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"Prints- Technique and Expression"

Collection Creator:
Ivins, William Mills, 1881-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 11, Folder 15-16
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1954
Collection Restrictions:
Use of unmicrofilmed material in the holdings of the Archives of American Art requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C., facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
William Mills Ivins papers, 1878-1964. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
William Mills Ivins papers
William Mills Ivins papers / Series 2: Writings
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e425ef82-bc13-44b5-a350-89c7e2715fc7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-ivinwill-ref536

"Prints: Technique and Expression"

Collection Creator:
Ivins, William Mills, 1881-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 14, Folder 34
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1954
Collection Restrictions:
Use of unmicrofilmed material in the holdings of the Archives of American Art requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C., facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
William Mills Ivins papers, 1878-1964. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
William Mills Ivins papers
William Mills Ivins papers / Series 3: Publications
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw95facb079-0b4b-4464-84ee-554a5a9e4c45
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-ivinwill-ref644

Folder 22 Prints: Technique and History

Container:
Box 4 of 17
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 324, Cooper-Hewitt Museum. Office of Public Programs, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 1: PROGRAMS, 1976-1982. ARRANGED ALPHABETICALLY BY SEMESTER. / Box 4
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0324-refidd1e1901

Larry Lebby Interview

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Lebby, Larry  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1982
Scope and Contents:
Artist Larry Lebby talks about what is important when producing art, including composition and medium, which is dependent on the subject and message he wants to convey through his artwork. Lebby explains his fascination with producing intricacies; his influences, including Michelangelo; and the process of printmaking and stone lithography in detail. He also talks about teaching art appreciation, producing work daily and specific pieces of his artwork.
Interview. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Dated 19820928.
General:
Title created by ACMA based on transcription from physical asset and contents of recording.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Lithography  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Larry Lebby Interview, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-054, Item ACMA AV003291
See more items in:
Here, Look at Mine! Exhibition Records
Here, Look at Mine! Exhibition Records / Audiovisual Materials
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa77bdba572-e749-4994-8d31-82e923a4c2a4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-054-ref544

Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
Corcoran Gallery--Dupont Center  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Bronson, David  Search this
Fralin, Frances  Search this
McNeill, Lloyd  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley, 1947-  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Atlanta (Ga.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show focuses on the formation of Workshop by Lou Stovall and Lloyd McNeill from its origins at the Corcoran Gallery of Art to its current location in northwest Washington, D.C. Stovall's and McNeill's poster work, the development of Stovall's silkscreen process, landscape designs, and use of color are also described. In interview clips, Francis Fralin and David Bronson provide memories about Stovall, McNeill, and Workshop. M. Murray provides the narration.
Music, narration, and interview clips edited for slide show. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. AV003444-1 and AV003509-2: music, narration, and interview clips. AV003444-2: narration and interview clips only. AV003509-1: constant beeps over music, narration, and interview clips. AV003444 labeled final mix. Dated 19830902 [AV003444]. Undated [AV003509].
Biographical / Historical:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Stovall Workshop Inc. was formed as a result of a poster collaboration between printmaker Lou Stovall and designer Lloyd McNeill in 1966. Printmaking, sculpture, photography, and furniture making were directed by Stovall in Workshop, first located at the Concoran Gallery of Art [Corcoran Gallery Dupont Circle]. By 1973, Stovall moved Workshop to northwest DC.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003444-2

ACMA AV003509-1

ACMA AV003509-2
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Posters  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Citation:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003444-1
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e17c3361-7603-4634-98bb-4502a75a18ef
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref69

Lou Stovall

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Capilongo, Christopher  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Artist Lou Stovall demonstrates and speaks about his silk screen printing process and use of color in detail. He also discusses his ability and passion for drawing.
Short documentary. Audio only [most likely there is related 16mm film which has not been digitized yet]. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Dated 19940329.
Biographical / Historical:
Lou Stovall is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Citation:
Lou Stovall, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV000957
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7ac2fe4b6-8d8d-41a6-b786-70862f5739f2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref80

Lou Stovall Interview - Silk Screen Process

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Capilongo, Christopher  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley, 1947-  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Interview with Lou Stovall for documentary in which Stovall demonstrates and speaks about his silk screen printing process and use of color in detail. During the interview, Stovall discusses his ability and passion for drawing, hiding the human figure in landscape compositions, working with stencils and proofing strips, details of the reductive printing process, integration of color in his work, silk screen printing as a technical medium, art intelligence, aesthetics in his work and other artists, where he gets his inspiration, and Sam Gilliam's work and abstract art.
Interview for short documentary titled Lou Stovall. Audio only. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. AV003305: audio skips and minimal distortions. Dated 19830627.
Biographical / Historical:
Lou Stovall Interview - Silk Screen Process is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003305-2

ACMA AV003281
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Citation:
Lou Stovall Interview - Silk Screen Process, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003305-1
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bb229130-69d9-455f-8f72-b9ba1e565722
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref81

Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Walk Thru Tour with Lou and Di

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley, 1947-  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Lou and Di Stovall walk through the exhibition 'Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall' with Zora Martin-Felton. The Stovalls talk about various pieces of their artwork displayed throughout the exhibition. They also speak of their artistic process and style.
Exhibiton tour. Sound only. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. AV001364: dated 19830923. AV001346: dated 19830925.
Biographical / Historical:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour was created for an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Di Stovall, also known as Di Bagley Stovall and Di Bagley, was born in Columbus, Georgia in 1947. As a child, she loved collecting small things, animate and inanimate. Stovall studied with Barbara Pound, a painter known for landscapes, oil, and watercolor, throughout her childhood and teenage years. In the late 1960s, Stovall was educated at Columbus College and Bradley Museum, both in Georgia, before moving to Washington, D.C. to attend Corcoran School of Art. Stovall is a noted master of the miniature, creating representational and abstract images painted in absorbing detail. Although she creates drawings, prints, and watercolors, she prefers to work with acrylic on paper to capture the minute detail she seeks. Stovall's work also includes acrylic paint on glass, hand-crafted jewelry, and wooden cabinetry. Overall, Stovall's work is colorful, whimsical, and sophisticated. Color is extremely important to her. In 1971, she married Lou Stovall, a printmaker.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001364_B

ACMA AV001346_A

ACMA AV001346_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Series Citation:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV001364_A
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7ab807585-83ae-47f0-957b-c65734f4e478
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref83

Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Exhibition Tour for Students led by Brian Jones

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley, 1947-  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1984
Scope and Contents:
Brian Jones led an interactive tour of the exhibition 'Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall' for JHS students during February 1984.
Exhibiton tour - educational program. Sound only. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Dated 198402.
Biographical / Historical:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour was created for an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Di Stovall, also known as Di Bagley Stovall and Di Bagley, was born in Columbus, Georgia in 1947. As a child, she loved collecting small things, animate and inanimate. Stovall studied with Barbara Pound, a painter known for landscapes, oil, and watercolor, throughout her childhood and teenage years. In the late 1960s, Stovall was educated at Columbus College and Bradley Museum, both in Georgia, before moving to Washington, D.C. to attend Corcoran School of Art. Stovall is a noted master of the miniature, creating representational and abstract images painted in absorbing detail. Although she creates drawings, prints, and watercolors, she prefers to work with acrylic on paper to capture the minute detail she seeks. Stovall's work also includes acrylic paint on glass, hand-crafted jewelry, and wooden cabinetry. Overall, Stovall's work is colorful, whimsical, and sophisticated. Color is extremely important to her. In 1971, she married Lou Stovall, a printmaker.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001363_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Students  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Series Citation:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV001363_A
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7d127bd1a-918f-4492-877e-8590d3187edb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref84

Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Exhibition Tour led by Brian Jones

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley, 1947-  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1984
Scope and Contents:
Brian Jones led an interactive tour, possibly for students, of the exhibition 'Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall.'
Exhibiton tour - educational program. Sound only. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour was created for an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Di Stovall, also known as Di Bagley Stovall and Di Bagley, was born in Columbus, Georgia in 1947. As a child, she loved collecting small things, animate and inanimate. Stovall studied with Barbara Pound, a painter known for landscapes, oil, and watercolor, throughout her childhood and teenage years. In the late 1960s, Stovall was educated at Columbus College and Bradley Museum, both in Georgia, before moving to Washington, D.C. to attend Corcoran School of Art. Stovall is a noted master of the miniature, creating representational and abstract images painted in absorbing detail. Although she creates drawings, prints, and watercolors, she prefers to work with acrylic on paper to capture the minute detail she seeks. Stovall's work also includes acrylic paint on glass, hand-crafted jewelry, and wooden cabinetry. Overall, Stovall's work is colorful, whimsical, and sophisticated. Color is extremely important to her. In 1971, she married Lou Stovall, a printmaker.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001366_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Series Citation:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV001366_A
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa73e0a8c29-ade9-4901-af28-d9fc855066f0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref85

Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Jones, Brian  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
Corcoran School of Art (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Howard University  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
McNeill, Lloyd  Search this
Porter, James A. (James Amos), 1905-1970  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley, 1947-  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
5 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Georgia
Springfield (Mass.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Brian Jones provides the narration for the self guided audio tour for the exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall. The life history of Lou and Di Stovall and their work with the Stovall Workshop Inc., Lou's relationship with Sam Gilliam and Lloyd McNeill, Lou's work with the Corcoran Gallery, Di's education at the Corcoran School of Art, the meaning of the poster, and Lou's passion for drawing are briefly discussed. Individual works - posters, prints, and fine art - by Lou and Di, including a collaboration piece by Gilliam and Lou, are described.
Audio tour script - unedited audio narration. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. AV003296-3: sound distorted. Dated 19831026, 19831027. AV001367 and AV001377: dated 198310. AV001368 and AV001369: dated 19831020. AV001365: undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour was created for an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Di Stovall, also known as Di Bagley Stovall and Di Bagley, was born in Columbus, Georgia in 1947. As a child, she loved collecting small things, animate and inanimate. Stovall studied with Barbara Pound, a painter known for landscapes, oil, and watercolor, throughout her childhood and teenage years. In the late 1960s, Stovall was educated at Columbus College and Bradley Museum, both in Georgia, before moving to Washington, D.C. to attend Corcoran School of Art. Stovall is a noted master of the miniature, creating representational and abstract images painted in absorbing detail. Although she creates drawings, prints, and watercolors, she prefers to work with acrylic on paper to capture the minute detail she seeks. Stovall's work also includes acrylic paint on glass, hand-crafted jewelry, and wooden cabinetry. Overall, Stovall's work is colorful, whimsical, and sophisticated. Color is extremely important to her. In 1971, she married Lou Stovall, a printmaker.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003296-1

ACMA AV003296-2

ACMA AV003296-3

ACMA AV001367

ACMA AV001377

ACMA AV001368

ACMA AV001369

ACMA AV001365
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Posters  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Series Citation:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003450
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa731fd1d52-7513-46ba-85bd-f42d01585523
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref68

Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show Interviews

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
Corcoran Gallery--Dupont Center  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Bronson, David  Search this
Cook, Dana  Search this
Davis, Gene, 1920-1985  Search this
Fralin, Frances  Search this
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
Hopps, Walter  Search this
McGowin, Ed, 1938-  Search this
McNeill, Lloyd  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley, 1947-  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Atlanta (Ga.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Interviews with Dana Cook, Francis Fralin, and David Bronson for Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show, which focused on the formation of Workshop by Lou Stovall and Lloyd McNeill from its origins at the Corcoran Gallery of Art to its current location in northwest Washington, D.C. Cook, an illustrator and printmaker, discusses her experience working with and learning from Stovall at Workshop. Fralin speaks of Walter Hopps' outreach program idea leading to a relationship between Stovall and the Corcoran Gallery of Art, development of the Workshop at the Corcoran Gallery Dupont Circle, Stovall's and McNeill's poster collaboration, Stovall's silkscreening and drawing, Di Stovall's art and imagination, and other Workshop and Corcoran artists, including Sam Gilliam, David Bronson and Gene Davis. Bronson, a technician and craftsman, discusses his role at Workshop: helping to set up Workshop at Corcoran, learning silk screen process, working in woodshop, and creating prints for artists, including Ed McGowin for Name Change exhibition at Baltimore Museum of Art. All speak of Stovall's personality as a person, teacher and leader, particularly his perfectionist nature and high standards.
Interviews for slide show about Stovall Workshop Inc. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Dana Cook interview dated 19830801: AV003309-1. Frances Fralin interview dated 19830809: AV003309-1 and AV003309-2. David Bronson interview dated 19830810: AV003314. All recordings have some distortions or skips in sound recording.
Biographical / Historical:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression from posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Stovall Workshop Inc. was formed as a result of a poster collaboration between printmaker Lou Stovall and designer Lloyd McNeill in 1966. Printmaking, sculpture, photography, and furniture making were directed by Stovall in Workshop, first located at the Concoran Gallery of Art [Corcoran Gallery Dupont Circle]. By 1973, Stovall moved Workshop to northwest DC.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003309-2

ACMA AV003314
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Posters  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show Interviews, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003309-1
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e787faf3-2445-469d-92c0-fc3ed72efc9e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref70

Lou Stovall Sound Rolls and Narration

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Capilongo, Christopher  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
10 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Outtakes
Ambient sounds
Sound effects recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Sound rolls for short documentary titled Lou Stovall in which Stovall demonstrates and speaks about his silk screen printing process and use of color in detail. Interviews, narration, ambient sounds, foley sound effects, and demonstration of screen printing process contained on sound rolls. During the interview segments, Stovall discusses his ability and passion for drawing, working with stencils and proofing strips, details of the reductive printing process, mixing and integrating of color in his work, and silk screen printing as a technical medium. Some of the footage, particularly AV003285, AV003287 and AV003288, consists of almost exclusively demonstration [sounds of the screen printing process].
Sound rolls and narration for short documentary titled Lou Stovall. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Audio only. Most likely there is film which syncs with sound rolls, except AV003276 [no camera/image according to statement at beginning of sound roll]. AV003506: Sound Roll 1. AV003288: Sound Roll 2. AV003285: Sound Roll 3. AV003276: Sound Roll 4. AV003313: Sound Roll 5. AV003498: Sound Roll 6. AV003287: Sound Roll 7. AV003303: Sound Roll 8. AV003289: Sound Roll 9. AV003447: Lou Stovall Narration [distortion at beginning of recording]. Dated 19830803 [AV003506], 19830804 [AV003276, AV003285, AV003288, AV003498], 19830805 [AV003287, AV003303], 19830824 [AV003289]. Undated [AV003313, AV003447].
Biographical / Historical:
Lou Stovall Sound Rolls and Narration is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003285

ACMA AV003287

ACMA AV003288

ACMA AV003289

ACMA AV003303

ACMA AV003313

ACMA AV003447

ACMA AV003498

ACMA AV003506
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Outtakes
Ambient sounds
Sound effects recordings
Citation:
Lou Stovall Sound Rolls and Narration, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003276
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa73ab81cb4-e843-4d1e-a8d1-87f13e796058
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref82

Print Council of America records

Creator:
Print Council of America  Search this
Names:
Print Council of America. Newsletter  Search this
Degas, Edgar, 1834-1917  Search this
Fine, Ruth, 1941-  Search this
Haverkamp Begemann, Egbert  Search this
Ostrow, Stephen E.  Search this
Reed, Sue Welsh  Search this
Extent:
24.5 Linear feet
3.02 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Photographs
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Date:
1951-2020
Summary:
The records of the Print Council of America measure 24.5 linear feet and 3.02 GB, and date from 1951 to 2020. The collection includes administrative files, correspondence and subject files, interviews, some in digital format, exhibition and project files, financial records, and printed materials that document the council's founding and activities as a non-profit, professional organization of print specialists.
Scope and Contents:
The records of the Print Council of America measure 24.5 linear feet and 3.02 GB, and date from 1951 to 2020. The collection includes administrative files, correspondence and subject files, interviews, some in digital format, exhibition and project files, financial records, and printed materials that document the council's founding and activities as a non-profit, professional organization of print specialists.

Administrative files consist of general administrative records and files for memberships, board of directors, trustees, committees, and digital photographs.

Correspondence and subject files contain a mixture of correspondence, writings, and printed material for various correspondents and topics.

The oral history project consists of twenty digital sound recordings and transcripts of interviews with council members Alan Fern, Ruth Fine, Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann, Stephen E. Ostrow, Sue Reed, Robert Waddell, and others.

Files for exhibitions include American Prints Today 1959 and 1962 , the VII São Paulo Biennial exhibition Eleven American Printmakers (1963), the New York World's Fair of 1964-1965, and 30 Contemporary American Prints (1964). Project files include documentation for the Index to Print Catalogues Raisonné database, other publishing and research projects, surveys, a print collection in India, the People-to-People Program, the sales of an Edgar Degas work, and project proposals.

Financial records consist of cash vouchers, check stub books, financial reports, disbursement and cash receipt ledgers, The Lessing and Edith Rosenwald Foundation grant information, paid bills, and tax information. In printed materials are issues of Print Council's Newsletter, press releases, print sales and exhibition catalogs, reprints of advertisements, informational flyers created by the council, and a booklet marking the council's 50th anniversary.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as seven series.

Series 1: Administrative Files, 1955-2016 (9.2 linear feet; Boxes 1-7, 24-28, OV 29; 0.26 gigabytes, ER01)

Series 2: Correspondence and Subject Files, 1953-2016 (5.9 linear feet; Boxes 7-12)

Series 3: Oral History Project, 2006-2016 (0.4 linear feet; Box 13; 2.76 gigabytes, ER02-ER20)

Series 4: Exhibition Files, 1956-2005 (3.0 linear feet; Boxes 13-16, OV 29)

Series 5: Project Files, 1956-2013 (3.4 linear feet; Boxes 16-19, OV 29)

Series 6: Financial Records, 1956-1995 (1.5 linear feet; Boxes 19-21)

Series 7: Printed Materials, 1951-2016 (1.1 linear feet; Boxes 21-22)
Biographical / Historical:
The Print Council of America (est. 1956- ) is a non-profit, professional organization of print specialists in Boston, Massachusetts.

The idea of a print council began in 1954 when a group of prominent art collectors, curators, and scholars gathered in New York to discuss creating a national organization that could promote prints and print collecting. After much discussion, by-laws and other legal documentation were drawn up by Joshua Binion Cahn, a legal advisor for the Print Council of America, to establish the organization. Some of the earliest members of the council, including Adelyn Breeskin, Gustav von Groschwitz, Una Johnson, William Lieberman, A. Hyatt Mayor, Elizabeth Mongan, Paul J. Sachs, and Carl Zigrosser, were led by Lessing J. Rosenwald, an art collector and son of Julius Rosenwald, who was part owner of Sears, Roebuck and Company.

Rosenwald's mission was to "foster the creation, dissemination, and appreciation of fine prints, old and new," and to encourage and professionalize the preservation, administration, and study of print collections in the United States and Canada. Eventually the organization evolved to become an authority on print standards, educating print professionals and collectors on how to prevent fraudulent practices by learning ways to identify authentic or "original" prints. As an authority on prints, the council published numerous guides and directories of print resources. One of the council's most notable accomplishments was the compilation of European, American, and Japanese print resources into the Index of Print Catalogues Raisonné online database. The council also aimed to provide its members with an avenue to share ideas through holding annual meetings. After the closing of the organization's New York office in 1973, annual and semi-annual meetings continued to be a valuable resource for members.

Today, the council continues to provide educational tools and resources for print professionals.
Provenance:
The Print Council of America records were donated in multiple installments from 1981 to 2020 via former council presidents Andrew Robinson, Sue Reed, Jay Fisher, Marjorie B. Cohn, and James A. Ganz and in 2020 via Jane Myers McNamara, Coordinator, Oral History Program.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of born-digital records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Occupation:
Art dealers  Search this
Topic:
Curators -- United States  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Prints  Search this
Prints -- societies, etc  Search this
Prints -- Technique -- United States  Search this
Function:
Arts organizations
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Photographs
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Citation:
Print Council of America records, 1951-2020. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.princoun
See more items in:
Print Council of America records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw91764af3b-0da1-43a4-a5b7-9d4c8bab3662
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-princoun
Online Media:

Screen Printing Demonstration

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents:
Screen printing demonstration and hands-on instruction.
Workshop. AV003171: Workshop from 000917-000943 and 001011-001454 [also on recording: Santa Claus in Anacostia and Footage of Anacostia Neighborhood]. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Transcribed from physical asset: appears to be an edit master or work print with b-roll. Undated.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Screen Printing Demonstration, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV003171
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f6fdf452-d4b6-4e3e-98c0-4418fd3de495
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref604

Letter to Thomas Wilson about Graphic art Print techniques

Creator:
Koehler, S. R. (Sylvester Rosa), 1837-1900  Search this
Addressee:
Wilson, Thomas  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
4 Pages
Container:
Box 26a, Folder 388
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1897
Scope and Contents:
Concern graphic art print techniques.
Collection Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Graphic arts  Search this
Collection Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Department of Anthropology records / Series 17: Division of Ethnology / 17.1: Manuscript and Pamphlet File / Inventions
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ccbfa4b7-f8ba-4f65-bc2d-6b47aecac742
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0311-ref15733

Michael Eden on Bloom Vase

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2014-11-25T20:24:34.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_05dBwtN4Fyc

3D Scanning the Carnegie Mansion

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2014-10-10T13:43:42.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_jUFkGlTU6n0

Helen Ludwig papers, 1937-1999

Creator:
Ludwig, Helen, 1911-  Search this
Type:
Sketchbooks
Topic:
Painting -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women art teachers  Search this
Women illustrators  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7924
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210092
AAA_collcode_ludwhele
Theme:
Women
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210092

Peter Milton papers, 1962-1983

Creator:
Milton, Peter Winslow, 1930-  Search this
Subject:
Albers, Josef  Search this
Hooven, Peter  Search this
Finkelstein, Irving L.  Search this
McNulty, Kneeland  Search this
Peterdi, Gabor  Search this
Maryland Institute, College of Art  Search this
Franz Bader Gallery  Search this
Associated American Artists  Search this
Print Club (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Topic:
Prints -- Technique -- United States  Search this
Prints, American  Search this
Prints -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8325
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210497
AAA_collcode_miltpete
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210497

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