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Lily Shuff papers, 1941-1975

Creator:
Shuff, Lily, 1906-  Search this
Shuff, Lily, 1906-  Search this
Subject:
Fabri, Ralph  Search this
Capp, Al  Search this
National Society of Painters in Casein  Search this
New York Society of Women Artists  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8590
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210769
AAA_collcode_shuflily
Theme:
Women
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210769
Online Media:

Esther G. Rolick papers, 1940-1985

Creator:
Rolick, Esther G., 1922-2008  Search this
Rolick, Esther G., 1922-2008  Search this
Subject:
Bearden, Romare  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob  Search this
Woodruff, Hale  Search this
Alston, Charles Henry  Search this
Cinque Gallery  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women art teachers  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9209
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211404
AAA_collcode_roliesth
Theme:
African American
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211404
Online Media:

Marian Simpson clippings and photographs, 1934-1958

Creator:
Simpson, Marian, 1899-1978  Search this
Simpson, Marian, 1899-1978  Search this
Subject:
Federal Art Project (Calif.)  Search this
Place:
United States -- Economic conditions -- 1918-1945 -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs
United States -- Social conditions -- 1933-1945 -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs
Topic:
New Deal, 1933-1939 -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs  Search this
Federal aid to the arts -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs  Search this
Federal aid to the public welfare -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs  Search this
Art and state -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women muralists  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Government Sponsorship of the Arts  Search this
New Deal  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9822
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212282
AAA_collcode_simpmari
Theme:
Women
Government Sponsorship of the Arts
New Deal
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_212282

Elizabeth Shoumatoff papers, 1945-1991

Creator:
Shoumatoff, Elizabeth, 1888-1980  Search this
Shoumatoff, Elizabeth, 1888-1980  Search this
Subject:
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano)  Search this
Topic:
Women painters  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10779
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214411
AAA_collcode_shoueliz
Theme:
Women
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_214411

Randye Sandel papers, 1968-2021

Creator:
Sandel, Randye, 1942-  Search this
Sandel, Randye, 1942-  Search this
Subject:
Market Street Program (Arts organization: Venice, Calif.)  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)22077
AAA_collcode_sandrand
Theme:
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_22077

Elisabeth Weber-Fulop papers, 1921-1966

Creator:
Weber-Fulop, Elizabeth, 1886-1966  Search this
Weber-Fulop, Elizabeth, 1886-1966  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women photographers  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15645
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)282174
AAA_collcode_webeelis
Theme:
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_282174
Online Media:

Elizabeth Shoumatoff papers

Creator:
Shoumatoff, Elizabeth  Search this
Names:
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945  Search this
Extent:
10.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1945-1991
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence consists of letters regarding portraits commissioned; photographs of art work including documentation of portraits done of the Ward family and the Shoumatoff family and presidential portraits, including her painting of Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated in the White House in 1967; studies for various portraits; clippings regarding her presidental portraits and her work; a series of engagement calendars; exhibition catalogs; a large group of color transparencies of paintings; and writings by Shoumatoff including the manuscript for her book FDR'S UNFINISHED PORTRAIT(1991).
Biographical / Historical:
Portrait painter. Born 1888. Died 1980.
Provenance:
Donated 1991 by Nicholas Shoumatoff and Sophie Ward, the son and daughter of Elizabeth Shoumatoff.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Portrait painters  Search this
Topic:
Women painters  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.shoueliz
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-shoueliz

Lily Shuff papers

Creator:
Shuff, Lily, 1906-  Search this
Names:
National Society of Painters in Casein  Search this
New York Society of Women Artists  Search this
Capp, Al, 1909-1979  Search this
Fabri, Ralph, 1894-1975  Search this
Extent:
2.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1941-1975
Summary:
The Lily Shuff papers date from 1941-1975 and measure 2.5 linear feet. Lily Shuff's work as a painter, participation in exhibitions, and contributions to professional arts organizations are documented in scrapbooks, printed material, biographical materials, correspondence, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The Lily Shuff papers date from 1941-1975 and measure 2.5 linear feet. Lily Shuff's work as a painter, participation in exhibitions, and contributions to professional arts organizations are documented in scrapbooks, biographical materials, correspondence, and photographs.

Biographical materials include Lily Shuff's awards from the Brooklyn Society of Artists, the American Society of Contemporary Artists, and the National Society of Painters in Casein; as well as biographical statements and resumes.

Letters include those written by Lily Shuff as Publicity Chair of the New York Society of Women Artists and associated mailing lists. Miscellaneous letters to Lily Shuff are found from friends and colleagues. Printed materials include clippings and exhibition files, and more materials of this nature are found within the scrapbooks. The photographs series primarily contains black and white photographs of Lily Shuff's casein and oil paintings.

Lily Shuff's scrapbooks make up the bulk of the collection. The scrapbooks chronologically document her travelling exhibitions and artistic career from 1941 to 1975. In her scrapbooks, she assembled exhibition announcements and catalogs, exhibition indexes, newspaper and magazine clippings, printed material pertaining to professional affiliations, photographs, and letters. Letters within the scrapbooks include letters and telegrams from family and friends in support of her exhibitions and awards, including correspondence with Ralph Fabri, founder and president of the National Society of Painters in Casein; letters from institutions to which she donated or sold her work; and letters from those who admired her work, including comic artist Al Capp. Letters related to her participation in, role on the jury of, or awards for exhibitions are also present. Newspaper and magazine clippings which review her work or exhibitions are predominant. Many exhibitions documented in the scrapbooks were organized by the National Association of Women in the Arts, but Lily Shuff's numerous one man shows and participation with other associations are also included. Photographs within the scrapbooks depict the artist, her work, and exhibitions.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1945-1973 (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 2: Letters, 1957-1974 (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 3: Printed materials, 1947-1974 (Box 1; 7 folders)

Series 4: Photographs, 1948-circa 1960 (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 5: Scrapbooks, 1941-1975 (Box 2-8; 2.1 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Painter Lily Shuff (1906-) lived and worked in New York City. She was educated at Hunter College and Columbia University, and studied at the Art Students League. She exhibited her work internationally and throughout the United States, but was especially active in New York City. Lily Shuff worked primarily in casein, watercolor, and oil, and painted abstract figurative and non-representational work. She had her first solo show at Argent Galleries in New York City in 1947.

Lily Shuff exhibited with and took on leadership roles in many professional associations. She was an active member of the New York Society of Women Artists, the National Society of Painters in Casein (which later became the National Society of Painters in Casein & Acrylic), and the National Association for Women. Lily Shuff also exhibited with the Brooklyn Arts Society and the Audubon Artists.
Provenance:
Lily Shuff donated her papers in 1975.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Lily Shuff papers, 1941-1975. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.shuflily
See more items in:
Lily Shuff papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-shuflily

Marian Simpson clippings and photographs

Creator:
Simpson, Marian Hahn, 1899-1978  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (Calif.)  Search this
Extent:
2 Reels (ca.20 items (on partial microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reels
Place:
United States -- Economic conditions -- 1918-1945 -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs
United States -- Social conditions -- 1933-1945 -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs
Date:
1934-1958
Scope and Contents:
Photographs and clippings.
Reel NDA 1: Photographs of marble panels for the Alameda County Courthouse in Oakland, California done for the Federal Art Project.
Reel NDA 3(frames 21-30): Newpaper clippings from San Francisco, Oakland and Los Angeles papers on Simpson's murals and mosaics, 1934 and 1958.[untitled on microfilm]
Biographical / Historical:
Marian Simpson (1899-1978) was a painter and mosaicist from Berkeley, Calif. Worked on the Federal Art Project of the Work Projects Administration.
Provenance:
Material on reel NDA 1 lent for microfilming 1964 by Marian Simpson; and material on reel NDA 3 lent 1964 by Lewis Ferbrache.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Muralists -- California -- Berkeley  Search this
Painters -- California -- Berkeley  Search this
Topic:
New Deal, 1933-1939 -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs  Search this
Federal aid to the arts -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs  Search this
Federal aid to the public welfare -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs  Search this
Art and state -- California -- Oakland -- Photographs  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women muralists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.simpmari
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-simpmari

Claire Falkenstein papers

Creator:
Falkenstein, Claire, 1908-1997  Search this
Names:
Coos Art Museum  Search this
Fresno Art Museum  Search this
Galerie Anderson-Mayer  Search this
Galerie Stadler  Search this
Jack Rutberg Fine Arts (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
John Bolles Gallery (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Los Angeles Museum of Art  Search this
Malvina Miller  Search this
Martha Jackson Gallery  Search this
Merging One Gallery  Search this
Mills College -- Faculty  Search this
Pond Farm Workshop  Search this
San Francisco Museum of Art  Search this
University of California, San Francisco. School of Fine Arts -- Faculty  Search this
Green, Ray, 1908-1997  Search this
Guggenheim, Peggy, 1898-  Search this
Kuh, Katharine  Search this
O'Donnell, May, 1906-2004  Search this
Sawyer, Kenneth B.  Search this
Still, Clyfford, 1904-  Search this
Still, Patricia  Search this
Tapie, Michel  Search this
Temko, Allan  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Wildenhain, Frans, 1905-1980  Search this
Extent:
42.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Notebooks
Diaries
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Sketches
Photographs
Movie scripts
Motion pictures (visual works)
Interviews
Date:
circa 1914-1997
bulk 1940-1990
Summary:
The papers of sculptor, painter, jewelry designer, and teacher Claire Falkenstein measure 42.8 linear feet and date from 1917 to her death in 1997. There is extensive correspondence with fellow artists, collectors, critics, friends, museums, and galleries. The collection also contains biographical materials, much of it collected and organized by Falkenstein, personal and business records, writings, diaries, exhibition files, commission files, teaching files, photographs, original artwork, scrapbooks, and printed materials. There is a short motion picture film of an interview with Falkenstein featuring the windows she designed for St. Basil's Church in Los Angeles.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of sculptor, painter, jewelry designer, and teacher Claire Falkenstein measure 42.8 linear feet and date from 1917 to her death in 1997. There is extensive correspondence with fellow artists, collectors, critics, friends, museums, and galleries. The collection also contains biographical materials, much of it collected and organized by Falkenstein, personal and business records, writings, diaries, exhibition files, commission files, teaching files, photographs, original artwork, scrapbooks, and printed materials. There is a short motion picture film of an interview with Falkenstein featuring the windows she designed for St. Basil's Church in Los Angeles.

Biographical material includes appointment calendars, awards and honorary degrees, interview transcripts, passports, resumes, wills, and scrapbooks. Scrapbooks were compiled by Falkenstein and focus primarily on her exhibitions at the Galerie Stadler and Gallery Meyer in 1959 and 1960. Also of interest are the "biography files" created and arranged by Falkenstein. These files contain material that she personally felt was the most important in documenting her activities each year. They include correspondence, exhibition catalogs, printed material, and invitations.

Measuring nine linear feet, correspondence is extensive and comprehensively documents Falkenstein's work, social life, relationships, and other business and personal activities. Correspondence dates from 1941 to 1997 and includes business letters and correspondence with friends and family. Her communications with friends, family, clients, gallery owners, collectors, museums, publishers, foundations, and grant agencies reveal many of her ideas and techniques. Individual correspondents include Ray Green, Peggy Guggenheim, Katharine Kuh, May O'Donnell, Ken Sawyer, Clyfford and Pat Still, Michel Tapie, Allan Temko, Mark Tobey, and Frans Wildenhain. Gallery and museum correspondence is with the San Francisco Museum of Art, Coos Art Museum, Los Angeles Museum of Art, Galerie Stadler (Paris), Gallery Mayer (Paris), Malvina Miller (New York), Martha Jackson Gallery (New York), Jack Rutberg Fine Arts (Los Angeles), Galerie Anderson-Mayer (Paris), and Bolles Gallery. Correspondence is also found in the Commission Files and Exhibition Files.

Personal and business records contain a wide variety of material documenting Falkenstein's business, financial, legal, professional, and personal transactions. Files are found for sales and prices, art inventories, smaller jewelry commissions, her work as a juror, her business with galleries, legal affairs and contracts, expenses, records of arts organizations to which she belonged, conferences, grants and fellowships, studio and house renovations, her Paris studio and Paris expenses, travel, donations, loans and consignments, conservation, art shipping, insurance, and taxes. Oversized visitor's logs contain comments from visitors to Falkenstein's studio in Venice, California.

Falkenstein maintained comprehensive documentation of her exhibitions from her first exhibition in the 1930s to the last one at the Merging One Gallery in 1996. Files include both a chronological record and individual record for nearly all of her exhibitions. Found with the files are correspondence, photographs, loan and shipping records, catalogs, announcements, clippings, articles, and other records. Most of the photographs related to exhibitions are found in the Photographs Series. The files for exhibitions at the Fresno Art Museum, Martha Jackson Gallery and Jack Rutberg Fine Art Gallery are particularly rich.

Commission files document nearly all of Falkenstein's public and private large-scale projects and often contain a visual record of the work, as well as correspondence, design notes, contracts, and expense reports. There is documentation of the St. Basils Church windows in Los Angeles; the Peggy Guggenheim gate in Venice, Italy; and the fountain at the California Savings and Loan, in Los Angeles; and many others. There is also a chronological record of her commissions. The bulk of the photographs of commissions are found in the Photograph series. Also, most of Falkenstein's jewelry design commissions are found in the Personal and Business Records series.

Falkenstein's work as a prolific writer, particularly in the 1940s and 1950s, is well-documented here through her numerous published articles in Arts and Architecture magazine, and the New York Herald-Tribune. Her work for Arts and Architecture was primarily written for the "Art Comments from San Francisco" section. She was living in Paris when she contributed an art news column to the New York Herald-Tribune. Also found here are five diaries and one journal dating from circa 1929-1978. The entries are inconsistent and concern mostly travel. The diaries from 1929 and 1934 are more personal. Falkenstein also maintained extensive notes and notebooks about artwork ideas, observations about art, research, and even drafts of letters. There are also many notes about various topics, including art and class notes. Additional writings are eclectic and cover a wide range of topics, including music, poetry, the script for Falkestein's film entitled Touching the Quick, and drafts of her unpublished book on murals. A handful of writings by others are found, most with annotations by Falkenstein.

Teaching files include Falkenstein's numerous lectures given while teaching at Mills College, Pond Farm Workshops, and California School of Fine Arts, and various symposiums and conferences. Also found are lesson plans, contracts, scattered correspondence, and notes. The files on her tenure at the Pond Farm Workshops are particularly interesting, with notes about her fellow teacher Frans Wildenhain and correspondence with workshop owners, Jane and Gordon Herr.

There are extensive photographs of Falkenstein, her family and friends, colleagues, commissions, exhibitions, and works of art. Included are many images of Falkenstein, of Falkenstien with her art, of Falkentstien working, and of Falkenstein's studio. There are numerous photographs of Falkenstein with friends, family, and colleagues in social or work settings. Also found are photographs of exhibition openings, installation views, and works of art exhibited. Additional photographs document Falkenstein's commissions, including images of her at work. Additional images of commissions may also be found in the Commission Series, but the bulk are filed here. There are numerous photographs of Falkenstein's works of art, including drawings, sculpture, jewelry, murals, lamps, and ceramics.

Falkenstein's papers include a large amount of sketches, sketchbooks, and drawings. Many of the sketches and drawings relate to her ideas about commissions and large sculpture, jewelry designs, and general sketches. Sketches are also found in the Commission Files. Also included are drawings by Mark Tobey and Michel Tapie, and others.

Finally, printed materials include general exhibition catalogs, newspapers clippings, and clippings of articles by and about Falkenstein. Also included are books that have been inscribed and signed by the author.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 9 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1934-1997 (Box 1-4, 41; 4.3 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1931-1997 (Box 5-13; 9 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal and Business Records, 1936-1997 (Box 14-17, 41, 46-49; 4.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Exhibitions, 1930-1996 (Box 18-21, 42, OV 50; 3.3 linear feet)

Series 5. Commissions, 1930-1992 (Box 21-22, OV 50-54 ; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 6: Writings, circa 1929-1993 (Box 22-26, 42, 55; 4.6 linear feet)

Series 7: Teaching Files, 1929-1995 (Box 26; .8 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1917-1997 (Box 27-35, 43, 55-56; 9.5 linear feet)

Series 9: Artwork, circa 1937-1995 (Box 36-37, 44, 57; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 10: Printed Materials, circa 1914-1990 (Box 37-40, 45, 58; 3.9 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Claire Falkenstein (1908-1997) spent the majority of her life working as an artist, sculptor, jewelry designer, teacher, and writer in California.

Claire Falkenstein was born in 1908 and grew up in Coos Bay, Oregon. In 1920, Falkenstein and her family moved to Berkeley, California, where she attended high school and then college at the University of California at Berkeley, studying philosophy, anthropology, and art. She graduated in 1930. Falkenstein had her first solo show at the East-West Gallery in San Francisco in 1930, the only member of her class to have an exhibition before graduation.

During the early 1930s, Falkenstein studied at Mills College with modernist sculptor Alexander Archipenko. There she also met Bauhaus artists Laszlo Moholy-Nagy and Gyorgy Kepes. Falkenstein married her high school sweetheart, Richard McCarthy in 1936.

In 1944, Falkenstein had her first New York exhibition at the Bonestall Gallery. At that time, Falkenstein's primary mediums were stone and wood. However, she became increasingly experimental with new materials that included sheet aluminum, Cor-Ten steel, glass, plastics, and welded wire rods while maintaining a connection to organic and natural forms. Her work in jewelry design was an outlet for exploring these new materials, forms, and techniques on a small scale. As her work grew physically larger, so did her recognition and it was her work in sculpture that won her a faculty appointment at the California School of Fine Arts from 1947-1949. It was here that she met Patricia and Clyfford Still, Hassel Smith, and Richard Diebenkorn.

In 1948, Falkenstein was invited to exhibit at the Salon des Realites Nouvelle in Paris, her first European show. She eventually moved to Europe in 1950 and had studios in Paris, Venice, and Rome. While in Europe, Falkenstein executed a number of large scale commissions, including the stair screen for Galerie Stadler (1955), grotto gates for Princess Pignatelli's villa in Rome (1957), and the bronze, steel, and the glass gate at the Peggy Guggenheim Museum in Venice (1961). While in Paris, she became acquainted with noted art critic Michel Tapie, with whom she maintained a life-long friendship.

During the 1940s and 1950s Falkenstein was a regular contributor to Arts and Architecture magazine, most often writing the "Art Comments from San Francisco" section. While in Paris, she also wrote a column on art news for the New York Herald Tribune.

Falkenstein returned to the United States in 1962, eventually renovating a studio space in Venice, California. It was here that she conceived her largest commissions. In 1965, Falkenstein received a commission from the California Savings and Loan to create a sculpture for a large fountain at the front of the bank in downtown Los Angeles. The copper tube fountain, entitled "Structure and Flow #2," was the first of many large scale public art commissions that Falkenstein completed during her years in California. Her most important commission in the United States, completed in 1969, was for the doors, rectory gates and grills and stained-glass windows for St. Basil's Church on Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles. The eight doors and fifteen rectory screens, including 80 foot high windows in the nave, were an expansion of the "never ending screen" concept that Falkenstein executed with the Pignatelli commission in Rome. She continued to use this motif in her work throughout her career.

Claire Falkenstein worked as an arts instructor, visiting artist, and guest lecturer at many colleges, workshops, and schools in California. Her first position was at Mills College from 1946-1947. Shortly thereafter, she was appointed to the faculty at the California School of Fine Arts and later taught in the Extension Divisions of the University of California, Berkeley. She taught classes at California State Polytechnic University, California State University at Davis, and the Anna Head School. Falkenstein also taught art at the Pond Farm Workshops in California, and lectured at numerous colleges and museums. She served on many juried art shows in Southern California.

Falkenstein was acquainted with many artists, writers, instructors, collectors, gallery owners, and critics. Close friends included Esther and Bob Robles, Clyfford and Patricia Still, Michel Tapie, Allan Temko, Mark Tobey, Frans Wildenhain, and other notable figures in the art world.

Falkenstein continued to complete large scale private and public commissioned sculptures during the 1960s through the 1980s, including work for the University of Southern California, Hyland Biological Laboratory, California State University at Dominquez Hills and the California State Department of Motor Vehicles. Throughout her career, Falkenstein's work was featured in numerous exhibitions across the country. Her sculpture and other artwork can be found in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Coos Art Museum, Harvard University Art Museum, University of Southern California Fisher Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Tate Gallery.

Falkenstein died in 1997 at the age of 89.
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds two oral history interviews with Claire Falkenstein. The interview on April 13, 1965 was conducted by Betty Hoag and the one on March 2 and 21, 1995 was conducted by Paul Karlstrom.
Provenance:
The Claire Falkenstein papers were donated in 1997 by Steffan Wacholtz and Nancy Kendall, trustees for the Claire Falkenstein Trust.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- California  Search this
Painters -- California  Search this
Jewelers -- California  Search this
Educators -- California  Search this
Authors -- California  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art patronage  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Artists' studios  Search this
Jewelry  Search this
Poetry  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women designers  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Notebooks
Diaries
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Sketches
Photographs
Movie scripts
Motion pictures (visual works)
Interviews
Citation:
Claire Falkenstein papers, circa 1914-1997, bulk 1940-1990. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.falkclai
See more items in:
Claire Falkenstein papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-falkclai
Online Media:

Elisabeth Weber-Fulop papers

Creator:
Weber-Fulop, Elisabeth, 1886-1966  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
1921-1966
Summary:
Papers of painter Elisabeth Weber-Fulop measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1921 to 1966. Biographical material, letters, printed material, and photographs document Weber-Fulop's career and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
Papers of painter Elisabeth Weber-Fulop measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1921 to 1966. Biographical material, letters, printed material, and photographs document Weber-Fulop's career and artwork.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 4 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1964-1966 (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Letters, 1936-1966 (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 3: Printed Material, 1940-1955 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 4: Photographs, 1921-1965 (Box 1; 9 folders)
Biographical / Historical:
Painter Elisabeth Lisel Weber-Fulop (1886-1966), a resident of Duxbury, Massachusetts, was born in Hungary and raised in Vienna, Austria by adoptive parents. She studied art in Vienna with Ludwig Miclek and in Paris. first at the Academy Colarossi and, later, with Jacques Emil Blanche and Lucian Simon.

At age 18, Weber-Fulop had her first solo exhibition at the Albert Durer Gallery in Vienna. She travelled to the United States to paint a portrait of Austrian opera singer Maria Jeritza and then moved to New York City with her husband, Emil J. Weber, an architect. The couple relocated to Duxbury, Massachusetts, in 1945 where Weber-Fulop remained until her death in 1966.

Weber-Fulop painted portraits, still lifes, and interior scenes. While still in Vienna, she painted the interiors of the palace of Kaiserin Maria Theresa; in New York, she depicted the interiors of the Armor Rooms at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Governor's room at City Hall. Her works were exhibited in Paris, Vienna, Budapest, Milan, and Zurich. In the United States she exhibited at various museums and galleries including the Findlay Galleries in New York City.
Provenance:
The Elisabeth Weber-Fulop papers were donated in 2009 by the Director and Chief Curator of the Museum of Art, Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute in Utica, New York, Paul Schweizer, who had received them from Weber-Fulop's estate.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women photographers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Elisabeth Weber-Fulop papers, 1921-1966. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.webeelis
See more items in:
Elisabeth Weber-Fulop papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-webeelis

Esther G. Rolick papers

Creator:
Rolick, Esther G., 1922-  Search this
Names:
Cinque Gallery  Search this
Alston, Charles Henry, 1907-1977  Search this
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Woodruff, Hale, 1900-1980  Search this
Extent:
3.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Date:
1940-1985
Summary:
The papers of painter and educator Esther Rolick measure 3.7 linear feet and date from 1940 to 1985. The papers document Rolick's career through correspondence with friends and colleagues; writings, including unpublished illustrated books for children; business records; printed material and scrapbooks of clippings and exhibition catalogs; artwork including a sketchbook; photographs of artwork, travels around the world, and personal photographs; and sound recordings of interviews with prominent African American artists.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and educator Esther Rolick measure 3.7 linear feet and date from 1940 to 1985. The papers document Rolick's career through correspondence with friends and colleagues; writings, including unpublished illustrated books for children; business records; printed material and scrapbooks of clippings and exhibition catalogs; artwork including a sketchbook; photographs of artwork, travels around the world, and personal photographs; and sound recordings of interviews with prominent African American artists.

Correspondence includes personal letters from friends and letters related to Rolick's exhibitions. Some of the letters are in Spanish. Writings include poems by Rolick and two unpublished books for children, primarily of illustrations.

Personal business records and professional activity files include financial materials related to Rolick's travels around the world, statements, promissory notes, certificates, and exhibition guestbooks.

Printed material consists mainly of exhibition announcements and catalogs, with some newspaper clippings. Additional printed material can be found in Series 6: Scrapbooks.

Photographs consist primarily of personal photographs, photographs of travels to Bogota, Colombia and Palermo, Italy, and photographs of artwork. Artwork includes oversized sketches by classmates and one small sketchbook of drawings.

Of note are untranscribed interviews conducted by Rolick for her class "Black Music and Art," at Mercy College, circa 1970-1971. Interviewees include Charles Alston, Romare Bearden, Jean Hutson, Jacob Lawrence, Norman Lewis, Hale Woodruff, and artists affiliated with the Cinque Gallery, Weusi Gallery, and SPIRAL artist's group.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged chronologically into eight series.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1946-1985 (1.3 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 2: Writings, 1947-1971 (0.1 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 3: Personal Business Records and Professional Activity, 1968-1974 (0.2 linear feet: Box 2)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1944-1980 (0.3 linear feet: Box 2)

Series 5: Photographs, circa 1940-1985 (0.6 linear feet: Box 2-3, 5)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, circa 1944-1972 (0.7 linear feet; Box 3, 5)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1944-1985 (0.1 linear feet; Box 3, 5, OV)

Series 8: Interviews 1970-1971 (0.4 linear feet; Box 3-4)
Biographical / Historical:
New York realist painter and educator Esther G. Rolick (1922-2008) taught art for two decades at Mercy College, where she helped to develop programs including a class, "Black Music and Art," for which she interviewed prominent Harlem artists and musicians.

Rolick studied at the Art Students League and had her first solo exhibition of drawings at Jacques Seligmann & Co. in 1947. She subsequently participated in exhibitions around the country and internationally in Haiti. In the 1960s she began teaching at Mercy College and helped to develop several innovative programs there. Rolick also traveled extensively and painted in places such as Bogota, Colombia and Palermo, Italy.
Provenance:
The Esther G. Rolick papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Esther Rolick in a series of installments between 1970 and 1985.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Educators -- New York (State)  Search this
Painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women art teachers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Citation:
Esther G. Rolick papers, 1940-1985. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.roliesth
See more items in:
Esther G. Rolick papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-roliesth

Oral history interview with Margaret Tomkins, 1984 June 6

Interviewee:
Tomkins, Margaret, 1916-2002  Search this
Tomkins, Margaret, 1916-2002  Search this
Interviewer:
Guenther, Bruce  Search this
Subject:
FitzGerald, James  Search this
Artists Gallery (Seattle, Wash.)  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Artists -- Northwestern States -- Interviews  Search this
Art, Modern -- Northwestern States  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12308
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212455
AAA_collcode_tomkin84
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212455
Online Media:

Eugenie M. Heller papers

Creator:
Heller, Eugenie M., 1868-1952  Search this
Names:
Aman-Jean, Edmond, b. 1859 or 60  Search this
Baraduc, Jeanne  Search this
Boissiere, Terese R.  Search this
Cassatt, Mary, 1844-1926  Search this
Champney, Elizabeth W. (Elizabeth Williams), 1850-1922  Search this
Dicksee, Francis Bernard, Sir, 1853-1928  Search this
Evans, Joe  Search this
Guillemin, Armand  Search this
Janvier, Catharine A. (Catharine Ann), 1841-1923  Search this
Janvier, Thomas Allibone, 1849-1913  Search this
Rodin, Auguste, 1840-1917  Search this
Sargent, John Singer, 1856-1925  Search this
Weir, Julian Alden, 1852-1919  Search this
Extent:
35 Items ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1878-1936
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence with other artists, and a one page autobiographical sketch, 1936.
Correspondents include: Edmond Aman-Jean, Jeanne Baraduc, Terese R. Boissiere, Mary Cassatt, Elizabeth Champney, Frank Dicksee, Joe Evans, Armand Guillemin, Catherine A. and Thomas Janvier, Auguste Rodin, John S. Sargent, and Julian A. Weir.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, craftsperson. Born 1868, died 1952.
Provenance:
Microfilmed 1956 by the Archives of American Art with other art-related papers in the Manuscript Division of the New York Public Library. Included in the microfilming project were selected papers of the Art Division and the Prints Division.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State)  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State)  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.helleuge
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-helleuge

Cleve Gray papers

Creator:
Gray, Cleve  Search this
Names:
Berry-Hill Galleries  Search this
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Connecticut. Commission on Arts, Tourism, Culture, History and Film  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Neuberger Museum of Art  Search this
Pratt Institute  Search this
Princeton University  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
Barzun, Jacques, 1907-  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Davis, Jim, 1901-1974  Search this
Dillenberger, Jane  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Ernst, Jimmy, 1920-1984  Search this
Gabo, Naum, 1890-1977  Search this
Grace, Louise N.  Search this
Gray, Francine du Plessix  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Richter, Hans, 1888-1976  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Villon, Jacques, 1875-1963  Search this
Weber, Nicholas Fox, 1947-  Search this
Extent:
9.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Poems
Articles
Photographs
Reviews (documents)
Notes
Illustrations
Notebooks
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Manuscripts
Paintings
Prints
Watercolors
Drawings
Lectures
Date:
1933-2005
Summary:
The Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005, measure 9.2 linear feet. Papers include biographical material, alphabetical files, writings, artwork, audio/visual records, artifacts, printed material, and photographs. Extensive alphabetical files contain personal and professional correspondence as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Especially well-documented are: Gray's involvement with the Vietnam protest movement; and Threnody, his best-known work composed of fourteen large panels lamenting the dead of both sides sides in Vietnam, commissioned by the Neuberger Museum of Art.
Scope and Content Note:
The Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005, measure 9.2 linear feet. Papers include biographical material, alphabetical files, writings, artwork, audio/visual records, artifacts, printed material, and photographs. Extensive alphabetical files contain personal and professional correspondence as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Especially well-documented are: Gray's involvement with the Vietnam movement; and Threnody, his best-known work composed of fourteen large panels lamenting the dead of both sides sides in Vietnam, commissioned by the Neuberger Museum of Art.

Among the biographical material are award and membership certificates, biographical notes, and personal documentation.

The alphabetical files contain Cleve Gray's personal and professional correspondence, as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Correspondence is with friends and family, colleagues, publishers, museum curators and directors, art dealers, collectors, and fans. Among the correspondents of note are: Jacques Barzun, James E. Davis, Naum Gabo, Louise N. Grace, Hans and Fridel Richter, and Jacques and Gaby Villon. Other substantial correspondence includes: Berry-Hill Galleries, Betty Parsons Gallery, Connecticut Commission on the Arts, Jacques Seligmann and Co., Neuberger Museum of Art, Pratt Institute, Princeton University, and Rhode Island School of Design. Subject files mostly consist of correspondence, but include printed material and some photographs. Among the subject files are: Art Collection of Cleve and Francine Gray, Artist-Dealer Consignments and Visual Artists' Rights Act of 1989, Artists' Tax Equity Act of 1979, Promised Gifts to Museums, Threnody, Vestments, and Vietnam Protest. Of particular interest are files relating to the Estate of Hans Richter (Cleve Gray, executor), and Gray's research correspondence and illustrations for his Cosmopolitan article "Women-Leaders of Modern Art."

Writings are manuscripts and drafts, research materials, notes, and miscellaneous writings by Cleve Gray and other authors. Those by Gray include articles and catalog introductions on a wide range of art-related topics, as well as book and exhibition reviews. Also found are a book proposal, texts and notes for lectures and talks, miscellaneous notes, poems, political statements, and student papers. Of particular interest are autobiographical notes in the form of a chronology that his biographer, Nicholas Fox Weber, cited as an "autochronology."

Among the writings by other authors are pieces about Cleve Gray including Nicholas Fox Weber's manuscript Cleve Gray. A significant amount of material relates to three books edited by Gray: David Smith by David Smith: Sculpture and Writings, Hans Richter, and John Marin. Research material survives for an unpublished volume, Naum Gabo. Also included are notes relating to his translation of A l'Infinitif by Marcel Duchamp. Jane Daggett Dillenberger is represented by a lecture, "The Resurrection in Art." The remaining items by other authors are unsigned; of particular interest is a small notebook of reminiscences and notes about Jackson Pollock.

Artwork by Cleve Gray consists mostly drawings and sketches, and a small number of paintings, prints, and watercolors. Works by other artists consist are an unsigned mobile of paper cut-outs, possibly by Alexander Calder, and a pencil drawing signed Dick (probably Richard Avedon).

Audio recordings are a radio broadcast featuring Cleve Gray, several lectures by Gray on John Marin, and a lecture titled "Meaning in the Visual Arts." Other recordings are of Hans Richter and an interview with Jimmy Ernst conducted by Francine du Plessix Gray. Also found is a videocassette of "Glenville School Students at SUNY (Lincoln Center Activity)."

Artifacts are a Chinese scroll representative of those that hung in Cleve Gray's studio, two of his paintbrushes, Aberdeen-Angus Breeders' Association blue ribbon, and Neuberger Museum of Art Lifetime Achievement Award.

The vast majority of printed material - articles, clippings, exhibition catalogs and announcements, reproductions of art work, etc. - are about or by Cleve Gray. Miscellaneous items and publications mentioning Gray consist of annual reports, brochures, calendars, newsletters, programs, etc. Clippings about Vietnam and Vietnam protest memorabilia reflect his passionate involvement in the anti-war movement; a small number of these items mention Gray or were written by him.

Photographs are of artwork, events, people, places, and miscellaneous subjects. Most of the art work appearing in the photographs is by Cleve Gray and includes images of destroyed paintings. Also found is an original print of Photo Abstraction by Gray, circa 1934. Of particular note are photographs of Threnody, among them preparatory drawings and views of the work in progress. Photographs of artwork by other artists include Louise N. Grace, Jacques Lipchitz, John Marin, Hans Richter, and Jacques Villon.

Photographs of people are mainly portraits of Gray, and views of him with his wife and sons. Other individuals appearing in photographs are Hans Richter and some of Richter's descendants. Pictures of places consist of Gray's studio.

Events are an unidentified exhibition opening. Miscellaneous subjects are mostly exhibition installations. Illustrations consist of photographs published in David Smith by David Smith: Sculpture and Writings. Also found are small number of negatives and color transparencies.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 8 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1943-circa 2001 (Box 1; 0.1 linear ft.)

Series 2: Alphabetical Files, 1936-2005 (Boxes 1-5, 9; 4.3 linear ft.)

Series 3: Writings, 1935-2000 (Boxes 5-6; 0.85 linear ft.)

Series 4: Artwork, circa 1933-1987 (Boxes 6, 9, OV 12; 0.45 linear ft.)

Series 5: Audio/Visual Records, 1971-1989 (Box 6; 0.25 linear ft.)

Series 6: Artifacts, 1957-1999 (Box 6, RD 11; 0.45 linear ft.)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1933-2005 (Boxes 7-8; 1.25 linear ft.)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1934-2002 (Boxes 8-10; 1.15 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Abstract Expressionist painter, sculptor, and writer Cleve Gray (1918-2004) lived and worked in Connecticut where he was politically active in the Vietnam protest movement and other liberal causes.

Born Cleve Ginsberg in New York City (the family changed its name to Gray in 1936), he attended the Ethical Culture School and at a young age developed a fascination with color and paint. At the urging of friends, Cleve's parents allowed him to accompany a school friend for lessons with George Bellows' student Antonia Nell. She encouraged and inspired the young artist, and a still life he painted in her class was shown at the National Academy of Design's 1932 annual exhibition. Miss Nell also introduced him to Louise N. Grace, an artist who became a good friend and had a lasting influence on him. While a student at Phillips Academy, Cleve studied painting with Bartlett Hayes and aspired to paint in France. Upon his graduation in 1936, he was awarded the Samuel F. B. Morse Prize for most promising art student.

Gray's mother was always supportive of his career choice. His businessman father, who didn't understand his son's desire to be an artist, insisted on a college education. Cleve chose Princeton, where he majored in art and archaeology, and studied painting with James E. Davis. His senior thesis was on Chinese landscape painting; both Eastern philosophy and art were long-term influences on Gray's work and outlook. He graduated summa cum laude in 1940, and then spent several months painting while living at the farm of a family friend in Mendham, New Jersey.

When a doctor suggeted that a dry climate might relieve sinus and asthma problems, Gray moved to Tucson, Arizona. Once settled in the desert, he contacted Louise N. Grace, whom he had met as a young teenager through his art instructor. Miss Grace, an artist and daughter of the founder of W. R. Grace and Co., was a highly cultured and independent woman older than his parents. The summer before Gray entered Phillips Academy, she had hired him to brush ground color onto canvases for murals she was painting for "Eleven Arches," her home in Tuscon then under construction. Miss Grace invited Gray to visit "Eleven Arches" to see the completed murals, and despite the substantial age difference, their friendship deepened; Gray found in her intellectual and spiritual guidance that was lacking in his own family. He remained in Tucson until enlisting in the U. S. Army in 1942, and they corresponded frequently during the the war. When a stroke in 1948 prevented Miss Grace from participating in the extensive tour of Europe she was arranging for a small group of friends, including Gray, she provided sufficient funds and insisted he make the trip on his own. Another stroke, suffered while Gray was traveling, left her in a coma; he was not permitted to see her again. Upon her death in 1954, Gray inherited "Eleven Arches."

Between 1943 and 1946, Gray was stationed in England, France, and Germany, serving in Army Signal Intelligence. Most of his work was performed at night, and he spent his free time drawing. While in London, Gray produced many colored pencil drawings of buildings that had been bombed. In France, a Red Cross volunteered to introduce him to Jacques Villon; although unfamiliar with the artist, Gray knew of Villon's brother, Marcel Duchamp, and accepted the invitation. Jacques and Gaby Villon lived near Gray's billet and he became a frequent visitor. Their friendship was important to his development as an artist. After being discharged from the Army in 1946, Gray remained in France to work with Villon who introduced him to the study of color and the concept of intellectual quality in painting. Gray also studied informally with André Lhote, Villon's former teacher. "American Painters in Paris," an exhibition presented in 1946 at Galerie Durand-Ruel, included work by Cleve Gray.

He returned to New York City in 1946. In the tight post-war rental market Gray managed to find a small room upstairs from a grocery store on East 106th Street for use as a studio. He commenced painting the London Ruins series based on drawings he had made during the war, and began thinking about exhibiting in New York. Gray secured introductions to Pierre Matisse, Curt Valentin, and Dorothy Miller. They encouraged him, but no opportunities came his way until Germain Seligmann, whose gallery was expanding its scope to include contemporary art, followed the advice of Curt Valentin and looked at Gray's work. Gary's first solo exhibition, held at Jacques Seligmann and Co., included selections from the London Ruins series, paintings done in Maine and Arizona, and a few portraits. The New York Times called it "an auspicious first," and one of the London Ruins series was selected by Edward Alden Jewell for the "Critic's Exhibition" at Grand Central Gallery.

Gray found New York City too frenetic. In 1949 he bought a large, old house in Warren, Connecticut, and lived and worked at "Graystones" for the remainder of his life. Half of a 6-car garage was converted to a studio; many years later, his studio moved to a barn, its renovation and design planned by sculptor and architect Tony Smith.

He married Francine du Plessix in 1957. Always interested in literature and philosophy, in the 1960s Francine du Plessix Gray began contributing articles to The New Yorker and is still affiliated with the magazine. Her reviews and articles appeared in prominent publications, and she wrote several award-winning novels and biographies. Their sons, Thaddeus and Luke (now a painter), were born in 1959 and 1961. Francine's mother, Tatiana du Plessix (the hat designer Tatiana of Saks), and step-father, the sculptor Alexander Liberman (also former art director of Vogue and later editorial director of Condé Nast publications) became Cleve Gray's closest friends.

The paintings and drawings of Cleve Gray - first consisting of figures and portraits, and then abstract compositions - were often produced in series. The earliest series, London Ruins, grew from the colored pencil drawings made while stationed in London during World War II. Travels to France, Italy, Greece, Morocco, Hawaii, Spain, Egypt, Japan, and Czechoslovakia, inspired many series, among them: Etruscan, Augury, Ceres, Demeter Landscape, Hera, Morocco, Hawaii, Ramses, Perne, Hatshepsut, Roman Walls, Zen, and Prague. His hometown, the Holocaust, and musicians inspired other series: Warren, Sleepers Awake!, Bela Bartok, and Four Heads of Anton Bruckner. Some series were works on paper, others were collage canvases, and a few series later spawned prints. Gray began using acrylics in the 1940s. Although the medium offered many benefits, he did not always like its appearance and frequently returned to oils. Around 1966 Gray was painting almost exclusively with acrylic, and eventually developed a technique of thinning the paint and applying successive layers of color (sometimes by pouring or with a sponge) on cotton duck rather than traditional canvas.

Gray was attracted to sculpture, too, working in that medium at different points in his career. His first sculpture, in plaster, was completed in 1959. In the early 1960s he visited a commercial sand-casting foundry and became excited about learning to cast in bronze. He made about a dozen sculptures to cast in sand, but due to too much undercutting, their casting became too difficult a problem. Lava flows seen while in Hawaii during 1970 and 1971 inspired a return to sculpture. This time, he used wood, papier maché, and metal. Gray then decided these pieces should be cast in bronze, and he was determined to do it himself. Friends taught him the lost wax process and he began working at the Tallix Foundry in Peekskill, New York where, over the next year, he cast about forty bronzes.

Gray's best known work is Threnody, a lament for the dead of both sides in Vietnam. In 1972, Gray received a commission to fill a very large gallery of the soon-to-open Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, College at Purchase) designed by Philip Johnson. Friends of the Neuberger Museum paid his expenses and Gray, who was enormously excited about the project he considered a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, donated his time. Developing plans for the execution of Threnody consumed most of his time during 1972 and 1973. Composed of a series of fourteen panels, each approximately twenty feet square, the piece presented a number of technical challenges. It was constructed and painted in situ during the summer and early fall of 1973. Since then, Threnody has been reinstalled at the Neuberger Museum of Art on several occasions.

Gray was commissioned to design liturgical vestments for two Episcopal churches in Connecticut in the 1970s. A chasuble, stoles, and a mitre were commissioned by the Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut in 1984.

He won the "Outdoor Art at the Station Competition," for Union Station, Hartford, Connecticut. His very large porcelain enamel tile mural, Movement in Space, was installed on the façade of the transportation center in 1988.

Gray began writing occasional articles and exhibition reviews in the late 1940s. His concern with rational structure in art led him to question Abstract Expressionism and write "Narcissus in Chaos." This article, published in 1959 by The American Scholar, drew considerable attention. In 1960, Cosmopolitan published "Women - Leaders of Modern Art" that featured Nell Blaine, Joan Brown, Elaine de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Sonia Gretchoff, Grace Hartigan, Ethel Magafan, Louise Nevelson, and Georgia O'Keeffe. Between 1960 and 1970, Gray was a contributing editor of Art In America, producing numerous articles (a few co-authored with Francine) and reviews for the periodical. He edited three books, David Smith by David Smith: Scupture and Writings, Hans Richter, and John Marin, all published by Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, and translated Marcel Duchamp's A l'Infinitif.

During the early 1960s, Gray became intensely focused on the situation in Vietnam. His first artistic response came in 1963 with Reverend Quan Duc, painted to commemorate a Buddhist monk who had immolated himself. Francine, too, felt strongly about the issue and over time the couple became increasingly active in the anti-war movement. They joined a number of organizations and helped to found a local chapter of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam. The years 1968 and 1969 were an especially intense and active period for the Grays. They protested, wrote and spoke out against the war, raised funds to support anti-war political candidates, and on a few occasions were arrested and jailed. Writing for Art in America, editing the book series, and anti-war activities left little time for his art. In 1970 Gray refocused his attention on painting.

Beginning in 1947, Gray was always represented by a New York Gallery: Jacques Seligmann and Co. (1947-1959), Staempfli Gallery (1960-1965), Saidenberg Gallery (1965-1968), Betty Parsons Gallery (1968-1983), Armstrong Gallery (1984-1987), and Berry-Hill Galleries (1988-2003). He was represented by galleries in other cities, as well, but not as consistently or for such long periods.

He exhibited extensively in group and solo exhibitions throughout the United States and internationally. In addition to numerous solo exhibitions presented by the dealers who represented Gray, there were retrospective exhibitions at: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Brooklyn Museum, Columbus Museum of Art, Krannert Art Museum (University of Illinois, Champaign), Princeton University Art Museum, Rhode Island School of Design, and Wadsworth Atheneum.

Many museums' permanent collections include the work of Cleve Gray, among them: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Butler Institute of American Art, Columbus Museum of Art, Neuberger Museum of Art (SUNY, College at Purchase), the Museum of Modern Art (New York), Newark Museum, Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Phillips Collection, Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Smithsonian Institution, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Yale University Art Gallery.

Cleve Gray served as artist-in-residence at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art in 1963 and at the Honolulu Academy of Arts in 1970, both sponsored by Ford Foundation programs. In 1980, he was appointed an artist-in-residence at the American Academy in Rome, where Francine concurrently served as a writer-in-residence; they returned for shorter periods during each of the subsequent seven years. Cleve Gray was presented the Connecticut Arts Award in 1987, and the Neuberger Museum of Art Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999. He was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Hartford in 1992, and was elected a member of The American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1998. In addition, he was a trustee of the Neuberger Museum of Art, New York Studio School, Rhode Island School of Design, and Wadsworth Atheneum.

Cleve Gray hit his head and suffered a massive subdural hematoma after falling on ice outside of his home. He died the following day, December 8, 2004.
Separated Material:
Exhibition catalogs and announcements and two scrapbooks donated to the Archives in 1967 and 1968 were microfilmed on reels D314-D315. Items on reel D315, transferred to the Smithsonian American Art Museum Library in 1975, are not described in this finding aid.
Provenance:
The Cleve Gray papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Mr. Gray in 1967 and 1968. The bulk of the collection was given by his widow, Francine du Plessix Gray, in 2007 and 2008.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordigs with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Connecticut  Search this
Painters -- Connecticut  Search this
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Vietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975 -- Protest Movements -- United States  Search this
Designers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Poems
Articles
Photographs
Reviews (documents)
Notes
Illustrations
Notebooks
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Manuscripts
Paintings
Prints
Watercolors
Drawings
Lectures
Citation:
Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.grayclev
See more items in:
Cleve Gray papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-grayclev
Online Media:

Jay DeFeo papers, circa 1940s-1970s

Creator:
DeFeo, Jay, 1929-1989  Search this
DeFeo, Jay, 1929-1989  Search this
Subject:
Hedrick, Wally  Search this
Berman, Wallace  Search this
Terrill, Ruth  Search this
Blum, Irving  Search this
Conner, Bruce  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women photographers  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Expressionism (Art)  Search this
Symbolism  Search this
Beat generation  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Photography  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7417
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209575
AAA_collcode_defejay
Theme:
Women
Lives of American Artists
Photography
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209575
Online Media:

Nell (Eleanor) and Stanley Sinton papers

Creator:
Sinton, Nell, 1910-1997  Search this
Sinton, Stanley H., d. 1954  Search this
Names:
DeFeo, Jay, 1929-1989  Search this
Hedrick, Wally, 1928-2003  Search this
Extent:
7.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
[circa 1920]-1993
Scope and Contents:
The Nell (Eleanor) and Stanley Sinton papers measure 7.9 linear feet and date from circa 1920-1993. Included are biographical material; personal and professional correspondence; a bound copy of "Nell Sinton, An Adventurous Spirit: The Life of A California Artist," (oral history, University of California, Berkeley, 1993); an album, "Happy School Days," (c. 1920s); writings; financial material; teaching material, including lecture, workshop and seminar outlines, lesson plans, writings, and notes; personal photographs and a family photo album and color slides and transparencies of Sinton's work; scrapbooks containing printed articles; works of art consisting of a portfolio of drawings, sketches, gouaches, and mixed media paintings; and an appraisal of the Sinton Art Collection; printed material consisting of exhibition catalogs and announcements for Sinton and other artists. Motion picture films include footage by Coni Beeson of Sinton at work with Delia Moon, and "Scroll: The Social Development of an American Female" (1976). A small portion of the material including letters from Jay DeFeo and Wally Hedrick (DeFeo's former husband) to Eleanor (Nell) and Stanley Sinton concerning her finances, personal and professional life (including Christmas cards and invitations to parties); and exhibition announcements can be found on microfilm reel 858.
Biographical / Historical:
Nell (Eleanor) Sinton (1910-1997) was a painter, collector and educator in San Francisco, Calif.
Related Materials:
Also in the Archives lent for microfilming on reel 860 are correspondence, some relating to the San Francisco Hall of Justice mural and the controversy surrounding the choice of John Garth as artist; a scrapbook containing correspondence, drawings, and printed material; and exhibition catalogs, announcements, and printed material
Provenance:
In 1974 Sinton donated papers on reel 858 and lent for microfilming papers on reel 860. She donated motion picture film and 0.4 feet of additional papers between 1974 and 1978. Additions were received in 1999 from the daughters of Nell Sinton, Joan Dodd and Margot Biestman.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Educators -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.sintnell
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sintnell

Oral history interview with Jay DeFeo

Interviewee:
DeFeo, Jay, 1929-1989  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Names:
University of California, Berkeley -- Students  Search this
Conner, Bruce, 1933-2008  Search this
Francis, Sam, 1923-1994  Search this
Gechtoff, Sonia, 1926-2018  Search this
Hopps, Walter  Search this
Martin, Fred, 1927-  Search this
Extent:
83 Pages (Transcript)
1 Item (sound file (10 min. 21 sec.) Audio excerpt, digital)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1975 June 3-1976 January 23
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jay DeFeo conducted 1975 June 3-1976 January 23, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
The interviews took place at DeFeo's home, in Larkspur, California. DeFeo speaks of her family background; the influences of her teachers; her education at the University of California at Berkeley; her friendships with Sam Francis and Fred Martin; working in Italy; jewelry making; the San Francisco arts community in the 1950s; her exhibitions; and her painting, "The Rose". She recalls Bruce Conner, Sonia Gechtoff, and Walter Hopps.
Biographical / Historical:
Jay DeFeo (1929-1989) was a painter and photographer from the San Francisco Bay area, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav file. Duration is 6 hr., 7 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Photographers -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women photographers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.defeo75
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-defeo75
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Joan Brown

Interviewee:
Brown, Joan, 1938-1990  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Names:
Berman, Wallace, 1926-1976  Search this
Bischoff, Elmer, 1916-1991  Search this
Bothwell, Dorr  Search this
Conner, Bruce, 1933-2008  Search this
DeFeo, Jay, 1929-1989  Search this
Hedrick, Wally, 1928-2003  Search this
Herms, George, 1935-  Search this
Kienholz, Edward, 1927-  Search this
McClure, Michael  Search this
Neri, Manuel, 1930-  Search this
Staempfli, George W.  Search this
Extent:
152 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1975 July 1-September 9
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Joan Brown conducted 1975 July 1-September 9, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
Brown speaks of her family background, childhood, and Catholic education; the influence of Egyptian art, Francis Bacon, Willem De Kooning, and others; her instructors at the California School of Fine Arts including Dorr Bothwell and Elmer Nelson Bischoff; her trips to Europe; abstract expressionism, figurative painting, funk art and regionalism; San Francisco's painters, poets and musicians in the late 1950s; women as professional artists; and her imagery. She recalls Wallace Berman, Bruce Conner, Jay DeFeo, Wally Hedrick, George Herms, Edward Kienholz, Michael McClure, Manuel Neri, George W. Staempfli, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Joan Brown (1938-1990) is a painter from San Francisco, California. Studied at the California School of Fine Arts 1955-1960 under Elmer Bischoff and others.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hr., 12 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Educators -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Figurative art  Search this
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.brown75
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-brown75

Oral history interview with June Wayne

Interviewee:
Wayne, June, 1918-2011  Search this
Interviewer:
McGlynn, Betty Hoag  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
33 Pages (Trancript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1965 June 14
Scope and Contents:
An interview of June Wayne conducted 1965 June 14, by Betty Hoag, for the Archives of American Art New Deal and the Arts Project, at the artist's studio, in Los Angeles, California.
Biographical / Historical:
June Wayne (1918-2011) is a painter and printmaker in Los Angeles, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hrs., 43 min.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Printmakers -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.wayne65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wayne65
Online Media:

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