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Sheet with Sketches

Designer:
Giuseppe Bernardino Bison, Italian, 1762 - 1844  Search this
Medium:
Pen and ink, brush and wash on paper
Type:
sculpture
Drawing
Object Name:
Drawing
Made in:
Italy
Date:
1762–1844
Credit Line:
Museum purchase through gift of various donors
Accession Number:
1901-39-583
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1901-39-583

Two Sketches for a Portal

Designer:
Filippo Marchionni, Italian, 1732–1805  Search this
Medium:
Pen and ink, brush and wash on paper
Type:
architecture
Drawing
Object Name:
Drawing
Made in:
Italy
Date:
1750–75
Credit Line:
Museum purchase through gift of various donors
Accession Number:
1901-39-683
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1901-39-683

Garden house for the Maison di Frascati

Architect:
Giuseppe Barberi, Italian, 1746–1809  Search this
Medium:
Pen and brown ink, brush and gray wash
Type:
architecture
Drawing
Object Name:
Drawing
Made in:
Italy
Credit Line:
Museum purchase through gift of various donors and from Eleanor G. Hewitt Fund
Accession Number:
1938-88-2589
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1938-88-2589

Miracle of the Book that Would Not Burn

Medium:
Pen and ink, brush and sepia, gray wash, white heightening on cream paper
Type:
figures
Drawing
Object Name:
Drawing
Made in:
Italy
Date:
1700–1750
Credit Line:
Gift of Hugh Cassel
Accession Number:
1958-143-45
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1958-143-45

Design for a Stained Glass Window: Grammatica

Artist:
Hans Kaspar Lang the Elder, Swiss, 1571 – 1645  Search this
Medium:
Pen and brown ink, brown wash
Type:
glasswares
Drawing
Object Name:
Drawing
Date:
1606
Credit Line:
Purchased for the Museum by the Advisory Council
Accession Number:
1911-28-129
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1911-28-129

Horae Beatea Mariae Virginies, secundum usum Romanae Curiae / Holy Hours of the Virgin Mary, according to the Ritual of the Roman Curie

Medium:
pen and ink, brush and washes, gold on parchment. Bound in red cover of Morocco leather
Type:
miniatures
illuminated manuscript
Object Name:
illuminated manuscript
Made in:
Flanders
Tourraine, France
Date:
1470–80
Accession Number:
1962-12-1
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1962-12-1

Oral history interview with Margaret Tomkins, 1984 June 6

Interviewee:
Tomkins, Margaret, 1916-2002  Search this
Interviewer:
Guenther, Bruce  Search this
Subject:
Fitzgerald, James  Search this
Artists Gallery (Seattle, Wash.)  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Women artists -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Artists -- Northwestern States -- Interviews  Search this
Art, Modern -- Northwestern States  Search this
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Art, American -- Northwestern States  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12308
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212455
AAA_collcode_tomkin84
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212455
Online Media:

Untitled, (painting)

Painter:
Conner, Charles 1852-1905  Search this
Medium:
Watercolor and ink wash on paper
Type:
Paintings
Owner/Location:
Smithsonian American Art Museum 6th & G Streets, N.W Washington District of Columbia 20560 Accession Number: 1981.176
Date:
1887
Topic:
Landscape  Search this
Figure male--Full length  Search this
Recreation--Sport & Play--Hunting  Search this
Control number:
IAP 08586011
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_ari_476517

Subterranean Fish Named 'Gollum' Belongs to a New Family

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Fri, 23 Oct 2020 16:12:29 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_e7830c4456325996ec30d6b867aa3f0f

Design for a Tapestry: Allegory of Africa

Artist:
Gérard Audran, Flemish, active in France, 1640–1703  Search this
Medium:
Brush and brown ink, black wash, white gouache,over black chalk on laid paper. Framing lines in pen and black ink.
Type:
textile designs
drawing
Object Name:
drawing
Made in:
France
Date:
1660-1680
Credit Line:
Purchased for the Museum by the Advisory Council
Accession Number:
1911-28-409
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kq4e1d69d0d-e68f-4df4-b004-e5dfc95df2d2
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1911-28-409
Online Media:

A Sepulchral monument of Henry Cardinal York (1725-1807) and Charles Edward Stuart, the “Young Pretender” (1720-1788)

Artist:
Unknown  Search this
Medium:
Pencil, pen and ink, brush and wash, Chinese ink
Object Name:
Drawing
Type:
Drawing
Made in:
Italy and France
Date:
1788–1793
Credit Line:
Museum purchase through gift of various donors
Accession Number:
1901-39-2509
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kq4ef401c3a-53ce-4647-bd05-dbce23f36729
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1901-39-2509

Takatori ware tea bowl, replica of "Yamanoha"

Medium:
Stoneware with teadust glaze over iron wash
Dimensions:
H x Diam: 6.6 × 13.6 cm (2 5/8 × 5 3/8 in)
Style:
Takatori ware
Type:
Ceramic
Vessel
Origin:
Higashi Sarayama kiln, Fukuoka, Fukuoka prefecture, Japan
Date:
18th-19th century
Period:
Edo period
Topic:
Takatori ware  Search this
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
tea  Search this
Japan  Search this
stoneware  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number:
F1901.175
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye3b80ec1f3-f513-4f43-b2b5-2ba13e6900c9
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1901.175
Online Media:

MS 948 Kwakiutl texts with interlinear translations

Collector:
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Extent:
414 Pages
Culture:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1897
Scope and Contents:
Manuscript in black ink with red ink, blue and black pencil changes in unidentified handwriting.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 948
Local Note:
autograph manuscript document
Topic:
Kwakiutl language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Kwakiutl (Kwakwaka'wakw)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 948, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS948
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms948
6 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View MS 948 Kwakiutl texts with interlinear translations digital asset number 1
  • View MS 948 Kwakiutl texts with interlinear translations digital asset number 2
  • View MS 948 Kwakiutl texts with interlinear translations digital asset number 3
  • View MS 948 Kwakiutl texts with interlinear translations digital asset number 4
  • View MS 948 Kwakiutl texts with interlinear translations digital asset number 5
  • View MS 948 Kwakiutl texts with interlinear translations digital asset number 6
Online Media:

MS 2241-a Letters and fiscal papers in Cherokee syllabary

Creator:
Ino:li, -1885  Search this
Collector:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Annotator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Extent:
325 Pages
Culture:
Cherokee  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1848-1881
Scope and Contents:
Usually with brief description of contents added in hand of James Mooney. Described by Pilling, Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 6, 1888, page 185, as follows: "Manuscript, consisting of original letters in the Cherokee alphabet, written by or to Inali (Black-fox) during a period of thirty years. They cover a wide range of subjects connected with the daily life and official interests of the Cherokees. Many of the letters were written to friends at home by Cherokees in the Confederate service during the late war, and contain accounts of operations in east Tennessee. There are also muster-rolls of the Cherokee troops, memoranda of issues of clothing, Sunday-school rolls.
Also includes "List of names," September 28, 1852, 3 pages, added July 1970 because it resembles this material. It was not included on the microfilm.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2241-a
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2241-a, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2241A
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2241a
Online Media:

MS 4419 Copy and Fragment of John Colton Sumner Journal

Creator:
Sumner, John Colton  Search this
Stanton, Robert Brewster, 1846-1922  Search this
Addressee:
Holmes, William Henry, 1846-1933  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Journals (accounts)
Date:
1869
Scope and Contents:
August 17-27 [1869]. 3 pages. Found in J. W. Powell's 1869 journal (Manuscript 1795a). Written in pencil on 3 torn-out leaves similar to those in the notebooks used by Powell for his journal. Believed to be a fragment of Sumner's original notes. July 5- August 31, 1869. 22 leaves and pages. Typed copy made from handwritten copy believed to have been made by Sumner from his original notes. Stanton, Robert Brewster to William H. Holmes, Washington, D. C. New York City, March 23, 1907. 1 page Typed letter signed. Acknowledges receipt of copy of Sumner's journal, which he recognises as being in Sumner's hand and signed by him. [No previous correspondence in Smithsonian Institution files, June, 1954.]
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4419
Genre/Form:
Journals (accounts)
Citation:
Manuscript 4419, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4419
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4419
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View MS 4419 Copy and Fragment of John Colton Sumner Journal digital asset number 1
Online Media:

MS 3226 Keetoowah Constitution

Creator:
Fullerton, Eula E.  Search this
Extent:
16 Pages
Culture:
Cherokee  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Biographical / Historical:
Constitution of Keetoowah segment, sometimes called the "nighthawks" or Redbird Smith Movement (elsewhere written up by R. K. Thomas, M. A. Thesis, University of Arizona, and in a paper by him in Cherokee-Iroquois symposium, American Anthropological Association, Wash., D.C., November 1958, publication in Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 180, 1961 - Information from Raymond Fogelson, University of Pennsylvania.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3226
Citation:
Manuscript 3226, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3226
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3226

Grover Sanders Krantz papers

Creator:
Krantz, Grover S.  Search this
Extent:
7.38 Linear feet (14 manuscript boxes, 1 oversize box, 1 manuscript folder, 47 floppy disks, and 9 audio cassettes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1904-2001
bulk 1955-2001
Summary:
Grover Sanders Krantz was a professor of physical anthropology at Washington State University and was considered a leading authority in hominoid evolution and primate bone structure, specializing in the reconstruction and casting of hominid fossils. Materials include articles, bibliographies, card files, clippings, correspondence, diplomas, computer disks, legal documents, manuscripts, maps, notebooks, notes, programs, school records, sketches, telegrams, transparencies and typescripts.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the personal papers of Dr. Grover S. Krantz and documents his research in physical anthropology as well as his 30-year teaching career. The collection also contains materials on Krantz's activities in the field of cryptozoology, especially his investigations of Sasquatch. Materials include his writings, correspondence, notes, sketches, newspaper clippings, sound recordings, photographs, and electronic records. Some materials in the collection are written in code and noospel, a phonetic spelling system he had developed.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 9 series: (1) Correspondence, 1964, 1974-2001; (2) Writings, 1955-2001; (3) Research, 1959-2001; (4) Professional Activities, 1958-2001; (5) Sasquatch, 1963-2001; (6) Teaching, 1957-2001; (7) Biographical and Personal Files, 1904-1911, 1931, 1952-2002; (8) Sound Recordings, 1988-1997, undated; (9) Electronic Records, 1987-2001
Biographical Note:
Grover Sanders Krantz was born on November 5, 1931, to Swedish immigrants in Salt Lake City, Utah, and spent his childhood in Salt Lake City and Rockford, Illinois. His undergraduate studies began at the University of Utah in 1949 but were postponed in 1951 by 18 months of service in the United States Air Force. After being honorably discharged, Krantz attended the University of California, Berkeley, and earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in Anthropology. In 1970, he earned his doctorate in physical anthropology from the University of Minnesota.

From 1968-1998, Krantz served as a professor of physical anthropology at Washington State University in Pullman, Washington. He was considered a leading authority in hominoid evolution and an expert on primate bone structure, specializing in the reconstruction and casting of hominid fossils. Among his numerous publications are the books Climatic Races and Descent Groups, The Process of Human Evolution, and Geographical Development of European Languages. Publicly known for his interest in cryptozoology, Krantz was one of the first established researchers to pursue the question of Bigfoot, or Sasquatch, from a scientific approach. Other research interests included the origin of language and speech, sex identification of skeletons, and early human immigration into America.

After a battle with pancreatic cancer, Krantz passed away on February 14, 2002. At his request, his remains were sent to the University of Tennessee's Anthropology Research Facility, where scientists performed skeletal research of great forensic value. His bones were processed and sent to the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History to be used in an educational capacity. In 2010, Grover Krantz's skeleton and that of his Irish Wolfhound Clyde were mounted in the museum's exhibit, "Written in Bone: Forensic Files of the 17th-Century Chesapeake."

Sources Consulted

"Dr. Grover Krantz." Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. Accessed September 30, 2011. http://anthropology.si.edu/writteninbone/grover_krantz.html

"Grover S. Krantz, 70, Port Angeles, Wash." Lewiston Morning Tribune (Lewiston, ID), February 16, 2002.

Krantz, Grover. "Curriculum Vitae."

Ruane, Michael E. "Natural History Museum Grants Professor's Dying Wish: A Display of his Skeleton." Washington Post, August 11, 2012. Accessed April 12, 2012. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/04/10/AR2009041003357.html.

"Sasquatch expert Grover Krantz dies at age 70." Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), February 19, 2002.

Chronology

1931 -- Born November 5 in Salt Lake City, Utah, to Carl Victor Emmanuel Krantz and Esther Maria (Sanders) Krantz

1949 -- Begins undergraduate studies at University of Utah

1951-1952 -- Serves in the United States Air Force at Clovis, New Mexico, as a desert survival instructor

1953 -- Marries Patricia Howland Transfers from University of Utah to University of California, Berkeley

1955 -- Receives B.A. in Anthropology from UC Berkeley

1958 -- Receives M.A. in Anthropology from UC Berkeley

1959 -- Marries Joan Brandson

1960-1966 -- Works as Museum Technician, R.H. Lowie Museum of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

1964 -- Marries Evelyn Einstein

1966-1968 -- Works as Visiting Lecturer, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

1968 -- Begins work as Assistant Professor in the Anthropology Department, Washington State University

1971 -- Receives Ph.D. in Anthropology from University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, with the publication of his dissertation "The Origin of Man"

1972 -- Promoted to Associate Professor in the Anthropology Department, Washington State University

1973 -- Starts serving on Editorial Board, Northwest Anthropological Research Notes

1979 -- Starts serving on Editorial Board, Evolutionary Theory

1982 -- Serves as founding member and member of the Board of Directors for the International Society of Cryptozoology (ISC) Marries Diane Horton

1984 -- Due to high scores on the Miller Analogy Test, is accepted into Intertel, an organization that accepts only individuals who have scored at or above the 99th percentile on a standardized IQ test

1987 -- Appears in well-publicized creationism vs. evolution debate with Duane Gish, Washington State University

1988 -- Organizes and chairs Early Man symposium at the American Anthropological Association meeting in D.C.

1994 -- Offered Full Professor title within the Anthropology Department, Washington State University

1998 -- Publishes Only a Dog, a story about the relationship between Krantz and his first Irish Wolfhound Clyde Retires from Washington State University

1999 -- Appears in the documentary "Sasquatch Odyssey"

2002 -- Dies February 14 of pancreatic cancer His remains are processed at the University of Tennessee's Anthropology Research Facility His bones and bones of his Irish Wolfhounds are donated to the Smithsonian Institution for educational purposes

2010-2013 -- His mounted bones and bones of his Irish Wolfhound, Clyde, appear in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History exhibit "Written in Bone: Forensic Files of the 17th-Century Chesapeake"
Separated Materials:
Film and video, including copies of the Patterson-Gimlin film, have been transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA accession 2003-04).

Grover S. Krantz's specimens were donated to the National Museum of Natural History's Physical Anthropology Collections.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Grover Krantz's wife Diane Horton and his brother Victor Krantz, a former Smithsonian photographer.
Restrictions:
Materials that include student grades are restricted until 2081. Nude photographs of Grover were restricted until 2017. Electronic records are restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Grover Sanders Krantz papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Physical anthropology  Search this
Sasquatch  Search this
Human evolution  Search this
Fossil hominids  Search this
Primates  Search this
Citation:
Grover Sanders Krantz papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2003-21
See more items in:
Grover Sanders Krantz papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2003-21

Solomon Adler Papers

Creator:
Adler, Solomon, 1901-1989  Search this
Extent:
4.5 Cubic feet (5 boxes, 1 oversize folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Printed material
Sketches
Photographs
Notes
Legal records
Drawings
Correspondence
Date:
1916-1980
bulk 1950-1966
Summary:
The papers document independent inventor Solomon Adler's work with sewing machine technology through correspondence, photographs, notes, drawings, sketches, patents, litigation records, and printed materials. The collection provides insight into both an independent inventor's process of invention and Japanese work culture during the post-World War II period.
Scope and Contents:
The papers include correspondence, photographs, notes, drawings, sketches, patents, litigation records, and printed materials, primarily documenting Adler's work with sewing machine technology. The papers provide insight into an independent inventor's process of invention and Japanese work culture during the post-World War II period.

Series 1, Personal Materials, 1920s-1950s and undated consists primarily of high school chemistry and biology notes, business cards, photographs, speeches, and writings of Sol Adler. The photographs contain one black-and-white portrait of Adler, November 1958, and two negatives of him from the nineteen teens; and one scanned copy of a photograph, circa the 1920s of Sol Adler with his children, R. Michael and Diane Zoe Adler. There is a small booklet, Agreement between Manufacturers Machine and Tool Co., Inc., and Amalgamated Machine and Instrument Local No. 475 from 1941. Adler worked for Manufacturers Machine and Tool Co., Inc.

Series 2, Inventions, is divided into two subseries: Subseries 1, Other, 1919-1980 and undated, and Subseries 2, Sewing Machines, 1938-1962 and undated. Arranged chronologically, both subseries highlight Adler's inventive work. While the primary focus of Adler's invention work was on sewing machines, his interests were broad.

Subseries 2.1, Other Inventions, 1919-1980 and undated, contains documentation in the form of drawings and sketches, photographs, correspondence, and patents. Overall, the documentation is uneven. The inventions include a dividing head (a specialized tool that allows a workpiece to be easily and precisely rotated to preset angles or circular divisions); decorative window treatment; telescoping umbrella; can opener; question/answer machine; correlating device; radio station recording device; receptacle tap; fountain pen; television projection device; combined ash tray and cigarette holder; automatic machine gun; juice blender; thermonuclear idea; apparatus for producing pile fabric; an extensible, retractable and concealable table; and textile machinery.

Only some of Adler's inventions were patented. However, many of his ideas were well documented through drawings or descriptive text. In some instances prototypes were built.

The question and answer machine, 1939, was approximately three feet by four feet and was powered by a battery, the device was intended for educational use by children and adults. It used interchangeable answer cards on a broad range of subjects and informed the user of a correct and wrong answer by lights and a buzzer.

The correlating device, 1942, was designed for automobile use, and it combined driving directions and maps on a roll of paper data mounted on the dashboard. Although patented (US Patent 2,282,843), the device was never manufactured.

The radio station recording device, 1939, was a device to maintain a record of radio stations tuned on a radio receiver during a twenty-four hour period using recording disks.

The receptacle tap (Siphon-It), 1939, was patented (US Patent 2,184,263). The Siphon-It was designed to fit any size bottle, can, or the like containing fluids without removing the bottle cap. The "tap" punctured the bottle cap and was then turned like a screw several times. It allowed the contents under pressure to not lose carbonation and be poured easily.

The combined ash tray and cigarette holder and lighter, 1951, was Adler's only design patent (US Patent Des. 163,984). Purely ornamental, the tray would light and hold a cigarette.

The automatic machine gun, 1952, was conceived of by Adler and his son R. Michael Adler. The drawings and accompanying narrative text detail a method for cooling the gun through the use of an automatically operated gas turbine centrifugal air compressor and a gun of simple design with few parts and capable of an extremely high rate of fire. Adler submitted his drawings and text to the United States Army Ordance Department at the Pentagon, but it was not manufactured.

Adler's thermonuclear fusion proposal, a technical paper written in 1960, was never realized. The paper, titled "Attempt to Utilize the Concentrated Magnetic Field Around a Pinched Plasma Column as the Focal Point for Particle Acceleration," details through text and schematics Adler's ideas about a thermonuclear reactor. Additionally, there is correspondence, journal articles, newspaper articles, and a notebook with notes from other publications and some loose drawings related to thermonuclear issues.

An apparatus for producing pile fabric (US Patent 3,309,252), was patented in 1967. The intention of the apparatus was to create a method for producing carpets and rugs in a fast, practical, and inexpensive way.

Adler's work with non-woven textiles and fabrics (see US Patent 3,250,655) is well documented through correspondence, drawings, notes, fabric samples, and photographs. Adler founded the Adler Process Corporation in the 1960s as a research and development organization specializing in the development of products for domestic and industrial uses. The corporation also built machinery for the commercial production of the products which included pile fabric (such as carpeting), non-woven fabrics, and leather-like material. A prospectus details the "Adler Process."

Method and apparatus for production of pile carpeting and the like (US Patent 3,424,632, 3,592,374, and 3,655,490)

Subseries 2.2, Sewing machines, 1938-1962 and undated, consists primarily of documentation about the development of the Pacesetter sewing machine and its predecessors through correspondence, drawings and sketches, photographs, guide manuals, and promotional materials. Adler constructed skeletal aluminum models to better understand the functions and internal mechanisms of sewing machines. Between 1940 and 1948, he designed and constructed a sewing machine prototype, which he called his "Parent Machine." The Parent Machine would become known as the Pacesetter. Seven patents were awarded for the novel mechanisms contained within this prototype (US Patent 2,561,643), the most notable being for a compact sewing machine that could expand to a full-sized machine. Additional sewing machine inventions include the needleless sewing machine; a zig-zag sewing machine, and an attachment for a zig-zag sewing machine (US Patent 3,016,030).

While working as an engineer for the Brother International Corporation in Japan in the early 1950s, Adler developed the Pacesetter sewing machine. This portable machine was designed to meet the rapidly growing popularity of multiple decorative and embroidery patterns. A selector dial, which Adler called the "Wishing Dial," controlled sixteen internal cams, multiple cam selectors and followers to automatically sew thirty different basic decorative stitch patterns. Since the Pacesetter could sew both zigzag and straight stitches, varying the width and length of the basic patterns made it possible to create thousands of decorative variations. Adler introduced the Pacesetter sewing machine at the Independent Sewing Machine Dealers Show in New York, July 18, 1955.

Series 3: Brother International Corporation, 1954-1959 and undated

Started in 1908 by Kanekichi Yasui, the Yasui Sewing Machine Company manufactured and repaired sewing machines. The company was later renamed Yasui Brother Sewing Machine Company by Masayoshi Yasui, the eldest of Kanekichi's ten children, who inherited the company. The new name reflected the involvement and spirit of cooperation of other "brothers" in the Yasui family.

In 1934, the Yasui brothers liquidated the Yasui Brother Sewing Machine Company and created the Nippon Sewing Machine Company in Nagoya, Japan. Nippon emerged in response to a Japanese sewing machine market dominated by imported products, and it began mass producing industrial sewing machines. In 1941, Brother Sales, Ltd. was established as a sales outlet for the Japanese market, and in 1954 Brother International Corporation (BIC) was created as an exporting company with offices established in New York City. The company actively promoted exporting in advance of other Japanese companies.

Adler joined BIC in 1954 as a consultant for their product design and development work. This work was previously done in-house by design and engineering staff, so Adler, an American, was charting new territory. The materials in this series consist of corporate histories, and annual report, correspondence, product literature, conference materials, and notebooks maintained by Adler. The latter constitutes the bulk of the material along with the correspondence.

The "conference" materials document a meeting Adler attended, presumably in Japan in 1957. The file contains detailed notes about product marketing and production factors. A flow chart for "product coordinating factors" outlines the motivations, idea sources, management control, and execution of an idea generally.

The correspondence, 1954-1958, consists of letters and inter-company communications (memorandum), patents and drawings between Sol Adler, Max Hugel and the legal firm of, Kane, Dalsmier and Kane of New York. The correspondence relates almost exclusively to patenting matters, especially by Adler and legal matters involving Singer Sewing Manufacturing Company alleging that Brother International infringed on certain Singer-owned patents.

The notebooks of Solomon Adler, approximately 1951-1958, consists primarily of materials documenting Adler's work in Japan on sewing machines. The materials were assembled by Adler and titled "notebook." Some of the materials are three hole punched (indicating they may have been in a three-ring notebook) and are both handwritten and typescript. Also included are chronologies of his work; translations of Japanese words into English; drawings in pencil on tracing paper; sketches in pencil on scrap paper and letterhead; detailed notes about mechanisms and methods of sewing machine operation; business cards; comparative data for sewing machines; and correspondence.

Of note is the "digest" or chronology of events from 1958 to 1959 maintained by Adler to detail the alleged patent infringement of BIC on Singer Sewing machine patents. The digest also notes the value, author of a document, to whom it was sent, date, and a brief description. Adler created a ranking system for his digest, assigning different values, very important, urgent, important, and general. He also compiled a chart of competitor sewing machines by brand name. Many of the Japanese documents--patents and drawings--bear Adler's "chop" or rubber stamp with Japanese characters for his surname.

The Litigation Materials, 1952-1961 and undated, consists of documents (numbered exhibits) assembled by Adler for use in litigation against Brother International Corporation (BIC). The exhibits were used as documentary evidence in court, and the materials are primarily typescript notes and correspondence, newspaper clippings, articles, technical drawings by Adler, patents, photographs and some product literature detailing aspects of the BIC sewing machines.

In 1958, Singer Sewing Machine Company filed a lawsuit against Nippon Sewing Machine Company for patent infringement by BIC's Pacesetter and Select-O-Matic sewing machines. Adler, on behalf of Nippon, conducted extensive patent research into the allegations, working with BIC attorneys in New York as well as creating new sewing machine designs to overcome Singer's claims. In 1959, Singer filed another lawsuit alleging that Nippon was violating United States customs laws by shipping automatic zigzag sewing machines to the United States, which were alleged to infringe on Singer patents. Correspondence related to this patent infringement can be found in Series 3: Brother International Corporation.

Adler returned to the United States in April of 1959 as the representative for Nippon and the Japanese sewing machine industry to help prepare the case and act as a consultant. BIC and Singer representatives appeared before the United States Tariff Commission (USTC). Adler officially testified on behalf of BIC, explaining the three angle cam structure difference between the Singer #401 sewing machine and imported Japanese sewing machines. Adler's testimony was successful, and with patent problems resolved, Adler resigned from BIC in July of 1959 and commenced a long negotiation with the company for financial compensation for his invention work.

Series 5, Publications, 1953-1967, consists of select issues of theNew Japan Sewing Machine News, which followed developments in the Japanese sewing machine industry and other publications featuring articles and brief pieces about sewing machines in general.

References

(http://welcome.brother.com/hk-en/about-us/history.html last accessed on March 24, 2011)
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into four series.

Series 1: Personal Materials, 1920-1950s and undated

Series 2: Inventions, 1938-1980

Subseries 1: Other, 1938-1980

Subseries 2: Sewing, 1938-1962 and undated

Series 3: Brother International Corporation, 1952-1961

Series 4: Publications, 1953-1967
Biographical / Historical:
Solomon "Sol" Adler is probably best known for his sewing machine inventions, but his portfolio of work also includes ideas and patents for a fountain pen, a window treatment, a receptacle tap, a telescoping umbrella, an ashtray, a retractable table, and jewelry designs. Adler wrote fiction as well (mostly short stories) that reflected his experiences during the early 1900s in New York City. He filled pages with themes on social protest, radicalism, mobs, unions, poverty, and sweatshop operators. In 1958 Adler wrote about theories of nuclear physics, noting, "Indeed a very bold attempt and definitely a long way from sewing machines." Adler's flow of ideas was constant, and he sought to express them constantly.

Sol Adler was born on July 8, 1901, [Russian?] on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, one of Isaac and Mindel Adler's five children. Isaac was a tailor, so sewing machines were part of Sol's life from the beginning. As a young man, Adler apprenticed in machine shops, honing his skills until he became an expert machinist and toolmaker; these skills eventually allowed him to build the machines he visualized. Adler's design drawings show his precision as a draftsman and engineer (he attended the City College of New York) and provide good insight into the drawing abilities that he later used in preparing patent drawings. Adler also enjoyed metalworking. His home workshop boasted a geared lathe, tilling head machine, drill press, bench grinder, and an assorted hand tools.

Adler's work on sewing machines began in the late 1930s with tinkering with his sister-in-law Bess's treadle-operated Singer machine. Bess wanted a lightweight, motorized sewing machine that had enough space between the frame and the needle for large projects such as quilts. Using his own basement machine shop, Adler began building simple frameworks for sewing machines to understand better the relationships between the parts and their functions. Adler's first sewing machine (which he dubbed the "parent machine") earned U.S. Patent 2,561,643, issued in 1951. The machine was a full-size home machine, with a concealed motor and power cord that could also expand into a commercial-size machine. Six subsequent patents for subassemblies were derived from the "parent machine" over the next several years.

During the Second World War, Adler worked for Manufacturing Methods Technology (MM&T) as a development engineer and experimental machine shop supervisor.

Analyzing the evolving U.S. domestic sewing machine market gave Adler ideas for further inventions, refining the machines and adding new features. Unfortunately, success was elusive; his machine with zigzag and straight-stitch capability was rejected by several U.S. and European sewing machine manufacturers. But in 1954, Adler met Max Hugel, president of the Asiatic Commerce Corporation of New York, later known as Brother International Corporation (BIC), a subsidiary of the Nippon Company. Nippon wanted to solve certain design and operational problems it was having in developing a zigzag sewing machine for sale in the United States. Adler joined BIC, moved to Japan, and succeeded in helping correct the design issues. Adler named the machine the "Select-O-Matic" because by turning a few knobs, an operator could select one of the six patterns that the machine produced.

Adler stayed with BIC until 1959, and worked on a variety of sewing machines, including an automatic zigzag machine and the versatile "Pacesetter," which was unveiled in the United States to great acclaim at the Sewing Machine Show in New York City on July 18, 1955 (a version of the Pacesetter is still sold by Brother). Additionally, he worked on a line of industrial and domestic sewing machines, home washing machines, home knitting machines, and other small appliances. Adler earned several Japanese patents for his work.

Among Adler's writings is a pronouncement of his passion for invention: "When an idea is conceived by an inventor, it never leaves him in peace, it possesses him day and night until it is expressed, after which he enjoys a sense of relief and accomplishment."

Adler married Fay (neé Kagan) in 1928. They had two children, Ralph Michael Adler and Diane Zoe Adler. Adler died on May 31, 1989 at the age of 88.

Issued United States Patents:

Receptacle tap (2,184,263)

Correlating device (2,284,843)

Sewing machine (2,561,643)

Sewing machine feed (2,473,934)

Bobbin winder for sewing machine (2,455,638)

Extension leaf for sewing machines (2,464,838)

Sewing machine feed (2,473,934)

Threading device (2,516,171)

Sewing machine pressure bar (2,554,970)

Sewing machine needle bar operating mechanism (2,554,971)

Sewing machine (2,561,643)

Sewing machine (2,709,978)

Attachment for zigzag sewing machines (3,016,030)

Sewing machine (3,053,207) assigned to Nippon Sewing Machine Manufacturing Company

Sewing machine (3,055,325) assigned to Nippon Sewing Machine Manufacturing Company

Method and apparatus for making non-woven fabric (3,236,711)assigned to Adler Process Corporation

Method for producing non-woven fabric (3,250,655)

Method and apparatus for producing pile fabric (3,309,252) assigned to Adler Process Corporation

Method and apparatus for production of pile fabric and the like (3,424,632) assigned to Adler Process Corporation

Combined ashtray, cigarette holder and lighter (Des. 163,984)
Separated Materials:
The Division of Home and Community Life holds artifacts related to this collection, including several sewing machine prototypes, the Siphon-It and the combination ashtray, lighter and cigarette holder. See Accession numbers: 2009.0118 and 2009.0114.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by R. Michael Adler and Diane Zoe Adler, September, 2009. Additonal materials were donated by R. Michael Adler in 2012.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Sewing machines  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Printed material
Sketches
Photographs -- 20th century
Notes
Legal records
Drawings -- 20th century
Correspondence
Citation:
Solomon Adler Papers, dates, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1157
See more items in:
Solomon Adler Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1157
Online Media:

[Charles Francis Hall's Diary]

Author:
Hall, Charles Francis, 1821-1871  Search this
Collection Creator:
Field, Cyrus  Search this
Hall, Charles Francis, 1821-1871  Search this
Franklin, John, 1786-1847  Search this
Royal Geographic Society.  Search this
Everett, Edward, 1794-1865  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Ink on paper, 14.0" x 8.5".)
Container:
Box 1, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Diaries
Place:
Arctic regions -- Discovery and exploration
Date:
circa 1860
undated
Scope and Contents:
Journal with preparations for Charles Francis Hall's first expedition.
Local Numbers:
AC0702-0000019
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Explorers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries -- 19th century
Collection Citation:
Charles Francis Hall Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Charles Francis Hall Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0702-ref11
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General store ledger

Collection Creator:
Stone, William Dickinson, 1836-1908  Search this
Collection Donor:
Perdue, Crispin  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1865-1867
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
William D. Stone General Store Ledger Book, 1865-1867, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
William D. Stone General Store Ledger Book and Papers
William D. Stone General Store Ledger Book and Papers / Series 1: William D. Stone General Store Ledger Book and Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-1358-ref20
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  • View General store ledger digital asset number 1
  • View General store ledger digital asset number 2
  • View General store ledger digital asset number 3
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  • View General store ledger digital asset number 9
  • View General store ledger digital asset number 10

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