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Oral history interview with Henry Halem

Interviewee:
Halem, Henry  Search this
Interviewer:
Warmus, William, 1953-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Glass Art Society  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
81 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2005 May 14
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Henry Halem conducted 2005 May 14, by William Warmus, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Kent, Ohio.
Halem speaks of his family background and growing up in the Bronx; learning to throw pots; taking art classes as a child; attending the Rhode Island School of Design and studying ceramics; joining the National Guard; his interest in music; working as resident craftsman at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; attending George Washington University; exhibiting at the Renwick Gallery; opening a gallery and studio in Alexandria, Virginia.; transferring to the University of Wisconsin for his graduate degree; and becoming Harvey Littleton's glass studio assistant. Halem also speaks of Harvey Littleton's teaching methods; teaching at Kent State University; learning the glass making process; making goblets and glass castings; making political pieces; selling work to the Corning Museum of Glass; forming the Glass Art Society; the studio glass community; getting color into glass; how the Glass Art Society has changed; his teaching method; exhibiting his artwork; how his technique changed during his career; writing his book, "Glass Notes"; visiting glass studios in Europe; his friendship with artists Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova; influences on his artwork; and working with enamel. Halem also recalls Peter Voulkos, Don Reitz, Fritz Dreisbach, Erwin Eisch, Dominick Labino, Marvin Lipofsky, Mark Peiser, Audrey Handler, Dale Chihuly, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Henry Halem (1938- ) is a glass artist from Kent, Ohio. William Warmus is a writer and curator.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hr., 12 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Glass artists -- Ohio  Search this
Topic:
Glass blowing and working -- Technique  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.halem05
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-halem05

Benjamin March Papers

Creator:
March, Benjamin, 1899-1934  Search this
Names:
March, Benjamin, 1899-1934  Search this
Rowe, Dorothy, 1898-  Search this
Extent:
15 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Lecture notes
Letters
Place:
China
Japan
China -- Description and Travel
Michigan
Date:
1923-1934
Summary:
Writer, curator, and professor Benjamin Franklin March Jr. (1899-1934) studied, lectured, and wrote in the United States and in China, and through his works gained respect as one of the foremost authorities on Chinese art during the 1920s and 1930s. His papers, dating from 1923 to 1934, document his professional and personal life in the United States and in China and include lecture notes and outlines; research notes; diaries; scrapbooks; and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The Benjamin March Papers span the years 1923 to 1934 and measure 15 linear feet. The collection includes: biographical data included in passports, obituaries, and fifty-seven condolence letters; lecture and course outlines; research notes; four diaries; one scrapbook; four illustrations including sketches for the March bookplate; fourteen photograph albums; printed matter; and 100 personal and artistic photographs.
Arrangement note:
The collection is divided into the following series:

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1927-1935

Series 2: Diaries, 1925-1934

Series 3: Writings and Research Materials, 1927-1934, undated

— Subseries 3.1: Lecture Materials

— Subseries 3.2: Research

— Subseries 3.3: Printed Matter

Series 4: Scrapbooks, 1924-1934

Series 5: Graphic Materials, 1925, 1933, undated

— Subseries 5.1: Illustrations

— Subseries 5.2: Photo Albums

— Subseries 5.3: Photographs
Biographical Information:
Biographical Sketch

1899 -- Born, Chicago, IL. Son of Benjamin Franklin and Isabel (née McNeal)

[1917?] -- Attended Lewis Institute and the YMCA College before transferring to the University of Chicago

1918-1919 -- Military service, Sergeant, Field Remount Squadron, No. 305, Army Service Corps

1922 -- Graduated from the University of Chicago (Ph.B)

1922-1923 -- Attended the Union Theological Seminary, New York, NY

1923-1925 -- Teacher of English, Latin, and Bible Studies at Hopei University; the Second Normal School; and the YMCA in Paotingfu, China

1925 June 25 -- Married Dorothy Rowe in Nanking, China

1925-1927 -- English instructor; Librarian; and Lecturer in Chinese Art, Yenching University Peiping, China

1927, summer -- Lecturer on Chinese art Columbia University

1927-1931 -- Curator of Asiatic Art Detroit Institute of Arts

1928 -- Honorary Curator of Oriental Aesthetic Art at the Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

1928 -- Appointed honorary curator at the Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

[1929?] -- Daughter (Judith) born

1929 -- China and Japan in Our Museums, published by the American Council, Institute of Pacific Relations

1931 -- Spent six months in China under a special grant from the American Council of Learned Societies to study 13th century painter, Ch'ien Hsuan

1932 -- Curator, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

1932 -- Appointed honorary curator at the Detroit Institute of Arts

1933 -- Awarded a Freer Fellowship

1934 -- Standards of Pottery Description, published by the University of Michigan Press

1934, summer -- Organized, directed, and lectured at a summer session of the Institute of Asiatic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley

1934 December -- Died at home in Ann Arbor, Michigan after a five-week illness (heart ailment)

Far Eastern art writer, curator, and lecturer, Benjamin Franklin March Jr., was born in Chicago on July 4, 1899 to Benjamin and Isabel March. He studied, lectured, and wrote in the United States and China and through his works gained respect as one of the foremost authorities on Chinese art during the 1920s and 1930s. Although he lived only thirty-five years, Benjamin March was a respected and influential scholar of Asian art.

After high school, March attended the Lewis Institute and the YMCA College before transferring to the University of Chicago from which he graduated in 1922 (Ph.B). With thoughts of becoming a Methodist minister, March enrolled at the Union Theological Seminary in New York City. At the same time, March enrolled in art classes at the Metropolitan Museum. After one year at the seminary, March was presented with and accepted the opportunity to work in China. From 1923 to 1927, March resided in China where he taught and lectured at colleges. Initially, March taught English, Latin, and Bible Studies at Hopei University, the Second Normal School, and the YMCA. From 1925 to 1927, he worked at Yenching University in Peiping (now Peking) as an instructor in English, a librarian, and lecturer in Chinese art.

While in China, March met Dorothy Rowe, the daughter of a Methodist missionary stationed in Nanking. On June 25, 1925 the two were married. Ms. Rowe, whom March sometimes called Doré, had lived in China since infancy. The author of the children's story, "The Begging Dear," Rowe wrote children's stories with Chinese settings.

During the summer of 1927, the March's moved to the United States when Columbia University offered March an appointment as lecturer of Chinese Art. Later that year March was appointed curator of Asiatic art at the Detroit Institute of Arts. He remained at the Detroit Institute of Arts in this capacity until 1931. In 1928, March was appointed Honorary Curator of Oriental Aesthetic Art by the University of Michigan's Museum of Anthropology. The next year, Dorothy March gave birth to the couple's only child, Judith.

During this period March published extensively, including two publications, China and Japan in Our Museums, in 1929 and, Standards of Pottery Description, in 1934. In the latter, March developed a new technique for the scientific study of the materials and methods of manufacture of ancient Chinese pottery. ( Ann Arbor Daily News. -- "Death Takes Noted Curator". -- December 14, 1934)

In 1931, March received a grant from the American Council of Learned Societies. This grant allowed March the opportunity to travel to China and Europe to study the 13th century painter, Ch'ien Hsuan. In 1932, March was named a curator at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. The following year he was named a Freer Fellow. The summer of 1934 found March in Berkeley, California, organizing and directing the Institute of Asiatic Studies at the University of California. During the fall of 1934, March fell ill with a heart ailment. He was ill for five weeks before he died, at the age of 35, in December of 1934. At the time of his death, Benjamin March was survived by his wife Dorothy and their daughter, Judith.
Related Collections:
The Detroit Institute of Arts maintains administrative correspondence and files generated by Benjamin March during his tenure as curator.

The Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan houses the Benjamin Franklin March drawings collection, This is a collection of drawings by March for his daughter; includes illustrated poems of Pentwater Beach, Michigan.
Provenance:
Judith March Davis, the daughter of Benjamin March, donated her father's papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1995.
Benjamin March's daughter, Judith March Davis, donated her father's papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1995.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
No restrictions on use.
Topic:
Art, Japanese  Search this
Art, Chinese  Search this
Architecture -- China  Search this
Architecture, Japanese  Search this
Painting, Chinese  Search this
Art, Korean  Search this
Art, Asian  Search this
Painting, Japanese  Search this
Art, Asian -- Research  Search this
Chinese language -- Terms and phrases  Search this
Art -- Terminology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Lecture notes
Letters
Citation:
Benjamin March Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of Judith March Davis, 1995
Identifier:
FSA.A1995.10
See more items in:
Benjamin March Papers
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1995-10
Online Media:

Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers

Creator:
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Names:
Carlson, John F., 1874-1945  Search this
Cramer, Florence Ballin, 1884-1962  Search this
Davidson, Florence Lucius, d. 1962  Search this
Davidson, Jo, 1883-1952  Search this
Frankl, Walter  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Howard, Lila  Search this
Johnson, Grace Mott, 1882-1967  Search this
Kuhn, Vera, d. 1961  Search this
Lockwood, Ward  Search this
Luhan, Mabel Dodge, 1879-1962  Search this
McFee, Henry Lee, 1886-1953  Search this
Riley, Mary G., 1883-1939  Search this
Simonson, Lee, 1888-  Search this
Sterling, Lindsey, 1876-1931  Search this
Wright, Alice Morgan, 1881-1975  Search this
Extent:
8.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Poetry
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Date:
1833-1980
bulk 1900-1980
Summary:
The papers of painter Andrew Dasburg and his wife and sculptor Grace Mott Johnson date from 1833 to 1980 (bulk 1900 to 1980), and measure 8.8 linear feet. The collection documents each artist's career and personal lives, including their brief marriage and their friendships with many notable artists in the New Mexico and New York art colonies during the early twentieth century. The papers of Dasburg (6 linear feet) and Johnson (2.8 linear feet) include biographical materials; extensive correspondence with family, friends, and fellow artists, such as John F. Carlson, Mabel Dodge Luhan, Marsden Hartley, Henry Lee McFee, and Ward Lockwood; writings by Dasburg, Johnson, and others; scattered legal, financial, and business records; clippings; exhibition materials; numerous photographs of Johnson and Dasburg, friends, family, and artwork; and original artwork, including two sketchbooks by Johnson.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of painter Andrew Dasburg and sculptor Grace Mott Johnson date from 1833 to 1980, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1900 to 1980, and measure 8.8 linear feet. The collection is divided into the papers of Andrew Dasburg (6 linear feet) and the papers of Grace Mott Johnson (2.8 linear feet), and documents each artist's career and personal lives, including their brief marriage, and friendships with many notable artists in New Mexico and New York art colonies during the early twentieth century. Found are scattered biographical, legal, and financial materials. Extensive correspondence (particularly in Dasburg's papers) is with family, friends, and fellow artists, such as John F. Carlson, Florence Ballin Cramer, Mabel Dodge Luhan, Marsden Hartley, Henry Lee McFee, Vera Spier Kuhn, and Ward Lockwood. Dasburg's papers also include letters to Johnson and his two later wives.

Johnson's correspondence is also with numerous artist friends and others, including John F. and Margaret Carlson, Florence Ballin Cramer, Jo Davidson, Florence Lucius, Walter Frankl, Lila Wheelock Howard, Henry Lee McFee, Mary Riley, Lee Simonson, Lindsey Morris Sterling, Alice Morgan Wright, Mabel Dodge Luhan, and Vera Spier Kuhn. Letters to her son Alfred are quite detailed and revealing. Writings are by Dasburg, Johnson, and others. Johnson's writings include a very brief diary and her poetry. Writings by others are about the Taos and New Mexico art communities. Printed materials about both artists include clippings and exhibition catalogs. There are numerous photographs of Dasburg and Johnson, individually and together, and with friends and family. Of note are a group photograph of Birge Harrison's art class in Woodstock, New York, which includes Johnson and Dasburg, and a photograph of Dasburg with friends Konrad Cramer and John Reed. Dasburg's papers also include snapshots of Florence Lucius, Konrad and Florence Ballin Cramer, Frieda and D. H. Lawrence, and Mabel Dodge Luhan. Original artwork by the two artists include two sketchbooks by Johnson and three prints and two drawings by Dasburg.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 2 series of each artist's papers:

Series 1: Andrew Dasburg Papers, circa 1900-1980 (Box 1-7; 6.0 linear feet)

Series 2: Grace Mott Johnson Papers, 1833-1963 (Box 7-10; 2.8 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Andrew Michael Dasburg (1887-1979) was born in Paris, France, to German parents. After his father died and when he was five, Dasburg and his mother moved to New York City. In 1902 Dasburg started attending classes at the Art Students' League and studied with Kenyon Cox and Frank Du Mond. He also took night classes with Robert Henri. In 1907 he received a scholarship to the Art Students' League summer school in Woodstock, New York and spent three summers studying there in Birge Harrison's painting class. While in school he became friends with many young artists, including Morgan Russell and his future wife, Grace Mott Johnson.

Grace Mott Johnson (1882-1967) was born in New York City. She began drawing when she was four years old, and when the family moved to a farm in 1900 she enjoyed sketching horses and other farm animals. At the age of 22 she left home to study at the Art Students' League with sculptors Gutzon Borglum and James Earle Fraser, and also attended Birge Harrison's painting class in Woodstock. Throughout her career she would sculpt animals from memory, and would often attend circuses and farms for inspiration.

In 1909 Johnson and Dasburg went to Paris and joined the modernist circle of artists living there, including Morgan Russell, Jo Davidson, and Arthur Lee. During a trip to London that same year they were married. Johnson returned to the United States early the next year, but Dasburg stayed in Paris where he met Henri Matisse, Gertrude and Leo Stein, and became influenced by the paintings of Cezanne and Cubism. He returned to Woodstock, New York in August and he and Johnson became active members of the artist community. In 1911 their son Alfred was born. Both Dasburg and Johnson showed several works at the legendary Armory Show in 1913, and Dasburg also showed at the MacDowell Club in New York City, where he met the journalist and activist John Reed who later introduced him to Mabel Dodge (Luhan), a wealthy art patron and lifelong friend. In 1914 Dasburg met Alfred Stieglitz and became part of his avant-garde circle. Using what he had seen in Paris, Dasburg became one of the earliest American cubist artists, and also experimented with abstraction in his paintings.

Dasburg and Johnson lived apart for most of their marriage. By 1917 they had separated and Dasburg began teaching painting in Woodstock and in New York City. In 1918 he was invited to Taos, New Mexico by Mabel Dodge, and returning in 1919, Johnson joined him there for a period of time. Also in 1919, Dasburg was one of the founding members of the Woodstock Artists Association with John F. Carlson, Frank Swift Chase, Carl Eric Lindin, and Henry Lee McFee. In 1922 Dasburg and Johnson divorced, and also at that time he began living most of the year in Santa Fe with Ida Rauh, spending the rest of the year in Woodstock and New York City. Dasburg became an active member of the Santa Fe and the Taos art colonies, befriending many artists and writers living in these communities, and remaining close friends with Mabel Dodge Luhan. Here he moved away from abstraction, and used the southwestern landscape as the inspiration for his paintings.

In 1928 he married Nancy Lane. When that marriage ended in 1932, he moved permanently to Taos, and with his third wife, Marina Wister, built a home and studio there. Dasburg periodically taught art privately and at the University of New Mexico. In 1937 he was diagnosed with Addison's disease, which left him unable to paint again until 1946. In 1945 he and his wife Marina separated. Dasburg was recognized for his career as an artist in a circulating retrospective organized by the American Federation of Arts in 1959. He also had retrospectives in Taos in 1966 and 1978. His artwork influence several generations of artists, especially in the southwest, and he continued creating art until his death in 1979 at the age of 92.

Grace Mott Johnson lived in the Johnson family home in Yonkers, New York during the 1920s and later moved to Pleasantville, New York. In 1924 she went to Egypt to study ancient Egyptian sculpture. During the 1930s she became a civil rights activist. She produced very little art during the last twenty years of her life.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are two oral history interviews with Andrew Dasburg, July 2, 1964 and March 6, 1974. Additional related collections at other repositories include the Andrew and Marina Wister Dasburg Papers at the New Mexico State Archives, the Andrew Dasburg Papers at Syracuse University Library, and the Grace Mott Johnson Papers at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming. Reel 2803 contains photocopies of ten Morgan Russell letters to Dasburg. Reels 4276-4278 include biographical material, subject files, photographs, correspondence, writings, and exhibition material. The photocopies on reel 2803 were discarded after microfilming, and the items on 4276-4278 were returned to the lender. This material is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers were donated by their son, Alfred Dasburg, in 1980. Syracuse Univresity lent materials for microfilming in 1978 and 1989.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Artist colonies -- New York (State)  Search this
Artist colonies -- New Mexico  Search this
Painters -- New Mexico  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State)  Search this
Painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Poetry
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers, 1833-1980 (bulk 1900-1980). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.dasbandr
See more items in:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-dasbandr
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Online Media:

Correspondence with Grace Mott Johnson

Collection Creator:
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 27
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1910 February-March 1
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers, 1833-1980 (bulk 1900-1980). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers / Series 1: Andrew Dasburg Papers / 1.2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-dasbandr-ref770
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Correspondence with Grace Mott Johnson

Collection Creator:
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 29
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1910 April
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers, 1833-1980 (bulk 1900-1980). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers / Series 1: Andrew Dasburg Papers / 1.2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-dasbandr-ref772
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Correspondence with Grace Mott Johnson

Collection Creator:
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 35
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1910 December
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers, 1833-1980 (bulk 1900-1980). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers
Andrew Dasburg and Grace Mott Johnson papers / Series 1: Andrew Dasburg Papers / 1.2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-dasbandr-ref778
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Charles Scribner's Sons Art Reference Department records

Topic:
Scribner's Monthly
Creator:
Charles Scribner's Sons  Search this
Names:
Berger, William Merritt, b. 1872  Search this
Extent:
7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketches
Date:
1839-1962
Summary:
The records of the Charles Scribner's Sons Art Reference Department measure 7.0 linear feet and date from 1839 to 1962. The records of the department include original art works, photographs, scattered letters, and miscellaneous printed material reflecting the portraiture and other illustration work completed in support of the wide range of materials and topics published by Charles Scribner's Sons over the company's long publishing history.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Charles Scribner's Sons Art Reference Department measure 7.0 linear feet and date from 1839 to 1962. The records of the department include original art works, photographs, scattered letters, and miscellaneous printed material reflecting the portraiture and other illustration work completed in support of the wide range of materials and topics published by Charles Scribner's Sons over the company's long publishing history.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 3 alphabetically-arranged series. Oversized material from all series have been housed in Box 7 (Sol), Box 8 (Sol), and OVs 9 - 12. Notations for the oversized materials are noted at the appropriate folder title with see also/see references

Series 1: Portrait Files, 1839-1962, undated (Boxes 1-5, 7, OV 11; 4.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Illustrator Files, 1878-1921, undated (Box 5, 6, 8-OV12; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 3: Miscellaneous Reference Files, 1933-1952, undated (Box 6, 8, OV 12; 1.0 linear feet)
Historical Note:
Charles Scribner's Sons was founded as a publishing partnership of Isaac D. Baker and Charles Scribner in 1846. The company set out to discover and publish the work of new American authors. The first work to be published was The Puritans and Their Principles by Edwin Hall, followed by many theological treatises, and the first bestseller, Napoleon and His Marshals by the Rev. J. T. Headley.

After Isaac Baker's death in 1850, Charles Scribner continued to direct the company which was primarily known for its books on religion. In the mid-1860s, Scribner published an American version of German author Johann Peter Lange's Biblical Commentary on the Holy Scriptures. Co-published with T. and T. Clark of Edinburgh, the resulting twenty-six volume work was both a commercial and critical success. Almost a century later, the two publishing houses again collaborated on a revision of Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible.

In 1865, Charles Scribner and Company expanded its range into magazine publishing with the quasi-religious Hours at Home that promoted the virtues by which Americans were supposed to live. In 1870 a new firm, Scribner & Company, was formed to publish a successor magazine entitled Scribner's Monthly. The magazine thrived and began to attract young American writers.

Charles Scribner died of typhoid in Lucerne, Switzerland on August 26, 1871, leaving the business to his eldest son, John Blair Scribner. In 1873 Scribner & Company launched a children's periodical, St. Nicholas, under the editorship of Mary Mapes Dodge, with Frank R. Stockton as assistant editor. The magazine brought many now-classic books to the publishing firm and established it permanently in the field of children's literature.

The 1870s saw the growth of the subscription book department. In association with Messrs. Black of Edinburgh, Scribners brought out the first American edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, selling 70,000 sets. In later years the subscription department published library sets of the works of well-known authors including J. M. Barrie, Henry James, Rudyard Kipling, and Robert Louis Stevenson. Its successor, the reference book department, became the foremost American publisher of reference works such as the Dictionary of American Biography, the Dictionary of American History.

In 1875, Charles Scribner II joined his brother, John Blair Scribner, and other partners, Edward Seymour and Andrew Armstrong, in the firm. Seymour died in 1877, and Armstrong sold his share to the Scribner's in 1878, leaving the book publishing company wholly controlled by the Scribner family. The name was changed to Charles Scribner's Sons. John Blair Scribner died in 1879, leaving his brother to manage the business.

In 1881 one of the outside partners, Roswell Smith, bought up enough stock to acquire individual control of Scribner & Company, the magazine company. Thus, Scribner's Monthly and the children's magazine St. Nicholas passed entirely out of the hands of the Scribner family. The remaining owners were reincorporated as the Century Company and Scribner's Monthly was renamed the Century Magazine. Charles Scribner's Sons agreed to stay out of the magazine publishing business for five years.

Charles Scribner II was joined by his younger brother, Arthur Hawley Scribner, in 1884, and during their almost fifty year partnership, they focused the company's business on publishing American literature. The publications of this period include Frances Hodgson Burnett's Little Lord Fauntleroy, Howard Pyle's The Merry Adventure of Robin Hood, and Robert Louis Stevenson's A Child's Garden of Verses. A popular series of books, "Scribner Illustrated Classics" became famous for their illustrations by Howard Pyle, Jessie Willcox Smith, N. C. Wyeth, and other members of the Brandywine school. In 1889, Henry Adams published his History of the United States in nine volumes.

Following the five-year moratorium on magazine publishing, the firm re-entered the magazine market and introduced the new Scribner's Magazine in December 1886. Under its original editor, Edward L. Burlingame, the magazine grew into a profitable enterprise and was an important venue for new authors, including Edith Wharton, who would follow their magazine debuts with many successful books. By the turn of the 20th century, Scribner's had virtually cornered the market in American literature and was enjoying a golden age of American book publishing. During this period, authors included Henry James, Theodore Roosevelt, and Elizabeth Wharton. In 1913, Charles Scribner III joined the firm.

During the 1920s, many important new authors were published, including James Boyd, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Ring Lardner, and Thomas Wolfe. In 1928, Charles Scribner II turned over the presidency to his younger brother Arthur, who began the publication of the first volumes of the Dictionary of American Biography. Charles Scribner II died in 1930 and Arthur Scribner died two years later, leaving Charles Scribner III to preside alone. In spite of the Depression, Charles Scribner's Sons continued to promote new authors including Taylor Caldwell, Marcia Davenport, Nancy Hale, and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. During the 1930s a separate children's department was established by Alice Dalgliesh. In 1937, Scribner's Magazine folded after fifty years of publication. The Dictionary of American History was published in 1940.

Charles Scribner III died suddenly in 1952, necessitating the relocation of Charles Scribner IV from his employment as a cryptoanalyst in Washington, D.C. to take charge of the firm in New York. He established the Scribner Library, a line of quality paperbacks that included the titles The Great Gatsby, Tender Is the Night, The Sun Also Rises, and Ethan Frome. Scribner also set out to develop fields of non-fiction such as history, biography, how-to books, and reference works including the Album of American History, and the Dictionary of Scientific Biography.
Related Materials:
Additional Charles Scribner's Sons Art Department files are in the Archives of Charles Scribner's Sons, 1786-2003 (mostly 1880s-1970s), at Princeton University Library, Manuscripts Division, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, identified as Series 2. Art Department Files, 1907-1951, and comprise correspondence and department printing records (on cards) for selected Scribner publications. See Princeton's finding aid for the collection at http://findingaids.princeton.edu/collections/C0101/
Provenance:
The Charles Scribner's Sons Art Reference Department records were donated in 1957 and 1958 by Charles Scribner's Sons.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Charles Scribner's Sons Art Reference Department records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Illustrators -- Great Britain  Search this
Designers -- Great Britain  Search this
Sculptors -- France  Search this
Portrait painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Charles Scribner's Sons Art Reference Department records, 1839-1962. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.charscrs
See more items in:
Charles Scribner's Sons Art Reference Department records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-charscrs
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Bob Winston

Interviewee:
Winston, Bob, 1915-  Search this
Interviewer:
Baizerman, Suzanne  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
California College of Arts and Crafts -- Faculty  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
95 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 July 31-October 10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Bob Winston conducted 2002 July 31-2002 October 2002, by Suzanne Baizerman, for the Archives of American Art as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artist's home in Concord, California.
Winston speaks of his early childhood and running away from home at 19 months old, being found in a garage and building things ever since; the numerous operations he had as a child; his dyslexia and how he got through college; the death of his father and move to Berkeley, California; teaching at Berkeley High school; 17 years teaching at California College of Arts and Crafts (1942-1959) and the growth of the school throughout that time period; moving to Arizona and teaching lost wax casting in an abandoned supermarket; his inventions, Win-Ox, an oxidizer, and Bubble-Be-Gone, a cleaner; his latest sale of Win-Ox; his title as "San Francisco's Most Professional Eccentric;" and finding that a lot of the people he teaches do not find the "magic" that he does in jewelry work. Winston then discusses his current studio layout in an former hospital building; his machines and different work rooms; his chemistry table, where he makes his Win-Ox solution; his collection; how he's accomplished so much despite his dyslexia; the Hunt brothers and how they made the price of gold drop; living from Art Festival to Festival on the road in his Jeep; his mentors John Haley and Chiura Obata; and his bike, which he still rides. Winston also recalls Aileen Webb, Margaret DePatta, Gene Bielawski, Mark Hopkins, Karl Kasten, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Bob Winston (1915-2003) metalsmith of Walnut Creek, California. Suzanne Baizermann, art historian, Alameda, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 41 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Metal-workers -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Jewelers -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Metal-work -- Study and teaching  Search this
Metal-work -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.winsto02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-winsto02

Robert Sperry papers

Creator:
Sperry, Robert, 1927-1998  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of Washington -- Faculty  Search this
Warashina, Patti, 1940-  Search this
Extent:
13.6 Linear feet
0.907 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Motion pictures (visual works)
Transcripts
Interviews
Sketches
Drawings
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Videotapes
Date:
1951-2002
Summary:
The papers of ceramicist Robert Sperry measure 13.6 linear feet and 0.907 GB and date from 1951-2002. The collection documents Sperry's career as an artist, teacher, and filmmaker through biographical information, correspondence, exhibition files, gallery files, material on projects and workshops, writings, a scrapbook, financial files, printed and digital material, photographs, moving image materials, and artwork.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of ceramicist Robert Sperry measure 13.6 linear feet and 0.907 GB and date from 1951-2002. The collection documents Sperry's career as an artist and teacher through biographical information, correspondence, exhibition files, gallery files, material on projects and workshops, writings, a scrapbook, financial files, printed and digital material, photographs, video recordings, films, and artwork.

Biographical files contain items outlining Sperry's career including resumes, teaching evaluations, awards, and interviews. Correspondence includes general correspondence with family, friends, colleagues, schools, galleries, art organizations, and publications as well as named files for those with whom Sperry exchanged a significant amount of correspondence over a long period of time. The Exhibition Files contain materials on group and solo exhibitions Robert Sperry participated in, while Gallery Files hold material, such as correspondence and contracts, related to the galleries which exhibited Sperry's work primarily after 1979. The Project and Workshop Files in Series 5 contain material related to public commissions he completed and workshops he gave during the 1980s and 1990s.

Writings encompass writings by Sperry and others. Sperry's writings vary greatly and include drafts of articles, a family history, poetry, notes and a screenplay, while writings by others are primarily essays on art. Within this series Sperry's event calendars are also found. Sperry compiled a scrapbook which spans 1955 to 1964 and includes correspondence and printed material about exhibitions and newspaper clippings which feature his artwork. He and his wife, Patti Warashina, also compiled Financial Records primarily of their business and living expenses from 1976 to 1984 and earnings as artists and professors at the University of Washington.

The largest series in this collection, Printed Material, provides information largely on Sperry's career through press clippings, exhibition announcements, catalogs, and publications, and also includes other materials on ceramics in general. The Photographs series contains both photos and negatives from Sperry's trip to Japan to film "Village Potters of Onda" as well as photographs of his artwork and his family. Also found in this collection are a few sketches and drawings by Sperry and one drawing by Patti Warashina. Moving image material includes video recordings and motion picture film with a wide range of content, including documentaries about Sperry, studio footage, and experimental and narrative films created by Sperry in a range of styles and genres, including animation such as the animated film "Henry," hand colored film, live action footage, abstract design, and narrative short films by Sperry. There are digital research copies of some of the films.
Arrangement:
The Robert Sperry papers are arranged as thirteen series, according to type of material. Each series is arranged either in rough chronological or alphabetical order.

Series 1: Biographical Files, 1954-circa 2000, undated (Box 1; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence Files, 1951-2000, undated (Boxes 1-2; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 3: Exhibition Files, 1963-1999, undated (Boxes 2-3; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Gallery Files, 1960-2000, undated (Boxes 3-4; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 5: Project and Workshop Files, 1967-1996, undated (Box 4; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 6: Writings, 1966-1990, undated (Box 5; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Scrapbook, 1955-1964 (Box 5; 8 folders)

Series 8: Financial Records, 1961-1995, undated (Boxes 5-6; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 9: Miscellaneous Subject Files, 1975-1998, undated (Box 6; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 10: Printed Material, 1955-2002, undated (Boxes 6-10; 3.4 linear feet)

Series 11: Photographs, 1963, undated (Box 10; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 12: Sketches and Drawings, 1984, undated (Box 10; 2 folders)

Series 13: Moving Image Material, circa 1962-1998, undated (Boxes 10-12, FC 13-18; 3.1 linear feet, ER01; 0.907 GB)
Biographical Note:
Robert Sperry was born in Bushnell, Illinois, in 1927. He grew up on his family's farm in Druid, Saskatchewan, Canada, and in 1945 was drafted into the U.S. Army, where he first developed an interest in art. After serving in the military, he returned home and completed his B.A. at the University of Saskatchewan in 1950 and a B.F.A. at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1953. While working on his B.A. he met and married Edyth MacDonald and they had one child, Van, in 1950. Sperry spent one summer as Artist in Residence at the Archie Bray Foundation, in Helena, Montana, and then moved his family to Seattle so that he could complete his M.F.A. at the University of Washington. After graduating in 1955 he stayed at the University and became a professor, teaching ceramics until retiring in 1982. During this time, Sperry widely exhibited his clay vessels in both group and solo exhibitions and was active in the American Craft Council.

When not teaching, Robert Sperry pursued his interest in photography and filmmaking and, in 1963, traveled to Japan to make "Village Potters of Onda," a project that included a documentary film and a collection of black and white photographs. Sperry continued experimenting with film and, in 1967, created a fictional film entitled, "Profiles Cast Long Shadows," which was shown at film festivals throughout the United States. After abandoning another film project in 1970 while going through a divorce, he returned to ceramics as his focus. During the 1970s Sperry developed his techniques, modifying glazes and moving away from the vessel shape. In 1976 Sperry married Patti Warashina, fellow ceramicist and professor at the University of Washington. He began producing murals, which led to several public commissions such as a mural for the IBM Field Engineering Educational Center in Atlanta, created in 1983. Robert Sperry: A Retrospective, was exhibited in 1985-1986 at the Bellevue Art Museum, however, Sperry would continue producing and exhibiting new work, and giving lectures and workshops for thirteen more years, until his death in 1998.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are the Patti Warashina papers, circa 1900-1991. An online finding aid is available.
Provenance:
The Robert Sperry papers were donated by Sperry's wife Patti Warashina in 2003 and 2004.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Robert Sperry papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Filmmakers  Search this
Potters -- Japan  Search this
Ceramicists -- Washington (State)  Search this
Ceramics -- Study and teaching  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Transcripts
Interviews
Sketches
Drawings
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Videotapes
Citation:
Robert Sperry papers, 1951-2002. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.sperrobe
See more items in:
Robert Sperry papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sperrobe

Selections from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Archives of American Art collection

Creator:
Philadelphia Museum of Art  Search this
Names:
Milch Galleries  Search this
Abbe, Robert  Search this
Arms, John Taylor, 1887-1953  Search this
Bartlett, Paul, 1881-1965  Search this
Beal, Gifford, 1879-1956  Search this
Beaux, Cecilia, 1855-1942  Search this
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim, 1893-1967  Search this
Cadmus, Paul, 1904-1999  Search this
Chagall, Marc, 1887-1985  Search this
Cortissoz, Royal, 1869-1948  Search this
Cox, Kenyon, 1856-1919  Search this
Curran, Charles C. (Charles Courtney), 1861-1942  Search this
De Creeft, José, 1884-1982  Search this
Dehn, Adolf, 1895-1968  Search this
Dewing, Thomas Wilmer, 1851-1938  Search this
Eakins, Susan Macdowell  Search this
Eakins, Thomas, 1844-1916  Search this
Eilshemius, Louis M. (Louis Michel), 1864-1941  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Force, Juliana, 1876-1948  Search this
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Haskell, Ernest, 1876-1925  Search this
Hassam, Childe, 1859-1935  Search this
Ingersoll, R. Sturgis (Robert Sturgis), b. 1891  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
McCarter, Henry, 1866-1942  Search this
Mechlin, Leila, 1874-1949  Search this
Miller, Kenneth Hayes, 1876-1952  Search this
Mullikin, Mary Augusta, 1874-1964  Search this
Pennell, Joseph, 1857-1926  Search this
Roberts, George B., Mrs  Search this
Sartain, William, 1843-1924  Search this
Schnakenberg, H. E. (Henry Ernest), 1892-1970  Search this
Sloan, John, 1871-1951  Search this
Valentin, Curt, 1902-1954  Search this
Walker, Hudson D. (Hudson Dean), 1907-1976  Search this
Zigrosser, Carl, 1891-  Search this
Extent:
4 microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Place:
China -- Description and Travel
Date:
1866-1968
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence, printed material, writings, and other personal papers collected by Carl Zigrosser and Leila Mechlin and later added to by others, all relating to American art.
REELS P10-P11 and P14: Letters to Leila Mechlin, Henry Schnakenberg and Hudson Walker. Correspondents include Robert Abbe, John Taylor Arms, Cecelia Beaux, Paul Bartlett, Gifford Beal, Paul Cadmus, Charles Curran, Royal Cortissoz, Kenyon Cox, Philip Evergood, John David Graham, Reginald Marsh, Joseph Pennell, John Sloan and many others. Some letters include printed material and photographs. Mechlin material includes writings, photographs and letters from Mary Augusta Mullikin describing her life and travels in China, 1933. Also included are letters from Adolph Dehn and Jose de Creeft to Juliana Force; from Ernest Haskell and Kenneth Hayes Miller to Carl Zigrosser; miscellaneous letters from Marc Chagall, Thomas Wilmer Dewing, Louis Eilshemius and Childe Hassam; an autobiography of William Sartain; and material on Thomas Eakins, including letters, a list of expenses, 1867, and motion study material,including writings, sketches and photographs taken with a camera invented by Eakins.
REEL 4547: Charles Burchfield letters; Susan and Thomas Eakins material; Jacques Lipchitz correspondence; Henry McCarter letters; and Carl Zigrosser correspondence. The Burchfield letters consist of 41 items, 1929-1947, from Burchfield regarding exhibitions, sales, and his paintings. The Eakins material includes letters from Susan Eakins to the Milch Galleries, 1933-1935, regarding the sale of Thomas Eakins' work, receipts from the Milch Galleries, Thomas' expense book, ca. 1866, for daily living in Paris and Switzerland and an autographed account of expenses while at school in Paris, April 12, 1867, a photograph of Susan Eakins by Carl van Vechten, a photograph of Eakins, and 71 engraved portraits from the collection of Thomas Eakins.
The Lipchitz correspondence is with R. Sturgis Ingersoll regarding Lipchitz's commission for the sculpture "Prometheus." Also included are 8 letters from Curt Valentin to Ingersoll regarding Lipchitz. The McCarter material includes 66 letters, 1933-1942, some containing sketches, from McCarter to Mrs. George B. Roberts regarding paintings, frames, exhibitions, and offering painting advice. The Zigrosser correspondence is regarding the purchase of prints from the regional projects of the WPA for the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and later included in the exhibition "Between Two Wars" at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Included are invoices and inventories of the prints from the various offices.
Provenance:
Material on reels P10-P11 and P14 lent for microfilming, 1954, by the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Additional material on reel 4547 was microfilmed in 1991 as part of AAA's Philadelphia Arts Documentation Project. The idea for the archives originated with Carl Zigrosser, who donated material, solicited it from others (mainly Henry Schnakenberg, Leila Mechlin and Hudson Walker), or pulled it from the files of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The Museum continues to add to the collection. It is not connected to the Archives of American Art at the Smithsonian Institution.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce must be obtained from the Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives.
Occupation:
Artists -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Artists' writings  Search this
Motion study -- Photographs  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.philmuss
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-philmuss

Oral history interview with Charles Childs

Interviewee:
Childs, Charles  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Goodspeed's Book Shop (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Arms, John Taylor, 1887-1953  Search this
Chamberlain, Samuel, 1895-1975  Search this
Karolik, Maxim  Search this
Wales, George Canning, 1868-1940  Search this
Extent:
70 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1972 April 18-May 12
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Charles Childs conducted 1972 April 18-May 12, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art. Childs speaks of his childhood and the development of his interest in art; his first involvement with printmaking; studying at Normal Art School; working at Goodspeed's Print Shop; the art scene in Boston in the 1920s and 1930s; his theories and approaches to art collecting; the development of the Boston Arts Festival; and his involvement with the Institute of Contemporary Art. He recalls John Taylor Arms, Samuel Chamberlain, Maxim Karolik, and George Wales.
Biographical / Historical:
Charles Childs is an art dealer and collector from Boston, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 35 min.
Parts 3 & 4 of Childs interview is under Walter Feldman on tape 2.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Art festivals  Search this
Art dealers -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.childs72
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-childs72

American Academy of Arts and Letters records

Creator:
American Academy of Arts and Letters  Search this
Names:
Arms, John Taylor, 1887-1953  Search this
Bellows, George, 1882-1925  Search this
Blashfield, Edwin Howland, 1848-1936  Search this
Brush, George de Forest, 1855-1941  Search this
Chase, William Merritt, 1849-1916  Search this
Cortissoz, Royal, 1869-1948  Search this
Hambidge, Jay, 1867-1924  Search this
Hassam, Childe, 1859-1935  Search this
Johnson, Robert Underwood, 1853-1937  Search this
Millet, Francis Davis, 1846-1912  Search this
Pennell, Joseph, 1857-1926  Search this
Vedder, Elihu, 1836-1923  Search this
Ward, John Quincy Adams, 1830-1910  Search this
Weir, Julian Alden, 1852-1919  Search this
Wood, Charles Erskine Scott, 1852-1944  Search this
Zigrosser, Carl, 1891-  Search this
Extent:
800 Items ((on 5 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1864-1942
Scope and Contents:
A collection of artists' papers containing correspondence, notes, biographical material, exhibition catalogs, and other published material. Includes:
volume of notes, drawings, and calculations made by George Bellows for a study of Jay Hambidge's theory of Dynamic Symmetry; correspondence and published and unpublished biographical and critical material on George de Forest Brush, Childe Hassam, Francis D. Millet, Joseph Pennell, Elihu Vedder, and J. Q. A. Ward. The Hassam papers are particularly voluminous, with letters from John Taylor Arms, E. H. Blashfield, William Merritt Chase, Royal Cortissoz, J. Alden Weir, and Charles Erskine Scott Wood. All groups contain official Academy correspondence from its secretary Robert Underwood Johnson.
Biographical / Historical:
Organized 1904, incorporated 1914; New York, N.Y. The American Academy of Arts and Letters was established "to afford recognition to distinguished achievement in literature and the fine arts...." [The American Academy of Arts and Letters and the National Institute of Arts and Letters merged on Dec. 30, 1976].
Provenance:
This is a collection of miscellaneous papers representing a gathering over the years of unsolicited documentary resources on American art given or addressed to the Academy.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Topic:
Art -- Societies, etc. -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Function:
Learned institutions and societies -- United States
Identifier:
AAA.ameracaa2
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ameracaa2

Edna Andrade papers

Creator:
Andrade, Edna, 1917-2008  Search this
Names:
Philadelphia Focuses on Women in the Visual Arts (1974 : Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Andrade, C. Preston (Clarence Preston), 1912-1977  Search this
Breckenridge, Hugh H. (Hugh Henry), 1870-1937  Search this
Laessle, Albert, 1877-1954  Search this
McCarter, Henry, 1866-1942  Search this
McEntee, Dorothy, 1902-  Search this
Extent:
4.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Silkscreen prints.
Woodcuts
Wood engravings
Date:
1917-1995
Scope and Contents:
Biographical information; writings; correspondence; a file relating to the Marian Locks Gallery; art works; photographs; 2 photograph albums; printed material; and a videotape.
Included in the biographical material are resumes, an artist's statement, press releases for exhibitions, a letter, 1987, from Andrade outlining the life of her husband, architect C. Preston Andrade. Memorabilia includes a baby book, report cards, awards, travel mementos, and a wood engraving of a cat by Dorothy McEntee.
Writings consist of short stories written by Andrade, 1934-1935 and a poem "Memo to Dwight D. Eisenhower." Personal correspondence includes letters, 1925-1981, from Andrade to her parents when she was a student at the Pennsylvania Academy in which she discusses her teachers, Hugh Breckenridge, Henry McCarter, and Albert Laessle, among others, and their critiques of her work, her 1936 and 1938 trips abroad on Cresson Scholarships, and war work in Washington, D.C.; letters from C. Preston Andrade (Andy), 1965-1981, providing information about her exhibitions, sales, and discusions of her paintings, as well as documenting his work as an architect with the Ford Foundation in India.
Professional correspondence, 1936-1985, relates to commissions, exhibitions, competitions, awards and loans to the East Hampton Gallery in New York City, as well as to many Philadelphia art institutions, and the "Philadelphia Focuses on Women in the Visual Arts" in which Andrade participated, 1974.
A file on Andrade's association with the Marian Locks Gallery contains consignment lists, bills of sale, receipts and loan agreements, 1970-1974. A card file created in the 1960s is incomplete, but contains information on individual works. Art works (29.4 x 22.7 cm. or smaller) include 3 childhood sketches, 4 drawings, 1 woodcut entitled "Pa. Farmhouse," signed, 2 woodcut Christmas cards of the Madonna and child, signed, and 1 abstract silkscreen print, signed, dated 1966. Printed materials are clippings, 1930-1987, including some relating to Andrade's work with the OSS during WWII, exhibition invitations, brochures, and catalogs, 1930-1986. Photographs are of Andrade, her family, homes, exhibitions and works, an album containing photographs of Andrade's works, and an annotated album, 1961, compiled for Andrade's mother, contains photographs of Andrade's exhibitions and works.
Not microfilmed is one VHS videotape, "A Vision Transformed : Profile of Artist Edna Andrade," produced by the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Andrade's passports, exhibition catalogs and announcements, newspaper and magazine clippings, and photographs of Andrade, her family, friends and works of art. Two spiral-bound volumes of photographs taken by Reuben Goldberg also include photographs of a performance of the Martha Graham Dance Company, circa 1955.
Biographical / Historical:
Edna Andrade (1917-2008) was a painter from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1933-1937, receiving a B.F.A. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1937. She won Cresson Scholarships to travel to Europe in 1936 and 1937. In 1941, she married architect C. Preston Andrade. During WWII, she worked under Eero Saarinen in the office of Strategic Services. After the war, Andrade returned to Philadelphia, where she taught at the Philadelphia College of Art between 1958 and her retirement in 1982. Andrade was a participant in the "op art" movement of the 1960s.
Provenance:
Donated by Edna Andrade, 1987 and 2004. 1987 portion Microfilmed as part of AAA's Philadelphia Arts Documentation Project. Andrade retained her more current gallery records.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Women painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Optical painting -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Painting, Abstract -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Silkscreen prints.
Woodcuts
Wood engravings
Identifier:
AAA.andredna
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-andredna

Isabel Bishop papers

Creator:
Bishop, Isabel, 1902-1988  Search this
Names:
American Society of Painters, Sculptors and Gravers  Search this
New Society of Artists (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Arms, John Taylor, 1887-1953  Search this
Bacon, Peggy, 1895-1987  Search this
Blume, Peter, 1906-1992  Search this
Brooks, Van Wyck, 1886-1963  Search this
Canaday, John, 1907-1985  Search this
Chappell, Warren, 1904-  Search this
Ciardi, John, 1916-  Search this
Cunningham, Merce  Search this
Delevante, Sidney, 1894-  Search this
Deutsch, Babette, 1895-1982  Search this
Dickinson, Edwin Walter, 1891-  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Ferber, Edna, 1887-1968  Search this
Folinsbee, John Fulton, 1892-1972  Search this
Force, Juliana, 1876-1948  Search this
Hoffman, Malvina  Search this
Hopper, Jo N. (Josephine Nivison), 1883-1968  Search this
Johnson, Una E.  Search this
Kearns, James  Search this
Kitaj, R. B.  Search this
Kroll, Leon, 1884-1974  Search this
Laning, Edward, 1906-  Search this
Lattimore, Richmond Alexander, 1906-1984  Search this
Leighton, Clare, 1899-  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
Moore, Marianne, 1887-1972  Search this
Mumford, Lewis, 1895-1990  Search this
Neel, Alice, 1900-1984  Search this
Pittman, Hobson Lafayette, 1899 or 1900-1972  Search this
Porter, Fairfield  Search this
Rattner, Abraham  Search this
Schmidt, Katherine, 1898-1978  Search this
Schnakenberg, H. E. (Henry Ernest), 1892-1970  Search this
Soyer, Raphael, 1899-1987  Search this
Tooker, George  Search this
Van Veen, Stuyvesant  Search this
Vonnegut, Kurt  Search this
Watkins, Franklin Chenault, 1894-1972  Search this
Westcott, Glenway  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Extent:
2.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Watercolors
Sketches
Photographs
Prints
Sketchbooks
Illustrated letters
Date:
1914-1983
Summary:
The papers of realist painter Isabel Bishop date from 1914 to 1983 and measure 2.6 linear feet. The collection documents Bishop's painting career, her friendship with other artists, and her participation in several arts organizations. There are scattered biographical documents, correspondence with fellow artists such as Peggy Bacon, Warren Chappell, Edward Laning, and R. B. Kitaj, and with writers, curators, museums, galleries, arts organizations, and others. Also found are arts organization files, Bishop's writings about Warren Chappell and friend Reginald Marsh, notes, exhibition catalogs, news clippings, and other printed material, photographs of Bishop and her artwork, and photographs of Reginald and Felicia Marsh. Original artwork includes 8 sketchbooks, loose sketches, prints, and watercolor figure studies.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of realist painter Isabel Bishop date from 1914 to 1983 and measure 2.6 linear feet. The collection documents Bishop's painting career, her friendship with other artists, and her participation in several arts organizations. Scattered biographical documents include awards and a file on her participation in art juries.

Bishop was friends with many artists and cultural figures and her correspondence includes letters to and from artists such as John Taylor Arms, Peggy Bacon, Peter Blume, Warren Chappell (many letters from Chappell are illustrated), Sidney Delevante, Edwin Dickinson, Philip Evergood, John Folinsbee, Malvina Hoffman, Jo Hopper, James Kearns, Leon Kroll, Clare Leighton, Jack Levine, Alice Neel, Hobson Pittman, Fairfield Porter, Abraham Rattner, Katherine Schmidt, Henry Schnakenberg, Raphael Soyer, George Tooker, Stuyvesant Van Veen, Franklin Watkins, Mahonri Young, and William Zorach. Bishop not only corresponded with artists but also many poets, authors, historians, and dancers, such as Van Wyck Brooks, John Canaday, John Ciardi, Merce Cunningham, Babette Deutsch, Edna Ferber, Richmond Lattimore, Marianne Moore, Lewis Mumford, Kurt Vonnegut, and Glenway Westcott. Also found are letters from many galleries, museums, and schools which exhibited or purchased her work, including curators Juliana Force and Una Johnson.

Bishop kept files from her affiliations with the American Society of Painters, Sculptors, and Gravers and the New Society of Artists, containing mostly membership and financial records, and a file on a UNESCO conference. Unfortunately, files documenting her membership and vice presidency of the National Institute of Arts & Letters are not found here.

A small amount of Bishop's writings and notes include essays about friends and artists Reginald Marsh and Warren Chappell. Printed material consists of exhibition catalogs and announcements, news clippings, magazines, and a design by G. Alan Chidsey for a book about Bishop. Photographs depict Bishop with her husband and in her studio, her artwork, and also include three photographs of her friend, Reginald Marsh.

Original artwork includes eight small sketchbooks, loose pen and ink sketches, intaglio prints, watercolor figure studies, and a drawing of Bishop by Aaron Bohrod.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1943-1975 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1939-1983 (Box 1; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Organization Files, 1924-1937, 1951-1952 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings & Notes, 1937-1960s (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1930-1979 (Box 2; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, 1914, circa 1920s-1975 (Box 2, OV 5; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1940s-1970s (Box 2-4, OV 5; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Isabel Bishop (1902-1988) was born in Cincinnati, Ohio to John Remsen Bishop and Anna Bartram Newbold Bishop. Shortly after her birth the family moved to Detroit, Michigan. As a child Bishop took art classes and had a growing interest in drawing. In 1918 at the age of 16 she left home and moved to New York City where she enrolled in the School of Applied Design for Women to be an illustrator. However, her real interest was in painting, not the graphic arts, and she enrolled in the Art Students League in 1920. There she studied with Kenneth Hayes Miller and Guy Pene du Bois and met many young artists, including Reginald Marsh and Edwin Dickinson, both of whom became close friends. She took classes until 1924 and rented a studio and living space on 14th Street in a neighborhood where many artists maintained studios at the time.

Bishop began exhibiting her work and participated in artist groups, including the Whitney Studio Club and the New Society of Artists. During the 1920s and 1930s she developed a realist style of painting, primarily depicting women in their daily routine on the streets of Manhattan. Her work was greatly influenced by Peter Paul Rubens and other Dutch and Flemish painters that she had discovered during trips to Europe. In 1932 Bishop began showing her work frequently at the newly opened Midtown Galleries, where her work would be represented throughout her career.

In 1934 she married Harold Wolff, a neurologist, and moved with him to Riverdale, New York. Bishop kept her studio in Manhattan, moving from 14th Street to Union Square. She remained in her Union Square studio for fifty years (1934-1984). From 1936 to 1937 she taught at the Art Students League and in 1940 her son Remsen was born. In 1941 she was named a member of the National Academy of Design and from 1944 to 1946 she was the Vice President of the National Institute of Arts & Letters, the first woman to hold an executive position with that organization. She wrote articles and joined other artists in speaking out in support of realist painting and against the abstract style that was dominating the New York art scene.

During her long career which lasted into the 1980s, Bishop exhibited in numerous group and solo exhibitions, traveled throughout the U. S. as an exhibition juror, and won many awards for her work, including the award for Outstanding Achievement in the Arts presented by President Jimmy Carter in 1979.
Related Material:
Also found at the Archives of American Art are three oral history interviews with Isabel Bishop, April 15, 1959, May 29, 1959, and November 12-December 11, 1987.

The Whitney Museum of American Art and Midtown Galleries loaned additional Bishop papers to the Archives for microfilming on reels NY59-4 and NY59-5. These items were returned to the lenders after microfilming and are not described in the container listing of this finding aid.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in several installments by Isabel Bishop from 1959 to 1983.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Isabel Bishop papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Realism in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Watercolors
Sketches
Photographs
Prints
Sketchbooks
Illustrated letters
Citation:
Isabel Bishop papers, 1914-1983. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bishisab
See more items in:
Isabel Bishop papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bishisab
Online Media:

Artists Talk on Art records

Creator:
Artists Talk on Art  Search this
Names:
Barnet, Will, 1911-2012  Search this
Bourgeois, Louise, 1911-2010  Search this
Christo, 1935-  Search this
De Niro, Robert, Sr., 1922-1993  Search this
Denes, Agnes  Search this
Goldberg, Michael, 1924-  Search this
Jeanne-Claude, 1935-2009  Search this
Longo, Robert  Search this
Mendieta, Ana, 1948-1985  Search this
Morris, Robert, 1931-  Search this
Murray, Elizabeth, 1940-  Search this
Neel, Alice, 1900-1984  Search this
Pavia, Philip, 1915-2005  Search this
Sleigh, Sylvia  Search this
Wilke, Hannah  Search this
Wojnarowicz, David  Search this
Extent:
64.4 Linear feet
317.43 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Transcripts
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1974-2018
Summary:
The records of Artists Talk on Art (ATOA) measure 64.4 linear feet and 317.43 gigabytes and date from circa 1974-2018. The bulk of the records consist of extensive video and sound recordings of events organized by the group featuring artists, critics, historians, dealers, curators and writers discussing contemporary issues in the American art world in hundreds of panel discussions, open screenings, and dialogues held in New York City. Events began in 1975 and continue to the present; recordings in the collection date from 1977 and 2016. A smaller group of records include administrative files, panel flyers, three scrapbooks, as well as photographs, slides, and negatives of panel discussions and participants.
Scope and Contents:
The records of Artists Talk on Art (ATOA) measure 64.4 linear feet and 317.43 gigabytes and date from circa 1974-2018. The bulk of the records consist of extensive video and sound recordings of events organized by the group featuring artists, critics, historians, dealers, curators and writers discussing contemporary issues in the American art world in hundreds of panel discussions, open screenings, and dialogues held in New York City. Events began in 1975 and continue to the present; recordings in the collection date from 1977 and 2016. A smaller group of records include administrative files, panel flyers, three scrapbooks, as well as photographs, slides, and negatives of panel discussions and participants.

ATOA's recordings chronicle the American art world, covering critical discussions and significant art world issues over five decades. Thousands of artists such as Will Barnet, Louise Bourgeois, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Robert De Niro, Agnes Denes, Michael Goldberg, Robert Longo, Ana Mendieta, Robert Morris, Elizabeth Murray, Alice Neel, Philip Pavia, Howardena Pindell, Larry Rivers, Sylvia Sleigh, Kahinde Wiley, Hannah Wilke, David Wojnarowicz, and others speak about their work. The original recordings exist in a variety of formats, including U-Matic and VHS videotape, MiniDVs, sound cassettes and sound tape reels. ATOA digitized most of the video and sound recordings prior to donating the collection.

The collection also includes printed histories, board and program committee meeting minutes, financial statements, general correspondence files of the president and chair, attendance statistics, grant files, panel participant release forms, sixteen panel transcripts, a complete set of panel flyers (many are annotated) and other printed materials, three dismantled scrapbooks, as well as photographs, slides, and negatives of panels and panel participants.
Arrangement:
The records are arranged into nine series.

Series 1: Adminstrative Files, 1974-2013 (0.4 linear feet, Box 1)

Series 2: Director's and Chairman's Correspondence, 1977-2006 (0.4 linear feet, Box 1)

Series 3: Grant Files, 1977-2009 (1 linear foot, Boxes 1-2)

Series 4: Panel Release Forms, 1978-2012 (1 linear foot, Boxes 2-3)

Series 5: Panel Transcripts, 1981, 1986, 1988, 2017-2018 (1 folder, Box 3; 0.002 GB, ER01)

Series 6: Printed Materials, 1975-2015 (0.8 linear feet, Boxes 3-4; 0.434 GB, ER02)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1975-1989 (0.2 linear feet, Box 4)

Series 8: Photographic Materials, circa 1975-circa 2000 (1 linear foot, Boxes 4-5)

Series 9: Video and Sound Recordings of Events, 1977-2016 (59 linear feet, Boxes 6-65; 317.43 GB, ER03-ER04)
Biographical / Historical:
Established in 1974 and still active in New York, Artists Talk on Art is the art world's longest running and most prolific aesthetic panel discussion series organized by artists for artists. Founded by Lori Antonacci, Douglas I. Sheer, and Robert Wiegand, the forum has presented 6,000 artists in nearly 1,000 documented panels or dialogues. ATOA held its first panel, "Whatever Happened to Public Art," on January 10, 1975 and it drew a "crowd" of 77 people. In the decades that followed, ATOA presented dozens of panels or dialogues a year, tackling such diverse topics as "What is Happening with Conceptual Art," with Louise Lawler and Lawrence Weiner; "Painting and Photography: Defining the Difference," with Sarah Charlesworth, Jack Goldstein, Joseph Kosuth, Barbara Kruger, and Robert Mapplethorpe; "Organizing Arts Activism," with Lucy Lippard; "The Artist and the Epidemic—an information panel about AIDS"; "Cross-generational Views of Feminism"; and hundreds more.
Provenance:
The Artists Talk on Art (ATOA) records, including digital files of the video and sound recordings, were donated to the Archives in 2016 by Douglas Sheer, Chairman of ATOA.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art critics  Search this
Art dealers  Search this
Art historians  Search this
Artists  Search this
Historians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Transcripts
Video recordings
Citation:
Artists Talk on Art records, circa 1974-2018. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.artitalk
See more items in:
Artists Talk on Art records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-artitalk
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Online Media:

Hydroides crucigera

Preparation:
Alcohol (Ethanol)
Common name:
Polychaetes
Published Name:
Hydroides crucigera Mörch, 1863
USNM Number:
58543
See more items in:
Invertebrate Zoology
Annelida
Data Source:
NMNH - Invertebrate Zoology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/37f3acdb7-e0da-4713-bdb6-1514ddd14804
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhinvertebratezoology_872886

Hydroides crucigera

Preparation:
Alcohol (Ethanol)
Common name:
Polychaetes
Published Name:
Hydroides crucigera Mörch, 1863
USNM Number:
58544
See more items in:
Invertebrate Zoology
Annelida
Data Source:
NMNH - Invertebrate Zoology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/308202d81-5a5d-4637-a245-1ae997279a34
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhinvertebratezoology_872889

Pseudovermilia occidentalis

Preparation:
Alcohol (Ethanol)
Common name:
Polychaetes
Published Name:
Pseudovermilia occidentalis (McIntosh, 1885)
USNM Number:
58667
See more items in:
Invertebrate Zoology
Annelida
Data Source:
NMNH - Invertebrate Zoology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3367848d6-83ba-4049-b288-0f2f88ab46e2
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhinvertebratezoology_873214

Hydroides brachyacantha

Preparation:
Alcohol (Ethanol)
Common name:
Polychaetes
Published Name:
Hydroides brachyacantha Rioja, 1941
USNM Number:
58513
See more items in:
Invertebrate Zoology
Annelida
Data Source:
NMNH - Invertebrate Zoology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/37c450818-de9f-4859-a96b-47ef751bd7c1
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhinvertebratezoology_873229

Hesperostipa comata subsp. comata (Trin. & Rupr.) Barkworth

Biogeographical Region:
73 - Northwestern U.S.A.  Search this
Collector:
C. E. Larsen  Search this
Min. Elevation:
1341  Search this
Place:
Forest and Range Expt. Sta. National Forest Bitterroot. County Ravalli. Sec.34, T.5 N., R.20 W., Sleeping Child R.S. Slope South., Montana, United States, North America
Collection Date:
28 Jun 1938
Common name:
needle and thread
Taxonomy:
Plantae Monocotyledonae Cyperales Poaceae Pooideae
Published Name:
Hesperostipa comata subsp. comata (Trin. & Rupr.) Barkworth
Barcode:
03991779
USNM Number:
2477893
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3e0b2d15f-cd1f-4311-bf85-b856f0c30c84
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_15777593

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