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Oral history interview with Flora Mace

Interviewee:
Mace, Flora, 1949-  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
4-H Youth Development Program (U.S.)  Search this
Contemporary Glass Gallery  Search this
International Farm Youth Exchange  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Pilchuck Glass Center (Stanwood, Wash.)  Search this
Plymouth State College -- Students  Search this
University of Illinois. -- Student  Search this
University of Utah  Search this
Wheaton Glass Village  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Chihuly, Dale, 1941-  Search this
Handler, Audrey  Search this
Kirkpatrick, Joey  Search this
Moore, Ben  Search this
Morris, William, 1957-  Search this
Stankard, Paul, 1943-  Search this
Wheaton, Frank  Search this
Wheaton, Mary  Search this
Extent:
3 Items (sound discs (3 hrs., 25 min.) Audio, digital)
58 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Norway -- description and travel
Date:
2005 August 17-18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Flora Mace conducted 2005 August 17-18, by Lloyd E. Herman, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artist's home and studio, which she shares with Joey Kirkpatrick, in Seattle, Washington.
Ms. Mace discusses growing up in New Hampshire, in a house that her family had lived in for generations; various family businesses, including clam-shucking; how her mother suffered from depression throughout her childhood; her grandparents, who played a large role in her upbringing; joining the 4-H and becoming a skilled shepherd; her family's hunting, fishing, and gathering, on which they survived during her childhood; the various art projects she did with her mother and grandmother, including making wreaths for friends and relatives; building tree houses out of scrap wood; trapping animals and making their pelts into clothes for her dolls; saving up her money from after school jobs and the 4-H competitions to buy tools; getting a scholarship from her grandmother's old employer to go to college; attending Plymouth State; her involvement in college athletics, including field hockey, skiing, and softball; early artistic influences, especially Alexander Calder; traveling to Norway on the International Farm Youth Exchange; attending the University of Illinois for graduate school and being their sculpture technician; attending a summer workshop at the University of Utah with Dale Chihuly; being invited by Chihuly to go to Pilchuck Glass School to continue her work; becoming an artist-in-residence at Wheaton Glass Village; having her first show at the Contemporary Glass Gallery (later the Heller Gallery) in New York; the growth of the studio glass movement in the late 1970s; and finally going to Pilchuck Glass School for the first time in 1979, where she met Joey Kirkpatrick. The continuation of Mace's story, and her lifelong collaboration with Kirkpatrick, is discussed in a joint interview of Kirkpatrick and Mace. Mace also recalls Bill Morris, Ben Moore, Audrey Handler, Paul Stankard, Mary and Frank Wheaton, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Flora Mace (1949- ) is a glass artist from Seattle, Washington. Lloyd E. Herman (1936- ) is a curator and former director of the Smithsonian's American Art Museum's Renwick Gallery and currently lives in Seattle, Washington.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hrs., 25 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Depression in women  Search this
Glass artists -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.mace05a
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mace05a

Reuben Tam papers

Creator:
Tam, Reuben  Search this
Names:
Alan Gallery (Charles Alan)  Search this
Brooklyn Museum of Art  Search this
Coe Kerr Gallery  Search this
Downtown Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation  Search this
Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture  Search this
Andrews, Dorothy, 1918-2008  Search this
Kienbusch, William, 1914-1980  Search this
Nesjar, Carl, 1920-  Search this
Solomon, Hyde, 1911-  Search this
Extent:
9.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Sound recordings
Poems
Drafts (documents)
Photographs
Prints
Diaries
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Drawings
Date:
1931-2006
Summary:
The papers of landscape painter and educator Reuben Tam measure 9.2 linear feet and date from 1931 to 2006. The papers document his career as a painter in New York, Maine, and Hawaii through biographical material; correspondence with family, friends, art organizations, schools, and galleries; diaries, poetry, and other writings; exhibition catalogs, news clippings, other printed material; photographs; artwork, including seventeen sketchbooks; and eight scrapbooks.

There is a 1.1 linear foot unprocessed addition to the collection donated in 2020 that includes 34 sketchbooks, circa 1940-1974, by Tam from his time in New York, Hawaii, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Oregon, Alaska and Canada.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of landscape painter and educator Reuben Tam measure 9.2 linear feet and date from 1931 to 2006. The papers document his career as a painter in New York, Maine, and Hawaii through biographical material; correspondence with family, friends, art organizations, schools, and galleries; diaries, poetry, and other writings; exhibition catalogs, news clippings, other printed material; photographs; artwork, including seventeen sketchbooks; and eight scrapbooks. There is a 1.1 linear foot unprocessed addition to the collection donated in 2020 that includes 34 sketchbooks, circa 1940-1974, by Tam from his time in New York, Hawaii, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Oregon, Alaska and Canada.

Biographical material includes school documents, records of his tenure as an instructor at the Brooklyn Museum of Art School, artwork consignment and sales records, and slides and accompanying audio cassette recording of the "Reuben Tam Show" about his work as an artist on Monhegan Island, Maine.

Correspondence is with family, fellow artists, including William Kienbusch and Hyde Solomon, as well as art organizations, schools, and museums, such as Brooklyn Museum of Art School, Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Maine Coast Artists group, and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Also found is correspondence with the three galleries which represented his work: Downtown Gallery, Alan Gallery, and Coe Kerr Gallery.

The collection includes five bound diaries as well as diary entries written by Reuben Tam on loose sheets of paper, primarily documenting the 1940s. Other writings include drafts of poetry, one notebook, miscellaneous notes, and essays by others.

Printed material consists of school publications, exhibition catalogs and announcements for solo and group shows, brochures, flyers, magazines, bulletins, and news clippings. Eight scrapbooks found in this collection also include newspaper clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, as well as event invitations, membership cards, and letters, documenting 40 years of Reuben Tam's career.

Photographs are of Reuben Tam, Tam with friends and family, and artwork. One photograph album contains photographs from Tam's visits to Maine from 1946 to 1948, and includes photographs of fellow artists Hyde Solomon, Carl Nesjar, Dorothy Andrews, and William Kienbusch. Artwork in the collection includes prints, drawings, and watercolors as well as seventeen large sketchbooks documenting the coastal landscape of Monhegan Island, Maine.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1934-1993 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1931-2006 (Box 1-4; 3.5 linear feet)

Series 3: Diaries, 1932-1974 (Box 4-5; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1939-1987 (Box 5; 7 folders)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1935-1997 (Box 5-6, 9; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1930-1990 (Box 6-7, 9; 1.0 linear foot)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1936-1975 (Box 7, 9-10, OV 11; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1938-1978 (Box 7-8; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 9: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1940-1974 (Box 12, OV13; 1.1 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Reuben Tam (1916-1991) was a landscape painter and educator in New York, Maine, and Hawaii. Tam was born in Kapaa, Hawaii, in 1916. He received a degree in education in 1937 from the University of Hawaii and was briefly a public school teacher before attending graduate courses at the California School of Fine Arts. In 1941 he moved to New York and took courses in art history and philosophy at the New School for Social Research and Columbia University. Tam became affiliated with the Downtown Gallery in 1945 and was a prolific exhibitor in national and regional shows, winning critical praise as an abstract landscape painter. In 1948 he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and first exhibited in the National Academy's annual exhibition in 1947.

Tam was an instructor at the Brooklyn Museum of Art School from 1946 to 1974. While there he taught advanced studies in painting and was chairman of the graduate painting department. He also served as a visiting professor at Oregon State University, Haystack, and Queens College, CUNY.

Beginning in 1948, Tam and his wife, Geraldine, spent summers at their home and studio on Monhegan Island, Maine. Tam's work was deeply influenced by coastal landscapes both in Maine and in his native Hawaii. In 1981 he and his wife moved back to Kapaa, Hawaii, where he continued to paint and exhibit his new works until his death in 1991.
Related Materials:
Reuben Tam papers, 1958-1966, are also located at Syracuse University.
Provenance:
Scrapbooks were lent for microfilming in 1970 by Reuben Tam and were subsequently donated in 2009 along with additional papers by Geraldine King Tam, Reuben Tam's widow. 34 additional sketchbooks were donated in 2020 by the Geraldine King Tam Trust, via Cindy King, trustee and niece of Geraldine King Tam.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Reuben Tam papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painters -- Maine  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- Hawaii  Search this
Educators -- Maine  Search this
Educators -- New York (State)  Search this
Painters -- Hawaii  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Sound recordings
Poems
Drafts (documents)
Photographs
Prints
Diaries
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Drawings
Citation:
Reuben Tam papers, 1931-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.tamreub
See more items in:
Reuben Tam papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tamreub
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Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers

Creator:
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Krasner, Lee, 1908-1984  Search this
Names:
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Martha Jackson Gallery  Search this
Benton, Thomas Hart, 1889-1975  Search this
Brooks, James, 1906-1992  Search this
Burkhardt, Rudy  Search this
Cavaliere, Barbara  Search this
Davis, Bill  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-  Search this
Dehner, Dorothy, 1901-1994  Search this
Eames, Ray  Search this
Forge, Andrew  Search this
Friedman, B. H. (Bernard Harper), 1926-  Search this
Glaser, Jane R.  Search this
Gray, Cleve  Search this
Greenberg, Clement, 1909-1994  Search this
Gruen, John  Search this
Holmes, Doloris  Search this
Isaacs, Reginald R., 1911-  Search this
Janis, Sidney, 1896-  Search this
Johnson, Philip, 1906-2005  Search this
Kadish, Reuben, 1913-1992  Search this
Maddox, Charles  Search this
Matter, Mercedes  Search this
McCoy, Sanford, Mrs.  Search this
Miller, Daniel  Search this
Miller, Robert, 1932 Apr. 17-  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Namuth, Hans  Search this
Ossorio, Alfonso, 1916-1990  Search this
Pollock, Charles C.  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956 -- Photographs  Search this
Rose, Barbara  Search this
Rouche, Burton  Search this
Smith, Tony, 1912-  Search this
Still, Clyfford, 1904-  Search this
Valliere, James  Search this
Wasserman, Tamara E.  Search this
Wright, William  Search this
Zogbaum, Wilfrid, 1915-1965  Search this
Extent:
16.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion pictures (visual works)
Video recordings
Photographs
Interviews
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Date:
circa 1914-1984
bulk 1942-1984
Summary:
The papers of abstract expressionist painters Jackson Pollock and wife Lee Krasner measure 16.1 linear feet and date from circa 1914 to 1984, with the bulk of the material dating from 1942 to 1984. The collection documents their personal and professional lives, as well as the legacy of Jackson Pollock's work after his death. Found are biographical material, correspondence, writings by Krasner and others, research material, business and financial records, printed material, scrapbooks, artwork by others, photographs, interview transcripts, audio and video recordings, and motion picture film.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of abstract expressionist painters Jackson Pollock and wife Lee Krasner measure 16.1 linear feet and date from circa 1914 to 1984, with the bulk of the material dating from 1942 to 1984. The collection documents their personal and professional lives, as well as the legacy of Jackson Pollock's work after his death. Found are biographical material, correspondence, writings by Krasner and others, research material, business and financial records, printed material, scrapbooks, artwork by others, photographs, interview transcripts, audio and video recordings, and motion picture film.

The collection is divided into two series, the first of which focuses on Pollock and includes his scattered papers dating from circa 1914 to his death in 1956, as well as Krasner's papers dating from his death to 1984 about managing Pollock's legacy. This series includes biographical materials, including transcripts and audio recordings of an interview with William Wright in 1949; Pollock's and Krasner's correspondence with Thomas Hart Benton, Betty Parsons Gallery, Bill Davis, B. H. Friedman, Reginald Isaacs, Sidney Janis, Violet De Lazlo, Martha Jackson Gallery, Alfonso Ossorio, Tony Smith, and Clyfford Still, and with one another; Krasner's correspondence concerning Pollock's estate and artwork after his death; numerous writings about Pollock, including an original draft of Bryan Robertson's biography and an essay by Clement Greenberg.

James Valliere extensive research files on Pollock for a never-published biography were given to Krasner and filed in Series 1. These include scattered correspondence with Lee Krasner, and Pollock's family and friends, including Charles Pollock, Thomas Hart Benton, and Robert Motherwell. There are also transcripts of interviews Valliere conducted with Pollock's friends and colleagues, including James Brooks, Dorothy Dehner, Clement Greenberg, Reuben Kadish, Lee Krasner, Charles Maddox, Mrs. Sanford McCoy, Daniel T. Miller, Robert Miller, and Tony Smith. The original audio reels and duplicates exist for many and are filed here. Additional interviews were conducted with Willem de Kooning, Alfonso Ossorio, and Burton Rouche, but not transcribed - these are filed in Series 1.10, Audio Recordings and Motion Picture Film.

Also found in Series 1 are scattered business records documenting Krasner's handling of Pollock's estate and legacy; printed materials relating to Pollock, including published biographies, exhibition catalogs, and clippings; two scrapbooks; and a sketchbook by an unidentified artist. Numerous photographs of Pollock include childhood and family photographs, photographs of Pollock in his studio by Hans Namuth, Rudy Burckhardt, and Herbert Matter, photographs of Pollock with Lee Krasner, and exhibition photographs. Audio recordings and motion film in Series 1 include a 1964 16mm film about Pollock (VHS copies are available) and reel-to-reel recordings of untranscribed interviews of Pollock's friends and colleagues by James Valliere, including interviews with Willem de Kooning and Alfonso Ossorio. Additional transcribed interviews are filed in subseries 1.4.

Lee Krasner's papers documenting her own career are arranged in Series 2 and date from 1927-1984. Biographical materials include resumes and awards, school documents, family documentation, and exhibition lists. Her correspondence with artist friends and art colleagues is extensive and includes many letters from artists such as Philip Johnson, Ray Eames, Cleve Gray, and Hans Namuth. She also maintained correspondence with many art historians and critics, curators, gallery owners, collectors, arts-related and social organizations, admirers, and family members.

There are thirteen transcripts of interviews with Krasner by Bruce Glaser, Barbara Cavaliere, Andrew Forge, Emily Wasserman, Barbara Rose, and others. The original audio recordings for these transcripts are filed in series 2.10, along with other audio recordings for which there are no transcripts, including interviews by John Gruen, Delores Holmes, Mercedes Matter, the Martha Dean Radio Show, NBC Today Show, and WQXR radio. There are also audio recordings of Krasner's lectures in series 2.10.

Krasner's papers also include writings and reminiscences by Krasner; writings about Krasner; printed materials such as exhibition catalogs and clippings; and one scrapbook containing clippings and photographs. Numerous photographs are of Krasner, including portrait photographs taken by Hans Namuth; of Krasner with Jackson Pollock and family and friends, and of her exhibitions and artwork.

Users should note that Pollock's and Krasner's papers contain similar types of material that often overlap in subject matter, especially among the correspondence and photographs.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 2 series:

Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock, circa 1914-1984 (Box 1-7, 16, OV 18, FC 19-22; 7.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Lee Krasner papers, circa 1927-1984 (Box 7-15, 17; 8.6 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Jackson Pollock was born in 1912, in Cody, Wyoming, the youngest of five sons. His family moved several times during his childhood, finally settling in Los Angeles. In 1930 he joined his older brother, Charles, in New York City, and studied with Regionalist painter Thomas Hart Benton at the Art Students League of New York. Pollock worked during the 1930s for the Works Progress Administration's Federal Art Project. During 1936 he worked in artist David Alfaro Siqueiros's Experimental Workshop. In 1938 he began psychiatric treatment for alcoholism, and his artwork was greatly influenced by Jungian analysis and the exploration of unconscious symbolism.

In 1943 Pollock had his first one-man exhibition at Peggy Guggenheim's New York gallery, Art of this Century, and continued to exhibit there over the next several years. A major turning point in Pollock's life and art was in 1945 when he married fellow artist Lee Krasner and moved to East Hampton, Long Island. There he developed his mature painting style, and became famous for his abstract pouring technique on large canvases. The height of his creativity spanned from 1947 to 1952, and his work was promoted by art critic Clement Greenberg. Along with other abstract expressionists including Hans Hofmann, Alfonso Ossorio, and Barnett Newman, he joined the Betty Parsons Gallery in 1947. He had his most successful one-man show in 1950 which was widely publicized and praised. This exhibition, combined with a 1949 feature article in LIFE magazine, made Pollock an American celebrity.

In 1952 Pollock moved his work to Sidney Janis Gallery and returned to earlier motifs in a search for new breakthroughs. The last few years of his life he suffered from mental and physical health problems, and in August, 1956 he died in a car accident. His wife, Lee Krasner, oversaw his estate and worked with many museums, including the Museum of Modern Art, on Pollock retrospective exhibitions.

Lee Krasner was born Lenore Krassner in 1908 in Brooklyn, New York to Russian immigrant parents. In 1926 she was admitted to the Women's Art School of The Cooper Union, and in 1928 she attended the Art Students League. After graduating from The Cooper Union in 1929, she attended the National Academy of Design until 1932. After briefly attending City College and Greenwich House, she worked for the Public Works of Art Project and the Temporary Emergency Relief Administration, and finally became an assistant in 1935 on the WPA Federal Art Project, Mural Division. From 1937 to 1940 she studied at the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts and began exhibiting with the American Abstract Artists group.

In 1942 Krasner met Pollock as they were both preparing to exhibit work in the same show. Although they married and she became immersed in his career, she continued to exhibit her own work with other abstract artists and from 1946 to 1949 worked on the Little Image painting series. In 1953 she began working on collages, a medium she would come back to again later in her career. After Pollock's death her work was greatly influence by her sadness and anger, creating a visible evolution of her style.

For the rest of her career, Krasner consistently exhibited her work in both group and solo exhibitions. She had her first retrospective at Whitechapel Gallery, London, in 1965, and in 1966, she joined Marlborough Gallery, New York which represented Pollock's work as well. In the 1970s and early 1980s Krasner won many awards for her achievement in the visual arts, including the Augustus St. Gaudens Medal and the Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. She returned to the medium of collage, and in 1976 joined the Pace Gallery, New York. In 1981 she joined the Robert Miller Gallery, New York. Lee Krasner continued creating art until her death in 1984.
Related Material:
Found in the Archives of American Art are the Charles Pollock Papers, 1902-1990, which includes correspondence, photographs, and other files relating to his brother, Jackson Pollock. Other resources in the Archives are oral history interviews with Lee Krasner, including a series of interviews conducted by Dorothy Seckler between 1964 and 1968, and interviews conducted by Barbara Rose in 1966 and Doloris Holmes in 1972.
Provenance:
The papers of Jackson Pollock were donated in 1983 by Lee Krasner through Eugene V. Thaw shortly before her death. Additional material about Pollock and the papers of Lee Krasner were donated in 1985 by Eugene V. Thaw, executor of Lee Krasner's estate.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Video recordings
Photographs
Interviews
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Citation:
Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, circa 1914-1984. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.polljack
See more items in:
Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-polljack
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Murray Lebwohl correspondence

Creator:
Lebwohl, Murray  Search this
Names:
Breeskin, Adelyn Dohme, 1896-1986  Search this
Cassatt, Mary, 1844-1926  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Extent:
8 Items
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1965-1968
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence, 1965, between Lebwohl and Willem de Kooning regarding de Kooning's painting "The Clam Diggers" purchased by Lebwohl; and, correspondence, 1968, between Lebwohl and Adelyn D. Breeskin concerning Breeskin's research for her catalogue raisonne of the graphic work of Mary Cassatt.
Biographical / Historical:
Paper conservator, collector; Arlington, Va., Washington, D.C.
Provenance:
Donated 2002 by Murray Lebwohl.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.lebwmurr
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lebwmurr

First Gramercy, Cape Cod

Collection Creator:
De Land, Colin, 1955-2003  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 18
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs [31027000764767]
Date:
1994 April-May
Scope and Contents:
Includes photos of Colin de Land shaving, Dennis Balk, Chi Chi, Patterson Beckwith, [Josephus Simpson?], Gramercy International Art Fair, Art Club 2000, Untitled (Sears Portrait Center), 1992. Also includes photo of delivery, likely of Vito Acconci artwork Convertible Clam Structure.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings and born-digital records in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Colin de Land papers, 1968-2008, bulk 1980-2003. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Colin de Land collection
Colin de Land collection / Series 1: Photographic Material / 1.1: Snapshots
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-delacoli-ref100

Emil Carlsen and Carlsen family photographs

Creator:
Carlsen, Emil, 1853-1932  Search this
Names:
Carlsen, Dines  Search this
Carlsen, Luella May  Search this
Extent:
1.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass plate negatives
Copy prints
Photographs
Date:
circa 1885-circa 1930
bulk 1910-1930
Summary:
The photographs of Emil Carlsen and the Carlsen family measure 1.6 linear feet and date from circa 1885 to circa 1930, with the bulk from circa 1910 to circa 1920s. Included in this collection are 169 glass plate negatives, black and white copy prints of all glass plate negatives, and four plastic safety negatives. Some descriptive annotations by Emil Carlsen are included.
Scope and Contents:
The photographs of Emil Carlsen and the Carlsen family measure 1.6 linear feet and date from circa 1885 to circa 1930, with the bulk from circa 1910 to circa 1920s. Included in this collection are 169 glass plate negatives, black and white copy prints of all glass plate negatives, and four plastic safety negatives. Some descriptive annotations by Emil Carlsen are included.

Also included are approximately 54 original glass plate negative sleeves containing contextual and descriptive information about the images penned by Emil Carlsen, which have been kept with their respective copy prints. Within the collection, 29 black and white copy prints and four plastic safety negatives were produced by the Smithsonian Archives of American Art from nitrate negatives no longer with the collection. Photographs include Emil Carlsen and his family, landscapes and animals, buildings and industrial exteriors, and artwork.

One third of the collection is made up of photographs of the artist and his family. Images of Emil Carlsen show the artist at work in his studio, painting outdoors, and enjoying time with his wife, Luella May Carlsen, and his son, Dines Carlsen. Also included are many photographs of Luella May and Dines over the years, alone and together. Additionally, Windham is listed as the town where several photographs of a very young Dines and Luella May were taken. The location of the rest of the photographs, when provided, is Port Washington.

Over half of the glass plate negatives depict landscapes, mostly of trees and various interiors and exteriors of the woods of Port Washington, New York. Landscape photographs also depict cornfields, a meadow, fences and roads, hills and mountains, boats and a marina, horses, and cattle.

Buildings and industrial exteriors contain multiple views of the exteriors of several houses and barns; cityscapes; a sand pit and quarry containing wooden building structures, equipment, and wagons.

Photographs of artwork include images of Emil Carlsen's painted landscapes, still-lifes, a single self-portrait, and two seascapes.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series. Photographs are arranged by subject. Cross reference numbers have been provided to match copy prints with with their respective glass plate negative originals housed separately in Series 6.

Series 1: Photographs of People, circa 1890s-circa 1920s (31 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Photographs of Buildings and Industrial Exteriors, circa 1885-circa 1930 (7 folders; Box 1)

Series 3: Photographs of Landscapes and Animals, circa 1885-circa 1930 (20 folders; Boxes 1-2)

Series 4: Photographs of Artwork, circa 1885-circa 1930 (18 folders linear feet; Box 2)

Series 5: Miscellaneous Notes, circa 1920s (1 folder; Box 2)

Series 6: Glass Plate Negatives, circa 1885-circa 1930 (1 linear foot; Boxes 3-4)
Biographical / Historical:
Painter Emil Carlsen (1853-1932) was born Soren Emil Carlsen in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1853. He studied architecture at the Danish Royal Academy for four years, and also painted alongside cousin and painter Viggo Johansen, one of Denmark's most notable painters. In 1872, he immigrated to the United States where he worked as an architectural assistant and as an assistant for Danish marine painter Laurits Bernhard Holst (1848-1934) in Chicago, Illinois. After studying in Paris for several years, he set up a painting studio in New York and then Boston, then spending two years (1887-1889) as the Director of the San Francisco Arts Association School. In 1891, he moved back to New York and taught at the National Academy of Design until 1918. He spent most of his time with his family at their vacation home in Falls Village, Connecticut when he didn't have teaching commitments in New York, where they also kept an apartment. In 1904, after struggling to become known for his work for many years, he was elected as an associate of the New York National Academy; he won the Shaw Prize from the Society of American Artists; and was awarded the Gold Medal at the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis for his still-life "Blackfish and Clams". Carlsen is best known for his still-life paintings and has been called "The American Chardin." Before purchasing his own property in Falls Village, Carlsen stayed often with friend and painter J. Alden Weir (1852-1919) at his farm, painting landscapes.

After deciding to make a career in painting rather than architectural design, Carlsen spent many years experimenting and finding his style. His paintings during 1872-1874 reflected his time spent assisting Laurits Bernhard Holst, and were in the style of traditional Danish marine paintings. Struggling financially, Holst arranged for Carlsen to receive his studio when Holst moved back to Denmark in 1874. At the recommendation of Chicago sculptor Leonard Wells Volk, Carlsen became an art instructor at the now Chicago Arts Institute, though he left for an opportunity to study classical painting for 6 months in Paris, where he spent time studying the painting of Jean-Baptiste-Simeon Chardin.

After Paris, he moved to a boarding house in New York, and then spent several years in Boston where he had his first exhibit at the Boston Art Club. In 1879 he moved back to New York and set up a studio, supplementing his painting with work as an engraver. During the 1880s Carlsen began becoming known for his still-life paintings, and commission work sent him to Paris again, this time for two years. He was commissioned by T. J. Blakeslee to produce bright flower paintings which were popular at the time, creating about one per month. Other American dealers began wanting his flower paintings as well, but Carlsen soon grew bored and returned to New York, refusing to paint any more flowers for Blakeslee, in 1887. It was during this time that Carlsen developed an interest in still-lifes with Chinese porcelain. His time in Paris also saw a brightening of his landscapes, as was the European style of the time. In the late 1800s he also became interested in painting white objects, such as porcelain, ceramics, garlic cloves, clothing, etc.

He married Luella May Ruby, a young model, in 1896, and his son Dines Carlsen was born in 1901. From 1900-1932, Carlsen favored a subdued color palette in his work. As still-life paintings fell out of vogue, he also painted more landscapes and marines, favoring Falls Village, Connecticut; Windham, Maine; and Port Washington, New York.

He died in New York at the age of 78, in 1932.
Provenance:
The Emil Carlsen and Carlsen family photographs were donated to the Archives of American Art on June 28, 1995, by Elizabeth M. Campanile of Campanile Galleries, Inc., which were purchased from the Dines Carlsen Estate.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.
Rights:
The Emil Carlsen and Carlsen family photographs are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Artists at or with their work  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass plate negatives
Copy prints
Photographs
Citation:
Emil Carlsen and Carlsen family photographs, circa 1885-circa 1930, bulk 1910-1930. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.carlemil
See more items in:
Emil Carlsen and Carlsen family photographs
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carlemil
Online Media:

Karl Knaths' Cape Cod [motion picture] / director and producer, Jack Calderwood; narration, Michael Drury; narrator, Charles Summers

Creator:
Calderwood, Jack  Search this
Names:
Knaths, Karl, 1891-1971  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (film reel (15 min.), sd., col., 16 mm.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Cape Cod (Mass.)
Date:
c1955
Scope and Contents:
Film shows Knaths fishing, clam digging, mixing paints in his studio, and painting. Shots of Knaths' abstract paintings incorporating Cape Cod scenes and themes are interspersed throughout.
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
[United States?]: Docufilms, c1955.
Provenance:
Donated 1985 by Henry J. Du Lawrence III.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Cape Cod  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.caldjack
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-caldjack

Cecilia Beaux papers

Creator:
Beaux, Cecilia, 1855-1942  Search this
Names:
Andrew, A. Piatt (Abram Piatt), 1873-1936  Search this
Extent:
3.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Photographs
Poems
Date:
1863-1968
Summary:
The papers of the painter Cecilia Beaux measure 3.3 linear feet and date from 1863 to 1968. Papers document her education, career and personal life through family and professional correspondence, twelve diaries, lectures, essays, poems, notes, clippings, catalogs, pamphlets, exhibition records, business records, photographs, certificates, diplomas, and artifacts.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of the painter Cecilia Beaux measure 3.3 linear feet and date from 1863 to 1968.

Biographical Materials include autobiographical notes written by Beaux, published biographical essays, and articles about Beaux. A lengthy correspondence from Beaux to her friend A. Piatt Andrew of Massachusetts is found, as well as correspondence with family and professional associates. Lengthy letters from Beaux to her family during trips to Europe contain scattered illustrations. Professional correspondents include other artists, teachers, patrons, critics, curators, dealers, and writers.

Writings include one early diary from the 1870s, and a series of eleven additional diaries dating from 1905 to 1913, which record daily activities related to her artwork and personal life. Numerous lectures and essays from her later career are found, often in multiple drafts, as are manuscripts of published and unpublished poems by Beaux. A single sketch, a study for a portrait, is also found.

A floor plan, lists of paintings, receipts, written bids, and other notes document the exhibition and sale of Beaux's artwork. Printed materials related to her career include exhibition catalogs and other ephemera, a scrapbook of primarily clippings related to her early career, and loose clippings related to her later career. Photographs include formal portraits of Cecilia Beaux and informal photographs of Beaux alone and with colleagues, friends, and family members in various settings including Concarneau, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Gloucester, and Malines, Belgium. Also found is a photograph of John Singer Sargent painting.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 6 series, with multiple subseries in Series 2:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, circa 1893-1943 (Box 1, OV 4-5; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1863-1968 (Boxes 1-2; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1868-1954 (Boxes 2-3, OV 6; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, circa 1883-1936 (Box 3, OV 6; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Materials, circa 1874-1953 (Box 3, OV 6; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1888-1919(Box 3; 0.3 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Cecilia Beaux was born in Philadelphia in 1855. Her mother died just days after her birth, and Beaux and her sister went to live with their grandmother and aunts. Her adoptive family exposed her to fine art throughout her childhood and, once in school, Beaux excelled in her drawing classes and began training in the studio of Catherine A. Drinker, an artist and a cousin of her uncle Will Biddle. From 1881-1883 she attended life classes directed by William Sartain, who traveled to Philadelphia from New York to give criticisms. She also counted the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts master Thomas Eakins among her early influences, though she did not receive direct instruction from him.

Her first major success in painting was a double-portrait of her sister and nephew entitled Les Derniers Jours d'Enfance, exhibited first at the American Art Association, and in 1885 at the Pennsylvania Academy, where it won the Mary Smith Prize, the first of many prizes Beaux received during her lifetime. In 1887, the painting was exhibited at the Paris salon to critical acclaim. Beaux's reputation as a Philadelphia portraitist grew steadily with the execution of several portraits her in Chestnut Street studio, and in 1888 she traveled to Europe to continue her studio education.

In Paris, she joined the Academie Julien, where she received criticisms from Tony Robert Fleury and William Adolph Bougereau. She spent the summer in Concarneau, Brittany, where Alexander Harrison and Charles Lazar critiqued her work, and returned to Paris, where she attended the Academie Colarossi under and sought out private criticisms in the atelier of Benjamin Constant. She copied paintings and classical sculpture at the Louvre, and traveled throughout Europe to view the works of old masters. In England, she painted several portraits of her friends, the Darwins, before returning to Philadelphia in August of 1889. She traveled to Europe several more times in her life, including a trip in 1896 to see six of her paintings exhibited at the Salon de Champs de Mars. At the time this was an unprecedented number of paintings shown there by an American, and their strength earned her a membership in the Societé Nationale des Beaux-Arts.

In the 1890s, Beaux earned a living painting commissioned portraits at her Philadelphia studio, while experimenting with and refining her style and technique with portraits of friends and family such as Sita and Sarita, of her cousin Sarah Leavitt with her cat, The Dreamer, of her friend Caroline Smith, and Ernesta with Nurse, of her niece, who was a favorite sitter of Beaux's throughout her life. Beaux became the first full-time female faculty member at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 1895, and continued teaching there until 1915.

In the late 1890s, Beaux painted several works for which she would be repeatedly honored, including Mother and Daughter, a double-portrait of Mrs. Clement A. Griscom and her daughter Frances, which won four gold medals at international exhibitions, and The Dancing Lesson, a double-portrait of Dorothea and Francesca Gilder, the daughters of Richard Watson Gilder, editor of Century Magazine and himself a devoted friend and supporter of Beaux. The Gilders, and especially Dorothea, were steady companions as well as sitters for Beaux throughout her adult life. In 1901 and 1902, Beaux painted Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt and her daughter Ethel in the White House, and in 1903, she was elected to the National Academy of Design.

By 1905 Beaux was living and working primarily in New York during the winter, and at "Green Alley," a home she built in Gloucester, Massachusetts, in the summer. She was introduced to Gloucester by her friend, the Harvard economist A. Piatt Andrew, and entertained a steady stream of intellectual, literary, and artistic friends such as Isabella Stuart Gardner, William James, and Thornton Oakley. Beaux continued to amass prizes and honors for her artwork, including an honorary doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania in 1908. She had solo exhibitions at Macbeth Gallery in 1910, the Corcoran Gallery in 1912, and M. Knoedler Gallery in 1915 and 1917. She had regular public speaking appearances, published articles, and interviews on such subjects as art education, women in art, and modernist art, the pervasive influence of which she eschewed as a passing fad.

In 1919, she traveled to war-torn Europe as the official portraitist of the United States War Portraits Commission painted the portraits of three European war heroes: Cardinal Mercier, Admiral Beatty, and Georges Clemenceau. In 1924, she broke her hip in Paris, and although she continued to paint, she would never again be the prolific painter of her earlier years due to the injury. She wrote her autobiography Background with Figures in 1930, and in 1935-1936, the American Academy of Arts and Letters held the largest exhibition of her work that was mounted during her lifetime. Beaux died in 1942 in Gloucester, at the age of 87.
Related Material:
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts holds additional papers related to Cecilia Beaux, particularly personal photographs. Portions of these papers were loaned to the Archives of American Art for microfilming in 1985 and were microfilmed on reel 3658.

The Archives of American Art also holds the Dorothea Gilder papers regarding Cecilia Beaux.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reels 3425 and 3658) including a sketchbook and other related papers. Lent materials were returned to the lenders and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Portions of the papers were first lent for microfilming by Harrison Cultra in 1968. The bulk of the collection was donated in1970-1971 by Catherine Drinker Bowen, Beaux's niece, and by Cultra. In 1985, the sketchbook on reel 3425 was lent for microfilming by art dealer Jeffrey Brown with additional material by The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. A palette was donated by Helen Seely Wheelwright, whose former husband, Paul Seeley, was an artist and friend of Beaux. Awards and diplomas were gifted in 1995 by Cecilia Saltonstall, a descendant of Beaux. Material and a poster reproduction of Beaux's portrait of Rear-Admiral Sampson advertising an article in Century Magazine, 1899, was donated in 1991 by Alfred J. Walker, a dealer who organized a Beaux exhibition. He received the material along with artwork he exhibited from the estate of Richard Barker, who had received them from Harrison Cultra. Cultra had inherited them from Beaux's niece, Ernesta Drinker Barlow.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Cecilia Beaux papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Women painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painting  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Photographs
Poems
Citation:
Cecilia Beaux papers, 1863-1968. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.beauceci
See more items in:
Cecilia Beaux papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-beauceci
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Online Media:

Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Meat

Creator:
Warshaw, Isadore, d. 1969  Search this
Extent:
2.35 Cubic feet (consisting of 5 boxes, 1 folder, 1 oversize folder, 3 map case folders, plus digital images of some collection material. )
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Print advertising
Correspondence
Recipes
Advertising mail
Trade cards
Commercial catalogs
Advertising fliers
Mail order catalogs
Advertising cards
Advertising
Illustrations
Printed materials
Business records
Business letters
Trade literature
Trade catalogs
Printed material
Reports
Periodicals
Invoices
Sales catalogs
Receipts
Ephemera
Letterheads
Manuals
Business cards
Sales records
Printed ephemera
Catalogs
Sales letters
Legal documents
Publications
Catalogues
Business ephemera
Date:
1791-1964
bulk 1840-1925
Summary:
A New York bookseller, Warshaw assembled this collection over nearly fifty years. The Warshaw Collection of Business Americana: Accounting and Bookkeeping forms part of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Subseries 1.1: Subject Categories. The Subject Categories subseries is divided into 470 subject categories based on those created by Mr. Warshaw. These subject categories include topical subjects, types or forms of material, people, organizations, historical events, and other categories. An overview to the entire Warshaw collection is available here: Warshaw Collection of Business Americana
Scope and Contents:
The meat category primarily covers beef, pork, and seafood. Material related to seafood, including clams, oysters, fish, and shellfish, is significant. Additional animal protein sources may be present, especially within the recipes. Several professional associations documents and promotional materials are included. For chicken and other fowl, see subject category Poultry.

Materials represent a sampling of transactional records such as bills, invoices and receipts, marketing material, shipping services for goods, butchering, and preparation for consumption.
Arrangement:
Meat is arranged in three subseries.

Business Records and Marketing Material



Genre



Subject
Forms Part Of:
Forms part of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana.

Series 1: Business Ephemera

Series 2: Other Collection Divisions

Series 3: Isadore Warshaw Personal Papers

Series 4: Photographic Reference Material
Provenance:
Meat is a portion of the Business Ephemera Series of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Accession AC0060 purchased from Isadore Warshaw in 1967. Warshaw continued to accumulate similar material until his death, which was donated in 1971 by his widow, Augusta. For a period after acquisition, related materials from other sources (of mixed provenance) were added to the collection so there may be content produced or published after Warshaw's death in 1969. This practice has since ceased.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Some items may be restricted due to fragile condition.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Slaughtering and slaughter-houses  Search this
Livestock  Search this
Food processing plants  Search this
Canning and preserving  Search this
Ranching  Search this
Packing-houses  Search this
Sausages  Search this
Buffalo  Search this
Food industry and trade  Search this
Meat -- Packing  Search this
Seafood  Search this
Food  Search this
Meat industry  Search this
Meat industry and trade  Search this
Sales promotion  Search this
Consumer goods -- Catalogs  Search this
Fisheries -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Fisheries  Search this
Fish and fisheries  Search this
Patents  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Trade associations  Search this
Genre/Form:
Print advertising
Correspondence
Recipes
Advertising mail
Trade cards
Commercial catalogs
Advertising fliers
Mail order catalogs
Advertising cards
Advertising
Illustrations
Printed materials
Business records
Business letters
Trade literature
Trade catalogs
Printed material
Reports
Periodicals
Invoices
Sales catalogs
Receipts
Ephemera
Letterheads
Manuals
Business cards
Sales records
Printed ephemera
Catalogs
Sales letters
Legal documents
Publications
Catalogues
Business ephemera
Citation:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Meat, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0060.S01.01.Meat
See more items in:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Meat
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0060-s01-01-meat
Online Media:

Giant Clam

Creator:
Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2012-01-17T16:04:35Z
Topic:
Natural History;Marine biology  Search this
Youtube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianSMS
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianSMS
Data Source:
Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_dIr35SsDwIU

Oil's Impact on Marine Invertebrates

Creator:
National Museum of Natural History  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2010-08-26T20:38:59Z
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
Youtube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianNMNH
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianNMNH
Data Source:
National Museum of Natural History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_0mZjUOboga0

Giant Clams Debut at the Invertebrate Exhibit

Creator:
National Zoo  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2011-05-03T14:43:00Z
Topic:
Zoology;Animals;Veterinary medicine;Animal health  Search this
Youtube Category:
Pets & Animals  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNZP
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNZP
Data Source:
National Zoo
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Cbsay97RzqY

Dinner Time: Crab vs. Clam

Creator:
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2012-02-02T20:21:52Z
Topic:
Animal health;Environmental Sciences;Coastal ecology  Search this
Youtube Category:
Pets & Animals  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianSERC
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianSERC
Data Source:
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Hv7dDY43WxM

Top Chef Shows How to Cook a Geoduck

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2009-03-03T19:58:49Z
Youtube Category:
People & Blogs  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianMagazine
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianMagazine
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_NgNR-nAlWaw

Oligocottus maculosus

Collector:
Richard T. Myren  Search this
Ocean/Sea/Gulf:
Pacific  Search this
Place:
Big Port Walter, southeast tip of Baranof Island, and on Clam Island., Sitka Borough, Alaska, United States, Pacific
Collection Date:
23 May 1959
Taxonomy:
Animalia, Chordata, Vertebrata, Osteichthyes, Actinopterygii, Neopterygii, Acanthopterygii, Scorpaeniformes, Cottoidei, Cottidae
Published Name:
Oligocottus maculosus
Accession Number:
299522
USNM Number:
208313
See more items in:
Vertebrate Zoology
Fishes
Data Source:
NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Fishes Division
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/34ea1de3e-5160-469c-a36d-c9ee6c3a4382
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhvz_5067860

MS 3692 Among the Clam Shell Mounds and Ancient Camp Sites of Vashon Island

Creator:
Waynick, Lynne C.  Search this
Extent:
37 Pages
1 Photograph
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
February 3, 1938
Scope and Contents:
Also includes Camp Sites and Mounds of Vashon Island (Additional Report). [1938?]
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3692
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Citation:
Manuscript 3692, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3692
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3692

Nature Brain: Could diversity help oysters fight disease?

Creator:
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2020-04-14T12:33:29Z
Topic:
Animal health;Environmental Sciences;Coastal ecology  Search this
Youtube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianSERC
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianSERC
Data Source:
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_YaS78fny16o

Oral history interview with Flora Mace, 2005 August 17-18

Interviewee:
Mace, Flora 1949-  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Subject:
Calder, Alexander 1898-1976  Search this
Chihuly, Dale 1941-  Search this
Handler, Audrey  Search this
Kirkpatrick, Joey  Search this
Moore, Ben  Search this
Morris, William 1957-  Search this
Stankard, Paul 1943-  Search this
Wheaton, Frank  Search this
Wheaton, Mary  Search this
4-H Youth Development Program (U.S.)  Search this
Contemporary Glass Gallery  Search this
International Farm Youth Exchange  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Pilchuck Glass Center (Stanwood, Wash.)  Search this
Plymouth State College Students  Search this
University of Illinois Student  Search this
University of Utah  Search this
Wheaton Glass Village  Search this
Physical description:
Audio: 3 sound discs (3 hrs., 25 min.) : digital
Transcript: 58 pages
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (State)
Seattle
Norway
Date:
2005
2005 August 17-18
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Depression in women  Search this
Glass artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Description and travel  Search this
Local number:
AAA
AAA mace05a
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_255870

Droit Gauche

Designer:
Sheila Hicks, (American, born 1934)  Search this
Medium:
Medium: linen, razor clam shell Technique: plain weave with discontinuous wefts (slit tapestry) with eccentric weft
Type:
woven textiles
Textile
Object Name:
Textile
Made in:
Paris, France
Date:
2003
Credit Line:
Gift of Anonymous Donor
Accession Number:
2006-31-1
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Textiles Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kq409ba6d9f-1da0-4259-a776-ff41ac13869f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_2006-31-1

Bathroom Mat Design: Sea Motif

Office of:
Donald Deskey, (American, 1894–1989)  Search this
Designer:
Donald Deskey, (American, 1894–1989)  Search this
Medium:
Conte crayon and pastel on gray wove paper
Type:
interiors
Drawing
Object Name:
Drawing
Made in:
New York, NY, USA
Date:
1929–31
Credit Line:
Gift of Donald Deskey
Accession Number:
1988-101-1482
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kq41ef22b70-c304-41e0-bfea-13ca048244a7
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1988-101-1482
Online Media:

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