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Ruth Leah Bunzel photographs of Quiche peoples of Guatemala

Creator:
Bunzel, Ruth Leah, 1898-1990  Search this
Extent:
49 Prints (silver gelatin)
110 Negatives (nitrate)
Culture:
Quiché Maya (Quiche)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Negatives
Photographs
Place:
Guatemala
Date:
1930-1932
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs probably made by Ruth Bunzel during her fieldwork among the Quiche in Chichicastenango, Guatemala, in 1930-32. Images include Quiche individuals and families, a church (probably the Church of Santo Tomás), a procession and ceremony, and landscapes.
Biographical/Historical note:
Ruth Leah Bunzel (1898-1990) started a career in anthropology after acquiring a secretarial job with Franz Boas at Columbia University in 1922. With support from Boas, Bunzel regularly traveled to the Southwest to study Zuni potters from 1924-1929. Studying under Boaz, she earned a Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1929. Her papers on Zuni ceremonialism as well as creation myths, kachinas, and poetry were published in the 47th Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology. From 1930 to 1932 she studied the Highland Mayan village of Chichicastenango and later published Chichicastenango, A Guatemalan Village (1952). She also conducted fieldwork in the village of Chamula in Chiapas, Mexico, and published a comparative study of the two villages entitled "The Role of Alcoholism in Two Central American Communities" (1940).
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 2007-10
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives holds the Ruth Lean Bunzel papers and drawings of Kachinas collected by Bunzel (MS 4609).
Correspondence between Bunzel and the BAE held in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 4846 and records of the Bureau of American Ethnology.
A photograph of Bunzel held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 92-35.
A video oral history of Bunzel, created as part of the "History of Anthropology Series" produced by the University of Florida's Department of Anthropology, is held in the Human Studies Film Archive in HSFA 89.10.8.
Restrictions:
Nitrate negatives are in cold storage and require advanced notice for viewing.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 2007-10, Ruth Leah Bunzel photographs of Quiche peoples of Guatemala, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.2007-10
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-2007-10

Photographs of Quiche peoples

Names:
Safford, William Edwin, 1859-1926  Search this
Extent:
3 Negatives (glass)
Culture:
Quiché Maya (Quiche)  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Photographs
Date:
circa 1890-1902
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs documenting Indigenous peoples of Guatemala and their daily activities, including painting ceramics, weaving, using a metate, and possibly carving. The photographs may have been collected by William Edwin Safford during his time in Peru and Bolivia or donated by Mary M. Owen with matching prints in 1902.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 134G
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs collected by William Edwin Safford are held in National Anthropological Archives MS 3366, Photo Lot 97, and Photo Lot 76-26.
Additional photographs donated by Mary Owen are held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 97.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pottery  Search this
Weaving  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 134, Photographs of Quiche peoples, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.134G
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-134g

Market in Quiche

Creator:
Sahlin, Carl Folke, 1885-1976  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sahlin, Carl Folke, 1885-1976  Search this
Extent:
1 Painting (37.8 x 28 cm.)
Culture:
Quiché Maya (Quiche)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Paintings
Artwork
Date:
1944
Scope and Contents:
The original cataloging indicated the artist's caption: "To the market in Quiche come Indians from all villages. The figure in the dark skirt is from Nahuala, the most Indian village in all Guatemala, where no white man is allowed overnight. The red and white huipile is from Patzia. Patzia was the place while I was in Guatemala where the Indians massacred a good part of the Ladino population.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7479 (part)
Local Note:
Watercolor on textured paper
Topic:
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Artwork
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 7479, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 7479 Carl Folke Sahlin paintings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms7479-ref1

Thomas T. Waterman negatives and photographs

Creator:
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), 1885-1936  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
12 Photographic prints (black and white)
12 Negatives (photographic) (black and white)
Culture:
Haida  Search this
Duwamish (Dwamish)  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Coast Salish  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Guatemala
California
Alaska
Washington
Date:
1921-1924
Summary:
These images were shot in California, Alaska, Washington, and Guatamala and feature images of Tolowa, Haida, Salish, and Quiché Maya (Quiché) Indians. Images include group portraits, daily activities, village scenes, and petrogylphs.
Scope and Contents:
The Waterman collection consists of photographic materials made by Waterman from 1921 to 1924 in California, Alaska, Washington State, and Guatemala. He made the bulk of the materials on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation while working in 1921 in California among the Tolowa and in Washington State among the Southern Coast Salish and Duwamish (Dwamish) and in 1922 in Alaska at Kasaan (Haida) village. Of particular note are the series of photographs of a Tolowa fisherman. The few remaining photographs date from 1923 and 1924 and depict Quiché Maya (Quiche) Indians in the Quetzaltenango Guatemalan highlands and an illustration from Waterman's contribution to the 1924 Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution.
Arrangement note:
Negatives: organized in envelopes; arranged by negative number

Prints: organized in folders; arranged by print number
Arrangement:
Negatives Arranged by negative number (N07288-N07289, N07291, N07295-N07300, N10859, N35256, N35848)

Photographs Arranged by photograph number (P04035-P04040, P04428-P04429, P05515, P05521, P37455, P37456)
Biographical/Historical note:
Born in Hamilton, Missouri, in 1885, Thomas Talbot Waterman grew up in Calfornia and was expected, like his father, to become an Episcopalian clergyman. After taking courses in phonetics and fieldwork with P.E. Goddard, Waterman instead chose to study anthropology and in 1913 received his Ph.D in anthropology at Columbia University under the direction of Franz Boas. From 1907 to 1921, he held both teaching and curatorial positions at the University of California and the University of Washington and from 1921 to 1922 briefly joined the staff of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation as a field collector. Waterman went on to hold positions at the National Museum of Guatemala, Fresno State College, University of Arizona, Territorial Normal College (Hawaii), and University of Hawaii. He is best known for bringing Ishi, the last surviving member of the Yahi people, from the town of Oroville, California, to the University of California Museum of Anthropology. Waterman died in Honolulu at the age of 50.
Provenance:
Historically, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation managed all photographic and related manuscript collections separately. This collection description represents current management practices of organizing and contextualizing related archival materials.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Copyright: National Museum of the American Indian
Topic:
Petroglyphs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Thomas T. Waterman negatives and photographs, 1921-1924, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.021
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-021

MS 3437 Nomina verbalia with their verb-bases. Extracted as examples for the Bureau of American Ethnology from (chiefly) North American languages

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
24 Pages
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Peoria  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Penobscot Indians  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Maya  Search this
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Passamaquoddy  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Tonkawa  Search this
Quiché Maya (Quiche)  Search this
Nahuatl  Search this
Quechua  Search this
Catawba  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1895
Scope and Contents:
Grammatical terms: Terms expressing actors, actions, etc. in the following dialects: Page: 2. Isleta 3. Arapaho 4. Nahuatl 5. Delaware 6. Penobscot 7. Passamaquoddy 8. Maya 9. Quiche 10. Kechua 11. Ojibwa 12. Kataba 13, 18, 24. Tonkawa 14. Dakota 15. Shawnee 16. Peoria 17. Blackfoot 19. Cree 20. Micmac 21. Peoria 22. Hidatsa 23. Wichita.
Includes 1 page (page 14) on Dakota and 1 page (page 22) on Hidatsa.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3437
Local Note:
autograph document signed
Topic:
Vocabularies -- American Indian  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Mi'kmaq  Search this
Illinois  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Blackfeet  Search this
Catawba Indians  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3437, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3437
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3437

Libro de Sermones Varios en Lengua Quiche. Compuesto por el Sr Fr Francisco Maldonado

Compiler:
Maldonado, Francisco Father  Search this
Creator:
de San Antonio, Miguel  Search this
de Lara, Lope Fernandez  Search this
de Zapata, Andres Fray  Search this
de Castellon, Nicholas Fray  Search this
de Arana, Sebastian Fray  Search this
de Thenas, Josep  Search this
Extent:
325 Pages
Culture:
K'iche' Maya (Quiché)  Search this
Kaqchikel Maya (Cakchiquel)  Search this
Quiché Maya (Quiche)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1690
Scope and Contents:
The book is apparently sermons and biblical passages translated into Quiche and Cakchiquel Maya during the 17th century. The sermons were written at different times and by different hands. It would also appear that Indians were responsible for the transcription of these Maya texts, since the Latin and Spanish titles often have obvious spelling errors. The book also contains various pages on "cures" for snake bites, etc. A short list of Quiche phrases and translations is contained in the first few pages. There are also two short poems, and a dedication to Pope Urban IV. The sermons bear the the names of some of the people who wrote them, and also of those who simply used them. They include: Miguel de San Antonio, Lope Fernandez de Lara, Fray Andres de Zapata, Fray Nicolas de Castellon, Fray Sebastian de Arana, and Josep de Thenas.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2262
Topic:
Medicine -- Maya  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2262, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2262
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2262
Online Media:

S. K. Lothrop negatives, photographs and lantern slides

Creator:
Lothrop, S. K. (Samuel Kirkland), 1892-1965  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1,188 Acetate negatives
3 Photographic prints
18 Lantern slides
Culture:
Maya (archaeological culture)  Search this
Yámana (Yagán/Yahgan)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Selk'nam (Ona)  Search this
Kaqchikel Maya (Cakchiquel)  Search this
Tz'utuhil Maya (Tzutuhil/Zutigil)  Search this
Quiché Maya (Quiche)  Search this
Central America  Search this
Island Caribbean  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
K'iche' Maya (Quiché)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Inka (Inca) (archaeological)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Acetate negatives
Photographic prints
Lantern slides
Photographs
Negatives
Place:
North America
Zuni (N.M.) -- Photographs
Tierra del Fuego (Argentina and Chile)
Date:
1915-1928
Scope and Contents:
The S.K. Lothrop collection primarily contains negatives, photographic prints, and lantern slides made by Lothrop while employed by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Lothrop traveled on behalf of the Museum to New Mexico, Argentina, Chile, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Peru. The four New Mexico negatives in this collection date from 1915, before Lothrop worked for the Museum, and depict scenes around Zuni. During his 1924 trip to El Salvador, Lothrop photographed volcanos, archaeological sites, antiquities, the landscape, villages, and native peoples engaged in pottery and rope making, food preparation, house building, and ceremonial activities. The 1925 views particularly concentrate on Argentina (but also Chile and Peru). The Argentina materials include views made in the Tierra del Fuego (also part of Chile), including depictions of the daily lives and ceremonial activities of natives peoples of Tierra del Fuego--Selk'nam (Ona) and Yámana (Yagán/Yahgan); the Patagonia landscape; and excavations undertaken by the Museum's La Plata Expedition. The 1928 Guatemala views include depictions of Mayan ruins of Zaculeu and of Tz'utuhil Maya (Tzutuhil/Zutigil), Quiché Maya (Quiche), and Kaqchikel Maya (Cakchiquel) people engaged in weaving, rope making, canoeing, and ceremonial actitivies. The collection also contains photographs made by Lothrop before he worked for the Museum, including 1915 views of effigy mounds in Wisconsin and views at Hopi, Acoma, and Santa Clara; 1917 views of Panama, Honduras, Costa Rica, and El Salvador; and 1918 views of Guatemala, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, and Nicaragua.
Arrangement note:
Lantern slides Arranged by lantern slide numbers (L00101-L00103, L00577-L00579, L00584-L00585, L00589, L00597, L00622-L00629)

Negatives Arranged by negative numbers (N09139-N09140, N09147-N09308, N09316-N09389, N09760-N09997, N10310-N10577, N10803, N14031-N14212, N19372-N19620)

Prints Arranged by print numbers (P10108-P10110)
Biographical/Historical note:
Samuel Kirkland Lothrop was an archaeologist and photographer who extensively traveled and worked throughout Central America and South America. George Gustav Heye originally hired Lothrop to research native Guatemalan and El Salvadoran textiles and pottery. He subsequently excavated on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian in such places as the Tierra del Fuego. Here he photographed indigenous communities who would not survive the twentieth century as a distinct culture group. In 1923, he also photographed the activities of the Hendricks-Hodge Hawikku Expedition excavations. In addition to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, the Peabody Museum and the Carnegie Institute sponsored his research and archaeological work.
Provenance:
Historically, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation managed all photographic and related manuscript collections separately. This collection description represents current management practices of organizing and contextualizing related archival materials.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Copyright: National Museum of the American Indian
Topic:
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of Central America -- El Salvador -- Photographs  Search this
Fuegians -- Social life and customs -- Photographs  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Argentina -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lantern slides
Photographs
Negatives
Photographic prints
Citation:
S. K. Lothrop collection of negatives, photographs and lantern slides, 1915-1928, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.010
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-010

Head scarf/Bandana

Culture/People:
Quiché Maya (Quiche)  Search this
Collector:
Olympia Altuve (Olympia Altruve), Non-Indian  Search this
Previous owner:
Olympia Altuve (Olympia Altruve), Non-Indian  Search this
Seller:
Olympia Altuve (Olympia Altruve), Non-Indian  Search this
Expedition:
Mrs. Thea Heye Guatemala Expedition (1928) (Thea Heye - Lothrop Expedition)  Search this
Expedition leader:
Samuel Kirkland Lothrop (S.K. Lothrop/SKL), Non-Indian, 1892-1965  Search this
Expedition sponsor:
Thea Heye (Thea Kowne/Mrs. Dorothea Page/Mrs. George Gustav Heye), Non-Indian, 1888-1935  Search this
Object Name:
Head scarf/Bandana
Media/Materials:
Cotton yarn
Techniques:
Woven
Dimensions:
70 x 57 cm
Object Type:
Clothing/Garments: Headwear and Headdresses
Native Term:
tzute
Place:
Nahualá; Nahualá Municipality; Sololá Department, Southwest Region; Guatemala
Catalog Number:
16/666
Barcode:
160666.000
See related items:
Pipil
Clothing/Garments: Headwear and Headdresses
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6fd04653a-3d9f-4d90-9134-23544724313d
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_172362
Online Media:

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