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Nisei Political Activists: The Stories of Five Japanese American Women, Thesis

Collection Creator:
Uyehara, Grayce  Search this
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1999
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Grayce Uyehara Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
See more items in:
Grayce Uyehara Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep885d3382f-9711-49a6-9495-a4998fe1c152
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-1480-ref4

Vigil, Cleofes, Political, Activist, Poet, Musician (1917-1992)

Collection Creator:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Container:
Box 28, Folder 37
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1992, 1994
Scope and Contents note:
(note to TYF from Vicente [Martinez?], 06/30/1994; typescript of eulogy for Cleofes Vigil given by Vicente Martinez, circa 1992; clippings)
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material, 1965-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material / Series 1: Subject Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97f868f25-f8ef-4641-a3e2-11215337e5cc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-ybartoma-ref1770

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Michelle Jacobs

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in Washington, D.C., attorney Michelle Jacobs (born 1954 NY) spoke about her early life, family, education, and work as a law professor as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Jacobs expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Jacobs talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Jacobs described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980904. Second date notation on asset: Dec. 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000162_B

ACMA AV000163
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Michelle Jacobs, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000162_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa72e0a1460-7a1b-4beb-bdbd-290bce57bcac
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref12

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Denise Rolark-Barnes

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office in Washington, D.C., Denise Rolark-Barnes (born 1954 DC) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Rolark-Barnes expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Rolark-Barnes talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Rolark-Barnes described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971216. Second date notation on asset: April 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000167_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Dr. Denise Rolark Barnes, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000167_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa71130a798-8989-4eed-85a4-c75d166e5d94
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref15

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Paula Walker Madison

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office in NY, Paula Walker Madison (born 1952 NY) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She talked about her work as a journalist and news director. Madison explained how she identifies herself. She expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Madison talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Madison described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Undated.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000172_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Paula Walker Madison, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000172_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa71aa21d7e-2952-4250-8bfc-218633af2fec
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref19

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Delna White

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office in Washington, D.C., Delna White (born 1967 CA) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. White expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. White talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. White described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971015. Second date notation on asset: Dec. 1997.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000173_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Delna White, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000173_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa75097b612-ec02-4e51-8f19-2f5bf3b4df9c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref20

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Melissa Bradley

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office in Washington, D.C., Melissa Bradley (born 1968 NJ) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Bradley expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Bradley talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Bradley described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971101.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000174_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Melissa Bradley, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000174_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c5e14dbe-8504-4ef9-9ff3-13868c17f9b4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref21

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Valerie Wesley

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in Washington, D.C., Valerie Wesley (born 1947 CT) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Wesley expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Wesley talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Wesley described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971018. Second date notation on asset: Nov. 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000175_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Valerie Wesley, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000175_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7b829ae42-0d6b-438c-bf1a-cb949c56a18e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref22

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Alberta Brasfield

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office in Washington, D.C., Alberta Brasfield (born 1930s VA) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Brasfield expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Brasfield talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Brasfield described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980203. Second date notation on asset: Nov. 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000176_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Alberta Brasfield, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000176_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7368375e3-4508-416a-bdac-8121b526ca7c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref23

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Margaret Boyer

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in Oakland, CA., Margaret Boyer (born 1925 WVA) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Boyer expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Boyer talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Boyer described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980203. Second date notation on asset: April 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000177_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Margaret Boyer, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000177_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa76673774e-d429-49ef-b969-fc51d82a8074
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref24

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Aurelia Richie Downey

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her home in Greenbelt, MD., Aurelia Richie Downey (born 1917 VA) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Downey expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Downey talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Downey described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Transcribed from AV000178: 3 of 3. Transcribed from AV000179: 1 of 3. Dated 19980618.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000179_A

ACMA AV000179_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Aurelia Richie Downey, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000178
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa708042bf6-54e7-4714-915c-eae2ed73bbb7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref25

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Ophelia T. Pinkard

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her home in Washington, D.C., Ophelia T. Pinkard (born 1917 IL) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Pinkard expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Pinkard talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Pinkard described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980623. Second date notation on asset: Sept. 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000180_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Ophelia T. Pinkard, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000180_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7cab88436-2c9b-4257-895e-b0f1171970aa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref26

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Pauline J. Jones

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her home in Washington, D.C, Pauline J. Jones (born 1908 MD) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Jones expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Jones talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Jones described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. AV000181 dated 19981101. AV000182: dated 19980701.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000181_B

ACMA AV000182
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Pauline J. Jones, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000181_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f40024f3-634e-4b57-802e-d0c8a001d773
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref27

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Vera Lee Clanton

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her home in San Francisco, CA.,Vera Lee Clanton (born 1918 TX) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Clanton expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Clanton talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Clanton described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980423.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000183_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Vera Lee Clanton, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000183_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa709d00ada-3193-4121-a762-18a67a302103
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref28

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Margaret Taylor Goss Burroughs

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed at DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago, IL., Margaret Taylor Goss Burroughs spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Burroughs expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Burroughs talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Burroughs described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. AV000184 and AV000185: same content. Dated 19980810.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000184_B

ACMA AV000185_A

ACMA AV000185_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Margaret Taylor Goss Burroughs, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000184_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa761a2b4f0-0516-4291-b3bd-8d6467ad3bc7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref29

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Irma Smith

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her home in New Carrollton, MD., Irma Smith (born 1930 NY) explained what she has done or does to bring about change in the black community; and described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources. These are the only two topics/questions covered on this recording of Audrey Brown's interview with Irma Smith; location/status of rest of interview unknown. The remainder of this recording consists of a woman preacher speaking of the Book of John, adultery, sin, and mercy.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971210.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000187_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Irma Smith, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000187_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c2dda572-ce57-40b3-9f89-877e5aa63a0d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref31

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Gloria R. Smith

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office in Battle Creek, MI., Gloria R. Smith (born 1934 MI) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Smith expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Smith talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Smith described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980807.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000188_B
General:
Title created by ACM staff based on project/exhibition name and interviewee's name.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Gloria R. Smith, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000188_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa721925801-8355-4403-9590-8eb795cb884b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref32

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Jackie Ryan

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her store in Los Angeles, CA ., Jackie Ryan (born 1937 CA) - sister of Mary Kimbrough, also interviewed for this project - spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Ryan expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Ryan talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Ryan described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Name on release form: Jacqueline Ryan. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980425.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000189_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Jackie Ryan, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000189_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa782950466-9168-4f8a-a143-b3300a4c5f62
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref33

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Bessie Rivers Grayson

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in in her home in Huntsville, AL., Bessie Rivers Grayson (born 1925 AL) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Grayson expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Grayson talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Grayson described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980628.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000192_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Bessie Rivers Grayson, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000192_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c0b913a4-d70f-4250-9ea0-75e43992d288
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref35

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Pearline Gilpin

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in in her home in Huntsville, AL., Pearline Gilpin (born 1936 Jamaica W.I.) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She talked about her Jamaican ancestry and working as a midwife. Gilpin explained how she identifies herself. She expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Gilpin talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Gilpin described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980628.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000193_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Pearline Gilpin, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000193_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e3508032-0db5-4f3a-96ac-44a7f4a1ae22
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref36

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