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The Wounded Scout, a Friend in the Swamp

Artist:
John Rogers, born Salem, MA 1829-died New Canaan, CT 1904  Search this
Medium:
painted plaster
Dimensions:
22 1/8 x 11 1/8 x 8 1/4 in. (56.3 x 28.1 x 21.0 cm)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
patented 1864
Topic:
Figure group\male  Search this
Ethnic\African-American  Search this
Occupation\military\soldier  Search this
History\United States\Civil War  Search this
State of being\emotion\friendship  Search this
State of being\illness\wound  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of John Rogers and Son
Object number:
1882.1.5
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Department:
Painting and Sculpture
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/vk71df0468a-bb61-44f9-930a-0b6967b85e3c
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:saam_1882.1.5

[Artists' portraits from Henry Tuckerman's Book of the Artists...], circa 1865]-1867

Creator:
Rockwood, George Gardner, 1832-1911  Search this
Names:
Benson, Eugene, 1837-1908 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Brown, Henry Kirke, 1814-1886 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Church, Frederic Edwin, 1826-1900 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Cole, Thomas, 1801-1848 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Cranch, Christopher Pearse, 1813-1892 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Cropsey, Jasper Francis, 1823-1900 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Darley, Felix Octavius Carr, 1822-1888 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Durand, Asher Brown, 1796-1886 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Elliott, Charles Loring, 1812-1868 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Gifford, Sanford Robinson, 1823-1880 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Gray, Henry Peters, 1819-1877 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Hart, James McDougal, 1828-1901 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Hicks, Thomas, 1823-1890 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Hubbard, Richard William, 1816-1888 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Inman, Henry, 1801-1846 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Inness, George, 1825-1894 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Johnson, Eastman, 1824-1906 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Kensett, John Frederick, 1816-1872 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Leutze, Emanuel, 1816-1868 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
McEntee, Jervis, 1828-1891 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Rogers, John, 1829-1904 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896  Search this
Shattuck, Aaron Draper, 1832-1928 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Sully, Thomas, 1783-1872 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Tuckerman, Henry T. (Henry Theodore), 1813-1871  Search this
Whittredge, Worthington, 1820-1910 -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Extent:
24 Items (photographic prints, b&w, 17 1/2 x 13 1/2 cm., on sheet 30 1/2 x 24 cm. or smaller.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Portraits of artists taken by George Rockwood and Napoleon Sarony (Sarony Photographic Co.) for the large paper, extra-illustrated edition of Henry Tuckerman's, "American artist life : comprising biographical and critical sketches of American artists : preceded by an historical account of the rise and progress of art in America : with an appendix containing an account of notable pictures and private collections" (New York, G.P. Putnam & Son, 1867). Also included is a copy of Tuckerman's book (not the extra illustrated version.) Photographs include: Eugene Benson (original missing, copyprint only), Henry Kirke Brown (original missing, copyprint only), Frederic Edwin Church, Thomas Cole, J. Francis Cropsey, Christopher Cranch, F.O.C. Darley, Asher Brown Durand, Charles Loring Elliott, Sanford Robinson Gifford, Henry Peters Gray, James M. Hart, Thomas Hicks (incorrectly identified as John Ehninger), Richard W. Hubbard, Henry Inman, George Inness (incorrectly identified as Albert Bierstadt), Eastman Johnson, John F. Kensett (original missing, copyprint only), Emanuel Leutze, Jervis McEntee (original missing, copyprint only), John Rogers, A.D. Shattuck, Thomas Sully (original missing, copyprint only), and Worthington Whittredge (original missing, copyprint only).
Provenance:
The copy of Tuckerman's book was donated in 1958 by Robert McIntyre. The photographs, along with the extra illustrated edition of Henry Tuckerman's, "Book of the Artists..." (1867) were donated in 1960 by McIntyre. The folio was one of the 25 copies produced, possibly acquired by McIntyre through auction of the library of S.K. Cleven of Iowa handled by Anderson Galleries in 1915. The photographs were removed from the folio prior to its transfer to the Smithsonian American Art Museum Library. Photographer and provenance information (annotated) from Putnam's Monthly Advertiser is enclosed with the original folio housed at the Smithsonian American Art Museum Library.
Topic:
Artists -- United States -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.rockgeor
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rockgeor

William Cullen Bryant and Parke Godwin papers

Creator:
Bryant, William Cullen, 1794-1878  Search this
Godwin, Parke, 1816-1904  Search this
Names:
Adams, Herbert, 1858-1945  Search this
Alexander, John White, 1856-1915  Search this
Beard, W. H. (William Holbrook), 1824-1900  Search this
Benson, Eugene, 1837-1908  Search this
Bierstadt, Albert, 1830-1902  Search this
Bispham, William  Search this
Brackett, Edward Augustus, 1818-1908  Search this
Brown, George Loring, 1814-1889  Search this
Brown, Henry Kirke, 1814-1886  Search this
Brown, John George, 1831-1913  Search this
Chapman, J. G. (John Gadsby), 1808-1889  Search this
Coffin, William A. (William Anderson), 1855-1925  Search this
Cozzens, Frederic S. (Frederic Swartwout), 1818-1869  Search this
Cranch, Christopher Pearse, 1813-1892  Search this
Dix, Charles Temple, 1840-1873  Search this
Edmonds, Francis William, 1806-1863  Search this
Ehninger, John Whetten, 1827-1889  Search this
Gignoux, Régis François, 1816-1882  Search this
Greenough, Horatio, 1805-1852  Search this
Hall, George Henry, 1825-1913  Search this
Hicks, Thomas, 1823-1890  Search this
Howland, Alfred Cornelius, 1838-1909  Search this
Huntington, Daniel, 1816-1906  Search this
Hutton, Lawrence  Search this
Jefferson, Joseph, 1829-1905  Search this
Johnson, Eastman, 1824-1906  Search this
La Farge, John, 1835-1910  Search this
Lang, Louis, 1814-1893  Search this
Laurence, Samuel, 1812-1884  Search this
Lippincott, William H. (William Henry), 1849-1920  Search this
Mayer, Frank Blackwell, 1827-1899  Search this
McEntee, Jervis, 1828-1891  Search this
Miller, Charles Henry, 1842-1922  Search this
Morse, Samuel Finley Breese, 1791-1872  Search this
Noble, Louis L.  Search this
Noble, Thomas Satterwhite, 1835-1907  Search this
O'Donovan, William Rudolph, 1844-1920  Search this
Oertel, Johannes Adam Simon, 1823-1909  Search this
Richards, T. Addison (Thomas Addison), 1820-1900  Search this
Robbins, Horace Wolcott, 1842-1904  Search this
Rogers, John, 1829-1904  Search this
Rossiter, Thomas Prichard, 1818-1871  Search this
Rowse, Samuel Worcester, 1822-1901  Search this
Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896  Search this
Smillie, James David, 1833-1909  Search this
Taylor, Bayard, 1825-1878  Search this
Thompson, Cephas Giovanni, 1809-1888  Search this
Thompson, Launt, 1833-1894  Search this
Ward, John Quincy Adams, 1830-1910  Search this
Weir, John F. (John Ferguson), b. 1841  Search this
Weir, Robert Walter, 1803-1889  Search this
White, Edwin D., 1817-1877  Search this
Whittredge, Worthington, 1820-1910  Search this
Wood, Thomas Waterman, 1823-1903  Search this
Extent:
200 Items ((on 2 partial microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1821-1901
Scope and Contents:
Letters and printed material.
Reel N5: Correspondence of Bryant and Godwin.
Correspondents include: John White Alexander, William H. Beard, Eugene Benson, Albert Bierstadt, William Bispham, Edward A. Brackett, George L. Brown, Henry Kirke Brown, John G. Brown, John G. Chapman, William A. Coffin, Frederick S. Cozzens, Christopher P. Cranch, Charles T. Dix, Francis W. Edmonds, John W. Ehninger, Regis F. Gignoux, Horatio Greenough, George H. Hall, Thomas Hicks, Alfred C. Howland, Daniel P. Huntington, Laurence Hutton, Joseph Jefferson, Eastman Johnson, John LaFarge, Louis Lang, Samuel Laurence, William H. Lippincott, Jervis McEntee, Frank B. Mayer, Charles H. Miller, Samuel F. B. Morse, Louis L. Noble, Thomas S. Noble, William R. O'Donovan, Johannes A. S. Oertel, Thomas A. Richards, Horace W. Robbins, John Rogers, Thomas P. Rossiter, Samuel W. Rowse, Napoleon Sarony, James D. Smillie, Bayard Taylor, Cephas G. Thompson, Launt A. Thompson, John Q. A. Ward, John F. Weir, Robert W. Weir, Edwin D. White, Worthington Whittredge, and Thomas W. Wood.
Reel N25: A calling card of Herbert Adams; a letter to Mrs. Frederic N. Goddard from Adams, returning photographs of Bryant; and a letter to Bryant from F. Tabbot about his painting of a forest.
Biographical / Historical:
Poet; New York City. Bryant's son-in-law, Parke Godwin, was an author, one of whose books was a biography of Bryant, THE LIFE AND WORKS OF WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT, 1883.
Other Title:
Bryant-Godwin collection (NYPL microfilm title)
Provenance:
Microfilmed 1956 by the Archives of American Art with other art-related papers in the Manuscript Division of the New York Public Library. Included in the microfilming project were selected papers of the Art Division and the Prints Division.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Poets -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.bryawill
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bryawill

R, Miscellaneous: Rob-Rog

Collection Creator:
Powers, Hiram, 1805-1873  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 52
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1857-1873
Scope and Contents note:
Robertson, D. A.

Robertson, John

Robinson, Chase & Co.

Rocchi, Mr.

Rogers, John

Rogers, Randolph
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Hiram Powers papers, 1819-1953, bulk 1835-1883. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Hiram Powers papers
Hiram Powers papers / Series 2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-powehira-ref418

W.85.22

Collection Creator:
United States. Indian Arts and Crafts Board  Search this
Container:
Box 31, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1985
1965-1966
Scope and Contents:
Artist Note: Roger Tsabetsaye (Roger John Tsabetsaye/Tsebetsaye).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records / Series 2: Accession Information
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-072-ref1689

W.66.1

Collection Creator:
United States. Indian Arts and Crafts Board  Search this
Container:
Box 12, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1965
1998
Scope and Contents:
Artist Note: Roger Tsabetsaye (Roger John Tsabetsaye/Tsebetsaye).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records / Series 2: Accession Information
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-072-ref557

W.66.28

Collection Creator:
United States. Indian Arts and Crafts Board  Search this
Container:
Box 12, Folder 28
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1965
Scope and Contents:
Artist Note: Roger Tsabetsaye (Roger John Tsabetsaye/Tsebetsaye).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records / Series 2: Accession Information
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-072-ref590

W.69.20

Collection Creator:
United States. Indian Arts and Crafts Board  Search this
Container:
Box 17, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1968
Scope and Contents:
Artist Note: Sylvester A. Ayek, Noreca Barthloma, Dolores Castillo (Dolores Castillo Zakin), Tony Da (Anthony Edward Da), Brenda J. Holden, Peter B. Jones (Peter Bauman Jones), Harold Littlebird, Earl Livermore, Linda Lomahaftewa, Edna Massey, Roger Tsabetsaye (Roger John Tsabetsaye/Tsebetsaye), Robert Tenorio.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records
Indian Arts and Crafts Board accession records / Series 2: Accession Information
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-072-ref829

Rogers, John C.

Collection Creator:
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Container:
Reel 5229, Frame 386-390
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1954
Collection Restrictions:
The microfilm of this collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not microfilmed or digitized requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Rockwell Kent papers, circa 1840-1993, bulk 1935-1961. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Rockwell Kent papers
Rockwell Kent papers / Series 1: Alphabetical Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-kentrock-ref3286

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
McCausland, Elizabeth, 1899-1965  Search this
Extent:
2.9 Linear feet (Boxes 2-5)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1923-1960
Scope and Contents note:
Series consists primarily of McCausland's professional and, to a lesser extent, personal correspondence, which includes general, artist, and some family correspondence. Correspondence typically consists of letters to and copies of letters from McCausland, along with enclosures (such as clippings and other printed material; contracts, agreements, and other business and financial papers; and proposals and manuscripts) and related material (such as notes, illustrations, and writings). Correspondents include artists, art organizations, museums, curators, editors, publishers, scholars, research institutions, her agent (Mary Squire Abbot), friends, and her mother, Belle Noble McCausland. Correspondence largely documents McCausland's various professional activities as an art critic, art historian, and freelance writer, and her relationships with various figures of the art and publishing worlds before, during, and immediately after the Second World War.

General correspondence relates to articles and reviews that McCausland wrote for the Springfield Republican; to freelance articles she wrote over the years for various publications, including ones for Parnassus, The New Republic, and Magazine of Art, as well as yearly articles for various encyclopedias (such as Encyclopedia Britannica, Encyclopedia Americana, and Collier Encyclopedia); and to various book projects, including Changing New York (1939), Careers in the Arts (1950), and ones on the artists E. L. Henry, George Inness, and Alfred H. Maurer. General correspondence also relates to her teaching job at Sarah Lawrence College and other courses taught; to various editing projects, including photo-editing Carl Sandburg's Poems of the Midwest and the planned book Art and Advertising; her work as a research consultant on the American Processional exhibition and book, and on other exhibitions; and her involvement in various art and social organization, as well as her participation in various conferences. General correspondence largely documents McCausland's tireless efforts to drum up work, and to fund (through various grants and fellowships) and carry out her many research and writing projects.

Correspondence from particular artists, including Arthur Dove, Louis Eilshemius, Marsden Hartley, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Alfred Stieglitz, was maintained by McCausland in files separate from general correspondence. Artist correspondence documents her relationships with these artists - particularly well-documented are her relationships with Dove and Stieglitz - and the artists' reactions to her reviews of their shows. Files of artist correspondence also include some of McCausland's own notes on her feelings about or relationship with particular artists.

Family correspondence consists almost entirely of letters and copies of letters from McCausland to her mother, Belle Noble McCausland. These seem to have originated from the scrapbook kept by McCausland's mother which can be found amongst personal papers.

See Appendix for a list of notable correspondents from Series 2
Arrangement note:
General correspondence is arranged in rough chronological order. Within individual yearly files, McCausland often grouped together letters to and from a particular correspondent; this existing organization has for the most part been maintained. Selected artist correspondence and family correspondence are arranged in files at the end of the series. Correspondence can also be found amongst research and writing files.
Appendix: Notable Correspondents from Series 2:
List represents only a selection of correspondents from general correspondence.

A. A. Wynn Inc.: 1951

ACA Gallery: 1941, 1943, 1945, 1946, 1947

Abbot, Mary Squire (McIntosh and Otis Company): 1941, 1945, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1958

Abbott, Berenice: 1934

Adams, Charles: 1938, 1939, 1940, 1943, 1944, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952

Adams, Harriet Dyer: 1946

Adelphi College: 1953

Adlow, Dorothy ( -- Christian Science Monitor -- ): 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

Albany Institute of History and Art: 1946, 1947

Aldrich, Adolf: 1945

American Academy of Arts and Sciences: 1946, 1947

American Artist Magazine -- : 1952

American Artists Congress: 1938, 1939, 1942

American Artists Group: 1939, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1950

American Association of University Women: 1951

American Federation of Arts: 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1956

American Museum of Natural History: 1944

American Newspaper Guild: 1942

American Philosophical Society: 1947

Anderson, Mrs. Sherwood (Eleanor): 1949

Antiques -- : 1955

Arden, Elizabeth: 1937

Arnason, H. Harvard (Walker Art Center): 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

Art Digest -- : 1951

Art in America -- (see also Jean Lipman): 1957

Art Institute of Chicago: 1945, 1947

Art of this Century: 1944

Artists for Victory: 1944

Artists Equity Association: 1956

Artists League of America: 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945

Artists Society for National Defense: 1941

Associated American Artists: 1940

Baltimore Museum of Art: 1953

Bard College: 1953

Barnes, Djuna: 1951

Barr, Alfred H.: 1939, 1944, 1947, 1951

Barr, Norman: 1941, 1942, 1943, 1945

Baumann, Gustave: 1946

Baur, John I. H.: 1939, 1942, 1946

Beam, Lura: 1945, 1958

Beard, Mary: 1938, 1939, 1944

Benn, Ben: 1951

Bennington School of the Arts: 1940

Berkshire Museum: 1939, 1940

Biddle, George: 1947

The Bobbs-Merrill Company: 1944

Bourke-White, Margaret (letter to Berenice Abbott): 1940

Brewster, William F.: 1954, 1955

The Brooklyn Museum: 1943, 1945, 1948, 1954

Brown, Milton: 1945

Buchholz Gallery: 1941, 1943

Butler, Joseph (Butler Institute of Art): 1954, 1955

Cahill, Holger: 1937, 1942, 1944, 1946, 1950

Carter, Clarence H.: 1945, 1946

Cinema -- : 1947

Clarke, Bert: 1950

Constantine, Mildred: 1939, 1941, 1942

Cook, Waldo Leland: 1949

Cooper Union: 1949, 1952

Cooper Union Art School: 1947, 1948

Corcoran Gallery of Art: 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951

Cowdrey, Mary Bartlett (Smith College Museum of Art): 1943, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

Crawley, Lawrence: 1950

Crehan, Hubert ( -- Art Digest -- ): 1953

Crichlow, Ernest: 1941

Curran, Charles: 1942

D'Harnoncourt, Rene: 1947

Daura, Pierre: 1949, 1951, 1954

Detroit Institute of Arts: 1945

Devree, Howard: 1949

Diamond (Rotkin), Adele: 1941

Donato, Louis: 1939

Dows, Olin: 1942

Eames, Charles: 1950, 1951

Estler, William C.: 1944

Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors: 1946

Fitch, George: 1955

Fitch, James: 1940

Fortune Magazine -- : 1946

Francis, Robert: 1940, 1942, 1943

Frick Art Reference Library: 1944, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1958

Friedman, William: 1939

Fuerstenberg, Eugenia Maurer: 1950, 1951

Fulton, W. Joseph (University of Chicago): 1951, 1952, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1958, 1959

G. P. Putnam's Sons: 1937

Genauer, Emily: 1947

George Walter Vincent Art Museum (Cordelia Sargent Pond): 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948

Gibran, Khalil: 1928

Gilbert, Dorothy: 1950

Godsoe, Robert Ulrich: 1951

Golden, Samuel (see also American Artists Group): 1946

Goodrich, Lloyd: 1942, 1947, 1950, 1951, 1952

Goodwin, Phillip L.: 1943

Gottlieb, Harry: 1944

Griffin, Maude: 1953

Graham, Martha: 1934, 1942

Grossman, Sid: 1938

Gwathmey, Robert: 1945

Harcourt, Brace and Company: 1947, 1949

Harper and Brothers: 1951

Hayes, Bartlett (Addison Gallery of Art): 1942, 1945, 1947

Hess, Thomas ( -- Art News -- ): 1950

Hope, Henry (University of Indiana): 1949, 1950

International Fine Arts Council: 1950

Irvine, Rosalind: 1952

J. B. Lippincott Company: 1951, 1952

Jacques Seligmann and Company: 1938

James, Rebecca Salsbury: 1951

Javitz, Romana: 1946, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1955

Jewell, Edward Alden: 1946, 1947

John Day Company: 1950, 1951, 1955

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation: 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1952, 1953

Jones, Howard Mumford (Harvard University): 1947

Kauffer, E. McKnight: 1946

Kent, Rockwell: 1945, 1946

Kirstein, Lincoln: 1941, 1943, 1944, 1946, 1947

Kish, Maurice: 1945

Kistler, Aline: 1941

Knight Publishers Inc.: 1938

Kuniyoshi, Yasuo: 1945

Landon, Edward: 1939

Lange, Dorothea: 1945

Larkin, Oliver: 1943, 1944, 1949

Leeper, John and Blanche (see also Corcoran Gallery of Art): 1950, 1951, 1954

Leighton, George: 1945

Lerner, Abe (see also World Publishing Company): 1950, 1951

Lipman, Jean: 1945, 1946, 1947, 1952

Lipton, Norman C. ( -- Good Photography -- ): 1941, 1942, 1943

Longman, Lester: 1940

MacMahon, Audrey (see also -- Parnassus -- ): 1936, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1942

The MacMillan Company: 1943, 1947, 1949, 1950

Magazine of Art -- : 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947

Magriel, Paul: 1954

Maurer, Alfred L.: 1951

Metropolitan Museum of Art: 1943, 1947, 1955

Miller, Dorothy: 1950, 1951

Milwaukee Art Institute: 1948

Minicam Photography -- : 1941, 1943, 1944

Modernage Furniture Corp.: 1945

More, Herman (Whitney Museum of American Art): 1954

Morton, Phillip: 1951, 1952

Mount Holyoke College: 1943

Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute: 1956

Museum of Modern Art: 1934, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945

Museum of the City of New York: 1958

N.W. Ayer and Son: 1945, 1946, 1950

The Nation -- : 1940, 1955

National Gallery of Art: 1944, 1945

National Maritime Union: 1945

Navas, Elizabeth: 1952, 1953, 1954

Neuberger, Roy: 1952

The New American Library -- : 1955, 1956

The New Republic -- : 1944, 1947

The New School for Social Research: 1945

The New York Herald Tribune -- : 1945, 1947

New York Historical Society: 1943

New York Public Library: 1943, 1955, 1956

New York State Museum: 1949

The New York Times -- : 1940

Newark Museum: 1944

Newhall, Beaumont: 1944

Newhall, Nancy: 1945

Norman, Dorothy: 1934, 1937, 1938, 1940

Old Print Shop: 1945

Olmsted, Anna Wetherill (Syracuse Museum of Art): 1950

Opportunity -- : 1943, 1944, 1945

Ossorio, Alfonso: 1953

P. F. Collier and Son Corp.: 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1958

Pach, Walter: 1955

Parnassus -- : 1939

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art: 1951

Pepsi-Cola Company: 1944, 1945

Philadelphia Art Alliance: 1946

Pierre Matisse Gallery: 1938, 1939

Popular Photography -- : 1943

Portland Art Museum: 1940

Porter, Eliot: 1954

Printer's Ink (Carl Weiss): 1951

Railway Express Agency: 1949

Rivera, Diego: 1949

Rogers, John C.: 1941

Roosevelt, Eleanor: 1944

Rosenblum, Walter: 1944

Rothschild, Lincoln: 1937, 1942, 1945, 1946, 1949

Royce, William: 1933, 1934, 1935, 1942, 1958

Rukeyser, Muriel: 1941, 1950

San Francisco Chronicle -- : 1951, 1953

Sarah Lawrence College: 1942, 1943, 1944

Saturday Evening Post -- : 1946

Schlesinger, Arthur: 1943

School Art League of New York City: 1953, 1954

Schwimmer, Rosika: 1933, 1935, 1943

Sculpture's Guild: 1938, 1940, 1941

Segy, Ladislaw: 1943

Shelter -- : 1939

Sloan, John: 1951

Smith College Museum of Art: 1939, 1954

Soby, James Thrall: 1935, 1946, 1951

Social Science Research Council: 1948

Springfield Museum of Fine Art: 1938, 1940, 1941

Standard Oil: 1946

Stein, Gertrude: 1934

Sterling, Charles (Department of Painting, The Louvre): 1951

Strand, Paul: 1942

Survey Associates -- : 1938, 1939

Sweeney, James John: 1954, 1955, 1956

Thornton, Russell (see also Corcoran Gallery of Art): 1951, 1952, 1953

Time Magazine -- : 1945

Toklas, Alice B.: 1949

Traphagen School of Fashion: 1957

U.S. Camera -- : 1940

University of Chicago Library: 1951

University of Minnesota: 1951

University of Nebraska: 1953, 1954, 1956, 1957

Vanderbilt, Paul (Library of Congress): 1950

Vogue Magazine -- : 1953

Vose, Robert C.: 1945

Wade, Henry: 1954

Walker Art Center: 1946, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951

Walker, Hudson: 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952

Ward, Lynd: 1942, 1945, 1947

Western Photography -- : 1946

Weston, Edward: 1943

Weyhe Gallery: 1940, 1951

Wheaton College: 1955

Wheeler, Monroe: 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945

Whitney Museum of American Art: 1946, 1947, 1951

Wichita Art Association: 1947

Williams, Hermann Warner (see also Corcoran Gallery of Art): 1950, 1951, 1952, 1954

Wilson, Sol: 1945

Worcester Art Museum: 1943, 1945

World Publishing Company: 1946, 1949, 1950, 1955

Yale University Art Gallery: 1949

Yale University Library: 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

Young, Art: 1941

Young Artists Guild: 1948
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccaeliz, Series 2
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-mccaeliz-ref60

General Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Page, William, 1811-1885  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1815-1942, undated
Scope and Contents note:
Letters in this series include the personal and professional correspondence of William Page, his wife, Sophia Candace Stevens Page, and their families, as well as correspondence of Sophia Page's first husband Stephen Hitchcock and his family.

William Page's correspondence is found from 1833 to 1885 only, with the bulk of his correspondence dating from 1852 to 1877. Drafts of outgoing letters written by William and Sophia Page are found throughout the series. Correspondence is arranged chronologically, with undated correspondence filed alphabetically by author at the end of the series. Correspondence of Page's children, which is voluminous from the early 1880s onward, and other family correspondence of the Page, Stevens, and Hitchcock families has not been indexed.

The earliest correspondence is that of Page's relatives of the Mathies, Dunnel, and Baldwin families of New York State. From 1840 through 1852, much of the correspondence is that of the Hitchcock family. See Series 2.3 for correspondence between Sophia and Steven Hitchcock. Love letters between William Page and Sophia (then Hitchcock) are prevalent in 1857, the year they were married. Family correspondence among Sophia Page, her parents, and her brothers Henry, B. Frank, and Simon Stevens is prevalent from the 1850s through the 1880s. By 1884, much of the correspondence is that of the Page children, including their personal, business, and family correspondence. A long, amorous correspondence from Charlotte "Sharly" Briggs to Candace "Dacie" Page, which documents an apparently intimate relationship between the two women, is found from the late 1880s onward, with many undated letters.

William Page's significant correspondents include artists such as Thomas Hicks, Enoch Wood Perry, William Stark, Theodore Tilton, and Lemuel Wilmarth; patrons Wendell Phillips, J. Hopper, William Walker Scranton, and Francis G. Shaw; writers James Russell Lowell, Charles Frederick Briggs (see also Series 2.2), George W. Curtis, and the actress Charlotte Cushman. An unusually lengthy letter from Page to a young artist "W" (possibly William Stark) about painting is dated 1860. Sophia Page's correspondents include Thomas K. Beecher, Mary Olmsted and Bertha Olmsted.

See Appendix for a list of selected correspondents from Series 2.1.
Appendix: Selected Correspondents from Series 2.1.:
The following is a selective list of correspondence of William and Sophia Page in Series 2.1: General Correspondence.

Spellings and abbreviations of names below reflect the actual signatures of letters. Names preceded by question marks indicate partially-legible signatures. Letters with unsigned and illegible signatures which could not be indexed are common in the correspondence, so this index should not be considered comprehensive.

Adam, Sarah W.: 1877-1878

Allan, W.G.: 1848

Allen, Elizabeth Akers: 1863-1864, 1880, 1885-1888, 1892, undated

Alsop, ?H.J.W.: 1871

Ammon, W.E.: 1887-1888

Appleton, Nathan: 1874

Arcadian Club: 1874

Armstrong, William: 1889

Austin Baldwin and Co.: 1863

Avery, Charles: 1870

Avery, Sam P.: undated

Badeau, Adam: 1866

Baker, H.: undated

Baker, W.J.: 1874

Balducci, Y.: 1855

Bard, M.I.: undated

Barney, C. H.: 1863

Barney, Hiram: undated

Bartholemew, E.: 1855-1856

Bartlett, C.E.: undated

Barton, Sam: 1870, 1879

Bates, L.: undated

Beardsley, Annie: 1885

Beatty, John W.: 1900, 1902

Becker, Dr.: undated

Beckwith, James Carroll: 1899

Beecher, Thomas K.: 1850, 1853-1854, undated

Bellinger, Louis: 1887

Benedict, Robert D.: 1856, 1876, 1886

Benedict, Taft, and Benedict: 1880

Benet, W.V.: 1861

?Bennett, J.R.: undated

Berdam, D.W.: 1861

Betty, Edward: 1875

Biglow, L.G.: 1883

Bigmore, Edward: 1880

Birney, E.P.: 1865

Blomeger, Georgina: undated

Boies, H.M.: 1875-1876

Bossange, H.: 1855

Bradford, J.F.: 1870

Brady, J.R.: 1873

Brehart, Mary: 1888, undated

Briggs, Charles Frederick: 1852, 1861, undated (see also series 2.2)

Briggs, Charlotte "Sharly": 1877, 1882-1883, 1886-1894, 1896, 1899, undated

Brower, Edith: 1878

Brown, Henry J.: 1884

Brown, H.K.: 1871

Brownell, W.C.: 1889

Bullard, Laura Curtis: 1875, 1880, undated

Burt, John: 1860

Carlin, R.: 1863

Carpenter, Edward J.: 1873

Carter, C.M. 1882

Carter, R.: 1864, 1866, 1872, 1874-1876

Carter, Susan N.: 1864, 1879, 187?, 1880, 1882, 1884, 1886-1889, 188?, 1891-1892, undated

Catlin, Henry: 1882

Centennial Commision: 1876

Chase, Thomas: undated

Chase, William M.: 1902

Cheney, E.D.: 1886

Cheney, T.A.P.: 1869

Child, Lydia Marie: 1848, undated

Chilton, James R.: 1848

Chilton, R.I.: 1849

Chilton, W.W.: undated

Choate, Joseph: 1873

Clagstone, H. Glassford: 1884

Clark, Mrs. C.S.: 1871

Clason, Mrs. A.S.: 1868, undated

Clemens, Clara: 1886

Cleveland, Esther Greeley: undated

Clover, Lewis: 1870, 1880

Codling, Geroge: 1862

Conant, B.B. (Harper and Brothers): 1883

Conant, L.B.: 1877

Congers, N.S.: 1863

Cook, Albert S.: 1873

Corbin, Francis: 1852

Cornwallis, H.J.: undated

Cowley, Mrs. Julius D.: undated

Crawford, L.W.: undated

Crawford, Thomas: 1853, undated

Crocker, U.H.: 1875-1876

Curtis, George W.: 1857, 1870, 1880, 1887

Cushman, Charlotte (Charles): 1853, 1858, 1874, undated

Dana, Charles A.: 1854, 1881

Day, Livy: undated

?Decamps, J.: 1880

Dewy, Julius: 1882

Dexter, Franklin B.: 1871

Didama, H.D.: 1867

Dietz, Linda: undated

Dixon, O.H.: 1875

Douglas, Eliza: 1863

Druker, L.E.: undated

Dunnel, John H.: 1861, 1863

Durfee, Rose: 1877, 1879

Easton, Harriet: undated

Eliot, Charles W.: 1876

Elliman, Charles B.: 1870

?Evans, Joseph or George: 1874

Evans, W.W.: 1877

Fagan, John F.: 1888

Farrell, M.: 1869

Fenton, R.: undated

Fields, Annie: 1860, undated

French, W.M.R.: 1877

G.P. Putnam Sons: 1877

Gale, L.D.: 1848

Gay, S.H.: undated

Gibbons, S.J.: 1878

Gifford, S.R.: 1871, 1873

Gilder, R.W.: undated

Godkin, E.L.: 1871-1872

Godwin, Parke: 1880, undated

Goodyear, William Henry: 1882-1883

Gray, David: 1862

Green, H.H.: 1865

Guy, S.J.: 1874, 1885, 1887

Hale, Mrs. E.E.: 1872

Hall, Anna Maria: 1853, undated

Hall, E.W.: 1868, undated

Hammersley, J.W.: undated

Hannah, George: 1870

Harper Brothers: 1879

Harris, Addie A.: 1863

Hart, Burnham: 1885

Hart, John S.: 1873

Hart, Levi Wells: undated

Hastings, Alice: undated

Hawkins and Cothren: 1871

Hazard, W.A.: 1879

Henderson, Ettie: 1891

Henry Holt and Co.: 1879

Hibbard, James N.: 1880

Hicks, Thomas: 1863, 1868

Hills, Mrs. Amelia: 1869

Hinckley, Polly Page: 1873

Holcombe, Emily: 1886

Hooker, J.C. (of Packenham and Hooker): 1854-1858, 1860, undated

Hooper: 1854

Hopkins, Geraldine: 1863

Hopper, J.: 1861-1862, undated

Hoppin, Rosalie: 1858

Hoppin, William J.: 1857

Hudson, John: 1883

Humphreys, Mary Cray: undated

Hunt, Richard M.: 1868

Huntington, D: 1878

Huntington, Frank: 1888-1889

Hussey, George B.: 1875

?Ickelheimer, I.: 1872, 1875

Ingersoll, W.H.: 1876

Jay, William: 1888

Jeremiah, Ann; 1880

Johnson, B.: 1863

Johnson, E.H.: 1876-1877

Johnson, E.N.: 1874

Johnson, Josephine M.: 1873

Johnson, Kate: 1886

Johnston, J.B.: 1869, 1876-1877

Johnston, Mrs. : 1868

Keenan, Thomas Jr.: 1889

Kennedy, James C.: 1858

Kidney, John S.: 1872

Kimball, Richard: 1852, 1854

King, Augustu G.: undated

King, Clarence: 1875

Knortz, Karl: 1877

Knowell, John: 1881

Kucsczuski, S.W.: 1861

Kuzynski, Pauline A.: 1855

Laing, Charles G.: 1885

Laurie, Alexander: 1870

Law, S.D.: 1848

Lester, Mrs. L.: 1877

Leupp, Charles: 1852

Lewis, Eliela P.: 1865

Lewis, Juan: 1873

Lines, Mary: undated

Linton, W.J.: 1872-1874, 1876-1886, 1891, undated

Livingston, John Henry: 1878

Loring, E.G.: 1857

Lossing, Bevson J.: 1877

Low, William H.: 1904-1905

Lowell, Effie: 1877

Lowell, James Russell: 1843, 1848, 1874, 1878, 1885-1887, 1889, undated

Lowell, Josephine S.: 1885, 1887, undated

Ludlow, E.H.: 1884

Lyman, Arthur T.: 1876

M. Knoedler and Co.: 1901

MacBeth, W.: 1902-1903

Mackay, W.B.: 1848

MacPherson, William H.: 1874

Mansfield, John W.: 1883

Manton, Walter: 1857

Maquay, George A.: 1853

Marrell, J.H.: 1871

Martin, Charles F.: 1887-1888

Martin, Mrs. C.L.: 1877, 1885 , 1887

Martin, Louise P.: 1885

Martin, ?H.H.: 1872

Maston, William H.: 1866

Mead, Mary V.: 1877, 1882, undated

Menger, Louis R.: 1880, 1887

Merchant, Daniel M.: 1868

Metcalf, Arthur: 1884

Millner, J.B.: 1877

Minturn, Robert B.: 1861, undated

Moulton, Charles: 1886

Moulton, Francis: 1872

Munn and Co.: 1861

Murphy, Charles: 1888

Naramore, E.M.: 1875

Neal, John: 1855

Newton, O.L.: 1864

Nichols, Abel: 1857

Nichols, Florence: 1857

Nichols, George Ward: 1857

Norris, J. Parker: 1870, 1873-1877, undated

Norton, Catherine: 1874, 1878, undated

Nutting, Mary O.: 1883

O'Donovan, W.R.: 1877, 1886, 1890-1891, undated

Olmsted, Bertha: 1853-1854, 1856-1857, 1860

Olmsted, Frederick Law: 1868-1869

Olmsted, John H.: 1851, 1853-1854

Olmsted, Mary A.: 1850, 1853-1854, 1874, 1877, undated

Osborne, Mary: undated

Ostrander, Nathaniel J.: 1885

Pakenham, N.: 1851

Pardue, Charles Inslee: 1873

Parkhurst, Henry M.: 1865-1866

Partridge, James R.: 1862

Patterson, F.B.: 1874

Peabody, Cornelia Marshall: undated

Peck, J.: 1854

Peet, Eileen: 1884

Pentecost, Hugh O.: 1890

Perkins, T.B.: 1872

Perry, Enoch Wood: 1870, 1873, 1877-1878, 1882-1884, 1886, 1902, undated

Phillips, E.O.: 1876

Phillips, Wendell: undated

Powers, H.N.: 1876

Putnam, G.P.: 1866

Quick, Addie T.: 1872

Rawson, Charlotte: 1886, 1888

Raymond, George: 1886

Ream, Vinnie: undated

Reinhart, B.F.: 1873

Rice, Alexander H.; 1882-1883

Richards, T. Addision: 1882, 1886 (see also the letters used as evidence in Page's probate trial; Series 4)

Richmond, Victoria and J.W.B.: 1883, 1886

Rider, George S.J.: 1868

Ridner, Caroline: 1885, 1887

Rively, Mary: 1886-1887

Robertson, Ann Elize Worcester: 1877

Robinson, A.S.: 1852-1853, 1855, 1862

Robinson, E.: 1874

Robinson, George C.: 1868, undated

Robinson, Mrs. Jennie: 1870

Robinson, M.C.: 1853

Robinson, W.H.: 1875-1876

Rogers, John: undated

Rogers, W.K.: 1877

Rose, J.W.: 1882

?Rossel: 1878

Ruggles, Edward: 1861

Sanborn, ?O.H.: 1868

Sartain, John: 1875

Schultz, E.A.: 1873

Schuyler, Louisa Lee: 1877

Schwab, Charles M.: 1906

Scott, Frank H.: 1875

Scott, Julian: 1874

Scranton, William Walker: 1874-1875, 1877-1879, 187?, 1880-1881

Scribner editors: 1879

Searle, L.: undated

Sellstedt, L.G.: 1863-1864, undated

Shaw, Anna K: 1863, undated

Shaw, Francis George: 1850-1851, 1853-1855, 1859, 1861, 1863-1864, 1872-1874, 1876-1877, 1880-1881, undated (see also letters used as evidence in Page's probate trial; Series 4)

Shaw, Sarah B.: 1877, 1879, 1881, 1883, 1885-1889, 1892, undated

Shegogue, J.H.: 1848

Shelton, W.H.: 1905

Shinn, Earl: 1873

Shipman, Andrew: 1892

Shipman, Frank: 1886

Shipman, Mary C.: 1886, undated

Skinner, Mabel R.: 1879

Smith, Charles E.: 1868

Smith, J. Eustace: 1884

Southland, William D.: 1886

Spencer, L: 1862

Sperry, Watson: 1880

Spring, Jeanie: 1861

Spring, Marcus: 1867, 1869, 1872

Spring, R.B.: undated

Spring, Rebecca: 1886

Stafford, John: 1864, 1877

Stafford, O.H.: 1864

Stark, William and Madelaine: 1858, 1860-1862

Stebbins, A.: 1869

Stenton, Josephine: 1872

Stoddard, W.O.: 1870

Storrs, R.S.: 1870

Story, Mr. and Mrs. William Wetmore: 1850, undated

Sturgis, Robert: 1870, 1873, undated

Sturgis, Russell: 1874-1875, 1879, 1881

Suydam, W.A.: 1883

Taylor, Charles J.: 1869

Thayer, A.H.: 1890, undated

Thayer, William Henry: undated

Thompson, E.C.: 1863

Thompson, Launt: 1872

Tilton, Theodore: 1868-1872

Torry, C.P.: 1869

Varnum, Joseph b.: 1875

Vaughn, Virginia: 1854

Vaulchaick, S.W.: 1873

Vlymer, Alice: 1884

Wainwright, C.S.: undated

Wales, George: 1856

Wall, J.W.: undated

War Department: 1877

Ward, J.Q.A.: 1870, 1872, 1873

Ward, Sam S.: 1850

Washburn, B. Davis: 1868

Watson, Fred: 1882

Watson, J.W.: 1886, 1890

Watts, Edmund: 1875, 1887-1889, 1892, 1903, 1907, undated

Weir, ?J or G.F.: 1871, 1874, 1876

Welby, Edgar: 1856

Weston, Eduard Payson: 1863

Weston, Theodore: 1871

Whiting, Julia D.: 1879

Whittingham, Jane: 1881

Wild, Hamilton G.: 1851, undated

Wilds, Howard Payson: 1874

Williams, M.W.: 1857

?Wills (Wells?), Theodore: 1877-1878

Wilmarth, L.E.: 1874, 1877

Winthrop, Robert C.: 1850

Wood, T.W.: 1880

World's Fair St. Louis: 1904

Wright, George F.: undated
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
William Page and Page Family papers, 1815-1947, bulk 1843-1892. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.pagewill, Subseries 2.1
See more items in:
William Page and Page Family papers
William Page and Page Family papers / Series 2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-pagewill-ref26

William R. Hutton Papers

Creator:
Hutton, William R., 1826-1901  Search this
Extent:
30 Cubic feet (33 boxes, 21 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Letterpress copybooks
Blueprints
Diaries
Drawings
Cashbooks
Business records
Business letters
Notebooks
Topographic maps
Tax records
Technical drawings
Stock certificates
Technical literature
Photoengravings
Notes
Maps
Microfilms
Linen tracings
Letter books
Letters
Land titles
Legal documents
Sketches
Salted paper prints
Reports
Receipts
Plans (drawings)
Photostats
Photographic prints
Architectural drawings
Administrative records
Albumen prints
Albums
Annual reports
Booklets
Account books
Books
Family papers
Financial records
Cyanotypes
Correspondence
Deeds
Printed material
Contracts
Harlem river bridge
Photograph albums
Specifications
Christmas cards
Menus
Place:
France
Maryland
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal
Panama Canal (Panama)
New Jersey
New York (N.Y.)
Hudson River
Baltimore (Md.)
Georgetown (Washington, D.C.)
New York
Washington Bridge
New Croton Aqueduct
Kanawha River Canal
Washington Aqueduct
Potomac River -- 19th century
Washington Memorial Bridge
Hudson River Tunnel
Date:
1830-1965
Summary:
The papers document the life and work of William R. Hutton, a civil engineer during the late 1800s to the early 1900s. Materials include diaries, notebooks, correspondence, letterpress copy book, printed materials, publications, specifications, photographs, drawings, and maps that document the construction of several architectural and engineering projects during this period. Most notable are the records containing information related to the construction of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Hudson River Tunnel, the Washington Aqueduct, the Kanawha River Canal, and the Washington/Harlem River Bridge. There are also several records about railroads in the state of Maryland, the District of Columbia and elsewhere, including the Western Maryland Railroad, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Colorado Midlands Railway, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, the Northern Adirondack Railroad, and the Pittsfield and Williamstown Railroad. The records can be used to track the progression of these projects, and engineering innovation during the late 1800s to the early 1900s.
Scope and Contents:
These papers document William R. Hutton's professional career as a civil engineer and his personal affairs. Although the personal materials in the collection provide insight into a man and a family that have been largely forgotten by biographers, it is the professional materials that are perhaps the most interesting to researchers. They provide a compelling narrative of the push to the West that occurred in 19th century America and the internal improvements movement typified by the American System plan proposed by Henry Clay. Perhaps best remembered for the high tariffs that accompanied it, the American System plan was also concerned with the advancement of internal improvements, such as canals, that would unite the East and West in communication, travel, and trade. The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal can be seen as one of the products of this movement (1) and was in fact initially heralded as the first great work of national improvement (2).

The papers in this collection that are related to the construction and maintenance of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal are an invaluable documentation of efforts during this turbulent time to unite the eastern and western United States. They provide details of the canal from its initial construction to its decline with the incline at Georgetown project. The canal also serves as an example, or perhaps a warning against, federal involvement in state improvement efforts as it was the first project to be directly funded and staffed by the federal government (3). The groundbreaking ceremony was attended by then President John Quincy Adams whose toast, "to the canal: perseverance," (4) became an ironic omen, as construction of the canal took over twenty-two years to be completed. The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal materials can be used as a case study for the problems encountered during canal building (5). These problems are best typified in the collection by the papers relating to the Georgetown incline. This project was headed by Hutton and was plagued with construction problems, boating accidents, and obsolescence from the moment of its completion. Despite these issues, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal remains a structure of historical significance in America. As the third and last effort to construct an all-water route to the West (6), the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal is an important artifact of 19th century attitudes and efforts towards commerce, trade, travel, and communication between the eastern and western United States. Other significant canals and water structures represented in the collection are the Kanawha Canal, the Washington Aqueduct, and a large collection of materials relating to the Kingston Water Supply (New York).

One of the most significant internal improvements made during this time was the railroad. The legal conflicts that arose between the canal companies and railroads is also represented in the materials relating to the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. These materials specifically deal with the legal conflict's between the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The development and construction of the railroads is also represented in the materials documenting the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, the Northern Adirondack Railroad, the Western Maryland Railroad, the Mexican National Railroad, the Colorado Midlands Railroad, and the Columbia Railroad.

The collection also demonstrates the spirit of innovation and invention that was prevalent in the engineering field in the nineteenth century. Joseph Gies writes, "...one of the distinctive characteristics of the great nineteenth century engineering adventurers was their readiness to gamble on the translation of theory into practice" (7). In this quote, he is speaking of the civil engineer Dewitt Clinton Haskins and a project that truly encapsulates engineering invention in the nineteenth century, the Hudson River Tunnel. Responding to the increase in the population of the City of New York in the late nineteenth century from sixty thousand to three and a half million, the Hudson River Tunnel was originally devised as a way to alleviate traffic and to transport train passengers directly across the Hudson River (8). Beginning with records dating from 1881 to 1901, the Hutton papers can be used to document not only the advances in engineering during this time but also the costs of progress. Haskins' initial efforts to build the tunnel using submerged air pressurized caissons were marked by failure and in some cases fatalities. Workers on the tunnel often suffered from what came to be known as "caisson disease" or "the bends," caused by the immense forces of compression and decompression experienced while working in the tunnels (9). This problem was so prevalent that as construction progressed the rate of worker deaths caused by "the bends" rose to twenty-five percent (10). Materials in the collection document worker complaints and deaths resulting from this disease as well as providing a technical record of the construction of the tunnel. The highlight of the materials relating to the Hudson River Tunnel is an album that contains photographs of workers in the tunnel and a detailed daily report of the construction progress on the tunnel that was maintained by Hutton's assistant, Walton Aims. The first hand account in these reports provides insight not only into the construction of the tunnel, but also the problems encountered.

Another project featured in the Hutton collection that was devised in response to the population explosion in the City of New York in the nineteenth century is the Harlem River Bridge, or as it is now known, the Washington Bridge. Known as one of the longest steel arch bridges of its time, the Harlem River Bridge also represents that spirit of invention and innovation that was prevalent in the civil engineering field during the nineteenth century. The collection provides an invaluable resource for those wishing to track the construction of the bridge from early concept drawings and proposals to finalized plans. Also present are photographs of the construction and workers. Societal response to the bridge in the form of newspaper and magazine clippings help to create the narrative of the Washington Bridge, and these are supplemented by correspondence from the builders, suppliers, and planners.

This collection also includes diaries, 1866-1901; letterpress copybooks, 1858-1901; correspondence on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Hudson River Tunnel, Washington Bridge over the Harlem River, and Maryland and Colorado railroads, 1861-1901, and on Hutton's financial and real estate affairs, 1835-1921; construction photographs of the Harlem River, Cairo, Poughkeepsie, Niagara bridges and the Hudson River Tunnel, Washington Aqueduct, and Capitol Dome (in the form of albumen, cyanotype, salted paper print); data and drawings; rolled land profile drawings; canal notes, 1828-1892; Hudson River Tunnel construction reports, 1889-1891; publications, drawings, and maps of railroad routes; pamphlets and reprints on hydraulic works and water supply; road, railway, bridge, and hydraulic construction specifications, 1870-1900; drawings (linen, oil cloth, and heavy drawing paper), and blueprints; account books, 1891-1899; and plans, drawings, field notebooks, and publications on American and European construction projects, especially in Maryland, New York, and France; personal correspondence detailing his role as executor for the estates of Benjamin H. Hutton, Joseph Hutton, Annie Theller, and the Countess H. De Moltke-Hvitfeldt and his relationships with his children, siblings, cousins, and colleagues, 1850-1942.

Materials are handwritten, typed, and printed.

Special note should be made that any materials dated after the year 1901 were added to the collection by another creator who is unidentified. It can be speculated that professional materials added after this date were contributed by his brother and colleague Nathanial Hutton or his son Frank Hutton. Personal materials contributed after this date may have been added by his wife, daughters, or other members of his extended family.

Series 1, Letterpress Copybooks, 1858-1901, consists of twenty seven letterpress copybooks containing correspondence between Hutton and other engineers, architects, and building suppliers. The letterpress copybooks in this series have been arranged chronologically. The books involve a process by which ink is transferred through direct contact with the original using moisture and pressure in a copy press. The majority of the correspondence is business- related. Some letterpress copybooks are devoted to specific projects such as the Washington/Harlem River Bridge, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, Annapolis and Elk Ridge Railroad, and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The letterpress copybooks provide a record of correspondence written by Hutton, which makes it distinctive from the other correspondence in the collection. Most of the other correspondence has Hutton as recipient.

The letterpress copybooks also document Hutton's various residences throughout his life and provide a glimpse into the civil engineering profession at the time by demonstrating how engineers shared ideas and comments about projects. This can be supplemented with the printed materials in the collection as many of the authors also appear in the correspondence. Other topics covered in the letterpress copybooks include business reports (specifically the report of the president and directors of the Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad), records of people and companies involved in projects, pasted in engineering sketches, engineering specifications and notes, travel expenses and estimates, construction histories and progress, legal issues with family estates, tax information, Colorado Railroad, payment certificate schedules, St. Paul Railroad, personal correspondence, title guarantees, Hudson River Tunnel, financial matters, real estate matters, insurance information, sketches and drawings, supply lists, cost estimates, the Memorial Bridge, Coffin Valve Company, engineering expenses, engineering calculations, payroll notes for Kingston Water Supply, proposals, account information, Hutton Park, reservoirs, contract drafts, French Society of Civil Engineers, inspection results (specifically Piedmont Bridge), land descriptions, damage reports, Morse Bridge, Illinois Central Railroad, North Sea Canal, moveable dams, iron works, site histories, Potomac Lock and Dock Company, Kanawha River canal (lock quantities, specifications, payroll information), Pennsylvania Canal, and bills for services.

Series 2, Professional Correspondence, 1861-1901, consists of correspondence that relates to Hutton's architectural and engineering projects. This series is further subdivided into two subseries: Project Correspondence and General Correspondence. Subseries 1, Project Correspondence, 1876-1899, correspondence is divided by project and arranged alphabetically. Subseries 2, General Correspondence, 1861-1901, is arranged chronologically. Both series contain handwritten and typed letters. Some letters are on letterpress copybook pages and are most likely copies. Some materials are in French and Spanish. Special note should be made that this series does not contain all of the professional correspondence in the collection. Some correspondence has been separated according to project and placed in Series 8, Professional Projects, 1830-1965, in order to make it easier for researchers to access materials related to those subjects.

Subseries 1, professional correspondence topics include comparisons between construction projects (specifically comparisons of the Kanawha River Canal to other canals), supply lists, location recommendations, sketches, construction plans and modifications, bills for supplies and works, leaks in the gates, cost estimates, Brooklyn Water Supply, use of lake storage (Ramapo Water Supply), water supply to states and counties, damages to water supply pipes, estimates of water quantities, responses to construction reports, legal issues related to projects, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and payment for services.

Subseries 2, general correspondence topics include employment opportunities, committee meetings and elections, land surveys, sketches, engineering plans and ideas, work on projects, dismissal from projects, notes on supplies, Washington Aqueduct, construction progress, land purchases, Civil War, Jones Falls, cost of water pumps, steam drills, lots divisions and prices, repairs, report of the engineering bureau, tidewater connection at Annapolis, bridge construction, construction costs, statement of vessels that entered and cleared Baltimore, technical questions from colleagues, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, supply costs, letters of introduction, requests for reference, changes to plans and designs, survey reports, St. Andrew's lot, Canal Coal Company, publication process, American Society of Civil Engineers and its members, responses to project inquiries, Graving Dock gross revenue, job offers, specifications, trade figures, contracts, water levels, appointment dates and times, moveable dams, proposals for membership, salaries, Piedmont Coal Lands, maps, land profiles, Washington Bridge, board payments, Nicaragua Canal, Grant Coal Company, statistics, engineering notes, Hartford Bridge, water pressures, coal deposits, Colorado Coal, pipe lines, reservoirs, boat costs for canals, floods, bridges, letters of resignation, engines, Ruxton Viaduct, Colorado and Midland Railroad, Morse Bridge, share values, railroad locations, membership invitations, call for submissions, structural tests, record of accounts for room and board, appointments, water rights (Putnam County), publications, blueprints, visitation programs, cotton compresses, street trenches, pressures in dams, level tests, Portland Transportation bureau, trade information, concrete steel, Chicago drainage canal, ship canals, Augusta Cotton and Compress Company, Sooysmith case, Consolidated Gas Company, masonry, book binding, Columbia Railway Company, jetties, land grades, Chesapeake and Delaware canal, water wheels, pneumatic lock, tunnel arches, rifton power, Hutton's health, elevators, Brooklyn Bridge Terminals, girder weights, legal issues and their results, rating table for the Potomac, land profiles, transmission lines, transformers, water turbines, and water power on the Potomac River.

Correspondents for this series include the following: Captain Montgomery C. Meigs, Captain T.W. Symons, William Bryan, Ernest Flagg, John Hurd, Jake Wolfe, J.C. Saunders, J.H. Dolph, Charles J. Allen, G.H. Mendell, Virgil S. Bogue, B.A. Mounnerlyn, Edward Burr, H.G. Prout, R. William, H. Dodge, C.R. Suter, M. Mink, W.R. King, John Lyons, Alex Brown and Sons, John G. Butler, D. Condon, Bernard Carter, R.P. McCormick, D.R. Magruder, Andrew Banks, Isaac Solomon, C.J. Mayer, C.W. Kern, John Herring, James S. Mackie, D.R. Magunde, D. Rittaguide, R.S. Stevens, J.L. Raudolph (Baltimore and Ohio Railroad), J.M. Lane, W.D. Stuart, W.G.P. Palmer (Committee Church of the Ascension), C. Crozet, General W. Hughes, V.R. Maus, J.M. Hood (Western Maryland Railroad Company), Ernest Pontzen, M. Haus, William F. Craighill, Harry Hutton, John W. Pearce, Reverend James A. Harrald, William Watson, A.L. Rives, Thomas Monro, A.F. Croswan (Commander United States Navy), H.R. Garden, William McAlpine, James Forrest, Wm. Bloomsfield, Daniel Ammen, Linel Wells, A. and Otto Sibeth, Alfred Noble, Clemens Hershel, Sidney Warner, E.H. de Rheville, Theodore Cooper, William Findlay Shunk, Lewis S. Wolfe, Rufus Mead, Theodore F. Taylor, John Bogart, J. Whaler, B. Williamson, Colonel F.V. Greene, Robert H. Sayre (Lehigh Valley Railroad Company), Charles W. Pussey, Louis Q. Rissel, V.C. Bogue, H.C. Eckenberger, Melville E.G. Leston, Edwin Parson, Rudolph Hering, R.S. Hale, F.M. Turner, Thosl Martindale, Justus C. Strawbridge, William M. Ayresm, R.L. Austin, A.M. Miller, P. Livingston Dunn, T.J. Cleaver, C.S. Dutton, H.A. Carson, William Bainbridge Jaudon, H.A. Presset, Thomas H. McCann, Russel Sturgis, H.G. Prout, Alexis H. French, John K. Cowen, F.W. Williams, J. Waldorf, B.H. Byrant, B.H. Jones, M.H. Rogers, J.W. Ogden, General W. Cashing, William Longhudge, A.J. Cameron, T.L. Patterson, J.J. Hagerman, H. Wigglesworth, Charles B. Rowland, E. Bantz, W.G. Lathrop, Clarence King, George Rowland, George A. Tibbals (Continental Iron Works), George N. Vanderbilt, Eugene C. Lewis, F.P. Burt, Colonel John C. Clarke, Lieutenant Thomas Turtle, W.S.M. Scott, E. Bates Dorsey, Bernard Carter, George M. Shriver (Baltimore and Ohio Railroad), Russel Sturgis, Macmillan Publishing, James Abernethy, B. Baker, J.G.W. Fynje, A. Mallet, Jean Hersuy, L.F. Vernon Horcourt, Robert Lilley, A.J. Johnson, F.M. Colby, Henry D. Loney, A.S. Cameron, James A. Harrald, William Watson, John B. Lervis, A.L. Rives, Edwin F. Bidell, Frank H. Stockett, E. McMahon, C.F. Elgin, Enrique Budge, G. Clayton Gardiner, Dwight Porter, William A. Chapman, T.E. Sickels, Theodore Cooper, C.J. Warner, Institution of Civil Engineers, Robert Gordon, United States Coast of Geodetic Survey Office, C.P. Pattun, J.N. Putnam, Sidney B. Warner, H.D. Fisher, Union Pacific Railway Company, Lewis S. Wolle, George E. Waring Junior, The American Exhibition, G.F. Swain, American Society of Civil Engineers, N.H. Whitten, U.S. Engineer Office, Government Works Committee, J.J. Hagerman, D. Jackson, Sterling Iron and Railway Company, E.P. Alexander, E. Williamson, Central Railway Company of New Jersey, William A. Underwood, F. Collingwood, James Dun (Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Company), Henry F. Kilburn, Louis A. Bissell, Virgil G. Boque, H.C. Eckenberger, Melville Egleston, Charles Parson, George Swain, Continental Iron Works, Rudolph Hering, J.B. Gordon, Mayor's Office (Baltimore), Harry Robinson, Pennsylvania Railway Company, W.H. Gahagan, L. Luiggi, B.H. Bryant, T.J. Cleaver (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Company), H.A. Carson, H.A. Presset (Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey), John K. Cowen, Vernon H. Brown, J. Waldorf, B.H. Bryant, L.F. Root, P.W. White, Metropolitan Railroad Company, Charles F. Mayer (Consolidated Coal Company, Cumberland and Pennsylvania Railroad Company), J.M. Lane (Western Maryland Railroad), Dr. R.S. Stewart (Annapolis and Elk Ridge Railroad), Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad (John Lyons, John G. Butler, D. Candon, R.P. McCormick, Andrew Banks), Thomas F. Rowland, J.A. Bensel, Walton Aims, S.D. Coykendall, H.C. Rogers, John F. Ward, T.B. Jewell, H.A. Pressey, C.S. Armstrong, J. Nennett, V.G. Bague.

Series 3, Personal Correspondence, 1850-1942, contains correspondence with immediate and extended family, specifically the heirs to the Benjamin H. Hutton and Joseph Hutton estates and Adele Gorman. Correspondence is primarily arranged chronologically, but some files have been divided based on subject or author (the Deer Park and Adele Gorman files), or by form (the Telegrams, and Cablegrams file). Special note is made of the posthumous correspondence file, which includes correspondence both relating to Hutton's death and correspondence that was written by family members after the years of his death. The series contains both hand written and typed letters. Some correspondence is in French. The correspondence demonstrates his relationship with his children specifically Elizabeth (Bessie) Hutton, and illuminates his role in his family. This series also provides details about nineteenth century upper class society and activities. Special note should be made that this folder does not contain all of the personal correspondence contained in the collection. Some correspondence has been separated according to recipient, or subject in order to make researching these recipients or subjects easier.

Series 3 correspondence topics include: estate payments, distribution of assets, funds transfers, estate lines, conflicts with tenants, sketches, lot maintenance, real estate sales, deeds, real estate sales negotiations, congratulations wishes on new babies, family illnesses, family affairs and travels, traveling directions, personal investments, invitations for social occasions, family debts, professional interests, professional and personal appointments, family issues, requests for money, sketches, advice to children (specifically Frank Hutton), life insurance, books, letters of introduction, legal issues, funeral expenses, charity donations, advertisements, minutes from professional organizations, army enlistment, deaths of friends and family, recipes, estimates of personal expenses, renovations, stock certificates (Great Northern Railway Company, New York), food, social activities, the weather, marriages, real estate and construction plans, and loan agreements.

Correspondents include the following: Frank Hutton, Thomas B. Brookes, J.L. Marcauley, C.M. Matthews, Edward J. Hancy, John M. Wilson, H.A. Carson, William H. Wiley (of John Wiley and Sons Scientific Publishers, New York), Georgina Hutton, Pierre and Jane Casson, George McNaughlin, Henrietta Hutton, Aaron Pennington Whitehead, J.B. Wheeler, B. Williamson, Robert De Forest, Elizabeth (Bessie) Hutton, Grace Beukard, J.C. Saunders, Mary Hutton, William J. Pennington, C.S. Hurd, Henry C. Cooper, Henry J. Segers, S.F. Miller, Annie Theller, Alfred Noble, Maria Burton, Joseph Hobson, E. Lennon, F. Hulberg, Charles Gordon Hutton, Edward C. Ebert, A. William Lewin, E.R. Dunn, William P. Craighill, Theodore Cooper, P.I. Chapelle, Anita McAlpine, Clarence King, Victoria Raymond, and Adele Gorman.

Series 4, Personal Materials, 1835-1946, contains documentation about Hutton's personal finances, role as executor of the Benjamin H. Hutton, Joseph Hutton, Annie Theller, and Countess H. De Moltke-Hvitfeldt estates, Mary Augusta Hutton (wife), Mary Hutton (daughter), Frank Hutton, John Caulfield (son-in-law), and B.F. and C.H. Hutton. The series has been divided into four subseries: Financial Records, 1876-1901, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921, Other Huttons, 1876-1936, and Personal Material, 1878-1946. Subseries 2, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921, contains correspondence relating to specific family estates and family members. This correspondence was separated from Series 3, Personal Correspondence, 1850-1942, to make it easier for researchers to access all records relating to the family estates. This series includes hand written, typed, and printed materials. Some materials are in French. All material dated after 1901 has been added to the collection by other creators such as Hutton's wife and children.

Subseries 1, Financial Records, 1876-1901, includes account books, account records, correspondence related to bank accounts, bank statements, financial notes, bills and proofs of payment, rent receipts, tax bills (New York, Flatbush, Montgomery County), checks, money exchanges, receipts for tax payments, real estate receipts, stock and bond certificates, loan agreements, executor accounts, rebate calculation sheet, and tax and insurance payments.

Subseries 2, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921, includes property maps and information (rent, mortgage costs, deeds), correspondence, notes on estate distribution, estate assets, value of estate and estate payments, account records, loan agreements, receipts, proof of payments, checks, financial records, legal documents, insurance documents, tax bills, auction receipts, and wills relating to the estates of Benjamin H. Hutton, Joseph Hutton, Countess H. de Moltke-Hivtfeldt, Annie Theller, and William R. Hutton. Also included are correspondence, property maps and information, and deeds and mortgages on Hutton properties.

Subseries 2, the estate and real estate records correspondence topics include: Virginia state building codes, construction costs, construction notices, purchasing offers for property, real estate prices, receipts of payments, property lines, real estate purchases and sales, real estate sales negotiations, deeds insurance estimates and costs, loan costs, property estimates, renovation costs, mortgages, property damages and repairs, property tax payments, insurance rates and payments, rent payments, telephone installation, building permits, rental agreements, reports on property condition, contracts of sale, conflicts with tenants, changes of address, deeds, distribution of estate monies, details about the Countess' illness, estate arrangements, changes of address, problems arising out of estate distribution, payment of debts, will details, selling of mortgage shares, accounts, estate settlement, money cables and transfers, dealings with lawyers, rent on Hutton Park property, legal and accounting fees, power of attorney transfer, investments, property security, land appraisals, lists of assets, legacy taxes, mortgages transfers, property management, Flatbush property, property rent and values, and physicians bills.

Correspondents include the following: A.C. Weeks, Walter I. Green, John D. Probsh, A.G. Darwin, Thomas H. McCann, Allan Farguhar, Thomas Dawson, Potter and Crandall Real Estate and Insurance Brokers, George C. Tilyou, H.D. Olephant, F. Winston, Richard E. Calbraith, Frank P. Martin, Henry DeForest, Henry C. Cooper, Metropolitan Telephone and Telegraph Company, John Ecker, C.K. Avevill, Georgina Hutton, Edward J. Hancy, Robert Graham, W.M. Bennett, Willis E. Merriman, Nathan L. Miller, Harry Hutton, Marquise de Portes (Adele Gorman), Annie Theller, Samuel L. Theller, Mrs. R. Locke, Frank Z. Adams, John Palmer (Secretary of State, New York), J.T. Cammeyer, Frank P. Martin, Florence Theller, Francis H. Seger, Henry C. Cooper, D.W.G. Cammeyer, Campbell W. Adams, Jane Casson, Elizabeth Hutton, Rene de Portes, H.G. Atkins, Grace Beukard, Aaron Pennington Muikhead, J.E. Delapalme, T.H. Powers, Egerton L. Winthrop Junior, George B. Glover, William Jay and Robert W. Candler, B. Williamson, J.E. Knaff, Cornelius C. Vermeule, S.V. Hayden, Charles G. Landon[?], H.A. Hurlbert, F.A. Black, John L. Calwalder, the Health Department of New York, A.G. Darwin, William Laue, Frederick Frelinghuysen, Charles S. Brown, Henrietta Hutton, Edward Gelon.

Subseries 3, Other Huttons, 1874-1936, includes professional drawings and proposals, checks, insurance information, correspondence, tax information, medical information, tax bills, relating to Mary Augusta Hutton (wife), Mary Hutton (daughter), Henry and Harry Hutton, Frank Hutton (son), John Caulfield (son-in-law), B.F. Hutton, and C.H. Hutton.

Subseries 4, Personal Materials, 1878-1946, contains handwritten property notes, school notes, sermons, travel documents, menus, Christmas cards, jewelry box, postal guide, typed religious materials and flyers.

Series 5, Diaries, 1866-1901, contains twenty nine diary books that document both Hutton's personal and professional life. These diaries provide not only a record of Hutton's life, but were also used by Hutton himself as a reference tool. When working on projects he would refer to notes and observations he made in his diary (as evidenced by notes made in his diaries). The first pages of the diaries often list his height, weight and clothing sizes as they varied from year to year. A researcher could probably use the cashbooks (see Series 7) and the diaries in conjunction as both detail the purchases made by Hutton. Many of the diaries also include a short record of accounts in the back. The diaries are arranged chronologically.

Topics found in the diaries include short form accounts of daily activities and appointments, records of the weather, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project, construction progress on projects, steam pumps, sketches and calculations, extension of Washington railroads, cost of food, work supplies, travel costs, costs of goods and food, work deadlines, home renovations, visits to family, cash accounts, accounts of household duties, produce on Woodlands property, records of deaths, debts owed, account of clearing Woodlands property, church visits, Hancock and Tonoloway Aqueduct, canals, Drum Point Railroad, Montgomery C. Meigs, Washington Aqueduct, Annapolis Water Works, telegram costs, wages for Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project, William Craighill, Morris Canal, Annapolis Railroad and Canal, professional duties (inspections), Kanawha River Canal, travel schedules, professional expenses, cash received from Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, John's Dam, cathedral construction (St. Patricks?), Piedmont Bridge, Cumberland, account of farm property belonging to Major Campbell Bruns, Cunard Pier, Marquise de Portes, rent costs, Baltimore Canal, Kingston Water Supply, Croton Orange Estate, Pierre Casson, Hudson River Tunnel, Washington/Harlem River Bridge, entertainment costs, Greenwood cemetery, train schedule, notes on illness, real estate sales, Hutton Park, Benjamin H. Hutton estate and heirs, estimates, accounts of correspondence received and sent, Central Railroad, rent on Orange properties, addresses, contracts and building supplies for projects, personal finances, Joseph Hutton property on Vanderbilt Avenue, New York, amounts paid and received, medical appointments, Ramapo Water Company, drawing progress of maps and diagrams, Harbor Board (New York), property repairs, inspection and test reports, reservoirs, lists of birthdays, Boston Tunnel, family financial issues, tax payments, and prayers.

Series 6, Notebooks, 1860-1900, document the engineering and architectural projects worked on by Hutton. The series has been divided into three subseries: Subseries 1, Engineering and Survey Field Notes, 1860-1899; Subseries 2, Notebooks, 1871-1886; and Subseries 3, Notes, 1863-1900. Subseries 1, Engineering and Survey Field Notes, 1860-1899, contains sixteen field notebooks used by Hutton. Subseries 2, Notebooks, 1871-1886, contains seven notebooks. Subseries three, Notes, 1863-1900, contains four documents.

Some notebooks correspond to specific projects such as the Kanawha River Canal (lockgate and Phoenix Waterline), Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Buffalo Reservoir, Potomac Lock and Dock Company, Northern Adirondack Railroad account, Washington Aqueduct, Little Rock Bridge, Wilson-Adam Dock, Croten Brick Works, Hutton Park, Centennial Iron Works, Cumberland Canal, Williamsport Aqueduct, Catoctin Aqueduct, Alexandria Canal, Miller's Saw Mill, Seneca Dam, Union Tunnel, Cumberland Waterworks, Victoria Bridge, Welland Canal, North Sea Canal, Ramapo Water Company, Annapolis Water Company, Antietam Aqueduct, Interoceanic Canal, San Quentin Canal, Suez Canal, Amsterdam Canal, Harlem Bulkhead, Morris Canal, Blue Lake Canal, and Nicaragua Canal.

These notebooks should be used in conjunction with the other materials in the collection related to professional projects, as they often provide more detailed accounts of the construction and land surveys. Some of the notebooks contain entries from several different sources. The notebooks were probably shared among the engineers working on these projects. The notebooks also contain looseleaf ephemera such as hand written calculations, newspaper clippings, and blueprints. Languages found in this series are English and French.

Notebook topics include construction projects, supply needs, costs for labor, sketches (Woodland Mills, landscapes, dams, railway cars, Noland Tunnel), costs of crops, survey measurements, cost of livestock, aqueducts, inspections, canal bridges, seed prices, dams, measurements, coffer dam, canal maintenance, worker salaries, calculations, towpath sketches and measurements, shipping rates, worker accidents, water and coal used, geometrical sketches (Washington Aqueduct), locks, damage reports, interactions with other engineers (William Reading), coal shipments on the canal, travel expenses, land survey notes, drafts for correspondence, William Craighill, Victoria docks, lists of personal supplies used, construction time estimates, surveying expenses, telegram costs, sand pump, canal from Sherling to Tuxedo Bay, analysis of several artificial lakes and reservoirs, distances of reservoirs to main pipes, calculations for the Austin Wheel, engine construction, bridges, gauging water depth, results and observations of tests and performance, problems with construction, to-do lists, cost of land surrounding towpaths, Fawcett's Lock, Tarman's Lock, comparison of costs in transporting coal by water and by rail, inspection notes, iron work, drainages, leaks, cost of supplies, watergates, harbor ferries, railroad station distances, flood protection, Panama Canal via the Nicaraguan route, cost of jetties, water levels, pressure of steam, boilers, steam and water cycle, water depth, cement, Great Falls, Virginia, waterflow, soundings, time of floats, flow of currents, rain fall measurements, tunnel measurements, cost of trenching San Francisco water supply, record of livestock, cost of food, rates of sawing woods and mills, preliminary railroad line measurements, profile of final line, and railroad line profiles.

Series 7, Cash Books, 1856-1899, contains seven cashbooks which list prices for personal items purchased by Hutton. Topics include groceries, church dues, clothes, hygiene products, cigars, some short journal entries about his work (Williamstown), concerts, dinners, family addresses, cakes, meals, cars, stamps, office supplies (pencils and papers), valentines, glasses, gloves, fabric, medicine, needles, diapers, tobacco, shoes (adult and childrens), travel expenses, telegrams, candles, newspapers, liquor, coal oil, jewelry, allowances given to family members, bank deposits, monies paid and received, taxes, subscriptions, tailoring costs, deposits and payments into estate trusts, and notes about payments to Benjamin H. Hutton heirs. The cashbooks also contain some personal loose leaf ephemera such as prayers, sketches, and engineering notes collected by Hutton.

Series 8, Professional Projects, 1830-1965, contains documents about engineering and architectural projects throughout Hutton's career, including information about the professional organizations and the legal issues in which he was involved. This series has been divided into eight subseries based on project, document form, and document subject. Some materials are in French and Italian.

Series 8, Professional Projects, also includes correspondence related to specific projects, primarily the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, the Hudson River Tunnel, the Washington/Harlem River Bridge, and the Georgetown Incline.

Topics include construction and repair to the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, engineering and use of Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, worker contracts, supply and labor purchases, design plans and proposals, construction and repair costs, supply notes and costs of supplies, water pressure and power, shipping materials and routes (specifically the shipping of coal), inspections and their findings, condition of canal dam and locks, water supply, drainage, sketches, board proceedings, business meetings, deeds, cost comparisons to other shipping methods, hiring processes, wages, cost estimates, Hutton's consulting fees, measurements and calculations, funding issues, worker conflicts, negotiations with municipal governments, payment schedules, bills for services, air pressure in Hudson River Tunnel, permission for construction, specifications, mortality rate among workers on the Hudson River Tunnel, construction reports, outlet incline, proposals for construction, letters of introduction, railroad versus water for trade, controversy with Tiersey, construction contracts, construction schedules, construction issues, construction progress, construction damage, basis for estimates, supply requests, internal politics, changes to construction plans, contract and price adjustments, issues with suppliers, construction delays, work permits, bills, worker issues, engineering notes, construction excavations, expenses, construction instructions, Union Bridge Company, lighting installations, construction processes, hiring practices, electrical conductors, water proofing, hydraulics, cement, concrete, payment of contributors, processes of approval for construction, meeting dates of the Harlem River Bridge Commission, and contract restrictions.

Correspondents include the following: W.W.M. Kaig, Henry Dodge, E. Mulvany, John Shay, James Clarke, H.D. Whitcomb, Horace Benton, J. Rellan, J.R. Maus, W.E. Merrill, A.P. Gorman, J.H. Staats, Vernon H. Brown, Charles H. Fisher (New York Central and Hudson River Railway Company), B. Baker, John Fowler, Benjamin and John Dos Passos, Charles B. Colby, Charles B. Brush, S. Pearson, Stanford White, Horace E. Golding, R.H. Smith, Daniel Lord, A. Fteley, Herbert Hinds, J.R. Bartlett, D.M. Hirsch, M.H. Bartholomew, Thomas O. Driscoll, W.E. Porter, Thomas F. Rowland, George Edward Harding, R.H. Dames, William Watson, James B. Eads, J.D. Bright, H. Aston, Charles Suley, A.M. Maynard, W.R. Henton, G. Geddes, H.P. Gilbut, Malcolm W. Niver (Secretary of the Harlem River Bridge Commission), J.D. Patterson, George Devin (Assistant Engineer Washington/ Harlem River Bridge), J.B. Wheeler, John Bogart, Charles Burns, J. McClellon, Rob Bassee, B. Williamson, Theodore Cooper, Lewis Cass Ledyard, R.M. Hunt, John Cooper, Henry Wilson, A.A. Caille, Myles Tierney, W. Pentzen, L.B. Cantfield, George Q. Grumstaid Junior, M.J. Funton, George Pierce, W.O. Fayerweather, Noah S. Belthen, Herbert Steward, W.M. Habirsham. Subseries 1, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 1828-1965, consists of plans, blueprints, land profiles, drawings, boat rates, contract forms, order forms, descriptions of the canal, design information, engineering data, sketches, cost estimates, land titles, microfilm, business papers, supply bills, patent bills, news clippings, reports, specifications, stockholder's reports, receipts, water leases, printed materials, and correspondence.

The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project was started in 1828 and completed twenty two years later in 1850. The canal's main objective was to connect Georgetown to the coal banks above Cumberland, Maryland, providing a short and cheap trade route between the eastern and western United States. It was also hoped that the canal would provide greater communication and travel between these two regions. Plagued by natural disasters, and construction setbacks, the canal was never completed in time to be useful and became obsolete shortly after its completion. Canal trade was eventually put out of business by the increase of railroads. Although it was an important development in engineering at its inception, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal is no longer in use and has become what locals affectionately refer to as "the old ditch." The canal was designated a National Historical Park in 1971 and consists of 184.5 miles of hiking and biking trails.

Subseries 2, Hudson River Tunnel, 1887-1901, consists of agreements for construction, certificates, contracts, and cost estimates, construction reports, engineering notebooks, engineering notes, sketches, land profiles, maps, progress profiles, plans, proposals, printed material, statements of expenses, and correspondence.

The Hudson River Tunnel project was started in 1874, and the final tubes were opened in 1910 after several construction setbacks. The tunnel connects Weehawken, New Jersey and Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan, New York City. Today the Hudson River Tunnel, known as the North River Tunnels is used by Amtrak's Northeast Corridor and New Jersey Transit rail lines.

Subseries 3, Harlem River Bridge, 1878-1982, consists of blueprints, printed materials, photographs, engineer's estimates, schedules, costs, reports, proposals, contracts, specifications, and correspondence.

The Harlem River Bridge project was started in 1885 and was completed in 1889. It spans the Harlem River in New York City, New York and connects the Washington Heights section of Manhattan with the Bronx. It was later named and is still known as the Washington Bridge and has been adapted over time to carry highway traffic. These adaptations have allowed the bridge to remain in use today.

Subseries 4, Other Projects, 1858-1832, consists of drawings, maps, blueprints, plans, proposals, cost estimates, bills, correspondence, sketches, land profiles, dimensions, engineering notes, account records, photostats, supply lists, calculations, legal documents, surveys, inspection reports, financial data, and measurements on architectural and engineering projects. Highlights of this subseries include: Western Maryland Railroad, Washington Aqueduct, Panama Canal, Ramapo Water Company, Piedmont Bridge, Northern Adirondack Railroad, Columbia Railroad, Morris Canal, Pittsfield and Williamstown Railroad, Suez Canal, St. Gothard Canal, Tansa Dam, Colorado Midland Railroad Company, Memorial Bridge, Mersey Tunnel, Little Rock Bridge, Kingston Water Supply, Kanawha River Canal, Florida Ship Canal, East Jersey Water Company, Consolidated Coal Company, Dismal Swamp Canal, Boston and Baltimore Tunnels, St. Patrick's Cathedral, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Annapolis Water Company, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad Company, and the Baltimore Beltline.

Subseries 5, Unidentified Project Files, 1872-1900, consists of bills of sale, engineering forms and regulations, cement test results and methods, census bulletin, contracts, cost estimates, correspondence, notes on publications, engineering data and notes, drawings, surveys, sketches, payrolls, photographs, and reports.

Subseries 6, Specifications, 1870-1900, consists of documents related to some of Hutton's projects, including specifications for bridges, reservoirs, canals, viaducts, docks, buildings, water works, and tunnels. Some specifications are more general, and some are blank proposal/specification forms. There are also proposals for estimates and a "call" or advertisement to contractors to bid on certain projects. Many of the specifications deal with projects in New York State, but projects in Pennsylvania, the City of Baltimore, and Europe are represented. The materials are arranged alphabetically by project name. There is one folder of documentation for the Potomac River Bridge (Arlington Memorial Bridge) in Washington, D.C. The Arlington Memorial Bridge was part of the 1901 McMillan Commission's plan for restoring Pierre (Peter) Charles L'Enfant's original plan for the capital. Two decades passed before construction was initiated by the architectural firm McKim, Mead, and White. The documentation for the Memorial Bridge consists of calculations and monetary figures for materials such as granite.

Subseries 7, Legal Documents, 1886, contains documents related to a patent infringement suit for moveable dams involving Alfred Pasqueau vs. the United States. This file contains both a printed version of the case and a handwritten statement from Hutton.

Subseries 8, Professional Organizations, 1870-1902, contains documents related to professional organizations where Hutton held membership. Specific organizations represented are American Institute of Architects, American Society of Civil Engineers, Institution of Civil Engineers, Boston Society of Civil Engineers, Societe des Ingenieurs Civils de France, Librarie Polytechnique, American Agency of "Engineering" in London, Imperial Institute, League of Associated Engineers, Railroad Corporation, American Institute of Mining Engineers, and the Century Association. Material in the subseries includes correspondence, candidates for membership, membership payments, membership lists, meeting minutes, schedule of terms, professional practices, charges, articles of association, invitations for membership, and election notes. Some materials are in French.

Series 9, Printed Materials, 1850-1913, contains a variety of printed materials relating to engineering and architectural projects written by Hutton and fellow engineers. This series can be used to examine not only professional developments of the period and responses to those developments, but also to track how ideas were transferred between engineers across countries and continents. This series should be used in conjunction with the professional correspondence found in this collection, as many of the authors also appear there. Some materials are in French, German, Spanish, and Italian.

Subseries 1, Printed Materials by Hutton, 1852-1900, includes printed papers on the Missouri flood wave, the Ravine du Sud, the Potomac waterfront, the Colorado midlands, and the application of water supply machinery.

Subseries 2, Printed Materials by Others, 1826-1913, includes printed materials on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canals, Tehuantec Ship Railway, Interoceanic canals and railways, jetties, Nicaragua Canal, uses of cements, mortars, concretes, steam power, harbors, Niagara Falls, Kanawha River canal, Mississippi River, Hudson River Bridge, sewage disposal, Washington Aqueduct, specifications, construction progress reports, hydraulic experiments, water supply, drainage, road surfacing, sea walls, water-cooling apparatus, pollution reports, bridges, pipes, channels, reservoirs, irrigation, water power, and sewers.

Subseries 2 contains an issue of The North American Review in which Hutton has specifically highlighted an article entitled, "The Inter-Oceanic Canal." Please see the container list for names of authors.

Subseries 3, Printed Materials with No Author, 1852-1903, includes printed materials on harbor reports, Annapolis Water Company, Ramapo Water Company, water departments and boards, maps, engineer's reports, sea walls, preservation of structures, annual reports, Coal and Iron Railway Company, sewers, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, contract specifications, proposals, social club life, Croton Water Supply, law suits, water supplies, moveable dams, reservoirs, East River Bridge, Eastern Canal, water filtration, Kingston New Water Supply, water pipes, locks, docks, contracts, construction reports, Croton Water Supply, and surveys. Also included are issues of journals such as Le Correspondant, Circular of the Office of Chief Engineers, The Club, VIII Congres International de Navigation, Journal of the Association of Engineering Studies, and Journal of the Franklin Institute.

Subseries 4, Newspaper, Journals and Magazine Clippings, 1873-1900, contains clippings from a variety of newspapers such as Scientific American, andRailroad Gazette. Subjects included are the Union Tunnel opening in Baltimore, Drum Point Railroad, railroad company conflicts, Washington/Harlem River Bridge, Metropolitan Railroad, Western Maryland Railroad, crop prospects, lumber trade, North Avenue Bridge, Nicaraguan Canal, harbors, river improvements, reactions to engineering projects, Belt tunnel, city transit, Washington, D.C. flood in 1880, tunnel shields, Springfield Bridge, railroad patents, Panama Canal, jetties, Hudson Tunnel, steel boilers, composition and use of cement, and the Brooklyn Bridge.

Subseries 5, Oversized Printed Materials, 1889-1892, contains large printed materials related to the Washington Aqueduct, General Post Office Building, subway arches, cornices, Warwick's Castle, Neuschwanstein Castle, Renaissance paintings, botanical drawings, school buildings, church architecture, the Hospital for the Insane of the Army and Navy and the District of Columbia, the Panama Canal, Morningside Park, and the Mississippi Jetties. Also includes engravings of Hutton, T.N. Talfound, and F. Jeffrey and photographs of Montgomery C. Meigs, and Hutton. Some materials are in German and French.

References:

1. Ward, George Washington, "The Early Development of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Project," Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science Series XVII, no. 9-11 (1899): 8.

2. Ibid., 88.

3. Ibid., 55.

4. Ibid., 90.

5. Sanderlin, Walter S., "The Great National Project: A History of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal," Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science Series LXIV, no. 1 (1946): 21.

6. Ibid., 282.

7. Gies, Joseph, Adventure Underground (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday and Company Inc., 1962): 134.

8. Ibid., 131-132.

9. Ibid., 135-136.

10. Ibid., 145.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into ten series.

Series 1, Letterpress Copybooks, 1858-1901

Series 2, Professional Correspondence, 1861-1901

Subseries 1, Project Correspondence, 1876-1899

Subseries 2, General Correspondence, 1861-1901

Series 3, Personal Correspondence, 1850-1942

Series 4, Personal Materials, 1835-1946

Subseries 1, Financial Records, 1876-1901

Subseries 2, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921

Subseries 3, Other Huttons, 1874-1936

Subseries 4, Personal Materials, 1878-1946

Series 5, Diaries, 1866-1901

Series 6, Notebooks, 1860-1900

Subseries 1, Engineering and Survey Field Notes, 1860-1899

Subseries 2, Notebooks, 1871-1886

Subseries 3, Notes, 1863-1900

Series 7, Cashbooks, 1856-1899

Series 8, Professional Projects, 1830-1965

Subseries 1, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 1828-1965

Subseries 2, Hudson River Tunnel, 1887-1901

Subseries 3, Harlem River Bridge, 1878-1892

Subseries 4, Other Projects, 1858-1932

Subseries 5, Identified Project Files, 1872-1900

Subseries 6, Specifications, 1870-1900

Subseries 7, Legal Documents, 1886

Subseries 8, Professional Organizations, 1870-1902

Series 9, Printed Materials, 1826-1913

Subseries 1, Printed Materials by Hutton, 1852-1900

Subseries 2, Printed Materials by Others, 1826-1913

Subseries 3, Newspaper, Journals, and Magazine Clippings, 1855-1901

Subseries 4, Oversized Printed Material, 1889-1892

Series 10: Drawings, 1875, 1883
Biographical / Historical:
Not much is known about the history of William Rich Hutton outside of his role in architectural and engineering projects of the late 1800s and early 1900s. In many cases, he is spoken of only in reference to his projects, and the short biographies that have been written read more like a resume than a life story. Because of this lack of information, this note will focus on Hutton's professional accomplishments, but will attempt to make some comments on his personal life.

William Rich Hutton was born on March 21, 1826 in Washington, D.C., the eldest son of James Hutton (died 1843) and his wife, the former Salome Rich (1). He was educated at the Western Academy (Washington, D.C.) from 1837-1840 under George J. Abbot and then at Benjamin Hallowell's School in Alexandria, Virginia, where he received special training in mathematics, drawing, and surveying (2). Hutton began his professional career in California when he, along with his younger brother James, accompanied their uncle William Rich to work for the United States Army. His uncle was a paymaster for the army and Hutton became his clerk. They traveled around the new state paying the various platoons stationed there, but Hutton also occupied his time by drawing the landscapes and structures he saw in the settlements of Los Angeles, San Francisco, La Paz, Mazatlan, Santa Barbara, Monterey, San Pedro, San Diego, and Cape San Lucas (3). These drawings are now held by the Huntington Library in San Marino, California. Hutton held the position of clerk until the spring of 1849, and in July of that year he began working with Lieutenant Edward O.C. Ord and completed the first survey of Los Angeles and its surrounding pueblo lands and islands. Hutton continued surveying in California from 1850-1851. He was hired by William G. Dana to survey the Nipomo Ranch in San Luis Obispo County and also surveyed the ranches Santa Manuela and Huer-Huero, both owned by Francis Z. Branch. After his employment with Dana, he became the county surveyor for San Luis Obispo County, where he prepared the first survey and map of the region. He also continued to survey ranches for Captain John Wilson during this time. In August 1851, he resigned from his position as county surveyor and moved to Monterey where he worked as an assistant to Captain (later General) Henry W. Hallack, superintendent of the New Almaden Quicksilver Mine in Santa Clara County (4). He remained in this position until March, 1853 when he returned to Washington, D.C. by way of Mexico (5).

Hutton began his career as a civil engineer in Washington, D.C. He was first assigned to the position of assistant engineer on a survey of the projected Metropolitan Railroad in 1853, which was chartered to connect Washington, D.C. with the mainline of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. In 1855 he began his professional relationship with Montgomery C. Meigs when he was appointed to the position of assistant engineer on the Washington Aqueduct. He also served as division engineer on this project until construction was shut down in 1861 because of the outbreak of the Civil War. Fortunately for Hutton, the construction on the Aqueduct was resumed in 1862, and when Congress transferred the supervision of the aqueduct project from the War Department to the Department of the Interior, Hutton was made chief engineer. By the end of the Civil War, Hutton's reputation as a civil engineer was established (6).

During this decade Hutton also served as the chief engineer for the Annapolis Water Works (1866) and as chief engineer for one of his most famous projects, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal (1869-1871). Although some historians minimize Hutton as just one of many engineers to work on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, he did make one major contribution to its construction: the Georgetown Canal Incline. Perhaps the final effort of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal company to compete with the emerging and fast expanding railroad, the Georgetown Incline was designed to allow canal boats to travel through the canal with low water levels and to alleviate canal congestion. Unfortunately, by the time the incline was completed use of the canal had decreased so significantly that it was no longer needed to help control traffic (7). Despite this, Hutton continued to work as a consulting engineer for the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company until 1881, when he was let go because of the dwindling fortunes of the company (7).

In the 1870s and 1880s Hutton was busy with several engineering projects. During 1871-1873, he was the chief engineer in the completion of the Western Maryland Railroad to Hagerstown and Williamsport (9). He also practiced as an architect with his brother, the prominent Baltimore architect Nathanial Henry Hutton, during the years 1873-1880. He relocated to New York in 1880, serving as chief engineer for the Washington Bridge in 1888 and 1889 and the Hudson River Tunnel from 1889 to 1891. In 1886, he became the consulting engineer for the New Croton Aqueduct and served in the same position for the Colorado Midland Railway between the years of 1886-1889 (10).

As his personal and professional correspondence shows, Hutton continued to work on various engineering and architectural projects until his death on December 11, 1901. In addition to these projects, he also invented the innovative system of locks and moveable dams used in the Kanawha River Canal. He was awarded the Diplome d'Honneur for this featat the Paris Exposition in 1878 (11). His correspondence also demonstrates how Hutton was respected within his professional community. These letters refer to the accuracy of his work, his willingness to help other colleagues and supply them with reference materials and information, and, in addition to all this, his politeness. It seems that these qualities defined not only his personality but also his ideology. In one of the cashbooks in the collection, dated 1899, a hand written note contains a religious parable of "The Straw." The phrase in this parable that speaks most to Hutton's work ethic, and to the spirit of inventors everywhere, is this: "Even so however lowly may be the act, however little opportunities we may have of assisting others, we may still do something. Let us beg to fulfil our duty in this regards by making ourselves useful to others by some little act of thoughtful charity..." (12). Hutton, in his dedication to civil engineering, seems to have lived up to this virtue, and in his work he changed the landscape of Washington, D.C. and New York.

The Fairy Godfather: Hutton's Personal History

His professional records reveal a man who was fiercely dedicated to his work. His obituary references his professional life more than his personal life (13). Despite his reputation in the professional engineering community, his personal records demonstrate that Hutton was also dedicated to his family and children. In 1855, he married Montgomery County native Mary Augusta Clopper (died 1915). Together they lived on her family's estate known as the Woodlands, and had five children: Frank C. Hutton, Mary Hutton, Elizabeth Hutton (later Caulfield), Rosa Hutton, and Annie Salome Hutton (14). It is at this estate that Hutton died and was buried. The personal letters to his wife found in the Woodlands Collection held at the Montgomery County Historical Society show a man in love and willing to take time from his work to write to his wife. His letters to his children show a similar interest and compassion. In the many letters found in this collection from his daughter Elizabeth (Bessie) one can see a father who is interested in not only his daughter's activities abroad, but also in her opinion. This interest also extends to his son Frank Hutton, as their correspondence shows Hutton offering his son advice on his own engineering projects.

Hutton also served as executor to many of his extended family's estates. Many letters show the conflicts that Hutton had to mediate and the dependence of his cousins on him for advice and money. Although his family was wealthy (his cousin was Benjamin H. Hutton whose daughters married into the court of Napoleon III), they were volatile, and his records seem to indicate that he served as a mediator for many of their disputes. In addition to this, as his nickname of Fairy Godfather suggests, Hutton was always willing to lend his family either financial or moral support when needed. Unfortunately, little other documentation concerning Hutton's personal life exists outside of this collection and the one held at the Montgomery County Historical Society.

References:

1. Waters, Willard O., "Introduction," California 1847-1852 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942).

2. Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): ix.

3. Waters, Willard O., "Introduction," California 1847-1852 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942). and Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): x-xi.

4. Waters, Willard O., "Introduction," California 1847-1852 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942).

5. Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): xvii.

6. Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): xvii-xviii.

7. Skramstad, Harold, "The Georgetown Canal Incline," Technology and Culture, Vol. 10, no. 4 (Oct. 1969): 555.

8. Business Correspondence, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 22 February 1881, William R. Hutton Papers, 1830-1965, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, box number 27, folder number 29.

9. "William Rich Hutton," The Club: A Journal of Club Life for Men and Women,(July 1894):37

10. Ibid.

11. Monzione, Joseph, "William R. Hutton," A.P.W.A. Reporter (Sept. 1977): 7.

12. Cashbook, 1899, William R. Hutton Papers, 1830-1965, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, box number 23, folder number 5.

13. The Woodlands Collection, Montgomery County Historical Society.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

The Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, 1870-1890, (AC0987). Contains materials relating to the construction of the Washington Aqueduct including a book of drawings illustrating reservoirs, tunnels, culverts, and other structural elements, a Government Senate Document relating to construction progress, scrapbooks created by Meigs that include newspaper clippings about the Washington Aqueduct project, water supply, engineering projects, building construction, architecture and other subjects. Collection is currently unprocessed, but is available for research.

Materials in Other Organizations:

The William Rich Hutton Papers, 1840-1961, are located at the Huntington Library in California (see http://catalog.huntington.org).

The collection contains 95 drawings, 13 letters, and 39 facsimile copies of letters and manuscripts. The illustrative material includes both watercolor and pencil drawings of California (including Los Angeles, Monterey, San Francisco, the New Almaden Quicksilver Mine, and the California missions), Baja California, Mexico, and Peru. There are also five pieces in the collection related to the author María Amparo Ruiz de Burton. In 1942, the Huntington Library published Glances at California 1847--853: Diaries and Letters of William Rich Hutton, Surveyor and California 1847--852: Drawings by William Rich Hutton.

The Hutton family papers are located at the Montgomery County Historical Society, Sween Library (see http://www.montgomeryhistory.org/sites/default/files/Family_Files.pdf).

The collection contains account books from the Woodlands estate, recipe books, livestock records, records of Mary Augusta Hutton (wife), Mary and Rose Hutton (daughters), newspaper clippings (including his obituary), correspondence, record books, deeds, bills and receipts, engineering papers, religious momentos (funeral service cards), and insurance papers.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Mr. and Mrs. James J. Madine, a relative of Hutton's and last owners of the Woodlands estate; the Department of Forests and Parks, Maryland; Louis Fischer; and Mr. and Mrs. Mayo S. Stuntz, 1965-1966, 1974.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Dams  Search this
Hydraulic engineering  Search this
Canals  Search this
Underwater tunnels  Search this
Railroad bridges  Search this
Railroad construction  Search this
Water-supply  Search this
Construction workers  Search this
Construction equipment  Search this
Concrete construction  Search this
Concrete  Search this
Coal -- Transportation  Search this
Civil engineers  Search this
Civil engineering  Search this
Canals -- Panama  Search this
Canals -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Canals -- Maryland  Search this
Canals -- Design and construction  Search this
Bridges -- United States  Search this
Waterworks  Search this
Tunnels  Search this
Tunnels -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Construction -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Underground construction  Search this
Locks and dams  Search this
Shipping  Search this
Iron and steel bridges  Search this
Sewage disposal  Search this
Railroads -- Maryland  Search this
Railroads -- 19th century  Search this
Railroad engineering  Search this
Railroad companies  Search this
Aqueducts  Search this
Arch bridges  Search this
Architects -- 19th century  Search this
Books  Search this
Bridges -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Bridges -- Design and construction  Search this
Bridge construction industry -- United States  Search this
Engineering notebooks  Search this
Docks  Search this
Domestic and family life  Search this
Architecture -- United States  Search this
Architecture -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Western Maryland Railroad  Search this
Annapolis Waterworks  Search this
Steam engineering  Search this
Harlem River Bridge Commission  Search this
Washington (D.C.) -- 19th century  Search this
Reservoirs  Search this
Patents  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Letterpress copybooks
Blueprints
Diaries
Drawings
Photographs -- 19th century
Cashbooks
Business records -- 19th century
Business letters
Notebooks
Topographic maps
Tax records
Technical drawings
Stock certificates
Technical literature
Photoengravings
Notes
Maps -- 19th century
Microfilms
Linen tracings
Letter books
Letters
Land titles
Legal documents
Sketches
Salted paper prints
Reports
Receipts
Plans (drawings)
Photostats
Photographic prints
Architectural drawings
Administrative records
Albumen prints
Albums
Annual reports
Booklets
Account books -- 19th century
Books -- 19th century
Family papers -- 18th century
Financial records -- 19th century
Diaries -- 19th century
Drawings -- 19th century
Cyanotypes
Correspondence -- 19th-20th century
Deeds
Printed material
Correspondence
Contracts
Harlem River Bridge
Photograph albums
Specifications
Christmas cards
Menus
Citation:
William R. Hutton Papers, dates, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0987
See more items in:
William R. Hutton Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0987
Online Media:

Saul Zalesch collection of artists' letters and documents, 1834-1973

Creator:
Zalesch, Saul E. (Saul Erich)  Search this
Zalesch, Saul E. (Saul Erich)  Search this
Subject:
Indiana, Robert  Search this
Lage, William Potter  Search this
Duveneck, Frank  Search this
Story, William Wetmore  Search this
Bishop, Isabel  Search this
Church, Frederick S. (Frederick Stuart)  Search this
Doughty, Thomas  Search this
Fenollosa, Ernest Francisco  Search this
Foster, Ben  Search this
Gardner, Isabella Stewart  Search this
Hassam, Childe  Search this
Henri, Robert  Search this
La Farge, John  Search this
Martin, Homer Dodge  Search this
Merry, C. M.  Search this
Pennell, Joseph  Search this
Redfield, Edward Willis  Search this
Rogers, John  Search this
Stankiewicz, Richard  Search this
Story, Franklin H.  Search this
Sully, Thomas  Search this
Teal, William P.  Search this
Vedder, Elihu  Search this
Bellows, George  Search this
Benton, Thomas Hart  Search this
Bearden, Romare  Search this
Williams, Gluyas  Search this
Lippold, Richard  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy  Search this
Gropper, William  Search this
Opper, Frederick Burr  Search this
Champney, James Wells  Search this
Betts, Louis  Search this
Baldridge, C. LeRoy  Search this
La Farge, John  Search this
Church, Frederic Edwin  Search this
Millet, Francis Davis  Search this
Weir, Julian Alden  Search this
Duveneck, Josephine W. (Josephine Whitney)  Search this
Sargent, John Singer  Search this
Society of American Artists  Search this
Brooklyn Art Association  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8850
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211035
AAA_collcode_zalesaul
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211035

Saul Zalesch collection of artists' letters and documents

Collector:
Zalesch, Saul E.  Search this
Names:
Brooklyn Art Association  Search this
Society of American Artists  Search this
Baldridge, C. LeRoy  Search this
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988  Search this
Bellows, George, 1882-1925  Search this
Benton, Thomas Hart, 1889-1975  Search this
Betts, Louis, 1873-1961  Search this
Bishop, Isabel, 1902-1988  Search this
Champney, James Wells, 1843-1903  Search this
Church, Frederic Edwin, 1826-1900  Search this
Church, Frederick S. (Frederick Stuart), 1842-1924  Search this
Doughty, Thomas, 1793-1856  Search this
Duveneck, Frank, 1848-1919  Search this
Duveneck, Josephine W. (Josephine Whitney), 1891-1978  Search this
Fenollosa, Ernest Francisco, 1853-1908  Search this
Foster, Ben, 1852-1926  Search this
Gardner, Isabella Stewart, 1840-1924  Search this
Gropper, William, 1897-1977  Search this
Hassam, Childe, 1859-1935  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Indiana, Robert, 1928-  Search this
La Farge, John, 1835-1910  Search this
La Farge, John, 1835-1910  Search this
Lage, William Potter  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy, 1923-1997  Search this
Lippold, Richard, 1915-2002  Search this
Martin, Homer Dodge, 1836-1897  Search this
Merry, C. M.  Search this
Millet, Francis Davis, 1846-1912  Search this
Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937  Search this
Pennell, Joseph, 1857-1926  Search this
Redfield, Edward Willis, 1869-1965  Search this
Rogers, John, 1829-1904  Search this
Sargent, John Singer, 1856-1925  Search this
Stankiewicz, Richard, 1922-1983  Search this
Story, Franklin H.  Search this
Story, William Wetmore, 1819-1895  Search this
Sully, Thomas, 1783-1872  Search this
Teal, William P.  Search this
Vedder, Elihu, 1836-1923  Search this
Weir, Julian Alden, 1852-1919  Search this
Williams, Gluyas, 1888-  Search this
Extent:
58 Items ((portions microfilmed on 1 reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1834-1973
Scope and Contents:
Artists' letters and documents collected by Zalesch and letters written to him in response to inquiries concnering autographs and biographical information.
REEL 3097: Twenty-six letters (1845-1973) written by George Bellows, Thomas Hart Benton, Isabel Bishop, Frederick Stuart Church, Thomas Doughty, Ernest Fenollosa, Ben Foster, Isabella Stewart Gardner, Childe Hassam, Robert Henri, John La Farge, Homer Dodge Martin, Joseph Pennell, Edward Willis Redfield, John Rogers, John Singer Sargent, Richard Stankiewicz, Thomas Sully, and Elihu Vedder. Also included are a Harvard University bond for William Wetmore Story's tuition signed by Franklin H. Story (1834) and a biographical questionnaire completed by John La Farge for The Cyclopedia of American Biography (1925).
UNMICROFILMED: Letters written by Roy Lichtenstein, William Gropper, Gluyas Williams, Ordway Partridge, Frederick Burr Opper, James Wells Champney, C. Gray Parker, Ben Foster, Louis Betts, Cyrus Le Roy Baldridge, Richard Lippold, Romare Bearden, Isabel Bishop, Thomas Hart Benton, Richard Stankiewicz, and others; a brochure for a work of art by Robert Indiana; a certificate from The Brooklyn Art Association for one share of capital stock in the name of William Potter Lage; one page of correspondence documenting a decision made for the Society of American Artists containing a note from Francis D. Millet to J. Alden Weir, followed by a note from Weir to Frederic Church, signed "O.K." by Church.
Vol. XXVI, no. 5, Feb. 1924 periodical, Old Hughes, published by the students of Hughes High school in Cincinnati, Ohio containing a published exchange of letters between principal C. M. Merry and Josephine W. Duveneck, daughter-in-law of painter Frank Duveneck about the Hughes High School purchasing a painting by Duveneck, and a reminiscence of Duveneck by William P. Teal, head of the art department at Hughes High School.
Biographical / Historical:
Saul Zalesch, an art historian, began collecting artists' letters around 1981.
Provenance:
This collection of letters was lent for microfilming by Zalesch in 1984 (reel 3097). Zalesch donated an additional three letters in 1993, twenty-five in 1999, one letter in 2008, and a publication in 2009.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.zalesaul
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-zalesaul

Rogers, John

Collection Creator:
Penney, Charles Rand, 1923-2010  Search this
Container:
Box 20, Folder 24
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1976-1994
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Charles Rand Penney Papers, 1923-1994, bulk 1945-1994. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Charles Rand Penney papers
Charles Rand Penney papers / Series 1: Art Collection Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-pennchar-ref988

R, Miscellaneous

Collection Creator:
Woodward, Sidney C., 1890-1963  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 22
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1845-1961
Scope and Contents:
Reich, Jacques

Reinagle, Ramsay Richard

Richards, William Trost

Richardson, Francis Henry

Richter, Herbert Davis

Ritschel, William

Robert C. Vose Galleries

Roberts, David

Robinson, Florence Vincent

Roche, M. Paul

Roerich, Nicolas Konstantin

Rogers, John

Rossiter, Henry P.

Roth, Ernest David

Ryerson, Margery Austen
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Sidney C. Woodward papers, 1823-1963, bulk 1915-1932. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Sidney C. Woodward papers
Sidney C. Woodward papers / Series 1: Correspondence and Collected Letters
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-woodsidn-ref184

Guide to 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Oral History Collection

Creator:
Turner, Reginald  Search this
Names:
Arnold, Juanita Burnett, (1909-2005)  Search this
Bates, J. B., 1916-2008  Search this
Campbell-Webster, Beatrice  Search this
Clark, Otis Granville, (1903-2012)  Search this
Eddy, Clyde, (1911-2008)  Search this
Ellsworth, Scott  Search this
Franklin, Archie Jackson, (1915-2006)  Search this
Franklin, Jimmie Lilly, (1915-2009)  Search this
Franklin, John Hope  Search this
Gates, Eddie Faye  Search this
Holloway, Robert, (1918-2010)  Search this
Hooker, Olivia J., Dr., (1915-2018)  Search this
Jackson, Eunice Cloman, (1903-2004)  Search this
Knight, Thelma Thurman, (1915-2009)  Search this
McCondichie, Eldoris Mae Ector, (1911-2010)  Search this
O'Brien, William [Bill]  Search this
Ogletree, Charles, Jr.  Search this
Rogers, Jewel Smitherman, (1918-2010)  Search this
Rogers, John Washington, Jr.  Search this
Young, Wess Hubert, (1917-2014)  Search this
Extent:
1.38 Terabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Terabytes
Oral history
Place:
Tulsa (Oklahoma)
Date:
2004-2007
Scope and Contents:
The Guide to 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Oral History Collection documents the survivors of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre as well as their journey to acknowledgment, justice, and restitution. This digital collection is an edited version of a larger collection created by Reginald Turner, Executive Director and Founder of The Tulsa Project, Inc. The collection consists of interview videos of individual survivors, their descendants, riot witnesses, historians, community supporters as well as the legal proceedings for U.S. government acknowledgement of the massacre and its subsequent devastation. This collection serves to bear witness to one of the most infamous episodes of American history, allowing those who lived through it to convey their experiences directly in their own words.
Biographical / Historical:
In 1921, one of the most devastating race massacres in American history occurred in Tulsa, Oklahoma. From May 31 to June 1, mobs of white Tulsa residents ransacked, pillaged, bombed, and burned over 1,000 homes, businesses, and churches and murdered scores of African Americans in the Tulsa's Black community of Greenwood. The history of this event was hidden in plain sight for many generations, invariably vanished from or never placed in the history books across the country. Generations of Tulsa's universal community began to learn of this tragic event over the course of the last few decades through the efforts of the survivors and their supporters. The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Oral History Collection alongside the great work of The Tulsa Project, Inc. sheds light on a community of resilience grappling with complex questions of history and memory, justice and law, reparation and reconciliation.

In the decades that followed, just a partial list of cities exhibits the expansive and dizzying geographic and temporal scope of organized white violence that continued with little recourse or reproach well into twentieth century. Such cities include: Colfax, Louisiana (1873); Clinton, Mississippi (1875); Hamburg, South Carolina (1876); Thibodaux, Louisiana (1887); Omaha, Nebraska (1891); Wilmington, NC (1898); Atlanta, Georgia (1906); and East St. Louis, Missouri (1917). In the summer of 1919, the U.S. was rocked by the white supremacist violence and attacks against over thirty Black communities across the country. This period of overwhelming racial violence was dubbed, "Red Summer" and affected major Black communities in Washington, DC; Chicago, Illinois, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Baltimore, Maryland; Clarksdale, Mississippi; and Omaha, Nebraska as well as many others. In these cities like Tulsa, mob violence devastated Black communities through the destruction of property and livelihoods.

The Greenwood District of Tulsa, Oklahoma is rooted in the history of westward expansion of the United States in early 19th century. Beginning in 1830s, the first African Americans came to the Oklahoma Territory with Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, the U. S government sanctioned removal of American Indians from their native territory across the country. Some of the African American travelers were enslaved while free Blacks traveled through treacherous conditions alongside white travelers. Dubbed the "Oil Capital of the World" and "Magic City," Tulsa experienced booming economic growth and prosperity during the early 1900s. During the era of post-Emancipation until the onset of the 20th century, African Americans were a part of a newer wave of migration that came to Tulsa from all over the country, including other parts of the Oklahoma Territory.

More than 50 all-Black settlements were established in Oklahoma territory during this era, including Tatums, Langston, Rentiesville, Boley, as well as Black communities of larger cities such as Muskogee, Okmulgee, and Tulsa. By 1900, African Americans composed seven percent of the combined Oklahoma and Indian Territories and five percent of Tulsa's population. In 1905, the Tulsa's Greenwood community was sold to African American settlers. Many of Greenwood's founding families were of mixed-race heritage as result of multiracial migration patterns and organic cultural adaptation to Oklahoma's natural resources and environment. The Perrymans, one of Tulsa's founding families, included Muskogee (Creek), African American, and white members.

In 1907, Oklahoma was admitted into the United States, and the legislature immediately began implementing restrictive race laws. Many mixed-race families lived in the Oklahoma Territory in the late 1800s. But dividing lines between the races were drawn more sharply after Oklahoma became a state. Oklahoma had one of the strictest sets of Jim Crow laws that divided the country, especially in Tulsa. Black Tulsans formed their community along Greenwood and Archer streets and quickly began to thrive as homes, churches and businesses were built and further developed. The community took shape with the construction and proliferation of African American owned cafes, grocery stores, beauty parlors, movie theaters, and dentist, lawyers, and doctor offices. By close of World War I, 10,000 individuals lived in Tulsa's Greenwood District, considered to be one of the most prosperous African American communities in America at the time. Educator, activist, and statesman Booker T. Washington dubbed the district, "Negro Wall Street." Later coined as "Black Wall Street" in the 1950s as scholarship began developing around the massacre.

After World War I, Black veterans returned to seek a "double victory" by securing freedom and equality at home, striking fear among white supremacists. This fear left white Tulsans blaming the prosperity of "Black Wall Street" for the lack to employment opportunities and other misfortunes among the white community. Tulsa city founder and prominent businessman, W. Tate Brady, despite his support of African American financial independence, was a member of white supremacy terrorist group, the Klu Klux Klan (KKK) as well as an active member in the Sons of the Confederate Veterans. A resolute white supremacist, Brady's mansion's design was inspired by the Virginia home of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. He welcomed KKK founder, Nathan Bedford Forrest to that same home in 1915. It was Brady's active membership in the Sons of Confederate Veterans that brought the organization's 28th annual convention to the city in 1918. The latter circumstances along with the ongoing racial tensions set the stage for 1921 massacre.

On May 30, 1921, Dick Rowland, a 19-year-old African American shoe shiner was accused of assaulting a 17-year-old white woman, Sarah Page. Rowland went inside the Drexel Building to use the restroom, the only bathroom allowed to African Americans in downtown Tulsa. Page was an elevator operator in the building. It is unclear if Rowland tripped or the elevator stopped suddenly, but he had physical contact with Page. Page screamed assault and a scared Rowland immediately fled. The next morning on May 31, Rowland was arrested and jailed in the city's courthouse. Later that afternoon, the city's most popular newspaper, Tulsa Tribune printed the story, "Nab Negro for Attacking Girl in Elevator" that claimed Rowland raped Page. Also printed was an editorial with the title, "To Lynch Negro Tonight," which no doubt influenced the rumors of a possible lynching of Rowland as the evening approached.

A large mob of thousands continued to grow over the course of the night outside the courthouse. African American WWI veterans and other members of the Greenwood community began to set up defenses outside the courthouse in order to protect Rowland. Tensions rose and soon an individual fight broke out and a gun was fired. The now weaponized white mob began to move about Greenwood armed with torches, guns, and other weaponry. Some survivors recall aerial bombs released overhead from small planes. The terror was directed at every visible African American in the vicinity, many fled for their lives while their homes and livelihoods were demolished. Historical research has not rendered an accurate number of lives lost in the massacre; it is believed that over 300 African Americans were murdered. Over 35 blocks of homes and businesses were destroyed with damages estimated to be over 1.5 million dollars.

On June 1st, the Oklahoma National Guard arrived, and martial law was declared. They arrested over 6,000 African Americans including children and illegally held them in detention centers throughout Tulsa. They were only released if a white person named them as an employee. Martial law ended on June 3rd, but African Americans were required to carry "green cards" once released from the detention centers as a mechanism to the police the Black population. The next week, Oklahoma governor James B.A. Robertson ordered an inquiry into the massacre. Only 85 people were indicted, mostly African Americans citizens. Rowland was released from jail and not charged for any crimes. Page recanted her claim as well.

Residents of Greenwood filed over 1400 lawsuits for damaged property. Insurance companies denied all claims based on a "riot clause." 1,000 Black Tulsans were forced to live in tents provided by the Red Cross from 1921-1922 because their homes were demolished. Historians estimate that over 700 families left Tulsa and never returned. However, many stayed and worked to rebuild the Greenwood community but experienced great difficulty as the city government actively tried to prevent African Americans from returning to their homes. Zoning regulations were put into effect that would make Greenwood only a commercial area, making it virtually impossible to live there. B.C. Franklin, businessman and father of historian John Hope Franklin, led the charge and filed a suit against the City of Tulsa before the Oklahoma Supreme Court and won, allowing Greenwood to rebuild.

Dozens of Black-owned businesses were rebuilt in Greenwood within a year of the riot, and hundreds more followed over the next three decades. The Oklahoma Eagle newspaper founded in 1922, replacing the community's former Black newspaper, The Tulsa Star that was destroyed by the riot. The Oklahoma Eagle, founded directly after the massacre, reported on African American community, as well as all facets of the massacre, since white newspapers refused to acknowledge the incident. In 1925, in a display of courage, the National Negro Business League held its 26th annual convention in Greenwood. By the 1950s, Greenwood was a thriving Black community despite racial segregation and inequality. Greenwood's mid-century renaissance was a rare occurrence as employment opportunities and fair treatment outside of the Greenwood remained limited. The Tulsa NAACP chapter, along with other activist groups, was formed to fight inequality and racism in wider Tulsa. Despite advances of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, redlining and urban renewal projects dwindled the former Greenwood improvements leaving the area and its residents impoverished and highly segregated.

After suffering decades of aftereffects from the massacre, Tulsa's African American community demanded justice and reparations from the state of Oklahoma and the U.S. government. In 1997, African American state lawmakers, Representative Don Ross and Senator Maxine Horner, co-sponsored an Oklahoma House Bill to create the Tulsa Race Riot Commission. The Commission was tasked with finding survivors and recording their testimony, gaining accurate accounts of property losses and values, and then make recommendations for reparations. In addition, they worked with forensic anthropologists and archeologists tasked with locating mass graves of massacre victims. In 2001, the committee concluded that each survivor should receive $200,000 and up to $100,000 in property claims. Unfortunately, these recommendations were not passed leaving survivors and descendants with little prospects for restitution.

In 2003, over 200 Tulsa massacre survivors filed a suit against the state of Oklahoma in the case, Alexander, et al., v. Oklahoma, et al. Survivors and their descendants served as plaintiffs and recounted their experiences during and after the massacre. The legal team was led by esteemed lawyer and educator Charles Ogletree and celebrity lawyer Johnnie Cochran. The suit demanded restitution for the damages and injuries done by the state of Oklahoma and the city of Tulsa. The main argument declared violations of the 14th Amendment of the U. S. Constitution including "deprivation of life and liberty [and property] and the privileges and immunities of United States citizenship". In addition, plaintiffs wanted to establish a scholarship fund to ensure future generations learn the history of the massacre for years to come. The judge ruled against the survivors, claiming that the statute of limitations had passed. In 2005, the lawyers tried yet again for justice by bringing the case to the U. S. Supreme Court, but the court declined to hear the appeal. A few survivors were given the opportunity to speak at a briefing in front of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) and other leaders on Capitol Hill, the same year with no action taken.

Over the years, Tulsa cultural institutions and organizations were developed to preserve the legacy of the African American community in Greenwood, Tulsa and the state of Oklahoma. The Greenwood Cultural Center and Mabel B. Little House have showcased the heritage of the community since the 1990s. In 2008, lawyer and filmmaker, Reginald Turner founded The Tulsa Project, Inc., a non-profit group committed to raising funds and awareness on behalf of massacre survivors and their descendants. The same year, Turner filmed interviews of massacre survivors that were later compiled in a documentary entitled, "Before They Die!" The interviews took place from 2004 to 2007 and featured survivors' efforts for justice, government hearings, and legal proceedings as well as Tulsa Commission meetings. The film's sales go towards compensating survivors and serve as an educational tool exhibited in schools, churches, and civic organizations around the country. In 2010, the John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park opened in Greenwood to help memorialize the massacre survivors and educate the community. In 2018, Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum called for the opening another investigation into the location of mass graves. In 2019, the Tulsa Race Massacre was added to the Oklahoma Education department curriculum and taught in classrooms.

As the massacre approaches its 100th anniversary in 2021, there are continuing advances for greater education about the massacre and the restitution of justice for the victims, survivors, and descendants of the one of the darkest times in American history.

Historical Timeline

1900 -- African Americans composed seven percent of Oklahoma territory and five percent of the Tulsa population.

1905 -- The Greenwood area in Tulsa was sold to African American Settlers.

1907 -- Oklahoma was made a state.

1917-1918 -- World War I veterans returned home seeking freedom and equality. In 1918, Tulsa hosted the 28th Annual Sons of the Confederacy Convention.

1919 -- "Red Summer," Over 30 race riots occurred over the course of 10 months in states across America.

1920 -- The wealth and prosperity of the Greenwood community, nicknamed "Black Wall Street," led to it to becoming one of the most financially prosperous African American communities in America.

1921: Tulsa Race Riot also known Tulsa Race Massacre takes place from May 30th to June 1st, in the Greenwood community of Tulsa. -- May 30: Dick Rowland, an African American shoe shiner is accused of assaulting Sarah Page, a white elevator operator. May 31: Rowland was arrested and brought to the courthouse jail. Afternoon: The Tulsa Tribune printed a story, "Nab Negro for Attacking Girl in Elevator" that Rowland raped Page and printed the editorial, "To Lynch Negro Tonight." 4:00 pm: Talk and rumors of lynching Rowland had spread. Police and Fire commissions J.M. Adkison phoned to warn Sheriff Willard McCullough of a possible incident. 7:30: A large white mob, numbering in the hundreds, gathered at the courthouse demanding Rowland be released to them. 9:30 pm: The mob had grown to two thousand. Members of the Greenwood community, many World War I veterans, set up defenses at the courthouse in order to protect Rowland from any impending violence from the mob. 10:00 pm: A fight broke out and a gun was fired. The mob began attacking and shooting all African Americans. June 1 12:00-1:30 am: Gunfire occurred between the white and African American commercial businesses across Fisco yards. 1:00-4:00 am: Over 35 blocks were destroyed, including 1200 homes, and an estimated 300 African Americans were murdered. However, the exact number is unknown. 9:00 am: The Oklahoma National Guard arrived. 11:30 am: Government declared martial law, by this point most of the fighting had already stopped. The final altercation occurred at Noon when the mob fired on African Americans near the Santa Fe railroad tracks. The National guard gathered and arrested nearly all the Greenwood residents, over 6000, detaining them in the Convention Center, sports arenas, and fairgrounds. 6:00 pm: All businesses were ordered to close, and a curfew was put into effect beginning at 7:00. June 3: Martial law ended. African Americans were required to carry "green cards" to leave the detention centers until July. June 8-20: Governor James B. A. Robertson ordered an inquiry of events by a Grand Jury examining the role of the police and sheriff departments. The all-white jury indicted over 85 people, the majority African American, for rioting and illegally carrying weapons. Five city police officers, including the Tulsa Chief of Police, John Gustafson, were also indicted and later fired. June 8-July 30: 1400 lawsuits were filed by African Americans for damaged commercial and/or personal property. The insurance companies invoked a "riot clause" that dismissed almost all the claims. Rowland was released and was not charged for any crime.

1922 -- Mary E. Jones Parrish was hired by the Inter-Racial Commission to write an account of the Race Riot. She was a teacher and journalist living with her daughter in Tulsa at the time of the massacre. Parrish interviewed survivors of the riot, collecting oral histories, photographs and a listing of property loses, publishing her findings in Events of the Tulsa Disaster. This was the first book published about the race riot. A large reconstruction effort began in Greenwood, and 80 businesses opened.

1925 -- National Negro Business League holds national convention in Tulsa, celebrating the rebuilding of Greenwood.

1931 -- Buck Colbert Franklin writes an unpublished memoir of the massacre entitled: The Tulsa Riot and Three of its Victims. It was later published by his son, John Hope Franklin and grandson, John W. Franklin in 1997.

1946 -- The first general history of the riot was published by Loren L. Gill, from the University of Tulsa. Although conducting many oral histories and research, some of his conclusions were later found to be incorrect.

1975 -- The Tulsa Race War of 1921 by Rudia M. Halliburton, Jr. was published. Halliburton was a professor at Northeastern State University and his work featured a collection of photographs, many from his students, of the riot.

1997 -- The Tulsa Race Riot Commission is established to study the riot and recommended reparations for survivors and their descendants. The city didn't comply.

1998 -- The Commission recommends archeological search for mass graves. This was approved in February 1999. A potential mass grave was found in Oaklawn Cemetery.

2003 -- Court case, Alexander, et al., v. Oklahoma, et al, was filed by over 200 survivors of the massacre. The suit was denied because the statute of limitations had passed.

2005 -- The survivors and lawyers attempted to repeal the decision in the Supreme Court, but the Court decided not to accept a case.

2010 -- John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park opened in Greenwood to help memorialize and educate the community about the race massacre.
Provenance:
Acquired as a gift from The Tulsa Project, Inc. (Reginald Turner, J.D.Clement & The Lomax Company).
Rights:
The copyright law of the United States (title 17, United States Code) governs the making reproductions of copyrighted material. Any reproductions of these materials are not to be used for any purpose other than research or educational use. It is the responsibility of the user to pursue the copyright owner, The Tulsa Project, Inc . for permission to use and publish the materials from this collection for use beyond private study, scholarship or research. Any reproduction of materials of this collection must include the copyright notice: © The Tulsa Project, Inc.
Topic:
Race relations  Search this
Tulsa Race Massacre, Tulsa, Okla., 1921  Search this
Hate crimes  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Violence  Search this
Race riots  Search this
Justice  Search this
Activism  Search this
Law  Search this
Identity  Search this
American South  Search this
American West  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral history
Citation:
Guide to the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Oral History Collection, 2004-2007. National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAAHC.A2014.240
See more items in:
Guide to 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Oral History Collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-a2014-240

Memberships Application for Hattie

Collection Creator:
Junkin, Hattie Meyers, 1896-1985  Search this
Container:
Box 5, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
See more items in:
Hattie Meyers Junkin Papers
Hattie Meyers Junkin Papers / Series 3: General materials of Hattie Meyers Junkin
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-0171-ref142
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  • View Memberships Application for Hattie digital asset number 1

John H. Rogers 95th Aero Squadron Collection

Creator:
Rogers, John H.  Search this
Extent:
0.33 Cubic feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photograph albums
Correspondence
Memoirs
Date:
1917-1919, 1960s
Summary:
This collection consists of a photo album, a memoir, memorabilia, and military records and certificates pertaining to John H. Rogers and his service with the 95th Aero Squadron during World War I.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a nine by eleven inch photo album containing snapshots of the aircraft, including SPAD XIII (S.13) and Nieuport (France) 28; airfields; and personnel of the 95th Aero Squadron. The collection also contains a twenty-one page typewritten 1969 memoir by John Rogers, and a folder entitled, "World War I Memories of John H. Rogers, 1916-1918." This folder contains memorabilia including a program for dedication of the James Ely Miller Field, a 1971 letter from Eddie Rickenbacker to the widow of John Rogers, Rogers' military records and certificates, a First Reserve Aero Squadron Association newsletter, postcards and snapshots.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged according to type of material.
Biographical / Historical:
The 95th Aero Squadron, organized on August 20th, 1917, and demobilized on March 18th, 1919, was part of the 1st Pursuit Organization stationed in France on the Western Front during World War I. The squadron was assigned as a Day Pursuit (Fighter) Squadron and was the first American squadron to fly in combat, doing so on March 8th, 1918. The 95th Aero Squadron shot down 35 enemy aircraft and 12 observation balloons, participating in the following military campaigns: Champagne-Marne Defensive, Aisne-Marne Offensive, St. Mihiel Offensive and the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Among the squadron's pilots were six air aces and Lieutenant Quentin Roosevelt.
John H. Rogers (d. 1971) was a mechanic for the 95th Aero Squadron during World War I. Rogers was working for the Oldsmobile Motor Company in New York City as a mechanic in the Spring of 1917 when he quit his job and enlisted. On June 4, 1917, he was ordered to appear for duty. He trained as a solider at Wright Martin Flying Field in Mineola, New York, and in August of 1917 he sailed to France as part of the 2nd Reserve. In January 1918, he reported to the 95th Aero Squadron. He was Sergeant First Class and later promoted to Master Electrician (Me.E.) On February 14, 1919, he sailed back from France, arriving in New York on March 3, 1919, and was discharged from the Signal Corps Aviation Station in Mineola. After the war he worked as a mechanic in the garage business.
Provenance:
J. M. "Jack" Rogers, Gift, 2017, NASM.2017.0025
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
World War, 1914-1918 -- Aerial operations  Search this
95th Aero Squadron  Search this
SPAD XIII (S.13)  Search this
Nieuport (France) 28  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photograph albums
Correspondence
Memoirs
Citation:
John H. Rogers 95th Aero Squadron Collection, NASM.2017.0025, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2017.0025
See more items in:
John H. Rogers 95th Aero Squadron Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2017-0025
Online Media:

[Written Memoir of World War I by Rogers]

Collection Creator:
Rogers, John H.  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Collection Citation:
John H. Rogers 95th Aero Squadron Collection, NASM.2017.0025, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John H. Rogers 95th Aero Squadron Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2017-0025-ref1

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