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Design for a Stained Glass Window: Grammatica

Artist:
Hans Kaspar Lang the Elder, Swiss, 1571 – 1645  Search this
Medium:
Pen and brown ink, brown wash
Type:
glasswares
Drawing
Object Name:
Drawing
Date:
1606
Credit Line:
Purchased for the Museum by the Advisory Council
Accession Number:
1911-28-129
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1911-28-129

[Trade catalogs from Buffalo Forge Co.]

Variant company name:
"Women in advertising"  Search this
Company Name:
Buffalo Forge Co.  Search this
Related companies:
Canadian Blower & Forge Co., Ltd. Kitchener, Ontario  Search this
Notes content:
"0A" Bending Roll : bends, shapes, or forms thousands of manufactured items
Includes:
Trade catalog and photographs
Physical description:
1 piece; 1 box
Language:
English
Type of material:
Trade catalogs
Trade literature
Place:
Buffalo, New York, United States
Date:
1900s
Topic (Romaine term):
Machine tools and metalworking equipment  Search this
Topic:
Machine-tools  Search this
Metal-working machinery  Search this
Record ID:
SILNMAHTL_10153
Location:
Trade Literature at the American History Museum Library
Collection:
Smithsonian Libraries Trade Literature Collections
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILNMAHTL_10153

[Trade catalogs from Kearney & Trecker Corp.]

Variant company name:
Jane's office, women in advertising  Search this
Company Name:
Kearney & Trecker Corp.  Search this
Notes content:
Modern grinder especially designed for sharpening carbide face mill cutters faster and better
Includes:
Trade catalog and photographs
Black and white images
Physical description:
1 piece; 1 box
Language:
English
Type of material:
Trade catalogs
Trade literature
Place:
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
Date:
1900s
Topic (Romaine term):
Machine tools and metalworking equipment  Search this
Topic:
Machine-tools  Search this
Metal-working machinery  Search this
Record ID:
SILNMAHTL_10452
Location:
Trade Literature at the American History Museum Library
Collection:
Smithsonian Libraries Trade Literature Collections
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILNMAHTL_10452

[Trade catalogs from Kingsbury Machine Tool Corp.]

Variant company name:
Jane's office, women in advertising  Search this
Company Name:
Kingsbury Machine Tool Corp.  Search this
Notes content:
Kingsbury machines perform machining operations on forged brass valves and fittings, and Ledloy cast iron valves and fittings.
Includes:
Trade catalog and photographs
Black and white images
Physical description:
2 pieces; 1 box
Language:
English
Type of material:
Trade catalogs
Trade literature
Place:
Keene, New Hampshire, United States
Date:
1900s
Topic (Romaine term):
Machine tools and metalworking equipment  Search this
Topic:
Machine-tools  Search this
Metal-working machinery  Search this
Record ID:
SILNMAHTL_10462
Location:
Trade Literature at the American History Museum Library
Collection:
Smithsonian Libraries Trade Literature Collections
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILNMAHTL_10462

[Trade catalogs from Clark Instrument, Inc.]

Variant company name:
"Women in advertising"  Search this
Company Name:
Clark Instrument, Inc.  Search this
Notes content:
Clark hardness tester for metals ; "Rockwell testing" ; Rockwell test is standard throughout industry and govt.
Includes:
Trade catalog and photographs
Black and white images
Physical description:
1 piece; 1 box
Language:
English
Type of material:
Trade catalogs
Trade literature
Place:
Dearborn, Michigan, United States
Date:
1900s
Topic (Romaine term):
Machine tools and metalworking equipment  Search this
Measuring; calculating and testing devices  Search this
Topic:
Calculators  Search this
Machine-tools  Search this
Measuring instruments  Search this
Metal-working machinery  Search this
Weighing instruments  Search this
Record ID:
SILNMAHTL_10161
Location:
Trade Literature at the American History Museum Library
Collection:
Smithsonian Libraries Trade Literature Collections
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILNMAHTL_10161

[Trade catalogs from Erie Foundry Co.]

Variant company name:
Jane's office, Women in advertising  Search this
Company Name:
Erie Foundry Co.  Search this
Notes content:
hydraulic presses, for elevators, forging presses, drop hammers, trimming presses
Includes:
Trade catalog
Black and white images
Physical description:
1 piece; 1 box
Language:
English
Type of material:
Trade catalogs
Trade literature
Place:
Erie, Pennsylvania, United States
Date:
1900s
Topic (Romaine term):
Metalwork products (architectural and ornamental)  Search this
Materials handling equipment (includes barrels; bottling and filling; casters; chains; etc.)  Search this
Topic:
Architectural metal-work  Search this
Art metal-work  Search this
Barrels  Search this
Bottling  Search this
Industrial equipment  Search this
Metal-work  Search this
Record ID:
SILNMAHTL_10224
Location:
Trade Literature at the American History Museum Library
Collection:
Smithsonian Libraries Trade Literature Collections
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILNMAHTL_10224

[Trade catalogs from High Speed Hammer Co., Inc.]

Variant company name:
Jane's office, women in advertising  Search this
Company Name:
High Speed Hammer Co., Inc.  Search this
Notes content:
Hammer with the human stroke ; high speed riveting hammer
Includes:
Trade catalog
Black and white images
Physical description:
3 pieces; 1 box
Language:
English
Type of material:
Trade catalogs
Trade literature
Place:
Rochester, New York, United States
Date:
1900s
Topic (Romaine term):
Metalwork products (architectural and ornamental)  Search this
Machine tools and metalworking equipment  Search this
Topic:
Architectural metal-work  Search this
Art metal-work  Search this
Machine-tools  Search this
Metal-work  Search this
Metal-working machinery  Search this
Record ID:
SILNMAHTL_10235
Location:
Trade Literature at the American History Museum Library
Collection:
Smithsonian Libraries Trade Literature Collections
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILNMAHTL_10235

Andy Nasisse files relating to self-taught artists

Creator:
Nasisse, Andy S., 1946-  Search this
Names:
Bailey, E. M. (Eldren M.)  Search this
Carpenter, Miles B. (Miles Burkholder), 1889-  Search this
Carroll, Tessie  Search this
Damonte, Emanuel "Litto", d. 1985  Search this
Dinsmoor, Samuel Perry, 1843-1932  Search this
Doyle, Sam, 1906-1985  Search this
Ehn, John Henry, 1896-1981  Search this
Finster, Howard, 1916-2001  Search this
Forester, Laura Pope, 1873-1953  Search this
Hall, Dilmus, 1900-1987  Search this
Hall, Irene Gibson, ca. 1895-1983  Search this
Harvey, Bessie, 1929-  Search this
McKissack, Jeff, 1902-1980  Search this
Milkovitch, John, 1912-1988  Search this
Murry, J. B. (John B.), 1908-1988 (John B.)  Search this
Prisbrey, Tressa  Search this
Pugh, Dow, 1906-  Search this
Ratcliffe, W. T., 1882-1956  Search this
Rice, William Carlton, 1930-2004  Search this
Robertson, Royal  Search this
St. EOM, 1908-1986  Search this
Thomas, Son, 1926-1993  Search this
Tolliver, Mose, 1920-  Search this
Van Zant, Frank, 1911-1989  Search this
Zoetl, Joseph, 1878-1961  Search this
Extent:
0.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1979-circa 1986
Summary:
The Andy Nasisse files relating to self-taught artists measure 0.8 linear feet and date from 1979 to 1986, with additional undated materials. Included are artist files on twenty-five self-taught artists. Files consist primarily of black and white photographs of artists, their artworks, and photographs of unidentified artworks. Also included is a letter discussing artist Howard Finster's first dealer, Jeffrey Camp, and in which Nasisse offers his advice to Finster to limit production of his work. An audio recording of an interview with Miles Carpenter conducted by Nasisse, and a documentary about J. B. Murray, A Video Documentary of an Artist and His Work, are also present in these files. The documentary features many of Murray's paintings and drawings, as well as his comments on his art and visions.

The artists included in the files are Eldren M. (E. M.) Bailey, Miles Carpenter, Tessie Carroll, Emanuel "Litto" Damonte, Samuel Perry (S.P.) Dinsmoor, Sam Doyle, John Ehn, Howard Finster, Laura Pope Forrester, Dilmus Hall, Irene Hall, Bessie Harvey, St. EOM (Eddie Owens Martin), Jeff McKissack, John Milkovitch, J. B. Murray, Grandma Tressa Prisbrey, Dow Pugh, W.T. Ratcliffe (or Ratliff), William Carlton Rice (Mr. Rice), Royal Robertson, James "Son Ford" Thomas, Mose Tolliver, Frank van Zant (Chief Rolling Mountain Thunder), and Brother Joseph Zoetl.
Scope and Contents:
The Andy Nasisse files relating to self-taught artists measure 0.8 linear feet and date from 1979 to 1986, with additional undated materials. Included are artist files on twenty-five self-taught artists. Files consist primarily of black and white photographs of artists, their artworks, and photographs of unidentified artworks. Also included is a letter discussing artist Howard Finster's first dealer, Jeffrey Camp, and in which Nasisse offers his advice to Finster to limit production of his work. An audio recording of an interview with Miles Carpenter conducted by Nasisse, and a documentary about J. B. Murray, A Video Documentary of an Artist and His Work, are also present in these files. The documentary features many of Murray's paintings and drawings, as well as his comments on his art and visions.

The artists included in the files are Eldren M. (E. M.) Bailey, Miles Carpenter, Tessie Carroll, Emanuel "Litto" Damonte, Samuel Perry (S.P.) Dinsmoor, Sam Doyle, John Ehn, Howard Finster, Laura Pope Forrester, Dilmus Hall, Irene Hall, Bessie Harvey, St. EOM (Eddie Owens Martin), Jeff McKissack, John Milkovitch, J. B. Murray, Grandma Tressa Prisbrey, Dow Pugh, W.T. Ratcliffe (or Ratliff), William Carlton Rice (Mr. Rice), Royal Robertson, James "Son Ford" Thomas, Mose Tolliver, Frank van Zant (Chief Rolling Mountain Thunder), and Brother Joseph Zoetl.
Biographical / Historical:
Andy Nasisse (1946-) is a ceramicist sculptor, potter, and former professor at the University of Georgia. Starting in the 1970s, he visited self-taught artists and photographed their art, environments and, in some cases, conducted interviews with them. He has had a solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Georgia and is the recipient of the Art Regional Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Miles Carpenter (also known as Miles Burkholder Carpenter or Miles B. Carpenter) (1889-1985) was a sculptor active in Waverly, Virginia who carved figures and animals from wood and referred to some as "advertisements."

Tessie Carroll was an Oklahoma folk artist known for her rock sculptures and carvings.

Eldren M. (E.M.) Bailey (1903-1987) was an African American sculptor and painter from Atlanta, Georgia whose sculptures were influenced from his background making grave markers.

Emanuel "Litto" Damonte (1892-1985) started collecting hubcaps in 1957 and created an art environment on his property in Napa Country, California, known as Hubcap Ranch.

Samuel Perry (S.P). Dinsmoor (1843-1932) was a Kansan sculptor who designed a sculpture garden at his home called the Garden of Eden," consisting of over 200 concrete works reflecting his religious and political beliefs.

Sam Doyle (1906-1985) was an African American artist born on St. Helena, an island off the coast of South Carolina, whose colorful paintings document the island's people and Gullah culture.

John Ehn (1887-1981) was a former trapper turned sculptor who decorated the landscape of his Californian motel, Old Trapper's Lodge, with sculptures depicting myths and the Old West.

Howard Finster (1916-2001) was a Georgian folk artist and Baptist minister known for his former home, Paradise Garden, consisting of constructions, found objects and sculptures.

Laura Pope Forrester (1873-1953) was a sculptor who created figurative works in her Georgian garden that depicted notable women and fictional characters.

Dilmus Hall (1896-1987) was an African American artist whose sculptural works are associated with religious customs that combine African traditions and Christianity.

Irene Hall was an Oklahoman artist who decorated her home with sculptural works she had made with found objects.

Bessie Harvey (1929-1994) was an African American folk artist from Tennessee who created wooden sculptures often inspired by nature.

Eddie Owens Martin "St. EOM" (1908-1986) was a Georgian artist who created a visionary art environment called Pasaquan.

Jeff McKissack (1902-1980) is the creator of The Orange Show, an art environment constructed in Houston Texas to honor his favorite fruit.

John Milkovitch (1912-1988) was a retired upholsterer who constructed the Beer Can House, by decorating his home with over 50,000 fattened beer cans.

J. B. Murry (1910-1988) (also known as J.B. Murray) was an African American painter who incorporated illegible text in his work which he interpreted with the use of a bottle of well water.

Tressa "Grandma" Prisbrey (1896-1988) constructed numerous structures out of bottles and found objects at her home creating what became known as Grandma Prisbrey's Bottle Village.

Dow Pugh (1906-1993) was an artist from Tennessee who created paintings and sculptural works.

W. T. Ratcliffe was an engineer who, in the 1930s created sculptures in Boulder Park in Jacumba, California.

William Carlton Rice (1930-2004) was a self-ordained minister who created a Cross Garden around his home in Alabama.

Royal Robertson (1936-1997) was an African American artist and self-proclaimed prophet from Louisiana whose work incorporated biblical themes, and references to "girlie magazines" and comic strips.

James "Son Ford" Thomas (1926- 1993) was an African American sculptor and blues musician from Mississippi who is known for his clay skull sculptures.

Mose Tolliver (1919-2006) was an African American folk painter from Alabama who painted with house paint on wood.

Frank van Zant "Chief Rolling Mountain Thunder" (1921-1989) was an Oklahoman artist who created a park in Nevada dedicated to the American Indian known as Thunder Mountain Monument.

Brother Joseph Zoettl (1878-1961) was a monk who constructed a miniature city of famous religious buildings at St. Bernard Abbey known as Ave Maria Grotto.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are the Photographs and videos of self-taught artists; Willie Ann Wright photographs; Howard Finster papers; John F. Turner research material on Howard Finster; Howard Finster interview and recordings; Videos and slides on Dilmus Hall, Mary T. Smith, and J.B. Murry; Willem Volkersz interviews; and J. B. Murray drawings. There is also an oral history interview with Howard Finster conducted by Liza Kirwin in 1984.

The California State University, Channel Islands holds the Prisbrey bottle village collection. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill holds the Judith McWillie papers. The University of Georgia Special Collections Libraries holds the Howard Finster collection and the Howard Finster Tapes.
Provenance:
The Andy Nasisse files relating to self-taught artists were donated to the Archives of American Art by Andy Nasisse in 1985.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
Video on J.B. Murray: Authorization to publish, quote, or reproduce must be obtained from Andy Nasisse.

The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Educators -- Georgia  Search this
Ceramicists -- Georgia  Search this
Potters -- Georgia  Search this
Topic:
Self-taught artists  Search this
Folk artists  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Andy Nasisse files relating to self-taught artists, circa 1979-circa 1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.nasiandy
See more items in:
Andy Nasisse files relating to self-taught artists
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-nasiandy

Lilla Cabot Perry and Perry family papers [microfilm]

Creator:
Perry, Lilla Cabot  Search this
Names:
Berenson, Bernard, 1865-1959  Search this
Davis, Charles H. (Charles Harold), 1856-1933  Search this
James, Henry, 1843-1916  Search this
Lowell, James Russell, 1819-1891  Search this
Monet, Claude, 1840-1926  Search this
Perry, Margaret  Search this
Perry, Thomas Sergeant, 1845-1928  Search this
Robinson, Edwin Arlington, 1869-1935  Search this
Tarbell, Edmund Charles, 1862-1938  Search this
Extent:
4 microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
1861-[ca. 1943]
Scope and Contents:
Biographical documents; correspondence; diaries; writings; photographs; and printed material. Included are letters to and from Lilla Cabot Perry, and selected letters to and from her husband Thomas Sergeant Perry and daughter Margaret Perry from family members, artists, writers, poets and friends. Correspondents include: Bernard Berenson, Henry James, James Russell Lowell, Claude Monet, Edwin Arlington Robinson, and Edmund Charles Tarbell. Also included are French identification cards for Lilla Cabot Perry and her husband, 1897; diaries of Lilla Cabot Perry, 1874?/1875, 1886, and of Thomas Perry, 1887-1894; guest book of Thomas and Margaret Perry; poems, and "Reminiscences of Claude Monet" by Lilla Cabot Perry; typed commentary by Edwin Arlington Robinson for the jacket of Perry's THE JAR OF DREAMS, with notes by her; "Reminiscences of Edwin Arlington Robinson" by Margaret Perry; inscribed photographs of Henry James and James Russell Lowell, and a signed photograph of Claude Monet; an obituary of Perry; and a Memorial Exhibition catalog.
Biographical / Historical:
Impressionist painter and author; Boston, Mass., Giverny, France, and Hancock, N.H.; b. 1848; d. 1933. Thomas Sergeant Perry, author, educator; Boston, Mass., Giverny, France, and Hancock, N.H. Lilla Cabot Perry studied painting at Cowles Art School in Boston with Dennis Miller Bunker and Robert Vonnoh, and in Paris at the Julian and Colarossi academies, and at Alfred Stevens' studio. She had a house in Giverny, France and introduced numerous American artists, who came to Giverny to paint, to her neighbor, Claude Monet. She wrote several books of poetry including FROM THE GARDEN OF HELLAS, THE HEART OF THE WEED and THE JAR OF DREAMS. In 1874, she married Thomas Sergeant Perry, a tutor in French and German at Harvard University and later an instructor in English. He was also the author of several books. The Perrys had three daughters, Margaret, Alice, and Edith. Alice married Joseph Clark Grew, a diplomat who was United States ambassador to Turkey and Japan, and undersecretary of state.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1992 by Colby College Library, Special Collections.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Painters -- New Hampshire -- Hancock  Search this
Painters -- France -- Giverny  Search this
Painters -- France -- Giverny  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Painters -- New Hampshire -- Hancock  Search this
Topic:
Women painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Women painters -- New Hampshire -- Hancock  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Impressionism (Art) -- United States  Search this
Impressionism (Art) -- France -- Giverny  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.perrlill
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-perrlill

Edgar Spier Cameron papers

Creator:
Cameron, Edgar Spier, 1862-1944  Search this
Names:
Cameron, Marie Gelon, 1872-1953  Search this
Laurens, Jean-Paul, 1838-1921  Search this
Extent:
2.8 Linear feet ((on 3 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Date:
1868-1968
bulk 1882-1968
Scope and Contents:
Genealogical material; letters; business records; notes; writings; art works; scrapbooks; printed material and photographs.
Notes and charts concerning the Spier and Cameron families, 1928-1938; letters, 1868-1947, include a few childhood notes, letters to his parents describing his courses, instructors; to classmates while at the Art Students League in New York, while studying art in Paris, and to his wife, Marie, in Chicago; and letters to Cameron from colleagues.
Among the business records are an application for letters patent, with colleague Mark Salomon, for a device used in the transformation of theater scenery, 1905, and copyright cards for paintings, 1911-1917; notes; a notebook, 1936; 38 cards, 1917-1920, containing information about art works; an undated draft and a typescript, 1940, for an autobiographical acccount "The Cusp of Gemini".
Art works by Cameron include a sketchbook, 1882-1883, primarily of costumed figures, 10 unbound sketches, 21 oil sketches, undated and 1899, some of which are studies for murals, an etching, and 2 copies of a lithograph portrait of a woman. Works by others include a pencil portrait, 1918, of Cameron by Fitzpatrick, and an ink sketch "Winter Morning" by Svend Svensen. Five scrapbooks, 1894-1968 contain clippings and photographs of Cameron, his wife, family members, and works of art.
Also included are clippings, 1888-1950, exhibition announcements and catalogs, 1899-1946, a catalog, 1926, for works by John Singer Sargent, and other printed material; material concerning Cameron's instructor Jean Paul Laurens, and reproductions of works of art including 43 engraved copies of classic works. Photographs, 1890-1918, include 19 of Cameron, 22 of his wife, 18 of family and friends, miscellaneous travel views, and works of art by the Camerons and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Mural painter; Chicago, Ill. Studied at the Chicago Academy of Design, the Art Students League of New York, and was a student of Cabanel, Constant and Laurens in Paris. His wife, Marie Gelon Cameron, was born in Paris, and was also a student of Cabanel, Constant and Laurens.
Provenance:
Donated 1988 by Arthur B. Carpenter and Marjorie L. Kimberlin, Cameron's nephew and niece.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm.
Occupation:
Art students -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art students -- France -- Paris  Search this
Muralists -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Identifier:
AAA.cameedga
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cameedga

Castano Galleries records

Creator:
Castano Galleries (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Names:
Beam, Philip C.  Search this
Castano, Giovanni, 1896-1978  Search this
Chrysler, Walter P. (Walter Percy), 1909-1988, Jr.  Search this
Danes, Gibson A.  Search this
Denghausen, Franz H., 1911-  Search this
Goodrich, Lloyd, 1897-1987  Search this
Grandin, Isabella  Search this
Hale, Lilian Westcott, 1880-1963  Search this
Hofer, Philip, 1898-1984  Search this
Rathbone, Perry Townsend, 1911-2000  Search this
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Sachs, Paul J. (Paul Joseph), 1878-1965  Search this
Venturi, Lionello, 1885-1961  Search this
Extent:
30 microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
1907-1983
Scope and Contents:
20 feet, chiefly gallery records and some personal papers of gallery owner, Giovanni (John) Castano, including correspondence, legal material, subject files, notes, writings, financial material, photographs, a scrapbook, and printed material.
Included are biographical information about Castano, business correspondence with dealers, museums, clients, collectors, artists, art historians, and others, and some personal correspondence, including a letter from Rome, 1876, from an unidentified writer to an unidentified woman containing a detailed description of a painting in the Barberini, and correspondence related to Castano's work as a scenic artist, 1924-1931. Subject files contain mainly correspondence and lists of work, and relate to Italian Renaissance exhibition, 1938, the Heeramaneck Collection of Persian and Indian Art, a Boldini exhibition, Arthur C. Goodwin, 1945-1952, and a Mancini-Sargent exhibition, 1951.
Financial material includes records of expenses and income; account books; employees' weekly wage book; records of purchases and sales of art work, including part of a bill for a painting by Diaz paid by Knoedler and Co., 1890; appraisals done for individuals, estates and institutions, including the Gorham Corporation, Harvard University murals, the Mrs. T. Morris Murray estate, furnishings of William M. Paxton's studio, ca. 1941, and paintings by Edmund Tarbell, and others; consignments; priced auction catalogs of the Henry F. Sears estate, the Mary A.H. Traiser estate, and miscellaneous price lists.
Also included are a card file on paintings; lists of paintings; inventories; client cards; address and appointment books; mailing lists; gallery journals, 1936-1927; descriptions and notes on paintings and authentications; biographies of artists; writings by and about Castano; and notes by Churchill Wyman on Philip Hale's anatomy lectures.
Photographs are of Castano, his work, artists at work, and various works of art. Original art work consists of sketches for a logo designed by Suzanne Chapman. Included in the exhibition related material is a catalog for Castano's posthumous exhibition.
Also included is a scrapbook containing announcements, clippings on the gallery and Castano, exhibition catalogs, and biographical material compiled by Castano's longtime secretary.
Among the correspondents are: Philip Beam, Walter P. Chrysler, Jr., Gibson Danes, Franz Denghasusen, Lloyd Goodrich (Whitney Museum of American Art), Isabella Grandin, Lilian W. Hale, Philip Hofer (Fogg Art Museum), Perry T. Rathbone (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston), Edgar P. Richardson (Detroit Institute of Arts), Paul J. Sachs (Fogg), and Lionello Venturi.
Biographical / Historical:
Art gallery, Boston, Mass. Founded in 1931 by Giovanni Castano, also known as John Castano. Castano attended the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where he was an assistant to Philip Hale. He was a scenic artist for the Boston Opera Company and for the Grand Opera in Cincinnati, Ohio. During the Depression, he returned to Boston where he opened a gallery on Newbury Street specializing in European and American paintings, acted as an agent for Wildenstein and Co., and restored paintings. The gallery had numerous exhibitions of the "Boston School," including A.C. Goodwin, Winslow Homer, Philip Hale, Edmund C. Tarbell, William Paxton and others. The gallery occupied several Newbury St. locations. From 1975 until his death, Castano operated it from his home in Needham.
Other Title:
Giovanni Castano Galleries records, 1907-1983.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming by Elvira Castano Palmerio, Castano's daughter, 1988.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art appraisers  Search this
Restorers  Search this
Set decorators  Search this
Gallery owners  Search this
Art dealers -- Massachusetts  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Identifier:
AAA.castgall
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-castgall

Elizabeth Gordon Papers

Creator:
Gordon, Elizabeth, 1906-2000  Search this
Names:
Claiborne, Craig  Search this
Gordon, Elizabeth, 1906-2000  Search this
Leach, Bernard  Search this
Extent:
3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Periodicals
Photographs
Correspondence
Personal papers
Place:
Japan
Date:
1958-1987
Summary:
Papers, 1959-1987, of Elizabeth Gordon, editor of the periodical, House Beautiful from 1941-1964, mostly related to her research for the August and September 1960 issues of House Beautiful regarding the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui", and the subsequent travelling "shibui exhibition" from 1961-1964. Included are correspondence, some photocopies, 1959-1963; notes; drafts for articles and lectures; printed material including magazine and newspaper clippings, 1959-1987; 2 books, and exhibition announcements; drawings of paper and foil art; a photo album containing photos of exhibition installations; and photographs, slides, color transparencies, and lantern slides depicting people, sites, and objects reflecting the "shibui" aesthetic.
Scope and Contents:
The Elizabeth Gordon Papers measure 4.5 linear feet and span the years 1959-1987. The collection mainly documents Ms. Gordon's research for the August and September 1960 issues of House Beautiful regarding the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui", and the subsequent travelling "shibui exhibition" from 1961-1964. Included are correspondence, some photocopies, 1959-1963; research notes and materials; articles; lectures; printed material including magazine and newspaper clippings, 1959-1987; 2 books, and exhibition announcements; article materials; a photo album containing photos of exhibition installations; and photographs, slides, color transparencies, and lantern slides depicting people, sites, and objects reflecting the "shibui" aesthetic.
Arrangement note:
This collection is organized into eight series. 1. Biographical data, 2. Shibui research, 3. Shibui issues of, House Beautiful, 4. Correspondence, 5. Shibui promotion, 6. Exhibition files, 7. Printed materials, and 8. Photographs.
Biographical Information:
Born in Logansport, Indiana in 1906, Elizabeth Gordon served as editor of House Beautiful magazine 1941 to 1964. Ms. Gordon first became interested in Japanese aesthetics during the mid-1950s. As a result she began to read and study Japanese art, history and culture. In 1959, Gordon travelled to Japan with three staff people from, House Beautiful. In Kyoto she met Eiko Yuasa, a young woman then employed by the City of Kyoto to handle foreign V.I.P.s, who was assigned to assist Gordon during her stay there. It was Ms. Yuasa who, in the course of discussions of Japanese aesthetics, introduced the term "shibui." Around that term and its related concepts ("iki", "jimi", "hade") the theme for the issue began to crystallize. In August and September, 1960, House Beautiful, under the editorial control of Ms. Gordon, published two extremely popular issues devoted to the subject of "shibui". Due to the popularity of the issues, museum exhibits devoted to the concept of "shibui" travelled around the United States. Ms. Gordon died in Adamstown, Maryland in 2000.

Biographical Overview

1906 -- Born in Logansport, Indiana

1920s -- Attended the University of Chicago

1930s -- Moved to New York to work as a promotional copywriter for several newspapers

1930s -- Syndicated columnist on home maintenance for The New York Herald Tribune

1930s -- Editor at Good Housekeeping (here for 8 years)

1937 -- More House for your Money by Elizabeth Gordon and Dorothy Ducas published by W. Morrow and Company: New York.

1937 -- Married Carl Hafey Norcross

1939 -- Appointed editor of House Beautiful

1964 -- Left the magazine world

1972 -- Published a special issue on Scandinavian design and awarded the insignia of a knight, first class, in the Finnish Order of the Lion

1987 -- American Institute of Architects made her an honorary member

1988 -- Carl Hafey Norcross died

September 3, 2000 -- Died in Adamstown, MD

(The following biography of Elizabeth Gordon comes courtesy of curator Louise Cort. Written in consultation with Elizabeth Gordon, October 23, 1987)

The research papers, memoranda, magazines, books, photographs and color transparencies and other materials in this archives are related to the publication by Elizabeth Gordon (Mrs. Carl Norcross), editor of House Beautiful from 1941 to 1964 and creator of the August, 1960 issue of the magazine on the special theme of the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui". The "shibui issue" was followed by the September, 1960, issue of the same publication on the theme, "How to be shibui with American things." As a by-product of the issues, a "Shibui Exhibition" travelled to eleven museums in the United States during 1961-1964. Each exhibition was opened with a slide lecture by Elizabeth Gordon.

Miss Gordon first became curious about Japanese aesthetics in the mid-1950s when she began to see Japanese objects being displayed and used in the homes of Americans who had spent time in Japan during the Occupation and Japanese influence began to appear in wholesale showrooms of home furnishings manufacturers. It was clear that the time had come: she HAD to go to Japan!

She read for five years before going to Japan - history, social mores, art history. (Many of the books on Japan that she collected during this time have been presented to the library at the University of Maryland, College Park.)

An important bit of advice came from Alice Spaulding Bowen, owner of Pacifica, the highest quality shop of Asian antiquities in Honolulu, who told her, "Be sure to read, The Tale of Genji - then you'll understand everything."

She made her first trip to Japan in April, 1959, accompanied by three staff people from, House Beautiful. In Kyoto she met Eiko Yuasa, a young woman then employed by the City of Kyoto to handle foreign V.I.P.s, who was assigned to assist Miss Gordon during her stay there. It was Ms. Yuasa who, in the course of discussions of Japanese aesthetics, introduced the term "shibui." Around that term and its related concepts ("iki", "jimi", "hade") the theme for the issue began to crystallize.

Miss Gordon came home, planning to spend the summer researching "shibui" with the aid of the Japan Society. But she found virtually nothing written in English on the concept. So she returned to Japan in December, 1959 together with staff member Marion Gough, to dig deeper and to work out details and get better educated with Eiko Yuasa. One of their devices was to walk through department stores and discuss with sales personnel whether objects for sale were "shibui", or were "jimi" or "hade", and why. Between themselves, they did the same for the costumes of women they saw on the streets.

Lacking printed sources for information on "shibui", Miss Gordon sought out and interviewed experts, including Douglas Overton, head of the Japan Society in New York. In Japan in December, 1959, she met Yanagi Soetsu, founder of Japan's Folk Craft Movement and head of the Craft Museum in Tokyo (with an introduction from Tonomura Kichinosuke, head of the Craft Museum in Kurashiki). She met the chef Tsuji Kaichi, who was commissioned to write an article on "kaiseki" (that could not be used because of an inadequate English translation) and Frances Blakemore. She met several times with Bernard Leach and attended his lecture at Bonnier's while he was in New York in March, 1960. (He would later write a "fan letter" for the issue)

As the concept of "the shibui issue" began to take shape, a third trip in the spring of 1960 focused on photography - to produce the shooting script decided on the preceding December. This was executed by the noted photographer Ezra Stoller of Rye, New York, and John DeKoven Hill, House Beautiful's Editorial Director. (Mr. Hill worked with Frank Lloyd Wright except for the ten years that he was a member of the House Beautiful editorial staff)

Miss Gordon was back in Japan in Mid-August 1960 as the "shibui issue" was causing a sensation. Altogether she spent sixteen months in Japan.

As one of the experiences that influenced her strong interest in Japanese costumes and textiles, Miss Gordon remembers a spectacularly thorough exhibition at the Tokyo National Museum in Ueno on, 1200 Years of Japanese Costume. She saw it on the last day of its exhibition (possibly 1964).

The August 1960 issue sold out quickly. Copies of the magazine, which sold for fifty cents, were sold on the "black market" for ten dollars.

The publication of the August 1960 issue was followed by an unprecedented avalanche of "fan mail". Many department heads in colleges and universities, including the Harvard-Yenching Institute and the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago (where Miss Gordon had worked as an undergraduate) wrote to comment on the issue. Many people in other fields of endeavor wrote: heads of firms concerned with interior design, landscape architecture, and related areas expressed their interest in the concept of "shibui" Other writers include Bernard Leach, Gertrude Natzler, Laura Gilpin, Mainbocher, the architect Yoshimura Junzo, the textile artist Marianne Strengell, Walter Kerr, Craig Claiborne, and Oliver Statler.

The "shibui issue" was followed immediately by the September issue dealing with the use of non-Japanese objects to express the concept of "shibui." (Miss Gordon convinced her advertisers, who had been skeptical about the potential success of the August issue, by promising the September issue dealing with American products.) Four American firms were involved in the production of an integrated line of paints, wallpaper, furniture and carpets expressive of the concept. Products were designed by the firms' designers following the clues offered by objects and fabrics purchased by Miss Gordon in Japan in December 1959 and spring 1960. Miss Gordon has expressed her dissatisfaction with the September issue, although public opinion was positive. She feels that some of the firms failed in the "shibui" project, though some "caught" the message: namely the paint company and the fabric/wallpaper company.

In response to strong public interest, the House Beautiful staff prepared a travelling exhibition to introduce the concept of "shibui" through a series of vignettes, mixing fabrics and objects, colors and textures. The museum installation was designed by John Hill of House Beautiful. Japan Air Lines underwrote shipping costs.

The exhibition began in Philadelphia in late 1961. Ezra Stoller was sent to photograph the installation in considerable detail at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts in January, 1962, so that his photographs cold serve as guidelines for installations at the other museums, which included the San Francisco Museum of Art (April 1962), the Newark Pubic Library, and the Honolulu Academy of Art. Miss Gordon presented a lecture on "shibui" at each of the museum installations.

In appreciation of her work to introduce Americans to the concept of "shibui", the city of Kyoto presented a bolt of especially "shibui" kimono fabric executed by a Living National Treasure textile artist. Miss Gordon eventually tailored the fabric into a dress and jacket. She received the 1961 Trail Blazer Award from the New York Chapter of the National Home Fashions League, Inc. In June, 1987, Miss Gordon was named an honorary member of the American Institute of Architects, with her introduction of the concept of "shibui" and her promotion of an understanding of other culture cited as her major contributions to American architecture.
Provenance:
Elizabeth Gordon donated her papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1988.
Elizabeth Gordon donated her papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1988.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
No restrictions on use.
Topic:
Interior decoration -- Periodicals  Search this
Landscape gardening  Search this
Art, Japanese  Search this
Aesthetics, Japanese  Search this
House funishings  Search this
Interior decoration  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Interior decorators  Search this
Gardens -- Japan  Search this
Genre/Form:
Periodicals -- 1940-1970
Photographs
Correspondence
Personal papers -- 1950-2000
Citation:
The Elizabeth Gordon Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of Elizabeth Gordon, 1988
Identifier:
FSA.A1988.03
See more items in:
Elizabeth Gordon Papers
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1988-03
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Margarita Cano

Interviewee:
Cano, Margarita, 1932-  Search this
Interviewer:
Martínez, Juan A.  Search this
Names:
Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture (Miami, Fla.)  Search this
Miami-Dade Public Library  Search this
Cano, Pablo  Search this
Extent:
45 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1998 April 22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Margarita Cano conducted 1998 April 22, by Juan A. Martínez, in Cano's home, Miami, Florida, for the Archives of American Art.
Cano recounts her interest in art, which developed after graduating as a science major at the University of Havana; arriving in Miami around 1962, where she found work at the main Public Library of Dade County, instituting an arts program focusing on the work of African American and Cuban American artists, which included building a permanent collection of local artists' work and arranging exhibitions; her work on the board of the Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture, including organizing the pivotal exhibition "The Miami Generation: Nine Cuban American Artists" in 1983; her own art, mostly painting on wood using a miniature style and reflecting mostly Cuban scenes; her son Pablo Cano, a successful artist; and her views on her Cuban background and her North American cultural identity.
Biographical / Historical:
Margarita Cano (1932-) is a painter, librarian, and curator in Miami, Florida. Born in Havana, Cuba.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound cassette. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 55 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators. Funding for this interview provided by the Smithsonian Institution's Latino Pool Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Artists -- Cuba  Search this
Topic:
Artists -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Curators -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Expatriate artists -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Cuban American artists -- Interviews  Search this
Cuban American art -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Hispanic American art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.cano98
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cano98

Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers

Creator:
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Names:
Carlson, John F., 1874-1945  Search this
Cramer, Florence Ballin, 1884-1962  Search this
Davidson, Florence Lucius, d. 1962  Search this
Davidson, Jo, 1883-1952  Search this
Frankl, Walter  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Howard, Lila  Search this
Johnson, Grace Mott, 1882-1967  Search this
Kuhn, Vera, d. 1961  Search this
Lockwood, Ward  Search this
Luhan, Mabel Dodge, 1879-1962  Search this
McFee, Henry Lee, 1886-1953  Search this
Riley, Mary G., 1883-1939  Search this
Simonson, Lee, 1888-  Search this
Sterling, Lindsey, 1876-1931  Search this
Wright, Alice Morgan, 1881-1975  Search this
Extent:
8.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Poetry
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Date:
1833-1980
bulk 1900-1980
Summary:
The papers of painter Andrew Dasburg and his wife and sculptor Grace Mott Johnson date from 1833 to 1980 (bulk 1900 to 1980), and measure 8.8 linear feet. The collection documents each artist's career and personal lives, including their brief marriage and their friendships with many notable artists in the New Mexico and New York art colonies during the early twentieth century. The papers of Dasburg (6 linear feet) and Johnson (2.8 linear feet) include biographical materials; extensive correspondence with family, friends, and fellow artists, such as John F. Carlson, Mabel Dodge Luhan, Marsden Hartley, Henry Lee McFee, and Ward Lockwood; writings by Dasburg, Johnson, and others; scattered legal, financial, and business records; clippings; exhibition materials; numerous photographs of Johnson and Dasburg, friends, family, and artwork; and original artwork, including two sketchbooks by Johnson.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of painter Andrew Dasburg and sculptor Grace Mott Johnson date from 1833 to 1980, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1900 to 1980, and measure 8.8 linear feet. The collection is divided into the papers of Andrew Dasburg (6 linear feet) and the papers of Grace Mott Johnson (2.8 linear feet), and documents each artist's career and personal lives, including their brief marriage, and friendships with many notable artists in New Mexico and New York art colonies during the early twentieth century. Found are scattered biographical, legal, and financial materials. Extensive correspondence (particularly in Dasburg's papers) is with family, friends, and fellow artists, such as John F. Carlson, Florence Ballin Cramer, Mabel Dodge Luhan, Marsden Hartley, Henry Lee McFee, Vera Spier Kuhn, and Ward Lockwood. Dasburg's papers also include letters to Johnson and his two later wives.

Johnson's correspondence is also with numerous artist friends and others, including John F. and Margaret Carlson, Florence Ballin Cramer, Jo Davidson, Florence Lucius, Walter Frankl, Lila Wheelock Howard, Henry Lee McFee, Mary Riley, Lee Simonson, Lindsey Morris Sterling, Alice Morgan Wright, Mabel Dodge Luhan, and Vera Spier Kuhn. Letters to her son Alfred are quite detailed and revealing. Writings are by Dasburg, Johnson, and others. Johnson's writings include a very brief diary and her poetry. Writings by others are about the Taos and New Mexico art communities. Printed materials about both artists include clippings and exhibition catalogs. There are numerous photographs of Dasburg and Johnson, individually and together, and with friends and family. Of note are a group photograph of Birge Harrison's art class in Woodstock, New York, which includes Johnson and Dasburg, and a photograph of Dasburg with friends Konrad Cramer and John Reed. Dasburg's papers also include snapshots of Florence Lucius, Konrad and Florence Ballin Cramer, Frieda and D. H. Lawrence, and Mabel Dodge Luhan. Original artwork by the two artists include two sketchbooks by Johnson and three prints and two drawings by Dasburg.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 2 series of each artist's papers:

Series 1: Andrew Dasburg Papers, circa 1900-1980 (Box 1-7; 6.0 linear feet)

Series 2: Grace Mott Johnson Papers, 1833-1963 (Box 7-10; 2.8 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Andrew Michael Dasburg (1887-1979) was born in Paris, France, to German parents. After his father died and when he was five, Dasburg and his mother moved to New York City. In 1902 Dasburg started attending classes at the Art Students' League and studied with Kenyon Cox and Frank Du Mond. He also took night classes with Robert Henri. In 1907 he received a scholarship to the Art Students' League summer school in Woodstock, New York and spent three summers studying there in Birge Harrison's painting class. While in school he became friends with many young artists, including Morgan Russell and his future wife, Grace Mott Johnson.

Grace Mott Johnson (1882-1967) was born in New York City. She began drawing when she was four years old, and when the family moved to a farm in 1900 she enjoyed sketching horses and other farm animals. At the age of 22 she left home to study at the Art Students' League with sculptors Gutzon Borglum and James Earle Fraser, and also attended Birge Harrison's painting class in Woodstock. Throughout her career she would sculpt animals from memory, and would often attend circuses and farms for inspiration.

In 1909 Johnson and Dasburg went to Paris and joined the modernist circle of artists living there, including Morgan Russell, Jo Davidson, and Arthur Lee. During a trip to London that same year they were married. Johnson returned to the United States early the next year, but Dasburg stayed in Paris where he met Henri Matisse, Gertrude and Leo Stein, and became influenced by the paintings of Cezanne and Cubism. He returned to Woodstock, New York in August and he and Johnson became active members of the artist community. In 1911 their son Alfred was born. Both Dasburg and Johnson showed several works at the legendary Armory Show in 1913, and Dasburg also showed at the MacDowell Club in New York City, where he met the journalist and activist John Reed who later introduced him to Mabel Dodge (Luhan), a wealthy art patron and lifelong friend. In 1914 Dasburg met Alfred Stieglitz and became part of his avant-garde circle. Using what he had seen in Paris, Dasburg became one of the earliest American cubist artists, and also experimented with abstraction in his paintings.

Dasburg and Johnson lived apart for most of their marriage. By 1917 they had separated and Dasburg began teaching painting in Woodstock and in New York City. In 1918 he was invited to Taos, New Mexico by Mabel Dodge, and returning in 1919, Johnson joined him there for a period of time. Also in 1919, Dasburg was one of the founding members of the Woodstock Artists Association with John F. Carlson, Frank Swift Chase, Carl Eric Lindin, and Henry Lee McFee. In 1922 Dasburg and Johnson divorced, and also at that time he began living most of the year in Santa Fe with Ida Rauh, spending the rest of the year in Woodstock and New York City. Dasburg became an active member of the Santa Fe and the Taos art colonies, befriending many artists and writers living in these communities, and remaining close friends with Mabel Dodge Luhan. Here he moved away from abstraction, and used the southwestern landscape as the inspiration for his paintings.

In 1928 he married Nancy Lane. When that marriage ended in 1932, he moved permanently to Taos, and with his third wife, Marina Wister, built a home and studio there. Dasburg periodically taught art privately and at the University of New Mexico. In 1937 he was diagnosed with Addison's disease, which left him unable to paint again until 1946. In 1945 he and his wife Marina separated. Dasburg was recognized for his career as an artist in a circulating retrospective organized by the American Federation of Arts in 1959. He also had retrospectives in Taos in 1966 and 1978. His artwork influence several generations of artists, especially in the southwest, and he continued creating art until his death in 1979 at the age of 92.

Grace Mott Johnson lived in the Johnson family home in Yonkers, New York during the 1920s and later moved to Pleasantville, New York. In 1924 she went to Egypt to study ancient Egyptian sculpture. During the 1930s she became a civil rights activist. She produced very little art during the last twenty years of her life.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are two oral history interviews with Andrew Dasburg, July 2, 1964 and March 6, 1974. Additional related collections at other repositories include the Andrew and Marina Wister Dasburg Papers at the New Mexico State Archives, the Andrew Dasburg Papers at Syracuse University Library, and the Grace Mott Johnson Papers at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming. Reel 2803 contains photocopies of ten Morgan Russell letters to Dasburg. Reels 4276-4278 include biographical material, subject files, photographs, correspondence, writings, and exhibition material. The photocopies on reel 2803 were discarded after microfilming, and the items on 4276-4278 were returned to the lender. This material is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers were donated by their son, Alfred Dasburg, in 1980. Syracuse Univresity lent materials for microfilming in 1978 and 1989.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Artist colonies -- New York (State)  Search this
Artist colonies -- New Mexico  Search this
Painters -- New Mexico  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State)  Search this
Painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Poetry
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers, 1833-1980 (bulk 1900-1980). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.dasbandr
See more items in:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-dasbandr
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Online Media:

Correspondence with Grace Mott Johnson

Collection Creator:
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 27
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1910 February-March 1
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers, 1833-1980 (bulk 1900-1980). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers / Series 1: Andrew Dasburg Papers / 1.2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-dasbandr-ref770
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Correspondence with Grace Mott Johnson

Collection Creator:
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 29
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1910 April
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers, 1833-1980 (bulk 1900-1980). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers / Series 1: Andrew Dasburg Papers / 1.2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-dasbandr-ref772
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Correspondence with Grace Mott Johnson

Collection Creator:
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 35
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1910 December
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers, 1833-1980 (bulk 1900-1980). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers / Series 1: Andrew Dasburg Papers / 1.2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-dasbandr-ref778
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Oral history interview with Patti Warashina

Interviewee:
Warashina, Patti, 1940-  Search this
Interviewer:
Jeck, Doug, 1963-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
42 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2005 September 8
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Patti Warashina conducted 2005 September 8, by Doug Jeck, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artist's home and studio, in Seattle, Washington.
Warashina discusses her childhood in Spokane, Washington, as the youngest of three children of Japanese immigrants; her first experience with art, which was working on murals in elementary school; getting through school by doing visual art projects, including one on fashion design for a French class; her great-grandmother who sold pottery and rice off a cart in her native Japan; her working processes and moving from high-fire to low-fire glazes, as well as dealing with color and decoration in her work; making increasingly larger pieces and thus discovering more surfaces on which to paint; learning how to make hand-built pieces, and in general learning how to control her material; spending her early years working in a vacuum because she was busy raising a family during the day and working in the studio all night; the influence of Surrealism, the Funk movement, and the Chicago Hairy Who on her work; her love of clay as a medium because it presents challenges and technical variables that keep the work interesting; the status of clay as a valid artistic material, and how that has changed over the course of art history; her own personal definition of art as something that "raises your blood pressure," and what makes a "a good pot into a work of art instead of just a pot"; the difference between her early and later work, which she calls cumulative process; her move to the figure, which came naturally out of her earlier work and was in keeping with the Surrealist images to which she was so attracted; recent series of her work, including Mile Post Queens, and Sake Sets: The Drunken Power Series; the role of the figure in her work and the unique challenges they present; being a self-proclaimed "news junkie" and listening to jazz while she works; spending 30 years teaching and the influence it had on her career; her mother as a strong influence and role model in her life, as well as her mother's interest in crafts and gardening; and the influence of artists such as Hieronymous Bosch, René Magritte and Joan Miró on her work. Warashina recalls Robert Sperry, Fred Bauer, Peter Voulkos, Robert Arneson, Toshiko Takaezu, Henry Takemoto, Garth Clark, Howard Cotler, Matthew Kangas, Warren McKenzie, Nan McKinnell, Bernard Leach, Shoji Hamada, Soetsu Yanagi, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Patti Warashina (1940-) is a ceramist from Spokane, Washington. Doug Jeck (1963-) is a ceramist from Seattle, Washington.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 5 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 54 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Ceramicists -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Pottery -- Technique  Search this
Japanese American women -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Women artists -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.warash05
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-warash05

Patti Warashina papers

Creator:
Warashina, Patti, 1940-  Search this
Names:
Lee Nordness Galleries  Search this
Currier, Anne, 1950-  Search this
Kottler, Howard, 1930-1989  Search this
Lipofsky, Marvin, 1938-2016  Search this
Lucero, Michael, 1953-  Search this
Sperry, Robert, 1927-1998  Search this
Extent:
4.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-1991
bulk 1970-1989
Summary:
The papers of ceramicist and sculptor Patti Warashina (b. 1940) date from circa 1900 and 1957 through 1991, bulk 1970-1989. The collection consists of 4.8 linear feet of correspondence and printed material reflecting the many ceramic and craft exhibitions and other projects Warashina participated in throughout the United States, and her associations with other ceramicists. Also included are biographical documents, writings, art works, several photographs, and a video.
Scope and Content Note:
The Patti Warashina papers measure 4.8 linear feet and date from circa 1900 and 1957 through 1991 (bulk 1970-1989). The collection documents the artistic and teaching career of Seattle-based sculptor and ceramicist Patti Warashina predominantly through correspondence and printed material reflecting the many ceramic and craft exhibitions and other projects Warashina participated in throughout the United States, and her associations with other ceramicists. Also included are biographical documents, writings, art works, several photographs, and a video.

Biographical material includes family trees, diplomas, awards, and documents relating to Warashina's family Japanese internment during WWII. Correspondence, 1968-1991, relating to exhibitions and other projects, is with galleries, museums, purchasers, publishers, and others, among them the Lee Nordness Gallery (N.Y.), Morgan Gallery (Kansas City), and Theo Portney Gallery (Seattle). Additional correspondence files contain letters received, 1977-1990, many addressed to Warashina and her husband Bob (Robert Sperry), from friends, colleagues, former students and family members, including Nancy Carmen, Anne Currier, Deborah Horrell, Matthew Kangas, Howard Kottler, Marvin Lipofsky, Michael Lucero, and others.

Ten photographs, circa 1900-1944, are portraits of Warashina's relatives and family, and several snapshots, circa 1970s, are of former students and works of art. Printed material, 1961-1990, includes newspaper and magazine clippings, programs, journals, newsletters, exhibition announcements, exhibition catalogs, and workshop announcements for Warashina's various sculpture and ceramic lectures. Writings include both published and unpublished works by Warashina, including an artist's statement for a possible lecture at the 1986 conference of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA). Also found here are handwritten notes on a panel discussion titled Cultural and Racial Heritage: Sources and Imagery in which Warashina was a participant along with artists Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson, María Brito Avellana, and Indira Johnson. Art work consists of blue line drawings for her sculpture "Red Earth," 1986 as well as a pen and ink sketch of Warashina by an unidentified artist. A videocassette, 1987, is of the television program "The Big A: Different Ways of Seeing", in which Warashina appears briefly.
Arrangement:
The Patti Warashina papers are arranged as seven series based primarily on type of material. The correspondence in Series 2 is arranged chronologically for exhibitions and projects and general letters received. Additional letters received are arranged by name of author.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1974-1991, undated (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1957, 1967-1991, undated (Boxes 1-3; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 3: Photographs, circa 1900- circa 1959, 1971, undated (Box 3; 3 folders)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1961-1990, undated (Boxes 3-6, OV 7; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Writings and Notes, 1984, 1986, 1989, undated (Box 6; 4 folders)

Series 6: Artwork, 1986, undated (Box 6; 2 folders)

Series 7: Miscellany, 1987, undated (Box 6; 2 folders)
Biographical Note:
Ceramicist and sculptor Patti Warashina was born in 1940 as Masae Patricia Warashina in Spokane, Washington to third generation Japanese emigrants. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Washington, Seattle, where she studied with sculptors Robert Sperry, Harold Myers, Rudy Autio, Shoji Hamada, Shinsaku Hamada, and Ruth Penington. She received her first solo exhibition in 1962 at the Phoenix Art Gallery in Seattle the same year she graduated with an M.F.A. from the University of Washington. Warashina later married fellow student Fred Bauer and from 1964 to 1970 exhibited as Patti Bauer.

Influences in Warashina's art include California funk and sculptural ceramics. Her work is best known for its whimsical themes expressed through low-fire highly colored figurative images. Together with fellow artists Robert Sperry, Howard Kottler and Fred Bauer, she brought national recognition to the department of ceramics at the University of Washington's School of Art beginning in the 1980s.

Patti Warashina is a recipient of several awards for achievements in the field of crafts, most recently the Twining Humber Award granted by Seattle's Artists Trust in 2002. She received the Governor's Award of Special Commendation for the Arts in 1980 in addition to grants from the National Endowment for the Arts in both 1975 and 1986. In 1978, Warashina was awarded a World Craft Council Travel Grant which allowed her to conduct research on the ceramic arts process in Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, Bali and the Philippines. Warashina's teaching career spans over 30 years and includes positions at the University of Wisconsin, Eastern Michigan University, and at her alma mater where she has taught for over 25 years. Her work is featured in several museum collections in both the U.S. and abroad including the American Craft Museum in New York, the Seattle Art Museum and Henry Art Gallery, the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Renwick Gallery (Washington, DC), the Art Gallery of Western Australia, and the Ichon World Ceramic Center in Korea. Since her marriage to ceramicist Robert Sperry in 1976, she has used Patti Warashina as her professional name. Patti Warashina is a resident of Seattle, Washington.
Provenance:
The Patti Warashina papers were donated by the artist to the Archives of American Art in 1991.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Patti Warashina papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Women sculptors -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Women artists -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Ceramicists -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Sculptors -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Japanese American families -- Photographs  Search this
Japanese American sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Patti Warashina papers, circa 1990-1991, bulk 1970-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.warapatt
See more items in:
Patti Warashina papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-warapatt
Online Media:

Eleanor Dickinson papers

Creator:
Dickinson, Eleanor, 1931-  Search this
Names:
Artists Equity Association  Search this
Bay Area Visual Arts Coalition  Search this
California College of Arts and Crafts -- Faculty  Search this
California Lawyers for the Arts  Search this
College Art Association of America  Search this
Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco. Graphic Arts Council  Search this
San Francisco Art Institute  Search this
Extent:
29 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Video recordings
Date:
1951-2011
Scope and Contents:
The Eleanor Dickinson papers measure 29.0 linear feet and date from 1951-2011. Included are biographical material, personal and professional correspondence, legal and financial records, notes, writings by Dickinson and others, art work, teaching files, photographs, printed material, and audio visual material relating to organizations Dickinson was involved in, her exhibitions, and her teaching career.
Organizations include California College of Arts and Crafts, San Francisco Art Institute, Artists Equity Association, California Lawyers for the Arts, Bay Area Visual Arts Coalition, Graphic Arts Council, College Art Association, and Women's Caucus for Art, and among others.
Biographical / Historical:
Eleanor Dickinson (1931-2017) was a painter, graphic, video artist and instructor in San Francisco, Calif. Dickinson taught at the California College of Arts and Crafts.
Provenance:
Donated 1979-2005 by Eleanor Dickinson and in 2017 by the Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson Charitable Art Trust. Additions are expected.
Restrictions:
This collection is temporarily closed to researchers due to archival processing. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Art -- Societies, etc. -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Graphic arts -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Video art -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Women artists -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.dickelea
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-dickelea

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