by the Office of Correspondence and Reports (later known as the Office of Correspondence and Documents), and then by the Office of the Registrar.

Includes reports submitted to the Director of the United States National Museum by curators and administrators.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 158, United States National Museum, Curators' Annual Reports
Identifier:
Record Unit 158
See more items in:
Curators' Annual Reports
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0158
2 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Curators' Annual Reports digital asset number 1
  • View Curators' Annual Reports digital asset number 2
Online Media:

Western Union Telegraph Expedition Collection

Creator::
Western Union Telegraph Expedition (1865-1867)  Search this
Extent:
0.75 cu. ft. (1 document box) (1 half document box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Field notes
Manuscripts
Place:
Alaska
Date:
1865-1867
Descriptive Entry:
This collection includes correspondence, mostly to Spencer F. Baird, from members of the Scientific Corps of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition, including Kennicott, Dall, Bannister, and Elliott; copies of reports submitted to divisional chiefs from expedition staff members; newspaper clippings concerning the expedition; copies of notes on natural history taken by Robert Kennicott; and a journal containing meteorological data recorded by Henry M. Bannister from March to August, 1866.
Historical Note:
The Western Union Telegraph Expedition, 1865-1867, also known as the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition, was undertaken to study the possibility of setting up a communications system with Europe by way of Alaska, the Bering Straits, and Asia. The expedition was organized in three divisions, working in Canada, Russian-America (Alaska), and Asia. Robert Kennicott, the veteran Alaskan explorer, was placed in charge of the Russian-American division. Under the auspices of the Smithsonian Institution and the Chicago Academy of Sciences, a Scientific Corps was established, with Kennicott in command, to accompany the Russian-American division and make collections in natural history. Naturalists William H. Dall, Henry M. Bannister, and Henry W. Elliott served as members of the Scientific Corps. On the death of Kennicott on May 13, 1866, Dall became chief of the Scientific Corps until the expedition was terminated in July 1867 due to the successful laying of the Atlantic Cable.
Restrictions:
It appears that some of the material in this collection was removed from the official correspondence files of the Smithsonian.
Topic:
Natural history  Search this
Scientific expeditions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7213, Western Union Telegraph Expedition Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 7213
See more items in:
Western Union Telegraph Expedition Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7213
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Western Union Telegraph Expedition Collection digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Collection of miscellaneous printed reports and pamphlets : Joseph Henry Library volume XIII

Compiler:
Henry, Joseph 1797-1878  Search this
Former owner:
Henry, Joseph 1797-1878 DSI  Search this
Subject:
Albany Institute  Search this
Albany Lancaster School  Search this
Medical Society of the State of New York (1807- )  Search this
Dartmouth College History  Search this
Physical description:
23 pamphlets bound in 1 volume, leaves of plates (some folded) : illustrations, charts ; 22 cm
Type:
Observations
Exhibitions
Indexes
Nomenclature
Biography
Sermons
Place:
New York (State)
New York
United States
Date:
1803
1829
War of 1812
Topic:
Meteorology  Search this
Banks and banking  Search this
Women--Education  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Railroad companies  Search this
Theological seminaries  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Geology  Search this
Governors  Search this
Charities, Medical  Search this
Poetry--Women authors  Search this
History  Search this
Call number:
F116 .H46 1803
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1109206

A. Myra Keen Interview

Creator::
Keen, A. Myra (Angeline Myra), 1905-1986 interviewee  Search this
Extent:
1 audiotape (Reference copy).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
1983
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or student on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

The Keen interview was donated to the Oral History Collection because of her long career and many contributions to the field of American malacology.
Descriptive Entry:
Keen was interviewed by Eugene V. Coan, malacologist and former student of Keen's, because of her long career and many contributions to the field of American malacology. The interview includes her reminiscences about her education, research interests, fieldwork, colleagues, and students. The interview complements the A. Myra Keen papers, also located in the Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Historical Note:
Angeline Myra Keen (1905-1986), an invertebrate paleontologist and malacologist, was an international expert on the systematics of marine mollusks. She influenced her profession as a researcher and fieldworker, teacher and advisor, curator and exhibitor, author and public speaker. Her work was of interest both to academic scholars and to shell collectors.

Raised in Colorado, Keen became an amateur naturalist and photographer in her teens, and pursued her research interests in birds and insects at Colorado College, graduating with an A.B. in 1930. She earned an M.A. in psychology from Stanford University the following year, and then a doctorate in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley. Finding herself with no employment prospects, graduating in the depression year of 1934, she volunteered to help identify shells in the Stanford geology department's collection. This was the beginning of Keen's serious study of shells and her thirty-eight year association with Stanford. She had some coursework in biology, geology, and statistics, but was self-taught in malacology.

In 1936 Keen was appointed Curator of paleontology in the department of geology, and began teaching there during the Second World War. She was appointed Assistant Professor of paleontology in 1954 and Curator of malacology in 1957. Despite her stature, Keen waited until 1960 for appointment as a tenured Associate Professor and until 1965 for a full professorship, becoming one of three women professors in the sciences at Stanford. Upon her retirement in 1970, she was made Professor of Paleontology Emeritus and Curator of Malacology Emeritus, and taught two more years.

Keen's research focused on molluscan systematics, but ranged widely within the field to include recent marine mollusk fauna of the Panamic Province and marine molluscan Cenozoic paleontology, neontology, and zoogeography of western North America. Keen was particularly interested in bivalve systematics and nomenclature. She spent many years adding to, cataloging, and systematically arranging the Cenozoic mollusk collection at Stanford. She also wrote fourteen books and sixty-four papers in the field of malacology.

Keen was the primary teacher of students in malacology at Stanford, advising advanced degree candidates in geology and biology. She also taught courses in advanced paleontology, biological oceanography, and curatorial methods.

Keen's professional honors included Phi Beta Kappa, a 1964 Guggenheim Fellowship, and appointment as Fellow of the Geological Society of America and as fellow of the Paleontological Society. She received the Fellows Medal from the California Academy of Sciences in 1979, becoming the first woman to do so. She served as President of both the American Malacological Union and the Western Society for Malacology, and chaired the Committee on Nomenclature of the Society of Systematic Zoology.
Topic:
Invertebrate zoology  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Mollusks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9527, Keen, A. Myra (Angeline Myra), 1905-1986 interviewee, A. Myra Keen Interview
Identifier:
Record Unit 9527
See more items in:
A. Myra Keen Interview
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9527

Folder 5 Joint Committee on Zoological Nomenclature for Paleontology in America, 1945-1963. Includes a copy of the commission procedures and by-laws. Correspondents include Curtis Sabrosky, Winston Sinclair, J. Brookes Knight, H. B. Stenzel, Helen Jean...

Collection Creator::
Keen, A. Myra (Angeline Myra), 1905-1986  Search this
Container:
Box 3 of 14
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7333, A. Myra Keen Papers
See more items in:
A. Myra Keen Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7333-refidd1e1296

George Sprague Myers Papers

Creator::
Myers, George S. (George Sprague), 1905-1985  Search this
Extent:
32.19 cu. ft. (63 document boxes) (1 16x20 box) (1 oversize folder)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Scientific illustrations
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
circa 1903-1986 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
The papers of George Sprague Myers provide extensive documentation of his research career in ichthyology and herpetology. The collection also offers substantial information concerning the development of Myers' interest in natural history; his college work at Indiana University and Stanford University; his teaching career at Stanford University and to a lesser extent Harvard University; his work as a part-time ichthyologist with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service; his activities in professional organizations and at international scientific symposia and conferences; his participation on scientific expeditions and field trips; and his work as an author and editor. Less well represented in the collection is material documenting Myers' brief curatorial career at the United States National Museum (USNM). Researchers interested in this aspect of his work should consult the records of the Division of Fishes, USNM (Record Units 213 and 234), in the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Myers maintained an extensive correspondence, and the bulk of his papers consists of letters written and received between 1920 and 1984. The correspondence illustrates most aspects of his career but is especially valuable in documenting his research interests and his activities in professional organizations. Myers exchanged letters with many of the outstanding zoologists of his era, and the correspondence is a valuable source for documenting the history of twentieth-century ichthyology and herpetology. The letters also reflect the breadth of his research interests. Many contain his thoughts on evolution, biogeography, zoological nomenclature, and the history of science. Myers' long association with the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists is well-documented in his correspondence, and it is an important source for those interested in the history of the society. His network of correspondents was world-wide, and several letters provide information on political and social events. Of special interest are letters describing the effect of World War II on European science and museums.

The remainder of the collection primarily consists of materials relating to Myers' zoological research and his teaching career at Stanford University. A large file of manuscripts and speeches (many of which are unpublished) not only documents the preparation of scientific papers, but also reveals Myers as a writer with diverse interests. Included are manuscripts dealing with general history, history of science, botany, biogeography, and museum theory. Also included in the collection are numerous notes, publications, and illustrations used in his research.

Myers' thirty-four-year teaching career at Stanford University is partially documented in the collection. Materials include correspondence with university officials, staff, and programs; administrative records concerning the operation of the Biology Department and Natural History Museum; classroom material used by Myers; and correspondence with graduate students under his guidance. Researchers should also consult the general correspondence for information concerning his career at Stanford.

Of particular interest is a group of collected materials relating to various aspects of Myers' professional career and personal life. Included are materials concerning his high school and college work; records documenting professional activities, official travel, and disputes with colleagues; personal memorabilia; and miscellaneous biographical, bibliographical, and family materials. Especially important is a small amount of papers illustrating his early interest and work in the biological sciences. Included is a catalogue of natural history specimens collected by Myers up to 1923; a notebook containing drafts of papers and field notes recorded by Myers in the 1920s; and notes, manuscripts, and illustrations from his work on aquarium fishes, circa 1920-1925.

A small group of photographs is found in the collection. Included are portraits of Myers; photographs of Myers with colleagues and at social occasions; and pictures he collected. A few photographs are also present in his correspondence and research materials.

The collection also includes diplomas, certificates, and awards presented to Myers by professional organizations and social groups.
Historical Note:
George Sprague Myers (1905-1985), ichthyologist, herpetologist, and educator, was born in Jersey City, New Jersey. He developed an early interest in vertebrate zoology--accumulating aquariums in which he kept species of exotic and native fishes. His first article on aquarium fishes was published at age fifteen, in 1920. Around this time Myers began frequenting the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City, seeking advice on natural history questions. As a result, he became a volunteer assistant at the AMNH from 1922 to 1924. At the museum he came under the influence of the ichthyology and herpetology staff including G. K. Noble, Karl P. Schmidt, John T. Nichols, Eugene W. Grudger, John Tee-Van, Charles M. Breder, and others.

In 1924, Myers was introduced to Carl H. Eigenmann, who invited him to attend Indiana University and offered him a part-time curatorial assistantship working in the fish collections. Under Eigenmann's guidance, Myers further developed his interest in the systematics of South American fresh-water fishes. He remained in Bloomington until 1926, when Eigenmann fell ill and moved to California. In that year, Myers was contacted by David Starr Jordan about continuing his ichthyological studies at Stanford University. He accepted Jordan's offer and received an assistantship in the Natural History Museum. Myers' education was influenced by an outstanding group of systematic zoologists gathered together by Jordan. John O. Snyder, Edwin C. Starks, Harold Heath, G. F. Ferris, and Albert W. C. T. Herre each played a role in shaping his career. Myers received the A.B. degree in 1930; the A.M. degree in 1931; and the Ph.D. degree in 1933. His dissertation was entitled "The Classification of the African Cyprinodont Fishes, with a Discussion of the Geographical Distribution of the Cyprinodontidae of the World"--an indication of his early interest in biogeography.

Myers began his professional career at the United States National Museum (USNM), where he was appointed Assistant Curator in charge of the Division of Fishes in 1933. His four-year tenure at the USNM was marked by fiscal restraints brought on by the Depression. The lack of technical and clerical assistance made it necessary for him to spend large amounts of time curating, organizing, and arranging the museum's fish collections. There was little time for research, although he did manage to publish several short papers and conduct a survey of the fresh-water fishes of Virginia with his USNM assistant, Earl D. Reid.

In 1936, Myers returned to Stanford, accepting appointment as Associate Professor of Biology and Head Curator of Zoological Collections. By 1938, he had been advanced to Professor. He remained in that position at Stanford until his statutory retirement in 1970. Perhaps the three outstanding achievements of his career at Stanford were development of a curriculum in systematic ichthyology, increasing and reorganizing the zoological collections in the Natural History Museum, and his guidance of a long line of outstanding graduate students, many of whom became distinguished in their chosen fields.

From 1942 to 1944, Myers served as a Special Professor of Ichthyology at the Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. His work was funded by the Committee for Inter-American Artistic and Intellectual Relations, a government-supported effort to maintain good relations with Latin America during World War II. At the museum he assisted with curatorial and library duties, exhibits, and administration. He also aided the Brazilian Fish and Game Division. Between 1970 and 1972 he served as Henry Bryant Bigelow Visiting Professor of Ichthyology and Alexander Agassiz Visiting Professor of Zoology at Harvard University.

While interested in all lower vertebrates, Myers' most influential research was on fishes. His greatest ichthyological interests were the characins, cichlids, cyprinodonts, and Asiatic cyprinids. He was an important advocate of modern ideas of fish evolution and was instrumental in developing the most widely accepted system of classifying the world fish fauna as primary freshwater, secondary freshwater, peripheral, or marine. Much of his biogeographical research tended to give credence to the theory of continental drift based on evidence derived through observations of primary freshwater fishes.

Myers was a prolific writer and his bibliography included over six hundred titles on ichthyology, herpetology, biogeography, the history of systematic zoology, and museum practices. He was also an accomplished editor. From 1932 to 1960, he served as associate editor of William T. Innes's The Aquarium and was scientific editor of all nineteen editions of Innes's Exotic Aquarium Fishes. He was the founder and editor of the Stanford Ichthyological Bulletin, 1938-1967; editor of The Aquarium Journal, 1952-1954; and a member of the editorial board of Ichthyologica, 1966.

Myers participated on several scientific expeditions. In 1938, he served as ichthyologist on the Hancock Pacific Expedition aboard the Velero III. During the trip he collected fishes off the coasts of Mexico, the Cocos Islands, the Galapagos Islands, Peru, Ecuador, and Panama. Later that year, he was co-leader of the Crocker Deep-Sea Expedition off the coast of California. In 1947, Myers participated in the United States Navy's Bikini Scientific Resurvey conducting field work on Bikini and Rongerik atolls. In addition, he executed several field surveys in the United States and South America.

Myers was active within the ichthyological profession and served several organizations in elected or appointed capacities. He was President of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists from 1949 to 1951. He also served on numerous committees of the society. From 1945 to 1951, Myers was a vice-president and council member of the California Academy of Sciences. He was named Research Associate in Ichthyology and Herpetology at the Academy in 1970. Myers was a corresponding member of the Zoological Society of London and an honorary fellow of the Zoological Society of India. In 1936, he was awarded the silver medal of the Societe National d'Acclimation, Paris.

For additional biographical information on Myers see, Lionel A. Walford, "On the Natural History of George Sprague Myers" in "Festschrift for George Sprague Myers," Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences, 1970, vol. 38, no. 1, pp 1-18; Daniel M. Cohen and Stanley H. Weitzman, "George Sprague Myers, 1905-1985," Copeia, 1986, no. 3, pp. 851-853; Alan E. Leviton, David C. Regnery, and John H. Thomas, "Memorial Resolution: George Sprague Myers, 1905-1985," The Stanford University Campus Report, 6 April 1986; and Martin R. Brittan, "In Memoriam: George Sprague Myers, 1905-1985," Tropical Fish Hobbyist, March 1986, pp. 84-86.
Topic:
Herpetology  Search this
Ichthyology  Search this
Herpetologists  Search this
Ichthyologists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Scientific illustrations
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7317, George Sprague Myers Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7317
See more items in:
George Sprague Myers Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7317
Online Media:

Folder 16 American Association for the Advancement of Science. Committee on Zoological Nomenclature. 1877.

Collection Creator::
Dall, William Healey, 1845-1927  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7073, William Healey Dall Papers
See more items in:
William Healey Dall Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7073-refidd1e1317

Untitled

Collection Creator::
Dall, William Healey, 1845-1927  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Summary:
The following is an example of the correspondence located in Series 4. Material below is listed in chronological order.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7073, William Healey Dall Papers
See more items in:
William Healey Dall Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7073-refidd1e6908

International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN), 1956-1987

Collection Creator:
Society of Vertebrate Paleontology  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2027; Transferring office; 4/1/1988 Agreement of Transfer; Contact reference staff for details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 12-107, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Records
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa12-107-refd1e2686

Leonhard Stejneger and Georg Herman Baur Collection

Extent:
1.6 linear meters.
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Scientific illustrations
Date:
circa 1850-1943
Descriptive Entry:
This collection consists of papers documenting the research of both Stejneger and Baur on tortoises. Much of the Baur material was created during his research for the planned USNM monograph on North American tortoises. The papers consist of correspondence, notes, manuscripts, lists, newspaper clippings, photographs, negatives, and drawings. Of special interest are color drawings executed by John H. Richard and Antonio Zeno Shindler.
Historical Note:
Leonhard Stejneger (1851-1943) was born in Norway. In 1881 he left for the United States and arrived in Washington, D.C., where he soon began working with the birds of the New World at the Smithsonian Institution with particular interest in aquatic birds. In December 1884, he was appointed Assistant Curator in the Department of Birds under Robert Ridgway, Curator. In 1889, after the resignation of Henry Crecy Yarrow, Honorary Curator of the Department of Reptiles and Batrachians, Stejneger became the first full-time Curator for the Department. In 1903 he served as Acting Head Curator of the Department of Biology for several months, and in 1911 he was appointed Head Curator of the Department of Biology after Frederick William True vacated the post. From that time until his death, Stejneger served both as Head Curator of the Department of Biology and Curator of the Division of Reptiles and Batrachians. He also chaired a Smithsonian committee which considered manuscripts for publication.

In addition to his herpetological and ornithological work, Stejneger was recognized as an authority on the fur seals of the North Pacific. He began his studies in this field when he was sent to the Commander Islands for the United States Signal Service in 1882, and made a number of trips to the area between then and 1922. In 1896, Stejneger was appointed to the International Fur Seal Commission by President Grover Cleveland. In connection with his fur seal work, Stejneger researched and published a biography of Georg Wilhelm Steller, 1936.

Stejneger also played an important role in international zoological meetings and was elected to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature in 1898.

Georg Herman Baur (1859-1898) was born and educated in Germany. He came to the United States in 1884 to be Othniel Charles Marsh's assistant at Yale University. He later held faculty positions at Clark University and the University of Chicago. Baur's primary fields of study were comparative osteology and paleontology. At the time of his death, Baur was preparing a monograph on the tortoises of North America which was to be published by the United States National Museum (USNM).
Topic:
Herpetology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scientific illustrations
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7441, , Leonhard Stejneger and Georg Herman Baur Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 7441
See more items in:
Leonhard Stejneger and Georg Herman Baur Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7441

Alexander Wetmore Papers

Creator:
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Extent:
50.21 linear meters.
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Date:
circa 1848-1983 and undated
Introduction:
The papers of Alexander Wetmore were received in the Smithsonian Archives in several different accessions between 1978 and 1987.

The Archives would like to thank Mrs. Beatrice T. Wetmore for her help in transferring her husband's papers to the Archives. We also appreciate the assistance of the staff of the Division of Birds, National Museum of Natural History. The authors thank Susan Glenn and Pamela Henson for their thorough review of the manuscript.
Descriptive Entry:
The papers of Alexander Wetmore provide comprehensive documentation of his professional career and personal life. The collection is especially valuable in illustrating his research career in systematic ornithology and avian paleontology; his many collecting trips and field expeditions; his involvement in professional organizations, scientific societies, and social groups; his education and the development of his interest in ornithology; his administrative career at the United States National Museum (USNM) and the Smithsonian Institution; his family history; and personal matters. Less well represented in the collection is material concerning his brief tenure as Superintendent of the National Zoological Park, 1924-1925. Interested researchers should consult Smithsonian Archives Record Unit 74, National Zoological Park, Records, 1887-1965, and undated.

Wetmore was a prolific correspondent and nearly a third of this collection is made up of letters written and received between 1901 and 1977. The correspondence documents most aspects of his career and is particularly valuable in illustrating his research on recent and fossil birds. Wetmore exchanged letters with many of the prominent ornithologists and avian paleontologists of his day, and the correspondence is an important source of information on the history of both disciplines during the twentieth century. It is also helpful in documenting USNM and Smithsonian history from the mid-1920s to the early 1950s. Especially valuable are letters exchanged with USNM curators which concern field work, research programs, and exhibits. Wetmore corresponded with many foreign specialists, and several letters from British and European ornithologists contain descriptions of World War II and its effects on society and science. Also included are countless letters written by Wetmore giving information and advice to amateur ornithologists, bird watchers, and youngsters interested in birds.

A large file of correspondence, reports, fiscal records, publications, and related materials documents Wetmore's constant involvement in professional activities and national and international scientific affairs. His seventy-year membership in the American Ornithologists' Union is thoroughly illustrated. Included are files concerning Wetmore's work with the AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature, and his role in the preparation of the fifth edition of the Check-list of North American Birds. Also included are files concerning Wetmore's work as a delegate and President of meetings of the International Ornithological Congress. Records concerning his work as Secretary-General of the Eighth American Scientific Congress, and as United States Representative to the Inter-American Committee of Experts on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation provide documentation of initial inter-American cooperation on conservation issues. Also found are substantial records documenting his associations with the National Geographic Society; the Gorgas Memorial Institute for Tropical and Preventive Medicine; the Washington Biologists' Field Club; the Cosmos Club; and the Explorers Club. Contained in a separate series are records dealing with his work as Chairman of the National Academy of Sciences Daniel Giraud Elliot Award Committee.

Wetmore's work as a field ornithologist and scientific expedition member is documented from his first recorded observation of a Florida pelican in 1894 through his last collecting trip to Panama in 1966. The majority of records concerning his field work are found in three series. The first documents Wetmore's work prior to his appointment to the U. S. Biological Survey in 1910 and includes field notes, migration records, and lists made during his boyhood in Wisconsin; similar materials compiled during his college days in Lawrence, Kansas, and on trips to the western United States; and catalogues of his ornithological and natural history collections. The second series consists of correspondence, field notes, diaries, reports, expense records, and related materials documenting field work carried out for the U. S. Biological Survey and the Smithsonian Institution (with the exception of trips to Panama). Also included are records created during trips to professional meetings, trips to study museum specimens, and other official travel. The third series contains records concerning his field trips to Panama, 1944, 1946-1966. Also included is a file of permits used during his field investigations, as well as expense accounts from his official travel.

Photographic documentation of Wetmore's life and career is a major strength of the collection. Included are voluminous photographs, albums, lantern slides, 35mm color slides, motion pictures, and negatives documenting his field work and other official travel. Also included are portraits of Wetmore; photographs of Wetmore with family, friends, and colleagues; photographs from his boyhood; photographs of Smithsonian events, scientific meetings, and social gatherings; and photographs of professional colleagues.

The papers contain a file of collected materials documenting Wetmore's personal life and family history. The file includes correspondence with his immediate family and other relatives; various biographical information; genealogical data on his family; school and college records; papers and drawings from his early work on birds; congratulatory correspondence and letters of introduction and recommendation; transcripts of an oral history interview; and personnel records from his service in the federal government. Of special interest is Wetmore's "private zoo" - a card catalogue of species and subspecies named in his honor. A series of daily diaries and appointment books helps to illustrate his day-to-day activities.

Wetmore's twenty-eight-year administrative career at the USNM and Smithsonian is partially documented in the collection. Most of the records consist of routine correspondence inquiring about employment at the USNM. Also included are various files concerning Smithsonian activities, offices, and administrative matters.

The remainder of the collection primarily consists of materials relating to his research in ornithology and avian paleontology. Included is a large group of unpublished manuscripts, speeches, and radio talks prepared by Wetmore. Also included are numerous letters; specimen lists; notes; published manuscripts; field records; and publications relating to his research. Of special interest are original journals, lists, and correspondence from field work in Haiti by William Louis Abbott, 1916-1928, and Watson M. Perrygo, 1928-1929. The collection also contains a sample of original illustrations used in his publications on fossil birds; and manuscripts, proofs, drawings, and other materials from his magnum opus, The Birds of the Republic of Panama.

Also included in the collection are diplomas, certificates, and awards received by Wetmore, and typescript copies of correspondence between John Xantus and Spencer F. Baird.

Additional records documenting Wetmore's professional career can be found in the Smithsonian Archives. Researchers interested in Wetmore's career as Assistant Secretary in charge of the USNM and Secretary of the Smithsonian should consult Smithsonian Archives record units 192 and 46. Field reports written during several investigations he conducted for the U. S. Biological Survey can be found in record unit 7176, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Field Reports, 1860-1961. Records dealing with Wetmore's work on the fifth edition of the AOU Check-list of North American Birds are a part of record unit 7050, American Ornithologists' Union Collection, 1883-1977. An oral history interview (record unit 9504) conducted by the Archives in 1974 provides insight to all aspects of Wetmore's career. Record unit 9516, the Watson M. Perrygo oral history interviews, include many reflections on Wetmore by his long-time field companion.

A voluminous collection of Wetmore's field catalogues, field notes, lists, and other specimen-related records are housed in the Division of Birds, National Museum of Natural History.
Historical Note:
(Frank) Alexander Wetmore (1886-1978), ornithologist, avian paleontologist, and science administrator, was the sixth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, serving from 1945 to 1952. He was born in North Freedom, Wisconsin, the son of Nelson Franklin and Emma Amelia (Woodworth) Wetmore. He developed an early interest in birds and at the age of eight made his first field journal entry - an observation on the pelican recorded on a family vacation to Florida in 1894. His first published paper, "My Experience with a Red-headed Woodpecker," appeared in Bird-Lore in 1900. By the time he entered the University of Kansas in 1905, Wetmore had made extensive natural history collections around his Wisconsin home and in Independence, Kansas.

Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, Kansas, Wetmore received his first museum job as Assistant at the University Museum under Charles D. Bunker. His undergraduate career was interrupted on several occasions as he took jobs in Arizona, California, and Colorado to finance his education. He also used these opportunities to study and collect the native avifauna. Wetmore received the Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Kansas in 1912. Wetmore continued his education in Washington, D. C., receiving the Master of Science degree in 1916 and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1920 - both from George Washington University. He would later receive honorary doctorates from the University of Wisconsin, George Washington University, Centre College, and Ripon College.

Wetmore's career in the federal government began in 1910 when he was appointed an Agent for the Biological Survey, a bureau of the United States Department of Agriculture. During the summers of 1910-1911 he assisted on field investigations in Wyoming and Alaska. He traveled to Puerto Rico in late 1911 and spent nearly a year surveying the bird life of that and adjacent islands. In 1913, Wetmore was promoted to Assistant Biologist with the Biological Survey, and he moved to Washington to begin work in the program on the food habits of North American birds. His career with the Biological Survey was highlighted by constant field investigations which took him to most of the United States, as well as Canada, Mexico, and South America. Among his more important investigations were a study of the causes of waterfowl mortality around the Great Salt Lake, Utah, 1914-1916; a survey of North American birds that migrated to the southern part of South America, 1920-1921; and the leadership of the Tanager Exploring Expedition to the islands of the mid-Pacific, 1923. Wetmore was promoted to the rank of Biologist with the Survey in 1924.

As his professional status grew, Wetmore received offers of curatorial and research positions from several of the leading museums in America. Perhaps the most interesting came in 1920 when the American Museum of Natural History asked him to join the Roy Chapman Andrews Asiatic Expedition and take charge of the zoological collections. Wetmore declined this and several other offers. Finally, in November 1924, he accepted appointment as Superintendent of the National Zoological Park (NZP). He remained at the NZP until March 1925 when he was appointed Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian in charge of the United States National Museum (USNM). Wetmore held this position for nearly twenty years, when, in 1945, he was elected the sixth Secretary of the Smithsonian. He retired in 1952 and became a Research Associate of the Institution where he continued his research on recent and fossil birds.

Wetmore's administration of the USNM and Smithsonian during the era of the Great Depression and World War II faced many constraints. However, he managed to continue the Institution's basic research aims, while instituting improvements in its administrative operations and exhibits program. Among his most important accomplishments was a move toward professional management of the Institution by hiring specialists such as John E. Graf and John L. Keddy to assist with federal budgetary procedures and other administrative matters. He also steered the Smithsonian toward a period of exhibit modernization which was realized after his retirement. Two new bureaus were added to the Smithsonian during Wetmore's tenure as Secretary - the National Air Museum (now the National Air and Space Museum) and the Canal Zone Biological Area (now the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute).

Despite his administrative responsibilities at the Smithsonian, Wetmore continued an active research program in the field and the laboratory. He conducted several collecting expeditions to the American tropics between 1927 and 1940. When the outbreak of World War II restricted travel outside the country, he undertook a study of the birds of Shenandoah National Park in nearby Virginia. In the mid-1940s, Wetmore began a research program that would occupy his energies for the remainder of his life. Between 1946 and 1966 he took annual trips to Panama - making an exhaustive survey of the birds of the isthmus. This work culminated in the publication of his magnum opus, The Birds of the Republic of Panama. Three volumes of the work appeared during his life. The final volume was completed by his Smithsonian colleagues and published posthumously.

Wetmore was widely recognized as the dean of American ornithologists, and he worked extensively in the field of avian paleontology and as a systematic specialist. His bibliography contained over seven hundred entries; including 150 papers and monographs on fossil birds. He described 189 species and subspecies of birds new to science. Wetmore made enormous natural history collections, which were eventually donated to the Smithsonian. Included were 26,058 bird and mammal skins from North America, South America, Central America, and the Caribbean area; 4,363 skeletal and anatomical specimens; and 201 clutches of birds eggs. Fifty-six new genera, species, and subspecies of birds (both recent and fossil), mammals, amphibians, insects, mollusks, and plants were named in his honor - an assemblage which Wetmore called his "private zoo." Also named in his honor was the "Wetmore Glacier" in the Antarctic and the "Alexander Wetmore Bridge," a canopy bridge in the Bayano River Basin in Panama.

Wetmore was a member of countless professional organizations, scientific committees, conservation groups, and social clubs. He served many of the groups in elected or appointed capacities. He was a member of the American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) for seventy years and served as President from 1926 to 1929. For many years he was Chairman of the AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature and was instrumental in the publication of the fifth edition of the Check-list of North American Birds. Wetmore also had a long-term association with the National Geographic Society, serving as a Trustee, 1933-1976, and as Vice-Chairman of the Committee on Research and Exploration. He also authored several popular publications on birds for the Society.

Wetmore served as President of the Washington Academy of Sciences, 1927; the Washington Biologists' Field Club, 1928-1931; the Biological Society of Washington, 1929-1931; the Cosmos Club, 1938; the Explorers Club, 1944-1946; and the X International Ornithological Congress held at Uppsala, Sweden, 1950. He was Home Secretary of the National Academy of Sciences, 1951-1955, and a Trustee (or Director) of the Textile Museum of Washington, 1928-1952; the George Washington University, 1945-1962; and the Gorgas Memorial Institute for Tropical and Preventive Medicine, 1949-1976.

During his career at the Smithsonian, Wetmore was named to several national and international scientific committees. He was Secretary-General of the Eighth American Scientific Congress, 1940; United States Representative to the Inter-American Commission of Experts on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation, 1940; Vice-Chairman of the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, 1945-1952; and Chairman of the Interdepartmental Committee on Research and Development, 1946.

His contributions to science resulted in many honors and awards. He was the recipient of the Otto Herman Medal of the Hungarian Ornithological Society, 1931; the Hubbard Medal of the National Geographic Society, 1957; the Brewster Medal, 1959, and the Elliott Coues Award, 1972, of the American Ornithologists' Union; the Explorers Club Medal, 1962; the Bartsch Award of the Audubon Naturalist Society, 1964; and the Arthur Allen Award of the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, 1970. Wetmore married Fay Holloway in 1912, and a daughter, Margaret Fenwick, was born in 1916. After a long illness, his wife died in 1953. That same year he married Annie Beatrice Thielen. Wetmore died at his home in Glen Echo, Maryland, on December 7, 1978.

For more detailed biographical information on Wetmore, see Paul H. Oehser, "In Memoriam: Alexander Wetmore," The Auk, July 1980, vol. 97, no. 3, pp. 608-615; S. Dillon Ripley and James A. Steed, "Alexander Wetmore, June 18, 1886-December 7, 1978," National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs, vol. 56, pp. 597-626, 1987; and John Sherwood, "His Field Notebook Was Started in 1894; It Is Not Yet Complete," The Washington Star, Thursday, 13 January 1977. A discussion of his contributions to paleornithology is found in Storrs L. Olson's "Alexander Wetmore and the Study of Fossil Birds" in "Collected Papers in Avian Paleontology Honoring the 90th Birthday of Alexander Wetmore," Storrs L. Olson, editor, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology, 1976, no. 27, pp. xi-xvi.
Chronology:
June 18, 1886 -- Born in North Freedom, Wisconsin

1900 -- Wrote first published paper, "My experience with a Red-headed Woodpecker" (Bird-Lore, vol. II, pp. 155-156)

1905-1908, 1910 -- Assistant, University of Kansas Museum

1909 -- Assistant, Colorado Museum of Natural History

1910-1912 -- Agent, United States Bureau of Biological Survey

1910 -- Field work, Wyoming

1911 -- Field work, Alaska

1911-1912 -- Field work, Porto Rico

1912 -- Bachelor of Science, University of Kansas

October 13, 1912 -- Married Fay Holloway

1913-1923 -- Assistant Biologist, United States Bureau of Biological Survey

1914 -- Field work, Utah and California

1914-1915 -- Field work, Utah and Montana

1916 -- Master of Science, George Washington University

1916 -- Birth of daughter, Margaret Fenwick

1916 -- Field work, Utah

1916 -- Birds of Porto Rico (U. S. Dept. Agric. Bull. 326, pp. 1-140)

1917 -- Field work, North Carolina

1917-1918 -- Field work, Arkansas and Texas

1918 -- Field work, Western United States

1919 -- Field work, Florida; Arizona

1920 -- Doctor of Philosophy, George Washington University

1920-1921 -- Field work, South America

1921 -- Field work, Georgia

1922 -- Field work, South Carolina; Minnesota; North Dakota; Pennsylvania; Maryland

1923 -- In charge of the Tanager Exploring Expedition to the mid-Pacific islands

1924 -- Biologist, U. S. Bureau of Biological Survey

1924-1925 -- Superintendent, National Zoological Park

1925-1944 -- Assistant Secretary, Smithsonian Institution (in charge of the U. S. National Museum)

1926 -- Observations on the Birds of Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay and Chile (U. S. National Museum, Bull. 133, pp.1-448)

1926 -- The Migration of Birds (Harvard University Press)

1926-1929 -- President, American Ornithologists' Union

1927 -- Field work, Haiti and Dominican Republic

1927 -- President, Washington Academy of Sciences

1927 -- Isidore Geoffroy St. Hilaire Medal, Societe Nationale d'Acclimitation de France

1928 -- Trip to study bird collections of museums in the western United States

1928-1931 -- President, Washington Biologists' Field Club

1928-1952 -- Trustee, Textile Museum of Washington

1929-1931 -- President, Biological Society of Washington

1930 -- A Systematic Classification for the Birds of the World (Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 76, art. 24, pp. 1-8). Revised and reprinted in 1934, 1940, 1948, 1951, and 1960.

1930 -- U. S. Delegate, VII International Ornithological Congress, Amsterdam; field work, Spain

1931 -- The Birds of Haiti and the Dominican Republic, by Wetmore and B. H. Swales (U. S. National Museum Bull. 155, pp. 1-483)

1931 -- Field work, Haiti

1931 -- Otto Herman Medal, Hungarian Ornithological Society

1931-1957 -- Chairman, American Ornithologists' Union Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North American Birds

1932 -- Honorary D.Sc., George Washington University

1932 -- Field work, western United States

1933-1976 -- Trustee, National Geographic Society

1934 -- U. S. Delegate, VIII International Ornithological Congress, Oxford

1936 -- Field work, Guatemala

1937 -- Field work, Venezuela

1937-1978 -- Vice Chairman, Acting Chairman, and Chairman Emeritus, Committee on Research and Exploration, National Geographic Society

1938 -- President, Cosmos Club

1938 -- Chairman of U. S. delegation, IX International Ornithological Congress, Rouen, France

1939 -- Field work, Mexico

1940 -- A Check-list of the fossil birds of North America (Smiths. Misc. Coll., vol. 99, no. 4, pp. 1-81)

1940 -- Secretary-General, Eighth American Scientific Congress

1940 -- U. S. Representative, Inter-American Commission of Experts on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation

1940 -- Field work, Costa Rica

1941 -- Field work, Colombia

1941 -- Distinguished Service Award, University of Kansas

1944-1946 -- President, Explorers Club

1944, 1946-1966 -- Field work, Panama

1945 -- Alumni Award for Achievement in Science, George Washington University

1945-1952 -- Secretary, Smithsonian Institution

1945-1952 -- Vice-Chairman, National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics

1945-1962 -- Trustee, George Washington University

1946 -- Honorary D.Sc., University of Wisconsin

1947 -- Honorary D.Sc., Centre College of Kentucky

1947-1963 -- Chairman, Daniel Giraud Elliot Fund Award Committee, National Academy of Sciences

1948 -- Chairman, Interdepartmental Committee on Scientific Research and Development

1948 -- Orden de Merito, Carlos Manuel de Cespedes, Cuba

1949-1976 -- Member, Board of Directors, Gorgas Memorial Institute for Tropical and Preventive Medicine

1950 -- President, Academy of Medicine of Washington, D. C.

1950 -- President, X International Ornithological Congress, Uppsala, Sweden

1951-1955 -- Home Secretary, National Academy of Sciences

February 14, 1953 -- Death of Fay Holloway Wetmore

December 16, 1953 -- Married Annie Beatrice Thielen

1953-1978 -- Research Associate, Smithsonian Institution

1954 -- Field work, Venezuela

1957 -- Hubbard Medal, National Geographic Society

1959 -- Honorary D.Sc., Ripon College

1959 -- Brewster Medal, American Ornithologists' Union

1962 -- Explorers Club Medal

1963 -- Treasurer, XVI International Congress of Zoology

1964 -- Bartsch Award, Audubon Naturalist Society

1965 -- The Birds of the Republic of Panama, vol. 1 (Smiths. Misc. Coll., vol. 150, pp. 1-483)

1968 -- The Birds of the Republic of Panama, vol. 2 (Smiths. Misc. Coll., vol. 150, pt. 2, pp. 1-605)

1969 -- Field work, Netherlands Antilles

1970 -- Arthur Allen Medal, Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology

1972 -- The Birds of the Republic of Panama, vol. 3 (Smiths. Misc. Coll., vol. 150, pt. 3, pp. 1-631)

1972 -- Elliott Coues Award, American Ornithologists' Union

1973 -- "Alexander Wetmore Bridge" dedicated in Panama

1975-1978 -- Honorary President, American Ornithologists' Union

1976 -- Collected Papers in Avian Paleontology Honoring the 90th Birthday of Alexander Wetmore, Storrs L. Olson, editor (Smiths. Contrib. to Paleobio., no. 27)

December 7, 1978 -- Death, Glen Echo, Maryland

1984 -- The Birds of the Republic of Panama, vol. 4 (Smiths. Misc. Coll., vol. 150, pt. 4, pp. 1-670)
Topic:
Birds of the Republic of Panama.  Search this
Ornithology.  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978, Alexander Wetmore Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7006
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7006

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By