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Charles H. Land Papers

Source:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Creator:
Land, Charles H., 1847-1922  Search this
Lindbergh, Charles A. (Charles Augustus), 1902-1974  Search this
Former owner:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet (1 box, 1 oversized folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Patents
Financial records
Letters (correspondence)
Writings
Sermons
Articles
Date:
1860-1957
Summary:
The collection documents inventor and dentist Charles H. Land and consists of correspondence, financial records, patent records, articles, printed material, writings, sermons and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of correspondence, financial records, patent records, articles, printed material, writings, sermons and photographs documenting the inventor and dentist Charles H. Land. The correspondence includes one letter written to Dr. Land, but the majority were written after Dr. Land's death and deal primarily with honors bestowed upon him and the Charles H. Land Museum. Two letters are in German. The financial materials consist of dental fees information and invoices from Baker & Company Gold, Silver and Platinum Refiners and Buffalo Dental Manufacturing Company. The patent records contain United States, Canadian, and French patents issued to Dr. Land. The writings deal exclusively with notes and letters written by Charles H. Land, Jr. in 1957. The notes describe issues surrounding the dental field. The sermons, 1860-1863, have no identified author, but three of the six sermons have titles:A.U. The Memory of a Christian Departed , P.U. Godly Sorrow , andNational Thanksgiving . There are four photographs, two of which show Dr. Land working.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into eight series.

Series 1, Biographical Materials, 1909-1915

Series 2, Correspondence, 1898-1956

Series 3, Financial Materials, 1872-1891

Series 4, Patent Records, 1877-1914

Subseries 4.1, United States Patents, 1877-1914

Subseries 4.2, Canadian and French Patents, 1887-1894

Series 5, Articles and Printed Materials, 1905-1956

Series 6, Writing of C.H. Land, Jr., 1957

Series 7, Sermons, 1860-1863

Series 8, Photographs, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Charles H. Land (1847-1922) was born in Simcoe, Ontario, Canada. Educated in New York, Land studied dentistry under J.B. Meacham of Canada and from 1864-1866 joined the offices of Drs. Sherwood, Haskell and Allport in Chicago, Illinois. From 1871 until his death in 1922, Land practiced dentistry in Detroit, Michigan. In 1875, he married Evangeline Lodge of Detroit and had two children, Charles H., Jr., and Evangeline. Land originated the "Land System of Dentistry" which included many of his patented processes, especially the adaptation of porcelain to dental restorations. Many of his patents deal with devices to aid porcelain work.
Provenance:
Gift of Charles A. Lindbergh, 1965.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.

Physical Access: Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audiovisual materials.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
The Division of Science, Medicine and Society transferred the collection to the Archives Center in 2003.
Occupation:
Dentists  Search this
Topic:
Opium  Search this
Inventors -- 19th century  Search this
Inventions -- 19th century  Search this
Dentistry -- History  Search this
Dental technology -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 19th century
Patents
Financial records -- 20th century
Letters (correspondence) -- 1880-1890
Financial records -- 19th century
Letters (correspondence) -- 20th century.
Writings
Sermons
Articles
Citation:
Charles H. Land Papers, dates, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0834
See more items in:
Charles H. Land Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0834

Procter & Gamble Company Product Packaging Collection

Topic:
Ivory Soap (Brand name)
Designer:
Deskey, Donald, 1894-  Search this
Collector:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Advertiser:
Procter & Gamble Company  Search this
Extent:
1.5 Cubic feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Packaging
Date:
1940s-1970s.
Summary:
A collection of flat-folded product packages for soap and detergent. Some of the packages were designed by industrial designer Donald Deskey.
Scope and Contents:
Collection comprises of sample packages, and signs for Proctor & Gamble products. The samples were for test marketing product names. Some of the products have the date stamped on the item. The industrial designer Donald Deskey designed a number of the packages. Most of the materials are personal care products, but there is a substantial amount of household products. Researchers interested in graphic design and the creative process of developing packaging for consumer goods will find this collection useful.

Series 1, Packaging, 1946-1980, includes sample packages for products such as soaps, shaving creams, laundry detergents, dental care, household cleansers, hair care and dish detergents. The packages are arranged first by size and then in alphabetical and chronological order.

Series 2, Signs, undated, includes two signs for Lennox and Naptha soaps. These materials are arranged in alphabetical order.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged into two series.

Series 1, Packaging, 1946-1980, undated

Series 2, Signs, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Candle maker William Procter and soap maker James Gamble formed a partnership in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1837 to sell their products. Procter & Gamble is probably best known for developing Ivory Soap, but the company has also developed other products such as Ivory Flakes, Chipso (the first dishwasher soap), and Crisco. Innovations in production, distribution, market research and advertising have also contributed to the success of the Procter & Gamble Company.
Provenance:
Donated to the National Museum of American History by Procter & Gamble in 1984, along with many artifacts.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research and access on site by appointment.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
advertising  Search this
Soap  Search this
Genre/Form:
Packaging
Citation:
Procter & Gamble Company Product Packaging Collection, 1940s-1970s, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0836
See more items in:
Procter & Gamble Company Product Packaging Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0836
Online Media:

M*A*S*H Television Show Collection

Topic:
M*A*S*H (Television program)
Author:
Levine, Ken, 1950- (scriptwriter)  Search this
Alda, Alan (actor, scriptwriter)  Search this
Bull, Sheldon (scriptwriter)  Search this
Bloodworth, Linda (scriptwriter)  Search this
Davis, Elias (scriptwriter)  Search this
Greenbaum, Everett (scriptwriter)  Search this
Gelbart, Larry, 1928-2009 (television scriptwriter)  Search this
Hall, Karen (scriptwriter)  Search this
Isaacs, David (scriptwriter)  Search this
Klane, Robert (scriptwriter)  Search this
Koenig, Dennis (scriptwriter)  Search this
Marks, Laurance (scriptwriter)  Search this
Mumford, Thad (scriptwriter)  Search this
Place, Mary Kay (scriptwriter)  Search this
Rappaport, John (scriptwriter)  Search this
Reynolds, Gene (scriptwriter)  Search this
Wilcox, Dan (scriptwriter)  Search this
Collector:
Community Life, Div. of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Community Life, Div. of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Producer:
Twentieth Century-Fox  Search this
Extent:
8.4 Cubic feet (25 boxes, 1 map-folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Television scripts
Transcripts
Music cue sheets
Interviews
Date:
undated
1950 - 1982
Summary:
The television show M*A*S*H was initially broadcast from September 17, 1972 to February 28, 1983. It told the story of doctors and nurses assigned to a fictitious medical unit, the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, based in Uijeongbu, Korea during the 1950-1953 war.
Scope and Contents:
The collection includes the scripts from the television shows starting with the pilot episode and continuing through the eleven season run of two hundred and fifty one episodes. Also included are transcripts of over fifty50 interviews conducted by the writers and producers with former doctors and nurses that served in Mash units in Korea and Vietnam and soldiers who were patients in those units. These transcripts reveal the source of many of the story lines. There are a number of letters from viewers, mostly concerning their regret over the death of one of the characters, Lieutenant Colonel Henry Blake. Notes on Korean customs and the history of an actual Mash unit are included in the collection.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into four series.

Series 1, Scripts, Storylines and Music Cue Sheets 1971-1982

Subseries 1.1, Scripts, 1971-1982

Subseries 1.2, Storylines and Music Cue Sheets, 1971-1982

Subseries 1.3, Script Notes 1973-1974

Series 2, Interviews of Mobile Army Surgical Hospital Personnel and Patients, 1973-1977

Series 3, Other Materials, 1970-1975, undated

Series 4, Photographic Materials, 1950-1970, undated
Biographical / Historical:
M*A*S*H was an award winning television show based on the bestselling novel and Oscar winning motion picture film of the same title. It portrayed the lives of doctors and nurses assigned to a fictitious medical unit, the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, based in Uijeongbu, Korea. While the goal of producers was for the program to be a comedy series, it often portrayed very different sentiments of war and in this case the Korean War. The program was initially broadcasted from September 17, 1972 to February 28, 1983 and achieved a very successful run.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Thomas Garvin Korean War Scrapbook (AC0756)
Provenance:
Collection donated to the National Museum of American History Museum by Twentieth Century Fox, through Suzy Kalter on July 23, 1984.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Television programs  Search this
Television music  Search this
Nurses  Search this
Entertainment  Search this
Physicians -- 1950-2000  Search this
Korean War, 1950-1953  Search this
Genre/Form:
Television scripts
Transcripts
Music cue sheets
Interviews -- 1970-1990
Citation:
M*A*S*H Television Show Collection, 1950-1984, undated, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0117
See more items in:
M*A*S*H Television Show Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0117
Online Media:

Project Bionics Artificial Organ Documentation Collection, [videotapes]

Interviewee:
Watson, John (M.D.)  Search this
Topaz, Stephen  Search this
Kolff, Wilhelm, 1911-  Search this
Jarvik, Robert K., 1946-  Search this
Creator:
American Society for Artificial Internal Organs  Search this
National Library of Medicine  Search this
Collector:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Interviewer:
McKellar, Shelley  Search this
Kondratas, Ramunas A.  Search this
Extent:
2 Cubic feet (8 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Dvds
Videotapes
Videocassettes
Date:
2002
Summary:
A series of interviews conducted jointly by the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs, the National Museum of American History, and the National Library of Medicine. The interviews are of scientists and others instrumental involved in the invention and development of artificial internal organs. Project Bionics is ongoing and may include additional interviews or other materials in the future.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of 7 ½ hours of original BetaCam SP and ½" VHS videos documenting Dr. Willem Kolff, a pioneering doctor in the area of artificial organ innovations and 4 ½ hours of original mini digital video and reference dvds documenting Robert Jarvik.
Arrangement:
One series.
Biographical / Historical:
Project Bionics is a multi-year project to engage, educate, and provide services to researchers, scholars and the general public about artificial organs, past, present, and future. The project intends to: recognize individual and corporate contributions to artificial organ history; identify the pioneers their contributions to the improved quality and length of life; to collect and preserve the records of leading scientists and practitioners in the field; to link past accomplishments to present and future developments; and to encourage education, scholarship, and research on artificial organ history. The project is an ongoing collaborative effort of the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs, the National Museum of American History, and the National Library of Museum.
Provenance:
Collection made for National Museum of American History through a collaborative effort of the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs, the National Museum of American History, and the National Library of Museum.
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Artificial organs  Search this
Genre/Form:
DVDs
Videotapes -- 2000-2010
Videocassettes
Citation:
Project Bionics Artificial Organ Documentation Collection, 2002, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0841
See more items in:
Project Bionics Artificial Organ Documentation Collection, [videotapes]
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0841

Garfield & Company Records

Creator:
United States. War Production Board.  Search this
Garfield & Co.  Search this
Source:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Former owner:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Extent:
15 Cubic feet (17 boxes, 11 oversized folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Ledgers (account books)
Correspondence
Sales records
Tax records
Date:
1909-1969
Summary:
The collection documents Garfield and Company, a pharmaceutical manufacturer in New Jersey during the twentieth century. Garfield and Company, founded by Isidor Z. Garfield (1863-1951), made Seidlitz Powder, a commonly known medication composed of tartaric acid, sodium bicarbonate, and potassium sodium tartrate that was used as a mild cathartic by dissolving it in water and then drinking it. Materials include customer files, invoices, correspondence, advertising and packaging materials, calendars, posters, financial records, and an oral and video history with Julius Garfield, son of Isidor Z. Garfield.
Scope and Contents:
The Garfield Company Records are divided into seven series: Series 1, Historical Background; Series 2, Customer Materials; Series 3, Correspondence, 1937-1952; Series 4, Financial Records, 1918-1950; Series 5, Advertising and Packaging Materials, 1923-1968 and undated; Series 6, Drawings/Diagrams, 1958; and Series 7, Photographs, circa 1950s. The collection documents Garfield and Company, a pharmaceutical manufacturer in New Jersey during the twentieth century. Garfield and Company made Seidlitz Powder, a commonly known medication composed of a mixture of tartaric acid, sodium bicarbonate, and potassium sodium tartrate that was used as a mild cathartic by dissolving it in water and then drinking it. The records include customer files, correspondence, advertising, packaging, audio visual materials, photographs, packaging, advertising and financial records. The collection provides good insight into the company during the World War II period and the hardship conditions under which they operated, such as delays in receiving raw materials and difficulty with labor.

Series 1, Historical Background, 1915-1969 and undated, consists of newspaper clippings and articles, corporate identity pieces (letterhead and envelopes), correspondence, and audio visual materials about Garfield and Company. The majority of the correspondence relates to machinery companies and their ability to provide equipment and expertise to manufacture powders and handle packaging issues. Other correspondence relates to advertising agencies and the State of New Jersey Division of Employment Security. The correspondence with Seil, Putt and Rusby, Inc., documents an analytical, consulting and research chemists firm that conducted testing for Garfield. The audio visual materials contain an oral history with Julius Garfield, son of Isidor Garfield on ½" VHS video footage (OV 820.1-2) and a demonstration of how Seidlitz powders are manufactured. The video footage, of which there are two copies, is approximately one hour in length and is divided into two segments. The first segment features the manufacturing equipment producing Seidlitz powders and the second segment features an informal interview with Julius Garfield discussing his father's background and his father's automation of the process of packaging Seidlitz powders. The audio cassettes (OTC 820.1-2) contain a more detailed oral history with Julius Garfield. He provides additional information about his father's background, his brother's (especially George's) background, and the history of the company. Curator Ray Kondratus, of the Division of Medicine and Science, National Museum of American History, conducted the oral history interview, circa 1970s.

Series 2, Customer Materials, 1909-1952, includes materials about customers who had a business relationship with Garfield and Company. The materials are divided into two subseries, Subseries 1, Index Card Files, 1909-1939 and Subseries 2, Customer Files, 1949, 1951-1952.

Subseries 1, Index Card Files, 1909-1939, contains customer names, addresses, and order history from 1909 to the 1920s. They are arranged geographically by city and alphabetically by customer name. They adhere to a color coding schema. Department stores are designated yellow; wholesalers pale blue; second jobbers buff; and chain drug stores are pink. The cards are annotated revealing information about the customer's personality, job information, and the specific salesman for that account.

Subseries 2, Customer Files, 1949, 1951-1952, is arranged alphabetically by customer name. The files contain invoices/receipts for companies, department stores, drug stores, and other organizations that ordered Seidlitz powder from Garfield and Company. The receipts include the name and address of the company and the cost for each order. Also included are bills of lading documenting where the shipment was sent and who received it.

Series 3, Correspondence, 1937-1952, is arranged alphabetically and consists of letters to and from other companies, individuals, and the War Production Board. Some general subject files are also here. The War Production Board correspondence contains information about the use and salvage of raw materials in the factory; requests to purchase certain types of materials; and compliance with quarterly requests for inventory, purchases, and usage of certain foods and materials. Included in the general subject files is documentation about insurance and workers compensation claims for employees of Garfield and Company. The documentation includes primarily State of New York Department of Labor Workers Compensation forms and accident/injury reports. The reports provide detailed information on the nature of the accident/injury, hourly wage and demographic information about the employee.

Series 4, Advertising and Packaging Materials, 1923-1968 and undated, and is divided into four subseries, Subseries 1, Advertising Materials, 1923-1968 and undated; Subseries 2, Posters, 1940s and undated; Subseries 3, Radio Broadcasts, 1951-1964, and Subseries 4, Packaging Materials, 1953 and undated.

Subseries 1, Advertising Materials, 1923-1968 and undated, contains primarily proofs of advertisements for Garfield Seidlitz powders, merchandising reports, price lists, metal printing plates for two advertisements, and calendars. The advertising proofs are in color, black-and-white, and pencil on tracing paper and were prepared by firms such as F.M. Advertising Agency, Inc. There are some pin-up calendars advertising Clairol, Inc., products, 1943, and other pin-ups advertising Garfield and Company Seidlitz powders, 1950-1951.

Subseries 2, Posters, 1940s and undated, consists of posters for Garfield and Company Seidlitz powders and war posters created from woodcuts by Frances "Fran" O'Brien Garfield and Ernest Hamlin Baker. Garfield and Baker designed the posters for the Putnum County Defense Council of New York. Garfield and Company distributed the posters.

Subseries 3, Radio Broadcasts, 1951-1964, contains two 5" inch reel-to-reel audio tapes of radio broadcasts for Garfield and Company products and four audio discs (33 rpm and 87 rpm) of radio broadcasts.

Subseries 4, Packaging Materials, 1953 and undated, consists primarily of labels for Seidlitz powders and cardboard carton packages for transporting and displaying Seidlitz powders. The labels are paper and primarily two and one half by four inches. They feature standard language about the Seidlitz powders. They are imprinted with the name of a specific drug company, such as Hazeltine and Perkins Drug Company or Gill Brook Laboratories. There are some labels that have been imprinted on aluminum sheets. The cardboard cartons are for Seidlitz powders, cough syrups, laxatives, rhinitis tablets, diarrhea remedies, and toothpaste. Packaging specific to a company/manufacturer is arranged alphabetically under the name of the company.

Series 5, Financial Records, 1918-1950, is divided into four subseries: Subseries 1, Invoices, 1918-1941; Subseries 2, Sales Books and Ledgers, 1939-1947 and undated; Subseries 3, Receipts, 1948-1952; and Subseries 4, Tax Materials, 1936-1950 and consists primarily of tax information for the company and specific employees, sales ledgers and invoices and receipts.

Subseries 1, Invoices, 1918-1941, contains invoices issued by Garfield and Company to companies, department stores, drug stores, and other organizations for purchases of Seidlitz Powders. Included are bills of lading. The subseries are arranged alphabetically. See also Series 2, Customer Files, 1949, 1951-1952.

Subseries 2, Sales Books and Ledgers, 1939-1947 and undated, documents order information about the number of tins, carts, and packs of Seidlitz powder sold to specific companies.

Subseries 3, Receipts, 1948-1952, is arranged alphabetically by name of company and contains documentation on products and services that Garfield and Company purchased and used. For example, they purchased soda bicarbonate from the American Cyanamid Company and used the Bronx Haulage Company for rubbish removal.

Subseries 4, Tax Materials, 1936-1950, contains employee wage records, tax returns, employee withholding exemption certificates, and invoices for Samuel Markowitz, an accountant. Some of the records detail the name of the employee, time worked (days and hours), wages, deductions, and wage paid.

Series 6, Drawings/Diagrams, 1958, contains one line drawing for hot water at the Garfield Company, December, 1958, and pencil sketches and diagrams for wiring of the tins and cartons machinery, 1958.

Series 7, Photographs, circa 1950s, contains black-and-white photographs of Isidor Garfield, employees operating packaging machinery, an exterior view of the manufacturing facility, and a store display.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into seven series.

Series 1: Historical Background, 1915-1969 and undated

Series 2: Customer Materials, 1909-1952

Subseries 2.1: Index Card Files, 1909-1939

Subseries 2.2: Customer Files, 1949, 1951-1952

Series 3: Correspondence, 1937-1952

Series 4: Financial Records, 1918-1950

Subseries 4.1: Invoices, 1918-1941

Subseries 4.2: Sales Books and Ledgers, 1939-1947 and undated

Subseries 4.3: Receipts, 1948-1952

Subseries 4.4: Tax Materials, 1936-1950

Series 5: Advertising and Packaging Materials, 1923-1968 and undated

Subseries 5.1, Advertising Materials, 1923-1968 and undated

Subseries 5.2: Posters, 1940s and undated

Subseries 5.3: Radio Broadcasts, 1951-1964

Subseries 5.4: Packaging Materials, 1953 and undated

Series 6: Drawings/Diagrams, 1958

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1950s
Biographical / Historical:
Garfield and Company of Edison, New Jersey, was the largest manufactures of Seidlitz Powders in the United States. Garfield and Company was founded by Isidor Z. Garfield (1863-1951), a New York pharmacist, who began manufacturing powders in 1908. Garfield was born in Russia and graduated from the University of Moscow with a degree in chemistry. He came to the United States in 1888 with his wife Frances and their first-born son, Louis. Three other sons, George, Julius, and Henry, were born in the United States. Garfield developed an automated process to package reactive ingredients (US Patent 1,091,568) in March, 1914. The process separately packaged the powders in moisture-proof wrappers so druggists no longer had to mix the compounds. In 1916, Garfield patented a machine for measuring and compressing powders (US Patent 1,177,854). Both of Garfield's patents were assigned to Samuel Loewy of New York City. After Garfield died, his sons, Julius and George Garfield inherited the business. The New Jersey manufacturing plant closed in 1980.
Related Materials:
Packaging equipment used by Garfield and Company is located in the Division of Medicine and Science. See Accession #1979.1144.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Julius and George Garfield in 1979.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.

Stored off-site. Arrangements must be made with the Archives Center staff two-weeks prior to a scheduled research visit. Reference copies of audio visual materials must be used.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Antacids  Search this
Packaging  Search this
Pharmaceutical industry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ledgers (account books)
Correspondence -- 20th century
Sales records
Tax records
Citation:
Garfield and Company Records, dates, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0820
See more items in:
Garfield & Company Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0820

Division of Science, Medicine and Society HIV/AIDS Reference Collection

Creator:
Kondratas, Ramunas A.  Search this
Source:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Former owner:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Cubic feet (12 boxes, 3 oversized folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pamphlets
Leaflets
Correspondence
Advertisements
Place:
Lithuania
Date:
1979-2006
bulk 1987-1993
Summary:
This collection consists of pamphlets, books, and a wide variety of printed matter and ephemera relating to HIV/AIDS. The collection was principally assembled by National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution curator Ramunas Kondratas.
Scope and Contents:
The Division of Science, Medicine, and Society HIV/AIDS Reference Collection contains a large amount of printed material representing how HIV/AIDS was depicted in popular culture, in the medical sciences, by activist groups, and by government agencies principally during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Most of the collection consists of pamphlets, brochures, reports, and other educational material designed to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS in the general public.

This collection includes correspondence and conference proceedings related to the history of HIV/AIDS. The materials were collected by NMAH curator Ramunas "Ray" Kondratas, working together with the AIDS history group that was part of the American Association for the History of Medicine. A number of bibliographies and resource guides to literature related to HIV/AIDS are included in the collection. Geographically, the material is primarily from the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, with New York City, San Francisco, Los Angeles, the general United States, as well as Lithuania and London, also represented in the collection.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into five series.

Series 1, Educational Material and Advertisements, 1984-2004

Subseries 1, American Red Cross, 1986-1993, undated

Subseries 2, Gay Men's Health Crisis, Incorporated, 1985-1994, undated

Subseries 3, New York State Health Department, 1984-1991, undated

Subseries 4, Government of the District of Columbia, 1990-1996, undated

Subseries 5, United States Department of Health and Human Services, 1984-1995, undated

Subseries 6, Whitman-Walker Clinic, Washington, D.C., 1988-1996, undated

Subseries 7, Various Organizations, 1984-2004, undated

Subseries 8, Posters, Newspapers, and Ephemera, 1986-1994, undated

Series 2, Reports, Commissions and Bibliographies, 1981-1999

Subseries 1, Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Epidemic, 1987-1989

Subseries 2, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 1981-1999

Subseries 3, National Library of Medicine (NLM), 1986-1993

Subseries 4, Other Organizations, 1987-1988

Series 3, Ramunas Kondratas, Correspondence and Collected Materials, 1979-1994, undated

Series 4, AIDS/HIV Related Press Clippings and Periodicals, 1982-2006

Series 5, Audiovisual Material, 1988
Biographical / Historical:
The HIV/AIDS crisis that began in the 1980s is a defining event of the latter half of the 20th century. Once thought to be a disease affecting homosexual men only, the epidemic spread to the broader population of the United States and the world at large. The response to the epidemic came from many public and private organizations, some internationally known like the Red Cross and some at the local level such as the Whitman-Walker Clinic in Washington, D.C. Many organizations produced a variety of pamphlets, studies, and reports dealing with all aspects of the disease.

This collection consists of material collected by the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, Division of Science, Medicine, and Society. The bulk of the collection was assembled by curator Ramunas "Ray" Kondratas during the late 1980s and early 1990s.
Provenance:
Received from Ramunas Kondratas, curator, Division of Science, Medicine, and Society.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.

Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow. Please ask staff to remove any staples before copying.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Reproduction permission from Archives Center: reproduction fees may apply.
Topic:
Political activists  Search this
HIV/AIDS awareness  Search this
Epidemics  Search this
Gay activists  Search this
AIDS (Disease) -- Prevention  Search this
AIDS (Disease) -- Lithuania  Search this
Genre/Form:
Pamphlets -- 20th century
Leaflets
Correspondence -- 20th century
Advertisements -- 20th century
Citation:
Division of Science, Medicine, and Society HIV/AIDS Reference Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1134
See more items in:
Division of Science, Medicine and Society HIV/AIDS Reference Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1134
Online Media:

Standards Western Automatic Computer Circuit Notebooks

Topic:
Standard Western Automatic Computer
Collector:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Creator:
Huskey, Harry D.  Search this
Larson, Harry  Search this
Rutland, Dave  Search this
Names:
United States. National Bureau of Standards  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Notebooks
Date:
1946-1952
Summary:
Collection documents circuit development for the Standards Western Automatic Computer (SWAC). SWAC was an early digital computer built in 1950 by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards in Los Angeles, California.
Scope and Contents:
Three bound notebooks maintained by Harry Huskey, Dave Rutland and Harry T. Larson, documenting circuit development for the Standards Western Automatic Computer (SWAC). SWAC was an early digital computer built in 1950 by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards in Los Angeles, California. Additional materials include one folder of test routines and coding sheets, from 1952.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Designed in 1950 by Huskey, and built by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards in Los Angeles, California, SWAC was an early version of an electronic digital computer.
Provenance:
Immediate source of acquisition unknown.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Computers -- History -- 1940-1950  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Notebooks
Citation:
Standards Western Automatic Computer Circuit Notebooks, 1946-1952, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1217
See more items in:
Standards Western Automatic Computer Circuit Notebooks
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1217

Dr. Bruno Z. Kisch Papers

Source:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Creator:
Kisch, Bruno Z., 1890-1966  Search this
Former owner:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Cubic feet (11 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Laboratory notebooks
Electron micrographs
Correspondence
Technical literature
Reprints
Photomicrographs
Date:
1904-1968.
Summary:
This collection consists of materials from the professional life of Dr. Bruno Z. Kisch.
Scope and Contents note:
Contains correspondence, most relating to Kisch's service as President of the American College of Cardiology; photomicrographs, of animal tissue specimens; writings and notes; notebooks on Dr. Kisch's experimentation and research, including many electrocardiograms; and printed material, such as medical journals containing articles by Dr. Kisch, and reprints of articles by Dr. Kisch.

The materials are useful to those with an interest in the American College of Cardiology during the 1950s, or those who have the ability to read and understand cardiological printouts.

Electrocardiograph: An instrument which records electrical currents produced by the heart.

Electrocardiography: A method of recording electrical currents traversing the heart muscle just previous to each heart beat. The study and interpretation of electrocardiographs.

Electrocardiogram: The graphic record of the heart's action currents obtained with the electrocardiograph.

Electrogram: Any record on paper or film made by an electrical event.

Tracing: Any graphic display of electrical or mechanical cardiovascular event.
Arrangement:
Divided into 5 series:

Series 1, Personal materials

Series 2, Correspondence

Series 3, Notebooks

Series 4, Photographs, Micrographs and Negatives

Series 5, Publications
Biographical/Historical note:
Dr. Bruno Zacharias Kisch (1890-1966) was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1890. He received his medical degree in 1913 at the Charles University of Prague and served in the Austrian army during World War I as a physician from 1914-1918. With the rise of Nazism, Kisch relocated to the United States in 1938 with his wife, Ruth, and their two children, Charlotte Rebecca and Arnold Emanuel. A colleague called him "one of the princely gifts that fell to America because of Adolph Hitler". In 1943, Kisch became a United States citizen.

Amongst his peers Kisch was credited as a "Da Vinci in a modern age" due to his wide range of interests. He was a founding member of the American College of Cardiology in 1949, and completed the first president's term upon his death in 1951. Kisch was elected as president in his own right at the end of the term and held the office of president from 1951-1953. From 1939 until 1966 Kisch had his own medical practice in New York City and was a researcher and consultant in cardiology. Kisch's major contribution to the field of cardiology was his experimentation with electron microscopes. He was the first scientist to use electron microscopes to perform cardiac research on warm-blooded animals. The microscope allowed researchers to study heart fibers more closely by magnifying cells by 30,000. Discoveries Kisch made through this research furthered the field of cardiology and led to the formation of the Electron Microscopic Institute in 1953.

The professorships he held at multiple schools, including Yeshiva University, in New York City, and Yale University, reflect his wide range of knowledge from physiology to the philosophy and history of science as does his consultation to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. on "the study of scales, weights, and measures", and his position as curator to the Edward Clark Streeter Collection of Weights and Measures at Yale University. Kisch's other interests can be found in the articles he wrote and the publications for which he served as founder/editor: "The Jewish Refugee and America"; "History of the Jewish Pharmacy (Judenapothek) in Prague"; "Scales and Weights – A Historical Outline"; "Shekel Metals and False Shekels"; Cardiologia; the Journal of Experimental Medicine and Surgery; and the Transactions of the American College of Cardiology. Dr. Bruno Z. Kisch passed away while visiting Germany in 1966. The Electron Microscopic Institute was dedicated in his memory in 1967.
Related Materials:
xMaterials at the National Museum of American History

Division of Medicine and Science

Other artifacts in the collection include sphygmomanometers, sphygmographs, stethoscopes, pacemakers, stents, and one of Claud Beck's defibrillators. The collection also has early examples of Bayer Aspirin.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Dr. Bruno Kisch's wife, Prof. Ruth Kisch, of Brooklyn, New York, in 1971.
Restrictions:
Collection open for research on site by appointment. Unprotected photographs must be handled with gloves.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Cardiology  Search this
Medicine -- Research  Search this
Microscopy  Search this
Medical sciences  Search this
Electron microscopy  Search this
Physicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Glass -- 1890-1920
Laboratory notebooks
Electron micrographs
Correspondence -- 20th century
Technical literature
Reprints
Photomicrographs
Citation:
Dr. Bruno Z. Kisch Papers, 1904-1968, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0835
See more items in:
Dr. Bruno Z. Kisch Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0835

G.W. Aimar Drug Company Records

Creator:
Aimar, George W.  Search this
Aimar, Harold  Search this
Aimar, G.W., Drug Company  Search this
Source:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Former owner:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Extent:
350 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Business records
Prescriptions
Cashbooks
Invoices
Formulae, chemical
Daybooks
Letterpress copybooks
Ledgers (account books)
Place:
South Carolina
Charleston (S.C.)
Date:
1864-1972
Scope and Contents note:
The day-to-day business records of a Charleston, South Carolina pharmacy, including day books, ledger books, cash books, prescription books, invoices, letterpress copybooks, and formula books.
Arrangement:
Divided into 8 series.
Biographical/Historical note:
A pharmacy established in 1852 which operated in Charleston, South Carolina for over 100 years. During the Civil War the store served as an official dispensary for the Confederate States of America, and the top three floors were converted to a hospital. The store remained in the family and in business until 1978.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Harold and George W. Aimar.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Drugstores  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Pharmacies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Business records -- 20th century
Prescriptions
Prescriptions -- 19th century
Cashbooks
Business records -- 19th century
Invoices
Formulae, chemical
Daybooks
Letterpress copybooks -- 20th century
Ledgers (account books)
Letterpress copybooks -- 19th century
Citation:
G.W. Aimar Drug Company Records, 1864-1972, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0810
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0810

Superconducting Super Collider Collection

Creator:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Extent:
4 Cubic feet (8 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Bumper stickers
Videotapes
Photographs
Clippings
Handbills
Signs (declaratory or advertising artifacts)
Posters
Place:
Texas -- Environmental protection
Date:
1985-1992
bulk 1987-1989
Summary:
The collection was assembled by Museum curators and documents the efforts of persons in eight states to have the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), a particle accelerator, built in their state. Also documents efforts in each state to oppose locating the SSC in their state. The collection contains correspondence, press kits, posters, signs, bumper stickers, leaflets, handbills, clippings, photographs, and a videotape.
Scope and Contents:
The collections contains materials documenting the efforts by persons in eight competing states to have the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) built in their state, as well as efforts in each state to oppose locating the SSC within their state. The materials include correspondence, press kits, posters, signs, bumper stickers, leaflets, handbills, clippings, two photographs and one videotape.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into nine series.

Series 1: Arizona (Ian MacPherson), 1988, undated

Subseries 1.1: Ian McPherson, 1988, undated

Series 2: Colorado (Uriel Nauenberg), 1987

Subseries 2.1: Uriel Nauenberg, 1987-1988

Series 3: Illinois, 1987-1991, undated

Subseries 3.1: Fermi National Laboratory Library/Paula Garrett, undated

Subseries 3.2: David L. Gross, 1988, undated

Subseries 3.3: Sharon Lough, 1988-1991

Subseries 3.4: Stan L. Yonkauski, undated

Series 4: Michigan, 1988-1989

Subseries 4.1: Larry Jones, 1988-1989

Series 5: New York, 1986-1990

Subseries 5.1: Gail Adair, 1987

Subseries 5.2: Mary Lou and Jim Alexander, 1986-1990

Subseries 5.3: Bill Herbert, 1987

Subseries 5.4: Doug McCuen, 1987-1988

Subseries 5.5: Brian L. Petty, 1987-1988

Series 6: North Carolina, 1987

Subseries 6.1: Bill Dunn, 1987

Series 7: Tennessee, 1987-1992

Subseries 7.1: Robert and Pat Sanders, 1987-1992

Subseries 7.2: J. Fred Weinhold, 1987

Series :, Texas, 1985-1990, undated

Subseries 8.1: Representative Joe Barton, undated

Subseries 8.2: Jean Caddel, 1986-1989

Subseries 8.3: Coby Chase, 1985-1989

Subseries 8.4: Red Oak Chamber of Commerce, 1990

Subseries 8.5: Waxahachie Chamber of Commerce, undated

Subseries 8.6: Mari Beth Williams, undated

Series 9: Miscellaneous, 1987-1988
Biographical / Historical:
The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), if built, would have been the world's most expensive instrument for basic science. It would have allowed physicists to study the collisions of subatomic particles in conditions approximating those of the Big Bang, the beginning of the universe. The SSC design called for a 10-foot wide tunnel to be laid out in an oval pattern similar to a racetrack, approximately 53 miles in circumference and 14 miles in diameter. The tunnel, buried several hundred feet underground, would have contained nearly 10,000 superconducting magnets. Small clusters of buildings located above the tunnel were planned to house the SSC's offices, laboratories, and control facilities. All of these structures would have made the SSC the largest particle accelerator in the world and, at an estimated cost of between $4.4 and $11.8 billion, one of the largest public works projects ever undertaken in the United States.

Physicists planned to use the SSC's superconducting magnets to accelerate two streams of protons (particles with a positive electrical charge that forming part of the nucleus of an atom) to a velocity of 20 trillion electron-volts (TeV) in opposite directions within the tunnel's parallel beam tubes. They would then deflect the two streams into each other and study the particles that were created in the resulting high-speed collisions. From these events, physicists hoped to detect particles never seen before and learn more about the composition of matter.

In January 1987, President Reagan publicly declared his support for the proposed SSC, to be built under the authority of the Department of Energy (DOE). States were invited to submit site proposals for the project, and from the twenty-five states that responded, eight finalists were selected: Arizona, Colorado, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.

The huge scale of the SSC meant that it would have a significant environmental and cultural impact on the area selected. The SSC would, one source estimated, "require 16,000 acres of donated land, a flow of between 500 and 2,200 gallons of water a minute and up to 250-megawatts of power, as well as accessibility to a major airport, so the world's scientists can fly in and out."1

In many of the finalist states, opponents of the SSC organized and actively campaigned against the project. They raised issues such as the threat to uproot hundreds of people from their homes or create heavy tax and utility burdens. Opponents attended public hearings on SSC issues, distributed leaflets by mail and by hand, and conducted letter-writing campaigns to local politicians. In New York, Citizens Against the Collider Here (CATCH) was able to force the state to withdraw from the competition. Groups in other states learned from the New York group's experiences and used similar techniques in their own campaigns, sometimes adopting the name CATCH. As one CATCH activist recalled, "opponents were not against the SSC or basic sciences, however they did not believe that they should be forced out of their homes for the SSC."2

Supporters of the SSC, on the other hand, addressed the concerns of the citizens by writing editorials or distributing pamphlets responding to particular issues or questions. Prominent city officials and politicians traveled to the proposed sites to discuss the economic and scientific benefits of the SSC, and cities distributed bumper stickers supporting the project. Scientists rebuffed claims that the SSC would produce large amounts of deadly radioactivity and contaminate the entire area. Supporters promised that, "the SSC project would bring federal funding, international prestige, and jobs—starting with 4,500 construction jobs, and later 2,500 full-time research staff positions."3

In November 1988, the Department of Energy declared the winning site to be Ellis County, Texas, southwest of Dallas near the town of Waxahachie. Full-scale construction began three years later with the building of laboratory facilities for the design and manufacture of the SSC's superconducting magnets. Contractors began boring the main tunnel and several vertical access shafts in January 1993.

The anticipated tremendous costs that dogged the project eventually helped undermine it. In June 1992 and again in June 1993, the House voted to cancel funds for the SSC; both times, the Senate restored funding. However, in October 1993 the House rejected the Senate's second restoration, and President Clinton echoed Congress's decision to cancel further work on the SSC. The project received a small budget to support termination activities through 1996. Once the remaining projects were shut down and the scientists and staff dispersed, only several empty buildings in the rural Texas countryside, and fourteen miles of tunnel underneath it, remained of the once-ambitious facility.

At the National Museum of American History, planning for the Science in American Life exhibit—which would examine how science, technology, and American society have intersected over a hundred-year period—began in 1990, at the same time that preparations were being made in Texas to build the Super Collider. Early in the planning phases, Smithsonian curators decided to dedicate a section of the exhibit to the SSC. This section was intended to be a "work in progress" that would change over time as the collider was built, reflecting the current and ongoing debates over the massive machine.

The exhibition design called for using materials donated by both supporters and opponents of the SSC. Early in the exhibit's development the curators began contacting organizations and individuals who both supported and opposed the SSC, asking if they still had materials related to their efforts. Over a two-year period, the curators collected a wide range of items in more than twenty donations, ranging from bumper stickers, t-shirts and hats, to newspaper clippings, maps, and copies of state site proposals.

The design of the SSC portion of the Science in American Life exhibit became permanent with the closing of the SSC in late 1993. The SSC portion now focuses on the roles that special interest groups, protest, and grass-roots political campaigns play in large-scale scientific endeavors. Many of the donated items were included in the exhibit.

Notes

1 DeMott, John S. and J. Madeleine Nash, "Super Push for a Supercollider," Time, April 13, 1987, p. 19, Box 2, Folder 20.

2 "Alexander Narrative," a brief typescript history of the New York CATCH organization, Box 3, Folder 14.

3 Koszczuk, Jackie. "Anti-SSC Felling CATCH-es On Fast," Daily Star News (Fort Worth, Texas), September 17, 1988, p. 4, Box 2, Folder 5.
Related Materials:
When the Superconducting Super Collider entered its termination phase in 1993, the Records Management Department of the project began grouping the official records of the SSC into five "disposition packages." These packages were in various stages of being assembled, shipped, received, and processed for research use and were dispersed to: the Fort Worth Regional Federal Records Center; Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory ("Fermilab") Archives; Niels Bohr Library, Center for History of Physics, American Institute for Physics; Ronald Reagan Presidential Library; and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Archives.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by individuals connected in various ways to the Superconducting Super Collider. The items were donated from personal collections, official files, and the project archives of several different institutions. The donors were Gail Adair, Mary Lou and Dr. Jim Alexander, Representative Joe Barton, Jean Caddel, Coby Chase, Bill Dunn, the Fermi National Laboratory Library, David L. Gross, Bill Herbert, Larry Jones, Sharon Lough, Uriel Nauenberg, Doug McCuen, Ian McPherson, Andrea Miller, Brian L. Petty, the Red Oak Chamber of Commerce, Pat and Dr. Robert Sanders, the Waxahachie Chamber of Commerce, J. Fred Weinhold, Mari Beth Williams, and Stan L. Yonkauski. A brief statement identifying donors and their connections to the Superconducting Super Collider accompanies each subseries in the container list.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use. Some materials are currently unprocessed.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Environmental impact analysis  Search this
Environmental protection -- Citizen participation  Search this
Superconducting Super Collider  Search this
NIMBY syndrome  Search this
Genre/Form:
Bumper stickers
Videotapes
Photographs -- 1980-2000
Clippings -- 20th century
Handbills
Signs (declaratory or advertising artifacts)
Posters -- 20th century
Citation:
Superconducting Super Collider Collection, 1985-1992, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0538
See more items in:
Superconducting Super Collider Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0538
Online Media:

David Vetter Collection

Creator:
Vetter, David, 1971-1984  Search this
Texas Children's Hospital  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Donor:
Vetter, David J., Jr.  Search this
Vetter, Carol Ann  Search this
Vetter, Carol Ann  Search this
Vetter, David J., Jr.  Search this
Collector:
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Science, Medicine and Society, Division of (NMAH, SI).  Search this
Extent:
4.6 Cubic feet (9 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Financial records
Reprints
Periodicals
Reports
Specifications
School records
Student drawings
Correspondence
Legislative documents
Articles
Trade literature
Manuals
Date:
1971-1986
Summary:
Papers document David Vetter, a Texas boy with a rare disease known as Severe Combined Immune Deficiency. His life in a special isolation unit received widespread publicity.
Scope and Contents:
Papers relating to David Vetter, a Texas boy with a rare disease known as Severe Combined Immune Deficiency. The papers document his and his family's efforts to maintain normalcy in his life in spite of the limitations imposed by his disease, and medical efforts to reduce or cope with the limitations. A special suit was designed for David by NASA scientists to give him mobility, and the papers include documentation of the development and implementation of the suit.

The collection includes letters, greeting cards, photographs, medical records and internal hospital memoranda and documents from the Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, procedure manuals for the isolation unit, specifications for the space suit, David's school records and school art projects, receipts and other financial papers, trade literature for products used in creating the sterile isolation unit, medical journals, newspaper and magazine articles, and clippings. The collection also includes a project created by high school students in 1985 about David's life and legislation to honor David with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into seven series.

Series 1: Correspondence and Press, 1971-1985

Series 2: Mobile Biological Isolation System (MBIS), 1973-1983

Series 3: Medical Publications, 1972-1983

Series 4: Personal Papers, 1978-1983

Series 5: Nimitz High School Project, 1985

Series 6: Texas Children's Hospital Medical Records, 1965-1989

Series 7: Photographs, 1974-1983
Biographical / Historical:
David Vetter (1971-1984) was a Texas boy who was born with Severe Combined Immune Deficiency, a disease which required him to live in a sterile, plastic isolation unit. NASA scientists designed and created a special suit for David, which resembled astronauts' space suits. His parents, family, church, doctors, and community all made efforts to enable him to have a normal childhood and life. At age 12, he underwent experimental bone marrow surgery, which was not successful, and David died a few months later. The bone marrow donor, David's sister Katherine, carried a dormant strand of the Epstein-Barr virus which was not detected by the pre-operation screens. He was removed from the bubble in February of 1984 and died 15 days later.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center, National Museum of American History

Shriners Hospital Patient Isolation Unit Records, NMAH.AC.1142

Materials in the Division of Medicine and Science, National Museum of American History

Related objects include action figure toys, a t-shirt, and a space suit. See accessioons: 1986.0201 and 1986.0450.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by David Vetter's parents, David and Carol Ann Vetter in 1986.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Some health-related materials in Series 3: Medical Publications, Series 6: Texas Children's Hospital Medical Records, and Series 7: Photographs are restricted until 2034.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Immunological deficiency syndromes  Search this
Space suits  Search this
Hospitals  Search this
Severe combined immunodeficiency  Search this
Immune diseases  Search this
Isolation (Hospital care)  Search this
Greeting cards -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 20th century
Financial records -- 20th century
Reprints
Periodicals
Reports -- 1950-1980
Specifications
School records
Student drawings
Correspondence -- 20th century
Legislative documents
Articles -- 20th century
Trade literature
Manuals
Citation:
David Vetter Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1133
See more items in:
David Vetter Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1133
Online Media:

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