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Gateways/Portales: Interview with John Herrera

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
25 Video recordings (MP4 Video (.MP4), born digital)
2 Sound recordings (AIFF Sound (.aif), born digital)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Baltimore (Md.)
Charlotte (N.C.)
Raleigh (N.C.)
United States
Date:
2016 October 29
Scope and Contents:
John Herrera was the founder of El Pueblo, co-founder of the Latino Community Credit Union in Durham, co-founder of La Fiesta del Pueblo, first Latinx nominated to be part of the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) board, and first Latinx elected to municipal office in North Carolina as the alderman of Carrboro. Herrera talked about his family and where they lived; growing up in San Jose, Costa Rica; why he left Costa Rica; his arrival in North Carolina and his first impression of NC; how North Carolina changed since his arrival; and when he knew North Carolina was his home. Herrera described his experiences creating community in North Carolina, working on the NCUA board, and serving his community as alderman of Carrboro; and he explained why he entered politics. He talked about the importance of the credit union for the Latino community and the success of the credit union. Herrera explained about the mission of El Pueblo, an advocacy organization which strengthens the Latino community in North Carolina through advocacy, public policy, leadership, development, education, and promotion of cross-cultural understanding. El Pueblo organized and brought about the 1996 La Fiesta del Pueblo; and developed North Carolina's first Latino legislative agenda in 2001. Herrera talked about the inaugural La Fiesta del Pueblo in 1994, and the community reaction and response to the festival. La Fiesta del Pueblo, the largest Latinx festival in the Raleigh-Durham area, featured booths for social, physical, and mental health services; a soccer tournament; food; and entertainment. The inaugural festival targeted Mexican farmworkers; 300 were expected, but 2000 attended. Herrera also talked about what makes him happy, proud; lessons he learned; and what he does for fun. Clips of this interview were included in the 'Community-Owned Banking,' 'Recognition and Representation,' and 'La Fiesta del Pueblo' sections of the exhibition.
Interview. Related to exhibition 'Gateways/Portales.' The MP4 video files are grouped with related SMI files, PPN files, XML documents, and BIM files. Dated 20161029.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Latin Americans -- United States  Search this
Immigrants  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Gateways/Portales: Interview with John Herrera, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Gateways/Portales Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7d10fe46e-6b37-4202-bc57-42eeab4eac80
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-102-ref77

Gateways/Portales: Interview with Dr. Maria Teresa Unger Palmer

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
18 Video recordings (MP4 Video (.MP4), born digital)
2 Sound recordings (MP3 Sound Recording )
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Baltimore (Md.)
Charlotte (N.C.)
Raleigh (N.C.)
United States
Date:
2016 October 27
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Maria Teresa Unger Palmer founded an immigrant church in Chapel Hill, established the first Spanish immersion preschool in North Carolina in 1996, became the first Latina appointed to North Carolina's Board of Education in 1999, and became the first Latina elected official in North Carolina as a council member for the town of Chapel Hill in 2013. Palmer talked about her family and where they lived; growing up in Lima, Peru; her college experience at Jacksonville State University in Alabama; her first impression of Alabama; her arrival in North Carolina; her first impression of Chapel Hill, North Carolina; her graduate school experience at University of North Carolina (UNC); and how Chapel Hill has changed since her arrival. Palmer talked about her first job in the United States as a summer missionary providing help to migrant farmers; the founding of a Hispanic congregation in North Carolina and the community's reception to it; working with young people in the community; fighting North Carolina's voter suppression laws; her arrest at the Moral Monday march; her start in politics and the political process; meeting her husband, John Herrera; and helping to organize El Fiesta del Pueblo and the soccer tournament for the festival. Palmer also spoke about what makes her happy, proud; lessons she learned; what she does for fun; and how she talked her children about her social justice work. Clips of this interview were included in the 'Undocumented and Unafraid,' 'Church as Safe Space,' and 'Recognition and Representation' sections of the exhibition.
Interview. Related to exhibition 'Gateways/Portales.' The MP4 video files are grouped with related SMI files, PPN files, XML documents, and BIM files. Dated 20161027.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Latin Americans -- United States  Search this
Immigrants  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Gateways/Portales: Interview with Dr. Maria Teresa Unger Palmer, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Gateways/Portales Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa72d6a8de7-44d0-4ea0-8d9f-586e734fd6b3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-102-ref78

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