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The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
10.55 Linear feet (16 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Exhibition records
Catalogs
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Place:
Harlem (New York, N.Y.)
Date:
1985-09 - 1986-12
Summary:
An exhibition on the history and art of the Harlem Renaissance. The exhibition, held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, ran from September 1985-December 1986. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Catalogs
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Citation:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-024
See more items in:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-024

Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hall, Robert L., 1950-  Search this
Extent:
1.25 Linear feet (4 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Exhibition records
Correspondence
Date:
undated
Summary:
An exhibition on contemporary African American women artists curated by Robert L. Hall and exhibited at the Anacostia Museum of the Smithsonian Institution from November 1990 to April 1991. Artists included are: Erlena Chisolm Bland, Lilian Thomas Burwell, Yvonne Pickering Carter, Margo Humphrey, Martha Jackson-Jarvis, Viola Burley Leak, Winnie Owens-Hart, Stephanie E. Pogue, Malkia Roberts, Gail Shaw-Clemons, Sylvia Snowden, Renée Stout, Denise Ward-Brown, Joyce E. Wellman, and Adell Westbrook.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American women artists -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Correspondence
Citation:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-044
Online Media:

Prentiss Taylor on the Harlem Renaissance

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Taylor, Prentiss, 1907-1991  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
New York (N.Y.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1986
Scope and Contents:
Washington artist Prentiss Taylor recalled the Harlem Renaissance. Taylor once lived in New York City where he met and forged friendships wtih Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, Carl Van Vechten, Richmond Barthe, Zora Neale Hurston, and others. During his presentation, Taylor relived many of the memories of these relationships.
Lunch bag forum. Audio only. Poor audio quality. Related to exhibition 'The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties.' Dated 19860606.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties - showcased the evolution and achievements of the Renaissance, which was the explosion of literary, visual, performance, and cinematic creativity generated by black artists between the end of World War I and the early days of the Great Depression. Represented is the creativity of Marian Anderson, Richard Barthe, Countee Cullen, Aaron Douglas, Duke Ellington, Meta Warrick Fuller, Roland Hayes, Zora Neale Hurston, Malvin Gray Johnson, Alain Locke, "Jelly Roll" Morton, Paul Robeson, George Schuyler, and Wallace Thurman, among others. The exhibition, held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, ran from September 1985 - December 1986.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001230_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Artists  Search this
African American authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Prentiss Taylor on the Harlem Renaissance, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-024, Item ACMA AV001230_A
See more items in:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-024: The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-024-ref509

Gathered Visions: Artist Interviews

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
4 video recordings (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents:
African American women artists talked about their artwork in-detail, including technique and meaning of work; the various types of media and tools they use to produce their work; their creative and work processes; and when and how they became interested in the media they are working. Additionally, Gail Shaw-Clemons spoke of her Anacostia roots. Most of the interviews took place in the artists' studios; and some of the artists, such as printmaker Stephanie Pogue, demonstrated part of their work process. All interviews included samples of the artists' work. The painters, sculptors, printmakers, mixed media, and performance artists included Viola Burley Leak (7-25-90), Erlena Chisolm Bland (7-27-90), Joyce Wellman (7-31-90 and 9-22-90), Malkia Roberts (8-1-90), Stephanie Pogue (8-3-90), Renee Stout (8-6-90 and 9-5-90), Gail Shaw-Clemons (8-7-90), Lilian Thomas Burwell (8-8-90), Adell Westbrook (8-10-90), Margo Humphrey (8-15-90), Yvonne Pickering Carter (8-17-90), Martha Jackson Jarvis (8-20-90), Denise Ward-Brown (9-7-90), and Sylvia Snowden (9-22-90).
Interview. AV002070: dated 19900725, 19900727, 19900731, 19900801. AV002071: dated 19900803, 19900806, 19900807, 1990808. AV002072: dated 19900810, 19900815, 19900817, 19900820. AV002073: dated 19900820, 19900905, 19900907, 19900922.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002071

ACMA AV002072

ACMA AV002073
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Artists  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American women artists  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Performance artists  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Mixed media (Art)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Series Citation:
Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044, Item ACMA AV002070
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-044: Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-044-ref611

John Kinard's Memorial Tribute at Smithsonian Institution

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Kinard, John, 1936-1989  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 video recording (VHS)
4 sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1989
Scope and Contents:
Representatives of the Smithsonian and the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (ANM), and those who worked closely with ANM and the community of Anacostia spoke of John Kinard's legacy, particularly his impact on community museums and African American museums nationwide. Marjorie Kinard, John's wife, spoke and represented the Kinard family at the memorial.
Event - memorial. AV002144: dated 19890914. AV001072, AV001937, and AV001938: audio only, same content, dated 19890919. AV001072: original. AV002026: audio only, very poor audio quality - audio of former recording of 'Black Musa Seminar' (transcribed from physical asset) in which John Kinard attended bleeds through distorting recording of memorial, undated.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001072_A

ACMA AV001072_B

ACMA AV001937_A

ACMA AV001937_B

ACMA AV001938_A

ACMA AV001938_B

ACMA AV002026_A

ACMA AV002026_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Museums  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
African American museums  Search this
Memorials  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
John Kinard's Memorial Tribute at Smithsonian Institution, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV002144
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref149

Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J., Dr., 1858-1964  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
11.38 Linear feet (23 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition records
Photographic prints
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Brochures
Date:
1981-02 - 1982-09
Summary:
An exhibition on Anna J. Cooper, Washington D. C. educator and author. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982. Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, and floor plans.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Photographic prints
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Brochures
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-029
Online Media:

Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
9.15 Linear feet (17 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibit scripts
Photographic prints
Exhibition records
Catalogs
Brochures
Correspondence
Place:
Africa, West -- History -- Exhibitions
Date:
1979-02 - 1980-02
Summary:
An exhibition on the history of the transatlantic slave trade, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood and held there from February 1979-February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist.
Topic:
Slave trade -- America -- Exhibitions  Search this
Slave trade -- Africa -- History  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Slave insurrections -- United States -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibit scripts
Photographic prints
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Catalogs
Brochures
Correspondence
Citation:
Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-031
Online Media:

Before freedom came: African American life in the antebellum South exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Traveling Exhibition Service  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.)  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Rice, Kym S.  Search this
Extent:
2.42 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Photographic prints
Color slides
Exhibition records
Contact sheets
Brochures
Place:
Southern States
Date:
undated
Summary:
This exhibition was developed for circulation by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service with the assistance of the Anacostia Museum of the Smithsonian Institution and the National Museum of American History. It was adapted from an exhibition organized by the Museum of the Confederacy, Richmond, Virginia. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit script, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Plantation life -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century -- Exhibitions  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Photographic prints
Color slides
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Contact sheets
Brochures
Identifier:
ACMA.03-032
See more items in:
Before freedom came: African American life in the antebellum South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-032
Online Media:

Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J., Dr., 1858-1964  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
5 video recordings (5 open reel 1/2" video recordings)
0.5 Linear feet
13 sound recordings (1 open reel 1/4" sound recordings ; 12 audio cassette sound recordings)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1981-1983
bulk 1981-1981
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials associated with an exhibition on Anna J. Cooper, Washington D. C. educator and author. The exhibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982. Louise Daniel Hutchinson
Related Archival Materials note:
Anacostia Community Museum. Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American women  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Audiovisual Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Series ACMA AV03-029
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref1360

The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Fisk University  Search this
Howard University  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Virginia Theological Seminary and College (Lynchburg, Va.)  Search this
Brown, Sterling A., 1901-1989  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Egypt, Ophelia Settle  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
2 sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Lynchburg (Va.)
United States
Southern States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Sterling A. Brown talks about his experiences and teachers, including Anna J. Cooper, at M Street High School (later known as Dunbar High School); and education and segregation, which was fought by Cooper and Mary Church Terrell. He provides a short history and legacy of Cooper, who he considers a role model; and reads prose by Anna J. Cooper which highlights her educational philosophy and her views regarding education and the roles of teachers. Brown talks about his education and academic career; reminiscences his teaching experiences particularly at Virginia Theological Seminary and College, and living in Lynchburg, Virginia; and reads a few of his own poems, which focus on black life experiences in the Southern United States. Ophelia Settle Egypt, a friend of Sterling Brown, reminiscences about her experiences attending Howard University and adventures with Brown and his wife, Daisy: their resentment of Jim Crow and riding on a segregated bus. Mr. Muhammad reads his poems in tribute of Sterling Brown and "for everyone in the struggle of identifying what is what and who is who and what we need to do about it." Zora Martin-Felton introduces the speakers throughout the lecture series.
Lecture, and poetry and prose reading. AV003057 and AV003051: video. AV001053 and AV001353: audio only. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV003057, AV003051, and AV001053: undated. AV001353: dated 19810426.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.;Professor, poet, and literary critic Dr. Sterling A. Brown (1901-1989) was born and raised in the Washington, D.C area. He grew up on a farm in Howard County, Maryland; and attended Waterford Oaks Elementary, Dunbar High School, Williams College in Massachusetts, and Harvard University. He married Daisy Turnbull in 1927. Brown taught at Howard University, Fisk University, Vassar College, New York University, Atlanta University, Yale University, and Virginia Theological Seminary and College in Lynchburg, Virginia. His studies and poetry focused on black history and culture of the Southern United States.;Originally named Preparatory High School for Colored Youth and later known as M Street High School, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, located in Washington, D.C., was the first black public high school in the United States. During the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school with many of its teachers holding master and doctorate degrees. By the 1950s, the school was sending 80 percent of its students to college. During the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century, Dunbar struggled to keep its prestigious reputation and high standards. As with many troubled urban public schools, Dunbar standards fell and some students struggle with basic reading and math. The Dunbar Legacy Lecture Series, which was held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in the early 1980s, consisted of lectures by and about people associated with Dunbar High School.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003051

ACMA AV001053_A

ACMA AV001053_B

ACMA AV001353_A

ACMA AV001353_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Education  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
Social history  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003057
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref906

The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke Lecture

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frelinghuysen University (Washington, D.C.).  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Miner Teachers College  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
St. Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Wilberforce University  Search this
Cooke, Paul P.  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Cooper, George A. C., Reverend  Search this
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963  Search this
Grimké, Francis J. (Francis James), 1850-1937  Search this
Hunt, Ida Gibbs, 1862-1957  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
1 sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Raleigh (N.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1981
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke speaks on the subject of Anna J. Cooper: Teacher and Human Being. He talks about Cooper's life and the time in which she lived; and her human and religious influences. Cooke, who assisted with the Cooper exhibition at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, provides an overview of Cooper's history and addresses questions from the lecture audience. Cooke also provides an overview of the history of educational institutions and schools, and the education system in Washington, D.C. He discusses civil rights, legislation changes in D.C., and how civil rights legislation affected Cooper, W. E. DuBois, and Booker T. Washington. Zora Martin-Felton introduces Cooke providing a short history of his Anacostian roots.
Lecture. AV003264: Part 1. AV003220: Part 2. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV003264 and AV003220: undated. AV001346: dated 19830925, audio only, contains part of (copy of) AV003220 recording.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.;Educator, author, statesman, and former president of the District of Columbia Teacher's College Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke (1917-2010) was born in New York City and raised in Washington, D.C. He attended Dunbar High School, Miner Teachers College, New York University, Catholic University of America, and Columbia University, where he received his doctorate. Cooke was married to Rose Cooke for 63 years.;Originally named Preparatory High School for Colored Youth and later known as M Street High School, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, located in Washington, D.C., was the first black public high school in the United States. During the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school with many of its teachers holding master and doctorate degrees. By the 1950s, the school was sending 80 percent of its students to college. During the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century, Dunbar struggled to keep its prestigious reputation and high standards. As with many troubled urban public schools, Dunbar standards fell and some students struggle with basic reading and math. The Dunbar Legacy Lecture Series, which was held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in the early 1980s, consisted of lectures by and about people associated with Dunbar High School.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003220

ACMA AV001346_B
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Education  Search this
Religion  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Social history  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003264
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref907

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Music, Literary Reading, and Sound Effects

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Music
Sound effects recordings
Literary readings (radio programs)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Components used for exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. Recording of song Moonlight Sonata; literary reading of Send Me No Flowers which has religious influences; and ambient sound of children talking (schoolroom sound effect).
Music, literary reading, and sound effects. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19810127.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Students  Search this
Children  Search this
Religion  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Music
Sound effects recordings
Literary readings (Radio programs)
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Music, Literary Reading, and Sound Effects, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003514
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref908

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Puppet Show

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum Black Heritage Puppet Theatre  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frelinghuysen University (Washington, D.C.).  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Music
Puppet plays
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
A puppet show, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum Black Heritage Puppet Theatre, provides school children with an introduction to the exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The main character in the puppet show is a student who needs to present a report on a black woman who lived in Washington, D.C. and who made an outstanding contribution to the lives of black people. The puppet show highlights Cooper's teaching career; her advocacy for education, black students, and civil rights; and the period of time in which she lived. Music played prior to puppet show, and children in the audience sing a rhyme about Cooper's live after puppet show.
Puppet show. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19810415.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Education  Search this
Educators  Search this
Students  Search this
Children  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Music
Puppet plays
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Puppet Show, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003070
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref909

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Audio Tour

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
5 sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1981
Scope and Contents:
Audio tour for the exhibition 'Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South.'
Audio tour. Audio only. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV001370: expanded version. AV001050: abbreviated version. AV001395: undated. AV001347: expanded version, undated. AV001348: abbreviated version, dated 19820416. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition - Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South - presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator, activist, and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001050_A

ACMA AV001395

ACMA AV001347

ACMA AV001348_A
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Audio Tour, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV001370
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref910

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Student Tests

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1982
Scope and Contents:
Instructions to be used for the pretest and the post-test given to student groups regarding the exhibition 'Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South.'
Instructions. Sound only. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19820416.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition - Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South - presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Student Tests, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV001348_B
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref911

The Dunbar Legacy: Sallie Underdue and Herbert Nicholson Lecture

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Sallie Underdue and Herbert Nicholson, 1917 graduates of Dunbar High School in Washington, D.C., reminescenced about their former teacher, Anna J. Cooper. They also provided historical context about Anna J. Cooper and Dunbar High School.
Lecture. Audio only. Very poor audio quality. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19810217.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition - Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South - presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Sallie Underdue and Herbert Nicholson Lecture, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV001378
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref912

Pinpoint Production: Anna Julia Cooper

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Drama
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents:
Pinpoint, an educational theater group, presents a dramatic program about Anna Julia Cooper.
Dramatic performance. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Poor audio. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
African American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Drama
Citation:
Pinpoint Production: Anna Julia Cooper, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV000814
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref913

Camara Laye: Conversation about Africa

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
2 sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Africa, West
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1977
Scope and Contents:
Camara Laye talked about griots who transmit the oral culture of Africa; his work as oral historian; the novel he was writing; the seven African countries that compressed the Empire Mali and the countries' shared culture; Kinte project with Alex Haley; African civilization as a social, humanistic civilization and European civilization as a mechanic civilization; expanded African family versus limited European family; limited independence of Africa; and regrouping of Africa. Following Camara Laye lecture, the remainder of the recording includes a demonstration/conversation about tie dying technique; and two women conversing about an alphabet book of African culture and what they are going to do the following day.
Lecture. Audio Only. French with English interpretation. AV001386: poor audio quality. Dated 19770728.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001375_B

ACMA AV001386_A
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African culture  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Storytelling  Search this
Griots  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Camara Laye: Conversation about Africa, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV001375_A
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1

Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
1 video recording (1 open reel 1/2" video recordings)
9 sound recordings (5 audio cassette sound recordings ; 4 open reel 1/4" sound recordings)
0.2 Linear feet
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Africa, West -- History -- Exhibitions
Date:
circa 1978-1980
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials created for an exhibition on the history of the transatlantic slave trade, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood and held there from February 1979-February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson. This collection contains the audiovisual output of the exhibit, including narration sound recordings created for use within the exhibit and video and sound recordings of related talks and exhibit tours.
Related Archival Materials note:
Anacostia Community Museum. Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
Slave trade -- Africa -- History  Search this
Slave trade -- America -- Exhibitions  Search this
Slave insurrections -- United States -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Series ACMA AV03-031
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1010

African History: Dr. Leonard Jeffries

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Jeffries, Leonard  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
2 video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Lectures
Place:
Africa
United States
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Leonard Jeffries speaks to supervisory staff at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (ANM) during the development of the exhibition, Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization. He discusses levels of analysis (factual level, conceptual level, theoretical level, and practical level) when studying and presenting history to others. He explains history is viewed through varying perspectives and talks about the Euro-American and African-Asiatic perspectives and value systems. Throughout the lecture, Jeffries talks about the history of slavery and the slave trade; African servitude versus Euro-American slavery; Euro-American abolitionists versus African abolitionists; Euro-American materialism and profit making; African history, traditions, and perspective; black history, and black experience. He explains misconceptions are made in the study and portrayal of history; and museums can either challenge these misconceptions or continue them. He stresses Africa has been called the dark continent, and this statement along with others presents black history and black experience in a negative context, which results in cultural genocide. Finally, Jeffries reviews and discusses the sections of the future ANM exhibit and explains the best ways to present topics of each section.
Presentation/lecture. Part of Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization Audiovisual Records. AV003271: Part 1, Levels of Analyses. AV003257: Part 2, America. Sound quality poor - static throughout both recordings. Dated: 19780605.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - Out of Africa: From West African Kingdoms to Colonization - explores early African civilizations, the slave trade, the abolitionist movement and the founding of the first African republic, Liberia. Maps, graphics, and tapes depict the ancient kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, Songhei, Kanem-Bornu and the Hausa States. Headdresses, masks, housepots, gold weights, taped music and musical instruments and door panels represent the cultures of Nigeria, the Ivory Coast, Ghana, Mali, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The journey into slavery is told in a diary of a ship's doctor, the account book of a slave trader and letters of a young passenger. Slave revolts are treated in documents, photographs and portraits. Photographs, books and other publications are included in a section on the Abolitionist movement. Additional documents and photographs tell the story of those who chose to return to Africa. The exibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1979 - February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003257
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Museums  Search this
Blacks -- History  Search this
Blacks -- Study and teaching  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slave trade  Search this
Colonization  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
African culture  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Lectures
Series Citation:
Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV003271
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-031: Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1011

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