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Oral history interview with Katherine Westphal

Interviewee:
Westphal, Katherine  Search this
Interviewer:
Austin, Carole  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
University of California, Davis -- Faculty  Search this
Farago, Daphne  Search this
Hickman, Pat (Patricia Lynette), 1941-  Search this
Karoly, Frederic, 1898-1987  Search this
Laky, Gyöngy, 1944-  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Lynn, Greg  Search this
Rossbach, Ed  Search this
Extent:
58 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Date:
2002 September 3-7
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Katherine Westphal conducted 2002 September 3-7, by Carole Austin, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
This interview took place in Berkeley, California. Westphal speaks of drawing every day; her rewarding education experience teaching at University of California, Davis' Applied Behavioral Sciences Department; her college encounters; the World Crafts Conference in Vienna in 1980; the significance of her travels in her artwork, including trips to Egypt, Hawaii, Wyoming, and Indonesia among others; her fascination with different types of art; the non-functional aspect of her artwork; the lack of necessity to sell artwork due to her job teaching, and the personal nature of her work not driven by a "craft market"; working for the textile industry; working with agent Frederick Karoly in New York; the considerable collection Daphne Farago has made of both Katherine's and her husband, Ed Rossbach's, artwork; her working environment; her storage condo; her most precious possession, her dogs; remodeling her Berkeley home and installing a glass elevator; the artist community at UC Davis and Fiberworks before it became a school; people she took workshops with at Fiberworks; a chronology of her work from the 1960s to present day; her and Ed's retirement in 1979 and their subsequent trip to Bali; her relationship with the home health care industry when Ed became sick; her development of baskets; her love of color; her artist in residency at Rhode Island School of Design in 1980, learning to work on the Jacquard loom; her very personal collection of postcards, which she created while on trips; her dog stories; several of the shows she has been in, including "Objects: USA" and "American Crafts at the Vatican"; the commission she completed for a hotel in Tokyo; and her copy machines and the various technological advances made during her career. Westphal also recalls Gyöngy Laky, Chere Lai Mah, Pat Hickman, Greg Lynn, Helen and Tio Giambruni, Jack Lenor Larsen and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Katherine Westphal (1919- ) is a fiber artist in Berkeley, California. Carole Austin is an interviewer, curator, and writer in Orinda, California.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Use requires an appointment.
Access is to transcript only.
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Fiber artists -- California -- Berkeley -- Interviews  Search this
Textile crafts -- California  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.westph02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-westph02

Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers

Source:
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Creator:
Stocksdale, Bob, 1913-2003  Search this
Names:
Central Utah Relocation Center  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Tanforan Assembly Center (San Bruno, Calif.)  Search this
War Relocation Authority  Search this
Anderson, Norman  Search this
Collingwood, Peter, 1922-2008  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Maloof, Alfreda Ward  Search this
Maloof, Sam  Search this
Merrill, Forrest L.  Search this
Okubo, Miné, 1912-2001  Search this
Shawcroft, Barbara  Search this
Stocksdale, Bob, 1913-2003  Search this
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Turner, Tran  Search this
Uchida, Yoshiko  Search this
Former owner:
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Extent:
19.5 Linear feet
0.125 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Sound recordings
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-2015
Summary:
The papers of woodturner Bob Stocksdale and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi measure 19.5 linear feet and 0.125 GB and date from circa 1900 to 2015. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, professional files, exhibition files, project files, personal business records, printed and digital material, scrapbooks, photographic material, and artwork. Of note are records from Sekimachi's forced internment during World War II at Tanforan Assembly Center and Topaz War Relocation Center from 1942 to 1944.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of woodturner Bob Stocksdale and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi measure 19.5 linear feet and 0.125 GB and date from circa 1900 to 2015. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, professional files, exhibition files, project files, personal business records, printed and digital material, scrapbooks, photographic material, and artwork. Of note are records from Sekimachi's forced internment during World War II at Tanforan Assembly Center and Topaz War Relocation Center from 1942 to 1944.

The bulk of biographical materials are from Kay Sekimachi with some originating from her time spent in forced internment at Topaz and Tanforan camps. These records include identification cards, War Relocation Authority printed materials, and school records. Also found are awards, resumes, and blank stationery. Some materials are from Stocksdale's 85th birthday and memorial service.

Letters and extensive greeting cards are from friends, family, and professional acquaintances. Correspondents include Norman Anderson, Peter Collingwood, Jack Lenor Larsen, Sam and Alfreda Maloof, Forrest L. Merrill, Miné Okubo, Barbara Shawcroft, and others.

Writings and notes are scattered and include two interviews with Kay Sekimachi, hanging instructions, and notes. Writings by others are by Jack Lenor Larsen, Tran Turner, and Yoshiko Uchida.

Sekimachi's and Stocksdale's professional activities are documented through files relating to their participation at conferences, awards ceremonies, and lectures. Also found are fiber samples, order forms for materials and equipment, and notes on techniques and design by Kay Sekimachi. Exhibition records include extensive documentation on Marriage in Form, In the Realm of Nature, and Loom and Lathe as well as files for various solo and group exhibitions for both Sekimachi and Stocksdale. Gallery and institution files include material on multiple or unnamed exhibitions. Exhibiton documentation may include correspondence, writings, proposals, printed material, financial and loan records, condition reports, and photographs. Project files contain material for proposed book projects, a retrospective, and portfolio, by and about Sekimachi and Stocksdale. Also found are three commissions files for works by Sekimachi. A proposed retrospective on the work of Bob Stocksdale by Kay Sekimachi includes a digital sound recording of recollections.

Personal business records include sales books, purchase records for works of art by others, appraisals, contracts, consignment receipts, and insurance records.

Published books, clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, magazines, and newsletters are found within printed materials. Of note is a publication by the San Francisco Chronicle entitled "This World" which features illustrations by Miné Okubo.

Four scrapbooks compiled by Kay Sekimachi date from 1937 to 1944. Most of the scrapbooks contain printed material from magazines and other sources with images such as children, valentines, food, birds, clothing, and may include scattered sketches and notes by Sekimachi. One scrapbook dates from the end of Sekimachi's internment at Topaz and relocation to Cincinnati, Ohio. This scrapbook includes sketches and printed materials concerning local and global events. Loose material found in this series was likely meant to be pasted into a new or the forth scrapbook. These materials include relocation information, Japanese-American publications, maps, clippings, sketches, and printed programs.

The bulk of photographic materials consist of slides of various vacation locations and homes and date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Also found are scattered portraits of Kay Sekimachi and Bob Stocksdale, as well as a photo of Miné Okubo with Roy Leeper and Cecil Thompson. Artworks are largely by Kay Sekimachi and include watercolor and pencil sketches as well as designs for fabrics and a weaving portfolio. Watercolor and pencil sketches are of Tanforan Assembly Center and date from circa 1942.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1920-2003 (1.5 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1943-2014 (7.6 linear feet; Box 2-10)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1960s-2008 (0.2 linear feet; Box 10)

Series 4: Professional Files, 1950s-2011 (1.1 linear feet; Box 10-11, 22)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, 1951-2015 (2.9 linear feet; Box 11-14, ER01; 0.125 GB)

Series 6: Project Files, circa 1900-2004 (0.3 linear feet; Box 14)

Series 7: Personal Business Records, 1970s-2010 (0.7 linear feet; Box 14-15)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1943-2011 (2.3 linear feet; Box 15-17, 22)

Series 9: Scrapbooks, 1937-1946 (0.9 linear feet; Box 17, 21)

Series 10: Photographic Material, circa 1950-2001 (0.9 linear feet; Box 18)

Series 11: Artwork, 1942-circa 1970 (1.1 linear feet; Box 18-20, 22-23)
Biographical / Historical:
Bob Stocksdale (1913-2003) was a woodturner active in California. He was known for bowls he formed from rare types of wood. Kay Sekimachi (1926- ) is a Japanese-American fiber artist and educator also active in California. She began her career in weaving on and off the loom and was part of the New Basketry movement.

Born in Indiana, Bob Stocksdale began his interest in carving by whittling with a pocket knife. Later, he created his own lathe with a washing machine motor and turned items such as baseball bats. During World War II, he was a conscientious objector and worked at various camps performing forestry work. It was in one of the camps that he turned his first bowl on a lathe.

After the war, Stocksdale settled in the Bay Area of California where he established his own woodturning shop in his basement. He concentrated on making bowls out of rare woods. His work has been recognized throughout the world and in 1998, he received the American Association of Woodturners Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2003, he received the James Renwick Alliance Masters of the Medium Award.

Kay Sekimachi was born in San Francisco, California in 1926. As a high school student, she was forcibly interned through Executive Order 9066 issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt which incarcerated approximately 120,000 Japanese and Japanese-American citizens during World War II. Along with her mother and siblings, Kay lived at Tanforan Assembly Center and later moved to Topaz War Relocation Center in Utah. She continued her schooling at Topaz and after 1944, was resettled in Cincinnati, Ohio.

After graduating from high school, Kay Sekimachi enrolled at the California College of Arts and Crafts and the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts where she learned the craft of weaving under Trude Guermonprez and Jack Lenor Larsen. Her early works were tapestries and garments. She later used her weaving techniques as part of the New Basketry movement to create baskets and boxes out of fibers. Also an educator, Kay taught weaving at San Francisco Community College. She received the American Craft Council Gold Medal for Consummate Craftsmanship in 2002.

After the dissolution of his first marriage through which he had two children, son Kim and daughter Joy Stocksdale, Bob married Kay Sekimachi in 1972. The two had been acquainted for many years as they were both craft artists living in the Bay Area. Although they married later in life, Kay and Bob travelled the world and exhibited their art together in many exhibitions including Marriage in Form and Loom and Lathe.

Bob Stocksdale died in Oakland, California in 2003. Kay Sekimachi continues to exhibit her work and lives in Berkeley, California.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are an oral history interview of Bob Stocksdale conducted February 16-March 21, 2001, by Signe Mayfield and an oral history interview of Kay Sekimachi [Stocksdale] conducted July 26-August 6, 2001, by Suzanne Baizerman. Both interviews were conducted in Berkeley, California, during the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Provenance:
The Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers were donated in 2003, 2004, and 2015 by Kay Sekimachi Stocksdale as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of original audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Woodworkers -- California  Search this
Topic:
Fiber artists -- California  Search this
Concentration camps -- United States  Search this
Textile design  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Fiberwork -- Technique  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Woodwork -- Study and teaching  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Textile crafts -- Study and teaching  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Photographs
Citation:
Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers, circa 1900-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stockbob
See more items in:
Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stockbob

Oral history interview with Peggie L. Hartwell, 2002 June 3 and July 10

Interviewee:
Hartwell, Peggie L., 1939-  Search this
Interviewer:
Malarcher, Patricia  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
African American quilts  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11503
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)237989
AAA_collcode_hartwe02
Theme:
African American
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_237989
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Peggie L. Hartwell

Interviewee:
Hartwell, Peggie L., 1939-  Search this
Interviewer:
Malarcher, Patricia  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
80 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 June 3 and July 10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Peggie Hartwell conducted 2002 June 3-July 10, by Patricia Malarcher, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in the artist's apartment, on Central Park West, New York, N.Y.
Hartwell speaks of growing up on a farm with her extended family in Springfield, S.C.; female quiltmakers and male storytellers in her family; drawing in sand as a child; her mother's move to Brooklyn; joining her mother and father in New York; growing up in Brooklyn; her awareness of the many cultures in New York and being surrounded by art, including her mother's crocheting and her father's a cappella group; taking tap dancing lessons; experimenting with art in public school; working at various factory jobs after high school until "reconnecting" with art; studying with dancer Syvilla Fort at the Katherine Dunham School of Dance in New York; Fort encouraging her to draw on the studio walls and sew costumes; touring internationally with the theater group Harlem Rhythm USA from 1965 to 1972; her return to the U.S. and receiving a theater degree at Queens College; working at an insurance company to support her art; exhibiting her black and white, pen-and-ink drawings; the narratives and "oral histories" in her quilts; the meaning of various fabrics and colors; participating in "quilting communities" such as the Women of Color Quilters Network, Empire Quilters, and the American Quilter's Society; her lectures, workshops, and residencies; working with children;narratives inspired by childhood memories; her move back to South Carolina; themes in her quilts and "quilting styles" (improvisational, traditional, contemporary, and African American); serving on the board of the New York Chapter of the Women of Color Quilters Network; and planning the exhibition "Threads of Faith" for the New York Bible Association. She also comments on John Cage, Cuesta Benberry, Asadata Dafora, Francelise Dawkins, Carolyn Mazloomi, Edjohnetta Miller, Arthur Mitchell, Harriet Powers, Faith Ringgold, Marie Wilson, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Peggie L. Hartwell (1939- ) is a quiltmaker of Summerville, S.C. Patricia Malarcher is a fiber artist.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 50 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- South Carolina  Search this
Topic:
African American quilts  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.hartwe02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hartwe02

Girls Weaving a Carpet

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 24 cm. x 18.4 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880-1930
Scope and Contents:
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "472."
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 37.5: Rug weaving (# 129)." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Arrangement:
According to Myron B. Smith handwritten document (Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran), Antoin Sevruguin's 696 glass negatives, at the time of their acquisition, were arranged into 61 boxes without any apparent organization. Today they are housed in archival document boxes, essentially duplicating the original arrangement, and stored on shelves. This glass negative was included into "Box 37."
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.37.05
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Occupation:
Weavers  Search this
Topic:
Clothing and dress  Search this
headgear  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.GN.37.05
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.01: Glass Plate Negatives / Glass Plate Negatives: Sets 1-61
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref10323

Silk Weaving

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 23.7 cm. x 18.2 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880-1930
Scope and Contents:
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "The glass negative is broken. Portions of the left corner are missing."
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "592."
- Scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "686."
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "131) Silk weaving." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 37.9: Silk weaving (yellow + chipped) (# 131)." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Arrangement:
According to Myron B. Smith handwritten document (Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran), Antoin Sevruguin's 696 glass negatives, at the time of their acquisition, were arranged into 61 boxes without any apparent organization. Today they are housed in archival document boxes, essentially duplicating the original arrangement, and stored on shelves. This glass negative was included into "Box 37."
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.37.09
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Occupation:
Weavers  Search this
Topic:
Textile crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.GN.37.09
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.01: Glass Plate Negatives / Glass Plate Negatives: Sets 1-61
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref10327

Girls Weaving a Carpet

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print, b&w, 17 cm. x 22.6 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Scope and Contents:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "491."
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "128."
Arrangement:
Gelatin silver prints arranged in sequential number following Joseph Upton's handwritten list of captions, and ultimately organized by Myron B. Smith into subject categories (royalty, people, executions, criminals, punishment, architecture). This print is in the following subject category: People.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
58.G.12

[16(B6)]

FSA A.4 2.12.Up.12
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Occupation:
Weavers  Search this
Topic:
Clothing and dress  Search this
headgear  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.Up.12
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.03: Sevruguin Upton Prints / Upton Prints: 10-19
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref9757

Boy Receiving Punishment with Small Crowd of Male Spectators

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Islamic Archives  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Collection Source:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print, b&w, 23.3 cm. x 17.7 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Scope and Contents:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1175."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "240."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "La punition à l'atelier de broderie."
Arrangement:
Gelatin silver prints arranged in sequential number following Joseph Upton's handwritten list of captions, and ultimately organized by Myron B. Smith into subject categories (royalty, people, executions, criminals, punishment, architecture). This print is in the following subject category: People.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
58.G.61

[16(D3)]

FSA A.4 2.12.Up.61
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Clothing and dress  Search this
Corporal punishment  Search this
headgear  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04, Item FSA A.4 2.12.Up.61
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Myron Bement Smith Collection / Series 2: The Islamic Archives / 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs / 2.12.03: Sevruguin Upton Prints / Upton Prints: 60-66
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-04-ref9777

[Woman sewing]

Publisher:
Tamamura, Kozaburo, 1856-19??  Search this
Collector:
Rosin, Henry D., Dr.  Search this
Rosin, Nancy  Search this
Collection Collector:
Rosin, Henry D., Dr.  Search this
Rosin, Nancy  Search this
Collection Creator:
Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920  Search this
Ueno, Hikoma, 1838-1904  Search this
Beato, Felice, b. ca. 1825  Search this
Stillfried, Raimund, Baron von, 1839-1911  Search this
Underwood & Underwood  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (Album 2, page 36, hand coloring, image 19.3 x 23.9 cm.; on mount 30.5 x 38.5 cm)
Culture:
Portraits  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Photographs
Place:
Asia
Japan
Date:
[1860 - ca. 1900]
Scope and Contents:
Seated young woman sewing upon a colorful cloth. Objects in the room include vase with flowers upon a small table, hanging wall scroll, painted sliding screens, propped shamisen, bolts of cloth, and small cabinet.
Photographer unidentified.
Local Numbers:
R380 (Rosin Number).

FSA A1999.35 380
General:
Forms part of Rosin album number 2. Page 36.
Included in an album produced by the studio of Tamamura Kozaburo.
Title devised by Henry and Nancy Rosin.
Album Information:
rosinalbum2 036
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Topic:
Photography -- Japan  Search this
Photography -- 19th century  Search this
Sewing  Search this
Domestic life  Search this
Screens -- Japan  Search this
Shamisen  Search this
Textile fabrics  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Women -- Japan  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Purchase and partial donation.
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.35, Item FSA A1999.35 380
See more items in:
Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan
Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan / Series FSA A1999.35 A2: Photo album from the studio of Tamamura
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a1999-35-ref553

[Weaving #102]

Creator:
Suzuki, Shin'ichi, Photographer, I, 1835-1918  Search this
Collector:
Rosin, Henry D., Dr.  Search this
Rosin, Nancy  Search this
Collection Collector:
Rosin, Henry D., Dr.  Search this
Rosin, Nancy  Search this
Collection Creator:
Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920  Search this
Ueno, Hikoma, 1838-1904  Search this
Beato, Felice, b. ca. 1825  Search this
Stillfried, Raimund, Baron von, 1839-1911  Search this
Underwood & Underwood  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print : on mount 16 x 24.3 cm, hand coloring, image 13.5 x 17.4 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia -- Japan
Date:
[1860 - ca. 1900]
Scope and Contents:
Three women are busy weaving while a man observes their progress. Indoor studio setting.
Photographer unidentified.
鈴木 真一
Biographical / Historical:
Suzuki Shin'ichi learned photography in Yokohama under the pioneering photographer Shimooka Renjo (1823 - 1914). In the early1870s, Suzuki produced a series of depictions of Japanese rural life which were reproduced in "The Far East." In 1889 Suzuki was commissioned with Maruki Riyō (1854-1923) to photograph the Meiji Emperor and Empress.
Local Numbers:
R071 (Rosin Number)

FSA A1999.35 071
General:
Title devised by Henry and Nancy Rosin.
102 is printed in both English and Japanese in lower left corner.
According to Henry Rosin, this print is part of Baron von Stillfried's third series, which include numbered as well as colored prints.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Topic:
Photography -- Japan  Search this
Photography -- 19th century  Search this
Artisans -- Japan  Search this
Labor  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Purchase and partial donation.
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.35, Item FSA A1999.35 071
See more items in:
Henry and Nancy Rosin Collection of Early Photography of Japan
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a1999-35-ref93

Hairdressing among Mangbetu people, Medje village, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35mm.)
Culture:
Mangbetu (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
The photograph depicts old woman doing traditional hairstyle on Mbombio, Chief Mogendo's principal wife. "The funnel-shaped coiffure which ended in an outward halo, originally symbolic of high social status, was considered exceptionally attractive, and took a lot of time to create. Of the ornaments that embellished the hairstyles of the Mangbetu, and related ethnic groups, combs were reserved for women." [Sieber R., Herreman F., 2000: Hair in African Art and Culture, Prestel]. During his trip to Congo (now Democratic Republic of Congo), Elisofon visited the Mangbetu people living in Medje village, southwest of Isiro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17,1970.
Local Numbers:
EENG-I-2, 20A.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "D 3 Mng. Mangbetu. Zaire, Medje (sw or Isiro). Old woman doing traditional hairstyle on Mbombio, the chief's principal wife. 3/1970. EE. neg.no. I-2, 20A." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Body arts  Search this
Hairstyles -- Africa  Search this
Households  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 01467
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EENG / 1970
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref28555

Hairdressing among Mangbetu people, Medje village, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35mm.)
Culture:
Mangbetu (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
The photograph depicts old woman doing traditional hairstyle on Mbombio, Chief Mogendo's principal wife. "The funnel-shaped coiffure which ended in an outward halo, originally symbolic of high social status, was considered exceptionally attractive, and took a lot of time to create. Of the ornaments that embellished the hairstyles of the Mangbetu, and related ethnic groups, combs were reserved for women." [Sieber R., Herreman F., 2000: Hair in African Art and Culture, Prestel]. During his trip to Congo (now Democratic Republic of Congo), Elisofon visited the Mangbetu people living in Medje village, southwest of Isiro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
EENG-I-2, 21A.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "D 3 Mng. Mangbetu. Zaire, Medje (sw or Isiro). Old woman doing traditional hairstyle on Mbombio, the chief's principal wife. 3/1970. EE. neg.no. I-2, 21A." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Households  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Body arts  Search this
Hairstyles -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 01468
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EENG / 1970
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref28556

Vertical Chi wara headdress mounted on basketry cap, Bougouni village, Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35mm.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"In the Bamana world, objects such the antelope headdress always come in pairs -one male and one female- symbolizing the union of mythical half-animal, half-human beings that taught their ancestors to farm, and the productive union of men and women throughout time." [Wooten S., 2004: Where is my Mate? The Importance of Complementarity: A Bamana Headdress (Ciwara). See the Music, Hear the Dance, Prestel]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the village of Bougouni, in the Bamana region. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
EENG-III-3, 32.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "E 1 Bmb. Bambara. Mali, Bougouni. Man holding antelope headdress used in acrobatic dance. 7/1970. EE. neg.no. III-3, 32." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Portraits  Search this
Masks  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 01583
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Mali
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref28671

Vertical Chi wara headdress mounted on basketry cap, Bougouni village, Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35mm.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"In the Bamana world, objects such the antelope headdress always come in pairs -one male and one female- symbolizing the union of mythical half-animal, half-human beings that taught their ancestors to farm, and the productive union of men and women throughout time." [Wooten S., 2004: Where is my Mate? The Importance of Complementarity: A Bamana Headdress (Ciwara). See the Music, Hear the Dance, Prestel]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the village of Bougouni, in the Bamana region. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
EENG-III-3, 33.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "E 1 Bmb. Bambara. Mali, Bougouni. Man holding antelope headdress used in acrobatic dance. 7/1970. EE. neg.no. III-3, 33." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Portraits  Search this
Masks  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 01584
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Mali
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref28672

Masked performer wearing vertical Chi wara headdress, Bougouni village, Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35mm.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"In the Bamana world, objects such the antelope headdress always come in pairs -one male and one female- symbolizing the union of mythical half-animal, half-human beings that taught their ancestors to farm, and the productive union of men and women throughout time." [Wooten S., 2004: Where is my Mate? The Importance of Complementarity: A Bamana Headdress (Ciwara). See the Music, Hear the Dance, Prestel]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the village of Bougouni, in the Bamana region. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
EENG-III-3, 34.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "E 1 Bmb. Bambara. Mali, Bougouni. Acrobatic dancer with antelope headdress, mask of red cloth and cowries. 7/1970. EE. neg.no. III-3, 34." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Portraits  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Dance  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 01585
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Mali
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref28673

Bamana weavers, Senou village, Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35mm.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
The photographs depicts weavers laying the warp thread with the bobbin carrier. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.
Local Numbers:
EENG-VII-8, 18A.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "H 1 Bmb. Bambara. Mali. Senou (near Bamako). Weaver walking the warp threads. Weaver is too poor to own a loom so he works for the loom's aged owner who is too feeble to work. 12/1970. EE. neg.no. VIII-8, 18A." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Weavers  Search this
Topic:
Textile crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 02784
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Mali
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref29867

Kuba women decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35mm.)
Culture:
Kuba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
The photograph depicts wives of Nyim Kot a-Mbweeky III at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. They are brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which they also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon travelled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
EENG-I-36, 11.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Exhibitions Note:
"Changing Place: Spatial Effects of African Art," held by the Fogg Art Museum, 2001.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "H 3 Kba. Kuba. Zaire, Mushenge. Embroidering raffia cloth. (L) "House of the King" design. 4/1970. EE. neg.no. !-36, 11." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Restrictions:
Image has been restricted due to cultural sensitivity. For access, please contact elisofonarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
Vernacular architecture  Search this
Women  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 03189
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EENG / 1970
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref30270

Kuba women decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35mm.)
Culture:
Kuba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
The photograph depicts wives of Nyim Kot a-Mbweeky III at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. They are brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which they also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon travelled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
EENG-I-36, 12.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "H 3 Kba. Kuba. Zaire, Mushenge. Embroidering raffia cloth. (L) "House of the King" design. 4/1970. EE. neg.no. I-36, 12." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
Vernacular architecture  Search this
Women  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 03190
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EENG / 1970
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref30271

Kuba woman decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35mm.)
Culture:
Kuba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
The photograph depicts Kuba woman at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. She is brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which she also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon travelled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
EENG-I-36, 13.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "H 3 Kba. Kuba. Zaire, Mushenge. Embroidering raffia cloth. (L) "House of the King" design, Djume Nyimi. 4/1970. EE. neg.no. I-36, 13." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
Women  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 03191
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EENG / 1970
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref30272

Kuba woman decorating woven cloth, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic) (b&w, 35mm.)
Culture:
Kuba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
The photograph depicts Kuba woman at work on all-plush panel typical of contemporary work. She is brushing the raffia pile with the edge of the knife, which she also use to cut the pile stitches. "After the dyeing, the cloth is ready to be embroidered. Most Kuba embroidery combines on one cloth two types of decoration: stem-stitching and cut-pile or plush stitching. The equipment is simple: a needle and, for cut-pile or plush-work, a knife. The embroideress needs an enormous amount of steadiness and patience. Because of the time required, prosperous and royal men who have several wives or concubines gain an advantage in the production of decorated garments. Fine plush pieces are worked for months ad even years. the work is done intermittently, usually in the afternoons, after returning from working in the fields." [Adams Monni, 1978: Kuba Embroidered Cloth. African Arts, 12 (1), November 1978, pp.24-39]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon travelled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
EENG-I-36, 14.
General:
Title source: Index card based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Typed index card reads, "H 3 Kba. Kuba. Zaire, Mushenge. Embroidering raffia cloth. (L) "House of the King" design, Djume Nyimi. 4/1970. EE. neg.no. I-36, 14." The card was written in 1977-79 by Archives staff using source provided by photographer.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
Women  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EENG 03192
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EENG / 1970
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref30273

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