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MS 2823 Piegan Blackfoot texts collected by Truman Michelson

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Duvall, David C., 1877-1911  Search this
Henry No Bear  Search this
Pablo, George  Search this
Extent:
161 Pages
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Date:
1910 June-July
Scope and Contents:
Stories in Piegan Blackfoot with English translations collected by Truman Michelson. The narratives are from dictaphone recordings by various Blackfoot speakers including Henry No Bear, Black Bear, Big Moon, Bear Medicine, and George Pablo. Michelson had David C. Duvall, another Blackfoot speaker, listen to the recordings. Most of the texts are transcriptions of the stories as redictated by Duvall and some include his English interlineal translations. Also present are notes on vocabulary from the stories.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2823
Local Note:
Title changed from "Piegan Blackfoot texts, apparently myths most with free translations June-July, 1910" 4/2/2014.
Related Materials:
Michelson's wax cylinder recordings are at the Library of Congress American Folklife Center.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Blackfoot  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Citation:
Manuscript 2823, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2823
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2823
Online Media:

MS 2826 Three Piegan Blackfoot stories in English collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Pablo, George  Search this
Mountain Chief, 1848-1942  Search this
White Swan, Julie  Search this
Duvall, David C., 1877-1911  Search this
Extent:
51 Pages
Culture:
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
1910 June-July
Scope and Contents:
Three handwritten Piegan Blackfoot stories in English, collected by Truman Michelson in Montana in 1910. Contents: "The Beaver-Bundle," by George Pablo. July 13, 1910. 35 pages; Concerning the buffalo drive (piskan), by Mountain Chief (interpreter, David C. Duvall). June 22, 1910. 3 pages; "The woman who turned into a bear," by Mrs. Julie White Swan. June 23, 1910. 13 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2826
Topic:
Buffalo jump  Search this
Medicine bundles  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2826, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2826
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2826
Online Media:

Mary Harriman Rumsey collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs

Collector:
Rumsey, Mary Harriman, 1881-1934.  Search this
Names:
Harriman Alaska Expedition (1899)  Search this
Photographer:
Averell, William H.  Search this
Coe, Wesley R. (Wesley Roswell), 1869-1960  Search this
Cole, Leon J. (Leon Jacob), 1877-1948  Search this
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Devereux, W. B.  Search this
Gilbert, Grove Karl, 1843-1918  Search this
Harriman, Edward Henry, 1848-1909  Search this
Keen, Dora, 1871-  Search this
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart), 1855-1942  Search this
Pillsbury, Arthur C. (Arthur Clarence)  Search this
Ridgway, Robert, 1850-1929  Search this
Artist:
Schreyvogel, Charles, 1861-1912  Search this
Extent:
396 Lantern slides
286 Photographic prints
1 Map
Culture:
Suquamish  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Yakutat Tlingit  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Apache  Search this
Yuit (Siberian Yup'ik)  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Alaskan Eskimo  Search this
Unangan (Aleut)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Photographic prints
Maps
Place:
British Columbia
Siberia (Russia)
Alaska
Date:
1898-1900
1903
1914
bulk 1899-1899
Summary:
The Mary Harriman Rumsey collection largely consists of photographic prints and lantern slides documenting the Harriman Expedition to Alaska in summer 1899. These depict members of the expedition and Alaskan scenery and people. The collection also includes scenic photographs of Alaska taken by Dora Keen in 1914 and photographs of Blackfeet, Hopi, Apache, and Suquamish Indians made by Edward Curtis in 1900 and 1903.
Scope and Contents:
The bulk of the collection comprises photographic prints, lantern slides, and one map documenting the Harriman Alaska Expedition from May to July of 1899. These photographs were made by members of the expedition, most prominently its official photographer Edward S. Curtis, funder Edward Henry Harriman, and lead scientist C. Hart Merriam. They depict Alaskan scenery, members of the expedition, and Native people and settlements that they encountered. Mary Harriman Rumsey's collection also includes later platinum prints of American Indians made and signed by Curtis (1900, 1903), photographs of glaciers in Alaska by Dora Keen (1914), a photograph of a painting by Charles Schreyvogel (1903), and a photograph of White Pass by Arthur Clarence Pillsbury (1898).
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in three series: photographs relating to the Harriman Expedition; photographs of Alaska that were not made on the Harriman Expedition; and other photographs relating to American Indians. The Harriman series is arranged in a rough chronological order.
Biographical / Historical:
Mary Harriman Rumsey (1881-1934) was an important American philanthropist and the oldest child of railroad tycoon Edward Henry Harriman. In 1901, while studying at Barnard College, she co-founded the Junior League for the Promotion of Settlement Movements (later named the Junior League of the City of New York), which facilitated charitable work by privileged women among New York's impoverished groups. Rumsey's efforts lead to the establishment of the Association of Junior Leagues International Inc. in 1921. Additionally, Rumsey co-founded Today magazine with her brother Averell Harriman and others, and in 1933 she chaired the Consumer Advisory Board of the National Recovery Administration.

In 1899, Mary Harriman was among the Harriman family members who accompanied the Harriman Alaska Expedition. Originally planned as a bear-hunting trip for the family, the expedition, was funded by Edward Henry Harriman and organized with the help of ethnographer and naturalist Clinton Hart Merriam. The party of accomplished scientists, naturalists, photographers, artists, and writers cruised from British Columbia to Siberia and back on a private ship, the SS George W. Elder, in June and July of 1899. The scientists' findings were published in the thirteen-volume Harriman Alaska Series, and Harriman also paid the expedition's official photographer, Edward S. Curtis, to compile souvenir albums from the over 5,000 photographs made during the course of the expedition.
Related Materials:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives, University of Washington Special Collections, and Library of Congress have photo albums relating to the Harriman Alaska Expedition. The SI Archives also holds the Harriman Alaska Expedition Collection and photogravure plates from the Harriman Alaska Series.

NMAI holds photogravure plates and proofs made from Edward Curtis's later photographs and Frederick Dellenbaugh's expedition notes in the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation records. The National Anthropological Archives also holds Curtis photographs and papers.
Separated Materials:
The following materials were also part of Mary Harriman Rumsey's estate, gifted to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, in 1934. Where possible, their current locations have been noted.

33 artifacts, most of which were likely collected in Alaska by the Harriman Alaska Expedition, are now housed in the NMAI object collection (catalog numbers 18/6460 - 18/6494)

A set of Harriman Alaska Expedition books, probably now in the Cornell University Libraries

4 phonograph records

A bundle of botanical specimens
Provenance:
This collection was donated as part of the estate of Mary Harriman Rumsey to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, in May 1934.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Scientific expeditions  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Mary Harriman Rumsey Collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition Photographs, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.053
See more items in:
Mary Harriman Rumsey collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-053
Online Media:

James Craig photographs of American Indians in Washington, DC

Creator:
Craig, James  Search this
Photographer:
Harris & Ewing  Search this
Names:
Bacon Rind (Osage Indian), 1860-1932  Search this
Collier, John, 1884-1968  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (silver gelatin)
6 Negatives (glass)
6 Contact prints
Culture:
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Osage  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Negatives
Contact prints
Date:
circa 1910-1935
Scope and Contents note:
Portraits of Bacon Rind, White Calf (probably Two Guns White Calf), Red Cloud Jeane, and a group portrait, probably of Oglala Indians. The collection also includes a vintage print by Harris & Ewing of Bureau of Indian Affairs Director John Collier seated with five American Indians around him. Two photocopied images of King George VI and his wife, one with Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, probably during a visit to Washington, D.C. are also available with the collection.
Biographical/Historical note:
James Craig was a professional photographer in Washington, DC.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 92-44
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional Harris & Ewing photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 8, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 77-80, Photo Lot 78-20, and Photo Lot 80-36.
Additional photographs of Bacon Rind held in National Anthropological Archives MS 4691, Photo Lot 90-1, and the BAE historical negatives.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Photo Lot 92-44, James Craig photographs of American Indians in Washington, DC, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.92-44
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-92-44

United States National Museum Department of Anthropology photograph collection of American Indians

Creator:
United States National Museum., Dept. of Anthropology.  Search this
Photographer:
Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories (U.S.)  Search this
Heyn Photo  Search this
Louisiana Purchase Exposition (1904: Saint Louis, Mo.)  Search this
Mitchell, McGowan and Company  Search this
Place & Coover  Search this
Addison, George A.  Search this
Barry, D. F. (David Francis), 1854-1934  Search this
Bell, C. M. (Charles Milton), approximately 1849-1893  Search this
Brady, Mathew B., approximately 1823-1896  Search this
Bretz, George W. (Fort Sill, Oklahoma)  Search this
Fly, C. S. (Camillus Sidney), 1849-1901  Search this
Fouch, John H., 1849-1933  Search this
Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882  Search this
Goff, O. S. (Orlando Scott), 1843-1917  Search this
Gutekunst, Frederick, 1831-1917  Search this
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942  Search this
Partridge, William Ordway, 1861-1930  Search this
Randall, A. Frank  Search this
Shindler, A. Zeno (Antonio Zeno), 1823-1899  Search this
Wittick, Ben, 1845-1903  Search this
Publisher:
Rice, Rutter & Co.  Search this
Artist:
Noyes, Francis H.  Search this
Reiss, Winold, 1886-1953  Search this
Extent:
3 Painted photographs
8 Prints (halftone and color halftone)
56 Photographic prints (albumen and silver gelatin)
10 Copy prints
1 Stereograph (albumen)
2 Engravings
2 Color lithographs
Culture:
Sioux  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Ute Indians  Search this
Teton Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Chiricahua Apache  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Powhatan  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Hunkpapa Lakota (Hunkpapa Sioux)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Mohawk  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Painted photographs
Prints
Photographic prints
Copy prints
Stereographs
Engravings
Color lithographs
Photographs
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
The bulk of the collection consists of portraits of identified American Indians and some government officials and interpreters. It includes cabinet cards, other mounted prints, newspaper articles, illustrations, and a photographic postcard. Depicted individuals include American Horse, Oglala; Black Hawk, Sauk; Bob Tail, Cheyenne; Crowfoot, Hunkpapa; Gaul, Hunkpapa; Geronimo, Chiricahua; John Grass, Teton; Chief Joseph, Nez Perce; Little Wound, Oglala; Medicine Bull, Hunkpapa; Osceola, Seminole; Ouray, Ute; Litte Raven, Arapaho; Plenty Coups, Crow; Pocahontas, Powhatan; Rain in the Face, Hunkpapa; Red Cloud, Oglala; Red Iron, Dakota; Short Man, Piegan; Sitting Bull, Hunkpapa; Standing On Prairie, Siouan; Thayendanegea (Joseph Brant), Mohawk; Two Guns White Calf, Piegan; Two Moon, Cheyenne; and Washakie, Shoshoni.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 87-2P
Contained in:
Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology photograph collections, undated
See others in:
United States National Museum Department of Anthropology photograph collection of American Indians, undated
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 87-2P, United States National Museum Department of Anthropology photograph collection of American Indians, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.87-2P
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-87-2p

U.S. Indian Congress of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition photograph album

Creator:
Rinehart, F. A. (Frank A.)  Search this
Muhr, Adolph F., -1913  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Linear feet
18 Photographic prints
Culture:
Chiricahua Apache  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Southern Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Hunkpapa Lakota (Hunkpapa Sioux)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Southern Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Photographs
Photograph albums
Date:
1898
Summary:
This photograph album contains 18 photographic portraits of American Indian delegates at the U.S. Indian Congress of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition in Omaha, Nebraska, 1898. Frank A. Rinehart and Adolph F. Muhr's photographs of the Exposition are considered one of the most comprehensive photo documentations of American Indian leaders at the turn of the century.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 18 photographs arranged in an album. The photographs depict portraits of American Indians delegates at the U.S. Indian Congress of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition held in Omaha, Nebraska, between June 1 and October 31, 1898. During the Congress, Frank A. Rinehart (ca. 1862-1928) and/or his assistant Adolph F. Muhr (ca. 1858-1913) photographed more than 500 delegates and groups representing the estimated thirty-five tribes represented at the Exposition.

The photographs that Rinehart and Muhr shot during the Exposition depict the largest gathering of American Indian leaders at the turn of the century. This collection contains only 18 of the hundreds of photographs that Rinehart and Muhr shot at the event.

The photographers assigned the photograph titles.
Biographical / Historical:
The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition World's Fair was held in Omaha, Nebraska from June 1 to October 1898. Over 500 Indian delegates from over thirty-five different tribes were present at the Fair.

James Mooney (Bureau of Ethnology) and Captain William A. Mercer organized and managed the Indian Congress in conjunction with the Exposition. It included "living exhibitions," with mock Indian villages and demonstrations of dances, daily activities, and sham battles.

The official photographer of the U.S. Indian Congress was Frank A. Rinehart (ca. 1862-1928) with his assistant Adolph F. Muhr (ca. 1858-1913). Rinehart shot the majority of the outdoor battles, dance scenes, and events, while Muhr photographed the majority of the delegate portraits. Rinehart copyrighted the photographs under his own name in 1899 and 1900. The Rinehart and Muhr photographs are considered one of the most comprehensive photo documentations of American Indian leaders at the turn of the century.
Related Materials:
The Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas has a large collection of Frank Rinehart photographs from U.S. Indian Congress of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, including the original glass plate negatives.

The National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center also holds other photographs shot by Rinehart and Muhr at Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, including collection NMAI.AC.119.
Provenance:
Donated by Margaret Cross in 2001.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition (1898 : Omaha, Neb.) -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Photograph albums
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); U.S. Indian Congress of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition photograph album, Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.118
See more items in:
U.S. Indian Congress of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition photograph album
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-118
Online Media:

Frank A. Rinehart and Roland W. Reed photograph collection

Photographer:
Reed, Roland, 1864-1934  Search this
Rinehart, F. A. (Frank A.)  Search this
Muhr, Adolph F., -1913  Search this
Extent:
43 Photographic prints
0.25 Linear feet
Culture:
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Southern Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Oto  Search this
Kitchai Wichita  Search this
Tonkawa  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
Chiricahua Apache  Search this
Plains Apache (Kiowa Apache)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Northern Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Oglala Lakota [Pine Ridge]  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Date:
1882-1913
Summary:
This collection consists of 43 photographic prints of Native American peoples from throughout North America. Dating from 1882 to 1913, the images in this collection document a variety of Native American communities and events, including the U.S. Indian Congress which took place at the 1898 Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition in Omaha, Nebraska. Photographers include Frank A. Rinehart, Adolph F. Muhr, and Roland W. Reed, as well as a series of images by an unknown photographer who also documented American Indian life.
Scope and Contents:
The Frank A. Rinehart and Roland W. Reed photograph collection consists of 43 photographic prints of Native American peoples at the turn of the twentieth century. Dating from 1882 to 1913, the images in this collection document a variety of Native American communities and events, including the U.S. Indian Congress which took place at the 1898 Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition in Omaha, Nebraska. This exposition, also referred to as the 1898 World's Fair, was held in Omaha, Nebraska from June through October, 1898. Attending the U.S. Indian Congress at the fair were over 500 American Indian delegates representing more than 35 Native communities from throughout the United States.

In addition to the Rinehart and Muhr 1898 photographs are also a number of staged portrait images created by Roland W. Reed in the early decades of the twentieth century. Traveling throughout the U.S. West and Canada, Reed photographed Native communities ranging from Minnesota to Montana and Canada, and extending to Arizona in the Southwest U.S.

This collection also consists of 18 photographs contemporary to those of Rinehart and Reed, dating approximately 1882 – 1904. The photographer(s) of these images is unknown. Although specific communities are not identified, many images appear to portray Northern Plains and Central Plains American Indian peoples.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into three series, organized by photographer, and then regionally by location or culture group. Series 1: Frank A. Rinehart photographs, Series 2: Roland W. Reed photographs, Series 3: Unknown photographer
Biographical / Historical:
Frank A. Rinehart (ca. 1862-1928) was born in Illinois, opened a photography studio in Omaha, Nebraska in 1885 or 1886, and is best known for his work as the official photographer of the 1898 Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition in Omaha. In addition to portrait photographs of Native American delegates attending the U.S. Indian Congress of 1898, Rinehart as official exposition photographer also documented the broader exhibits and events that took place at the 1898 Omaha World's Fair.

Adolph R. Muhr (ca. 1858-1913) worked as Frank A. Rinehart's assistant at the 1898 Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, creating a photographic record of the events and attendees. While Rinehart documented many of the outdoor sham-battles, dance scenes, and other events related to the U.S. Indian Congress, Muhr was responsible for the majority of the posed delegate portraits. Muhr in later years worked with photographer Edward S. Curtis in Seattle, until Muhr's death in 1913.

Roland W. Reed (1864-1934) was born in Wisconsin, and is best known for traveling widely throughout the western United States and Canada, photographing Native American communities. Having apprenticed with photographer Daniel Dutro in 1890s Montana, Reed later ran photography studios in both Ortonville and Bemidji, Minnesota in the early 1900s. Over the next few decades he continued to document the lives and cultures of Native peoples, opening photography studios in Kalispell, Montana in 1909, and later in San Diego, California in 1915. Many of Reed's photographs are clearly staged, representing romanticized and stereotyped images of what Reed believed Native American life to be. He died in Colorado in 1934.
Related Materials:
The NMAI Archive Center collections also include an album of 18 photographic prints of Frank A. Rinehart's U.S. Indian Congress images: U.S. Indian Congress of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition photograph album, NMAI.AC.118.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by the Dakota County Historical Society, South St. Paul, MN, in 2013.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition (1898 : Omaha, Neb.) -- Photographs  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Frank A. Rinehart and Roland W. Reed photograph collection, NMAI.AC.289; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.289
See more items in:
Frank A. Rinehart and Roland W. Reed photograph collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-289
Online Media:

Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian

Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
96 Photomechanical prints (photogravure proofs)
184 Printing plates (copper printing plates)
Culture:
Twana  Search this
Hoh  Search this
Walla Walla (Wallawalla)  Search this
Wishram  Search this
Suquamish  Search this
Skokomish  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Quileute  Search this
Apache  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Squaxon  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Achomawi (Pit River)  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Yurok  Search this
Kumeyaay (Diegueño)  Search this
Cayuse  Search this
Northern Paiute (Paviotso)  Search this
Santa Ysabel (Santa Isabela) Diegueño  Search this
Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Spokan  Search this
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Tsuu T'ina (Sarcee)  Search this
Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood)  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Serrano  Search this
Washoe (Washo)  Search this
Kutzadika'a (Mono Paiute)  Search this
Kupangaxwichem (Kupa/Cupeño)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Osage  Search this
Yokuts  Search this
Chukchansi Yokuts  Search this
Southern Mewuk (Southern Miwok)  Search this
Wailaki  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Wappo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photomechanical prints
Printing plates
Photogravures
Photographs
Date:
1899-1927
circa 1980
Summary:
The Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian include photogravure printing plates and associated proofs made from Curtis photographs and used in the publication of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The bulk of the images are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps.
Scope and Contents:
The collection comprises 183 photogravure plates (101 folio and 82 octavo) and 96 associated proofs used in the printing of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The original photographs used to make the photogravures were made circa 1903-1926 and the photogravure plates were made in 1907-1930. The bulk are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps. About half of the proofs in the collection are originals used for Curtis's publication, though the collection also includes proofs made in the process of later publication by the Classic Gravure Company (circa 1980). Vintage proofs include handwritten notes, likely made by Curtis Studio employees in Seattle and Los Angeles. Many of the photogravure plates do not have matching proofs; in particular, there are no proofs for the octavo plates.
Arrangement:
The plates and proofs are arranged by the volume of The North American Indian in which they were published. They are described in this finding aid by the caption and plate number with which they were published.
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Sheriff Curtis (1868-1952) was an American photographer best known for his monumental and now-controversial project, the twenty-volume publication The North American Indian. Here he sought to document in words and pictures the "vanishing race" of American Indians.

Born in Wisconsin in 1868, Edward Curtis grew up on his family's farm in Le Sueur County, Minnesota, from 1874 to 1887. In 1887, he and his father Johnson Curtis settled on a plot near what is now Port Orchard, Washington, and the rest of the family joined them the following year. When Johnson Curtis died within a month of the family's arrival, the burden of providing for his mother and siblings fell to 20-year-old Edward, and Edward set out to do so through his photography. In 1891, Curtis moved to the booming city of Seattle and bought into a joint photo studio with Rasmus Rothi. Less than a year later, he formed "Curtis and Guptill, Photographers and Photoengravers" with Thomas Guptill; the enterprise quickly became a premier portrait studio for Seattle's elite. In 1895, Curtis made his first "Indian photograph" depicting Princess Angeline, daughter of the chief for whom Seattle had been named. The following year he earned his first medal from the National Photographic Convention for his "genre studies."

In 1899, Edward Curtis joined the Harriman Alaska Expedition as official photographer, a position which allowed him to learn from anthropologists C. Hart Merriam and George Bird Grinnell while documenting the landscapes and peoples of the Alaskan coast. This expedition and the resulting friendship with Grinnell helped to foster Curtis's ultimate goal to "form a comprehensive and permanent record of all the important tribes of the United States and Alaska that still retain to a considerable degree their primitive customs and traditions" (General Introduction, The North American Indian). Curtis made several trips to reservations from 1900 to 1904, including a trip with Grinnell to Montana in 1900 and multiple trips to the Southwest, including the Hopi Reservation. He also hired Adolph Muhr, former assistant to Omaha photographer Frank A. Rinehart, to manage the Curtis studio in his absence, a decision which would prove more and more fruitful as Curtis spent less and less time in Seattle.

In 1906, Curtis struck a deal with financier J. P. Morgan, whereby Morgan would support a company – The North American Indian, Inc. – with $15,000 for five years, by which time the project was expected to have ended. Systematic fieldwork for the publication began in earnest that summer season, with Curtis accompanied by a team of ethnological researchers and American Indian assistants. Arguably the most important member of Curtis' field team was William Myers, a former newspaperman who collected much of the ethnological data and completed most of the writing for the project. The first volume, covering Navajo and Apache peoples, was published at the end of 1907, but already Morgan's funding was incapable of meeting Curtis's needs. Despite heaping praise from society's elite, Curtis spent much of his time struggling to find people and institutions willing to subscribe to the expensive set of volumes. After the initial five years, only eight of the proposed twenty volumes had been completed. Fieldwork and publication continued with the support of J. P. Morgan, but Curtis's home life suffered because of his prolonged absences.

In 1919, Curtis's wife Clara was awarded a divorce settlement which included the entire Curtis studio in Seattle. Exhausted and bankrupt, Edward Curtis moved with his daughter Beth Magnuson to Los Angeles, where they operated a new Curtis Studio and continued work on the volumes; volume 12 was published in 1922. The constant financial strain forced Myers to leave the North American Indian team after volume 18 (fieldwork in 1926) and Curtis made his last trip to photograph and gather data for volume 20 in 1927. After the final volumes were published in 1930, Curtis almost completely faded from public notice until his work was "rediscovered" and popularized in the 1970s.

Curtis's "salvage ethnology," as scholar Mick Gidley describes it, was mildly controversial even during his life and has become ever more so as his legacy deepens. In his quest to photograph pre-colonial Indian life through a twentieth-century lens, he often manipulated and constructed history as much as he recorded it: he staged reenactments, added props, and removed evidence of twentieth-century influences on "primitive" life. Curtis's work continues to shape popular conceptions of American Indians and so, while problematic, his legacy--his vision of American Indian life--continues to be relevant.
Related Materials:
NMAI also holds Edward Curtis photographs documenting the Harriman Expedition (1899) as well as platinum prints and photogravures of the images published in The North American Indian.

The Smithsonian Institution, National Anthropological Archives holds Edward Curtis prints submitted for copyright (Photo Lot 59) as well as many of his original negatives, photographs, and papers.

Steve Kern donated photogravure plates to the Center for Creative Photography and the Seattle Art Museum at the same time that he donated this set to MAI.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Steven and Arlene Kern to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, in 1984.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Pictorial works  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photogravures
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.080
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-080
Online Media:

Fred R. Meyer collection of lantern slides, negatives, and photographic prints

Creator:
Meyer, Fred R.  Search this
Names:
Miller, Fred E., 1868-1936  Search this
Throssel, Richard, -1933  Search this
Extent:
199 Lantern slides (black and white)
381 Negatives (photographic) (black and white)
6 Photographic prints
Culture:
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Ute  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Juneau (Alaska)
Yosemite Valley (Calif.)
Date:
1890-1915
Scope and Contents:
The Meyer collection consists primarily of lantern slide and glass plates negatives made by Meyer among the Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke) and Pikuni (Piegan) in Montana on the Crow and Blackfeet Reservations, perhaps in1902 and in 1904. The Apsáalooke and Pikuni lantern slides and negatives are mostly informal, outdoor portraits of men and women in traditional clothing, but they also depict camps and ceremonials and even buffalo herds. In addition, there are depictions of Ute, Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet), Nimi'ipuu (Nez Perce), Numakiki (Mandan), and Ojibwa individuals. He made the Numakiki photographs on the Fort Berthold Rerservation in North Dakota. The collection also contains landscape views made in Yosemite Valley, California, and British Columbia and cityscapes of Juneau, Alaska. Although Meyer likely photographed the vast majority of the items in the collection, it is unlikely that he created all of them. For example, there are many studio portraits that an amateur such as Meyer lacked the studio space, equipment, and experience to make. In addition, there is at least one glass plate negative of a Fred Miller Crow Reservation photograph and several that appear to be by Cree photographer Richard Throssel, who also made photographs on the Crow Reservation. The five prints (one of these--assigned a print number--is in fact a newspaper clipping announcing the death of Ka-Be-Na-Gway-Wence or Meet-Ka-Be-Nah-Gway) are certainly not by Meyer. Of interest here is a photograph depicting Goyathlay (Geronimo) in later life wearing traditional Chiricahua Apache clothing, including his headdress. Most of the negatives are on glass but some of them are film copies of the glass negatives and lantern slides.
Arrangement note:
Lantern slides: organized in envelopes; arranged by image number

Negatives: organized in envelopes; arranged by negative number
Biographical/Historical note:
Relatively little is known about Fred R. Meyer (1874-1939), but from his photographic record it is clear that he was an amateur photographer who traveled extensively throughout the western United States, particularly in Montana and North Dakota possibly from 1890 to 1915. A handful of his Montana photographs were given to the Buffalo Bill Historical Center by Meyer's friend William P. Sargent. Meyer's notations on the versos of these prints are dated either 1902 or 1904. According to the Historical Center's records, Meyer was a surveyor but other sources indicate that he (also) worked as a butcher. It has also been suggested that he was associated in some way (perhaps as a clerk) with the Indian agencies that served the Apsáalooke, Pikuni, and Numakiki reservations. He apparently also photographed in Pine Ridge in 1907 and collected objects in Wyoming and Montana. On January 19, 1914, he gave a lantern slide lecture at the Rochester Historical Society entitled "Indian Life and Customs in the Great Northwest," and it appears that he was either originally from or eventually settled in Rochester. In addition, in 1913 he may have corresponded with Joseph Keppler. In the letter, he thanks Keppler for a book and a gun and states that he was pleased to give Keppler the medicine teeth, some of which he also planned to give to "Mr. Pepper" (George Pepper?).
Provenance:
Gift of Mrs. Fred R. (Hattie M.) Meyer.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Copyright: National Museum of the American Indian
Topic:
Crow Indians -- Montana -- Crow Indian Reservation -- Photographs  Search this
Piegan Indians -- Montana -- Great Blackfeet Reservation -- Photographs  Search this
Mandan Indians -- North Dakota -- Fort Berthold Indian Reservation -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Lantern slides
Citation:
Fred R. Meyer collection of lantern slides, negatives, and photographic prints, 1890-1915, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide and catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.032
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-032

Photographs of Piegan and Nez Perce Indians with members of Serven and Potter law firm

Photographer:
Baker, Elwood A.  Search this
Names:
Serven, Abram R.  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (silver gelatin)
1 Contact print
Culture:
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Contact prints
Date:
1930, 1934
Scope and Contents note:
Photograph depicting luncheon group including Nez Perce delegates and A. R. Serven and his associates, made by Elwood A. Baker on March 5, 1930. There is also a studio photograph of Oscar Boy, a Piegan Indian, and Carter in March 1934.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 89-50
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Photo Lot 89-50, Photographs of Piegan and Nez Perce Indians with members of Serven and Potter law firm, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.89-50
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-89-50

Willis G. Tilton photograph collection of American Indians

Collector:
Tilton, Willis G.  Search this
Names:
Field Museum of Natural History  Search this
Big Foot, -1890  Search this
Geronimo, 1829-1909  Search this
Photographer:
Dorsey, George A. (George Amos), 1868-1931  Search this
Gutekunst, Frederick, 1831-1917  Search this
Hall, E. E.  Search this
James, George Wharton, 1858-1923  Search this
Maude, F. H. (Frederic Hamer)  Search this
Nelson, Edward William, 1855-1934  Search this
Thompson, J. Eric S. (John Eric Sidney), 1898-1975  Search this
Voth, H. R. (Henry R.), 1855-1931  Search this
Winternitz, L.  Search this
Extent:
685 Negatives (circa, glass and nitrate)
Culture:
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Apache  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Jicarilla Apache  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Kootenai (Kutenai)  Search this
Kickapoo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Northwest Coast  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Umatilla Indians  Search this
White Mountain Apache  Search this
Wichita Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Mayas  Search this
Patagonia  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Haida  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Hunkpapa Lakota (Hunkpapa Sioux)  Search this
Chiricahua Apache  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Coast Salish  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Place:
Belize
Fort Belknap Indian Reservation (Mont.)
Oraibi (Ariz.)
Date:
circa 1880-1930
bulk 1899-1904
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs collected by Willis G. Tilton, a dealer in artifacts and photographs relating to American Indians. Many of the photographs were made by Field Columbian Museum photographer Charles Carpenter at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904; many others were created by various photographers for Field Museum publications. Notable subjects include Big Foot, dead in the snow at the Wounded Knee battlefield; Arapaho and Cheyenne social dances; Hopi ceremonies; a reenactment of the shooting of Sitting Bull; Sun Dances (Arapaho, Assiniboin and Atsina, Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Ponca); and views of the United States Indian School Building and Pawnee Indians at the the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, Missouri. Other photographs include portraits and images of artifacts, basket weaving, cradles, dress, dwelling, tipis and other dwellings, and tree burials. There are also some photographs of Henry Field's expedition to Iraq in 1934 (Field museum anthropological expedition to the Near East), work elephants in Burma, Pipestone Quarry in Minnesota, a church in the Yucatan, and a rickshaw and cart in Ceylon.
Biographical/Historical note:
Willis G. Tilton was a dealer and owner of the store, Tilton Indian Relics, in Topeka, Kansas.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 89-8, NAA Photo Lot 135
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Photographs in the Tilton Collection, previously filed in Photo Lot 135, have been relocated and merged with Photo Lot 89-8. These photographs were also purchased by the Bureau of American Ethnology from Willis G. Tilton and form part of this collection.
Associated photographs still held in the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.
Most photographs included in the card catalog of copy negatives and in the reference file prints by tribe.
Additional photographs by Dorsey held in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 4721 and Photo Lot 24.
Correspondence from Dorsey held in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 4821, records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, the J.C. Pilling Papers, and the Ales Hrdlicka Papers.
Additional photographs by Nelson held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 171, Photo Lot 133, Photo Lot 24, and the BAE historical negatives.
Additional Maude photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 90-1 and Photo Lot 24.
Additional E. E. Hall photographs held in National Anthropological Archives MS 4978 and Photo Lot 24.
The Smithsonian Institution Archives holds Nelson's field reports (SIA Acc. 97-123) and the Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection (SIA RU007364).
See others in:
Willis G. Tilton photograph collection of American Indians, circa 1880-1930 (bulk 1899-1904)
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Wounded Knee Massacre, S.D., 1890  Search this
Sun Dance  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 89-8, Willis G. Tilton photograph collection of American Indians, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.89-8
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-89-8

Charles Milton Bell photographs of Native Americans

Creator:
Bell, C. M. (Charles Milton), approximately 1849-1893  Search this
Names:
Joseph (Nez Percé Chief), 1840-1904  Search this
Lean Wolf.  Search this
Parker, Quanah, 1845?-1911  Search this
Plenty Coups Chief of the Crows, 1848-1932  Search this
Red Cloud, 1822-1909  Search this
Spotted Tail, 1823-1881  Search this
Extent:
340 Copy prints (circa)
3 Prints (albumen)
333 Glass negatives (wet plate collodion and dry gelatin)
69 Copy negatives
Culture:
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Northwest Coast  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Sisseton Indians  Search this
Spokane Indians  Search this
Wichita Indians  Search this
Winnebago Indians  Search this
Yakama Indians  Search this
Yanktonai Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Oto  Search this
Osage  Search this
Kickapoo  Search this
Kaw (Kansa)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Plains Apache (Kiowa Apache)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Hunkpapa Lakota (Hunkpapa Sioux)  Search this
Iowa  Search this
Palouse  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Copy prints
Prints
Glass negatives
Copy negatives
Photographs
Date:
circa 1874-1890
Scope and Contents note:
Portraits of Native Americans made by Charles Milton Bell in his Washington, DC studio. Depicted individuals include Red Cloud, Oglala; Spotted Tail, Brule; Quanah Parker, Comanche; Nawat, Arapaho; Scabby Bull, Arapaho; Wolf Robe, Cheyenne; D. W. Bushyhead, Cherokee; John Jumper, Seminole; Plenty Coups, Crow; Rushing Bear, Arikara; Gall, Hunkpapa; John Grass, Sihasapa; Lean Wolf, Hidatsa; Chief Joseph, Nez Perce; and Lone Wolf, Kiowa; as well as people associated with Pawnee Bill's Wild West Show. The collection also includes copies of some images by other photographers, including G. G. Rockwood and F. T. Cummins.
Biographical/Historical note:
Charles Milton Bell (circa 1849-1893) was the youngest member of a family of photographers that operated a studio in Washington, DC, from around 1860-1874. Bell established his own studio on Pennsylvania Avenue in 1873 and it rapidly became one of the leading photography studios in the city. Bell developed the patronage of Ferdinand Vandeveer Hayden, who sent Native American visitors to the studio to have their portraits made. Bell also made photographs of Native Americans for the Department of the Interior and the Bureau of American Ethnology.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 80, NAA MS 4661
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Copy prints previously filed in MS 4661 have been relocated and merged with Photo Lot 80. These are also copy prints of Bell negatives that were acquired from Boyce and form part of this collection.
Additional C. M. Bell photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 4420, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 60, Photo Lot 81-44, Photo lot 87-2P, and Photo Lot 90-1.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 80, Charles Milton Bell photographs of Native Americans, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.80
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-80

De Lancey W. Gill portraits of Native Americans of the Northeast and Plains

Creator:
Gill, De Lancey, 1859-1940  Search this
Extent:
12 Mounted prints (platinum)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Sihasapa Lakota (Blackfoot Sioux)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Osage  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Kickapoo  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Cayuga  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Mounted prints
Studio portraits
Photographs
Date:
1901-1914
Scope and Contents note:
Studio portraits of Native Americans, including Thas-hunke-hine-kota (Roan Horse), Wa-sho-she (Brave), Cka-gthe (White Plume, Wa-Sho-She's wife), Shunga-neha-ga-he (Horse Chief Eagle), Me-kon-tunga (Big Goose), Apeyohantanka (Big Man), Yshidiapas or Aleck-shea-ahoos (Plenty Coups), Mary Baldwin, Imetacco (Little Dog), Kishkinniequote (Jim Deer), Ta-semke-to-keco (Strange Horse), and Hodjiagede (Fish Carrier). The prints were originally part of a framed display.
Biographical/Historical note:
De Lancey W. Gill (1859-1940) was a Washington, DC-based artist and photographer. Between 1884 and 1898, he served as a draftsman and illustrations editor for the United States Geological Survey. From 1889-1932, he also worked as illustrations editor for the Bureau of American Ethnology. While employed at the BAE, he took photographs of Native American visitors to Washington, continuing a BAE project that had started in the 1860s. Gill made over 2,000 portraits during his career, some during anthropological expeditions to Virginia, Arizona, New Mexico and northwestern Mexico.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 79-4
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Original glass negatives for these prints can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in the BAE hisorical negatives.
Additional photographs by Gill can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 14, Photo Lot 33, Photo Lot 65, Photo Lot 70, Photo Lot 85, Photo Lot 87-2P, and Photo Lot 90-1.
The Wisconsin Historical Society holds additional platinum prints by Gill.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Studio portraits
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 79-4, De Lancey W. Gill portraits of Native Americans of the Northeast and Plains, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.79-4
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-79-4

United States Army Medical Museum composite photographs of skulls

Creator:
Army Medical Museum (U.S.)  Search this
Names:
Billings, John Shaw, 1838-1913  Search this
Matthews, Washington, 1843-1905  Search this
Extent:
78 Prints (circa, albumen)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Apache  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Paiute  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Hawaiians  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Unangan (Aleut)  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Wichita Indians  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Date:
circa 1884-1885
Scope and Contents note:
Army Medical Museum photographs prepared under the supervision of John Shaw Billings and Washington Matthews, and created by superimposing images of several skulls for comparative purposes. Each image has a caption that includes tribal or racial identification, number of skulls photographed, photograph number, negative number, and data on photographic technique.

The collection represents of Aleut, Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Dakota, Eskimo, Hidatsa, Navajo, Oglala, Ojibwa, Paiute, Piegan, Ponca, Wichita, African American, Hawaiian, people, and people of San Miguel and San Nicholas Islands (California).
Biographical/Historical note:
The United States Army Medical Museum (AMM, renamed the National Museum of Health and Medicine in 1989) was established by US Army Surgeon General William A. Hammond in 1862. Its initial focus was on collecting specimens of unusual pathology, mostly taken from victims of the American Civil War. By 1867, the museum had expanded to include medical, microsopical, anatomical, comparative anatomics, and other sections. The anatomical collection grew in part as a result of Circular No. 2 of 1867, which authorized military medical officers to collect cranial specimens from deceased Native Americans. Additionally, the AMM made an arrangement with the Smithsonian Institution, by which the Smithsonian transferred their collection of human remains in exchange for ethnological artifacts. AMM photographed and measured many of the specimens in its collection as part of the museum's anthropological research.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 6A
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional Army Medical Museum photographs of skulls can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 6B, Photo Lot 73-26C, Photo Lot 78-42, Photo Lot 83-41, and Photo Lot 97.
The National Anthropological Archives holds microfilm of the papers of Washington Matthews, circa 1864-1905, and records concerning skeletal material transferred to the Smithsonian Institution from the Army Medical Museum.
See others in:
United States Army Medical Museum composite photographs of skulls, circa 1884-1885
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
anthropometry  Search this
Skull  Search this
Citation:
Photo lot 6A, United States Army Medical Museum composite photographs of skulls, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.6A
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-6a

Jesse Walter Fewkes photograph collection relating to archaeological subjects

Creator:
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Photographer:
Beam, George L. (George Lytle), 1868-1935  Search this
Gill, De Lancey, 1859-1940  Search this
Higley, Elmer Ellsworth  Search this
McKee, Thomas M., 1854-1939  Search this
Poley, H. S. (Horace Swartley)  Search this
Rowland, Wesley R.  Search this
Wittick, Ben, 1845-1903  Search this
Artist:
Gill, Mary W.  Search this
Mullett, G. M.  Search this
Extent:
9 Prints (cromolithograph)
40 Prints (circa, halftone)
77 Prints (circa, albumen)
84 Drawings (circa 84 drawings (some mechanically produced))
1,655 Prints (circa, silver gelatin)
71 Copy negatives
43 Copy prints
363 Negatives (circa, nitrate)
7 Paintings
1 Print (cyanotype)
1 Print (photogravure)
1 Postcard (collotype)
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Huastec  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Drawings
Copy negatives
Copy prints
Negatives
Paintings
Postcards
Photographs
Place:
Tennessee -- Antiquities
Stikine River (B.C. and Alaska)
South Carolina -- Antiquities
New Mexico -- Antiquities
Huasteca Region (Mexico)
Maryland -- Antiquities
Louisiana -- Antiquities
Alabama -- Antiquities
Arizona -- Antiquities
Colorado -- Antiquities
Cahokia Mounds State Historic Park (Ill.)
Florida -- Antiquities
Mexico -- Antiquities
Hovenweep National Monument (Utah and Colo.)
Utah -- Antiquities
Mesa Verde National Park (Colo.)
Navajo National Monument
Casa Grande (Ariz.)
Date:
circa 1890-1928
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs and drawings mostly relating to archeological subjects, collected and arranged by Jesse Walter Fewkes for his reference. Subjects include burial mounds, excavations, drawn maps, as well as urns, implements, idols, pottery, and other artifacts found in excavations, and Hopi, Zuni, and Piegan ceremonies and dances. Many of the photographs and drawings were probably made by Fewkes. Publication information is noted on some. The collection also includes newspaper clippings and correspondence.

Photographs were taken in Alabama, Arizona (including Casa Grande, Elden Pueblo, Navajo National Monument, and Wupatki National Monument), Colorado (including Mesa Verde and Montezuma Valley), Florida (including Weeden Island), Illinois (Cahokia Mound), Louisiana, Maryland, Mexico (including La Huasteca Region), Mississippi Valley, New Mexico (including Chaco Canyon, Hawikuh, and Mimbres Valley), South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah (including Hill Canyon, McElmo Canyon, and McLean Basin Ruins), Hovenweep National Monument, the West Indies (including Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo, and Cuba), and West Virginia.
Biographical/Historical note:
Jesse Walter Fewkes (1850-1930) was a naturalist, anthropologist, and archeologist, and chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology from 1918 to his death in 1928. Fewkes received a Ph.D. in marine zoology from Harvard in 1877, and acted as curator of lower invertebrates at the Museum of Comparative Zoology until 1887. While on a collecting trip in the western United States, he developed an interest in the culture and history of the Pueblo Indians. In 1891, Fewkes became director of the Hemenway Southwestern Archeological Expedition and editor of the Journal of American Archeology and Ethnology, studying and recording Hopi ceremonials. In 1895, he embarked on various archeological explorations for the Bureau of American Ethnology, excavating ruins in the Southwest, the West Indies, and Florida. He was appointed chief of the Bureau in 1918, and played an important role in the creation of Hovenweep National Monument in Colorado and Wupatki National Monument in Arizona.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 4321
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives also holds the Jesse Walter Fewkes Papers (MS 4408), his photographs of excavations in Mesa Verde (Photo Lot 30), his negatives (Photo Lot 86), and other manuscript collections by and related to Fewkes' ethnological research and archeology and his work with the Bureau of American Ethnology.
Correspondence from Fewkes held in the National Anthropological Archives in the George L. Beam papers (MS 4517), the Henry Bascom Collins, Jr. papers, the Anthropological Society of Washington records (MS 4821), the Herbert William Krieger papers, the J.C. Pilling papers, the Walter Hough Papers (in the records of the Department of Anthropology), and the records of the Bureau of American Ethnology.
The anthropology collections of the National Museum of Natural History hold artifacts collected by Fewkes, including USNM ACC 048761 (relating to Casa Grande excavations) and USNM ACC 050765 (relating to Mesa Verde excavations).
Restrictions:
Original nitrate negatives are in cold storage and require advanced notice for viewing.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Burial  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 4321, Jesse Walter Fewkes photograph collection relating to archaeological subjects, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.4321
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-4321

MS 2932 Notes on sign language and miscellaneous ethnographic notes on Plains Indians

Creator:
Scott, Hugh Lenox, 1853-1934  Search this
Dunbar, John Brown, 1841-1914  Search this
He Dog  Search this
Red Feather  Search this
Whirling  Search this
Addressee:
Wissler, Clark, 1870-1947  Search this
Names:
United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs  Search this
Bruguiere, Johnnie, 1849-1898  Search this
Petalesharo, 1797-1836  Search this
Extent:
4 Boxes
2,736 Items (2,736 pages)
Culture:
Sioux  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Paiute  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Wichita Indians  Search this
Osage  Search this
Apache  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Bannock  Search this
Ute Indians  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Slave  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Sarsi Indians  Search this
Plains Apache (Kiowa Apache)  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Yampa Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Northwest Coast  Search this
Kootenai (Kutenai)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1934
Scope and Contents:
Much of this material is relevant to the Dakotas. Includes: miscellaneous notes on Dakota history, bands, and sign for "Dakota," Autograph Document. Approximately 100 pages. (Box 2); account of the Battle of Little Big Horn by He Dog, Red Feather, and Whirling, Autograph Document. 7 pages. (Box 3); "The Custer Battle with the Sioux, Autograph Document. 10 pages. (Box 3); notes on sign language in general, its history and distribution, Autograph and Typescript Document, 1 box (Box 4).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2932
Local Note:
manuscript document
Topic:
Dakota Indians  Search this
Sign language  Search this
Marriage and family -- Berdache  Search this
Weapons -- bow  Search this
Dance -- calumet  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Rituals, formulas and ceremonies  Search this
Zoology -- Buffalo  Search this
Dance -- grass  Search this
War -- Battle of Little Bighorn  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Names, place  Search this
Dance -- Ghost dance  Search this
Religion -- soul, concept of  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Navaho  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Ute  Search this
White River (Parusanuch and Yampa)  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Assiniboin  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Plains Apache  Search this
Blackfoot  Search this
Sarcee  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Kootenai  Search this
Kutenai  Search this
Blackfeet  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2932, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2932
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2932
Online Media:

MS 1585 Research notes complied by A.S. Gatschet

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Culture:
Odawa (Ottawa)  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Maya  Search this
Mexica (Aztec) (archaeological culture)  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Peoria  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contents: Words and lists of days, months and years and other time divisions, approximately 100 pages. (includes Maya, Aztec, etc.) Color adjectives, 8 pages. Totemic clans of all tribes, 37 pages. Personal names (Chiefs, etc.), 25 pages. (Personal names of "Knisteneaux or Crees, Shawnee, Crow, Dakota, Arikaras, Cheyennes, Blackfeet, Piegan, Menomoni, Peoria, Otawa, Sauk").
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1585
General:
Previously titled "Texts."
Topic:
Color and dyes  Search this
Time -- divisions  Search this
Totems and totem poles -- totemic clans  Search this
Cree Indians  Search this
Shawnee Indians  Search this
Crow Indians  Search this
Dakota Indians  Search this
Arikara Indians  Search this
Cheyenne Indians  Search this
Blackfeet  Search this
Piegan Indians  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Peoria Indians  Search this
Ottawa Indians  Search this
Sauk Indians  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Illinois  Search this
Sauk & Fox  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Blackfoot  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1585, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1585
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1585
Online Media:

MS 2827 Truman Michelson field notes on Piegan Blackfoot

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Duvall, David C., 1877-1911  Search this
Little Young Man  Search this
Mountain Chief, 1848-1942  Search this
Pablo, George  Search this
Thomas, Norah  Search this
Vielle, James  Search this
White Swan, Julie  Search this
Extent:
150 Pages (Approximate)
Culture:
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Vocabulary
Field notes
Date:
1910 June-July
Scope and Contents:
Notes and texts collected by Truman Michelson during his field work among the Piegan Blackfoot in Montana in 1910. The materials consist primarily of stories in English and ethnographic notes covering topics such as Crazy Dog society, Sun Dance, and other ceremonies and societies. There are also notes on Piegan vocabulary and Chippewa Sun Dance and Medicine Dance. Michelson obtained information from various people, including David Duvall, who also served as an interpreter; Mountain Chief; George Pablo; Little Young Man; Norah Thomas; James Vielle; and Julie White Swan.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2827
Local Note:
Title changed from "Field notes concerning Piegan Blackfoot ethnography, including ceremonials and societies, with some linguistic notes June-July, 1910" 5/13/2014.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Social structure  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Dance -- North America  Search this
Blackfoot  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Field notes
Citation:
Manuscript 2827, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2827
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2827
Online Media:

Joseph C. Farber photographs of Native American life

Creator:
Farber, Joseph C., 1903-  Search this
Names:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) -- Exhibitions.  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Gorman, R. C. (Rudolph Carl), 1932-  Search this
Extent:
6,000 Contact prints (circa 6000 contact prints (proof sheets))
6,000 Acetate negatives (circa)
8 Color transparencies
1,000 Items (circa 1000 enlarged prints: silver gelatin (some mounted for exhibition))
Culture:
Arctic peoples  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Quinault Indians  Search this
Tlingit Indians  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tewa Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Lummi  Search this
Haida  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Kootenai (Kutenai)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Miccosukee Seminole (Mikasuki)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Chehalis  Search this
Apache  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Contact prints
Acetate negatives
Color transparencies
Photographs
Place:
North Carolina
New York
New Mexico
Montana
South Dakota
Oklahoma
Arizona
California
Florida
Minnesota
Alaska
Alberta
Washington (State)
Barrow, Point (Alaska)
Yuma County (Ariz.)
Taos (N.M.)
Date:
circa 1970-1975
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made as part of Joseph C. Farber's project to document modern NAtive American everyday life. Represented tribes include the Acoma, Apache, Blackfoot, Chehalis, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chippewa, Cocopa, Dakota, Eskimo, Haida, Kiowa, Kutenai, Lummi, Mohave, Mohawk, Navaho, Northern Athabascan, Onandaga, Pima, Pueblo, Quinalt, Seminole, Taos, Tlingit, and Zuni. Subject coverage is broad and varies from tribe to tribe. Included are portraits, as well as totem poles, carving, weaving, pottery, painitng, landscapes, boats and canoes, ceremonial regalia, camps, classes and vocational training, homes and traditional dwellings, construction projects, rodeos and powwows, dances, industries (including lumber), herding and ranching, agriculture, stores and storefronts, cliff dwellings, parades, crab cleaning, fishing, games, health care, legal processes, music, office work, sewing, vending, and a funeral. There are also photographs of R. C. Gorman (and a letter from Gorman to Farber) and Fritz Shoulder (some in color).

Farber's travels included Alaska (Point Barrow, Dead Horse, Glacier Bay, Haines, Hoona, Hydaberg, Ketchikan, Mount McKinley, Prudhoe Bay, Saxman, and Sitka); Alberta (Blackfeet Reservation); Arizona (Canyon de Chelly, Cocopa Reservation, Flagstaff, Kayenta, Monument Valley, Pima Reservation, Quechan Reservation, Mojave Reservation, and Yuma); California (Alcatraz, Oakland, and San Francisco); Florida (Big Cypress Reservation; Miccosukee Reservation); Minnesota (Minneapolis and Nett Lake); Montana (Northern Cheyenne Reservation); New Mexico (Acoma, Gallup, Navajo Forest, Picuris, Puye, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, Santa Fe, Taos, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, and Tesuque); New York (New York City and Onandaga Reservation); North Carolina (Cherokee Reservation); Oklahoma (Anadarko, Apache, Lawton, Stilwell, and Tahlequah); South Dakota (Rosebud and Wounded Knee); and Washington (Lummi Reservation, Nisqually River, Puyallup River, and Quinalt Reservation).
Biographical/Historical note:
Joseph C. Farber (1903-1994) was a successful New York businessman and professional photographer. He studied with Edward Steichen at the New York Camera Club in the 1920s. The prints in this collection resulted from a five-year project that involved travelling to Native communities throughout the United States to document modern Native American life. The project resulted in a book, Native Americans: 500 Years After (1975), as well as exhibits, including one in the National Museum of Natural History in 1976-1977.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 78-1, NAA ACC 95-3
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Farber's photographs, previously located in Photo Lot 95-3 have been relocated and merged with Photo Lot 78-1. These photographs were also made by Joseph C. Farber and form part of this collection.
The National Museum of American History Archives Center holds the Joseph Farber Papers and Photographs, circa 1962-1990.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Photographs published in Farber's books still under copyright. Reproduction permission from artist's estate.
Topic:
Dwellings  Search this
Vocational education  Search this
Canoes and canoeing  Search this
Boats and boating  Search this
Dance  Search this
Powwows  Search this
Rodeos  Search this
Building  Search this
handicrafts  Search this
Totem poles  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Livestock  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 78-1, Joseph C. Farber photographs of Native American life, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.78-1
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-78-1

MS 1996 Blackfoot Language: Piegan dialect

Creator:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Informant:
Kipp, Kennally Blackfoot  Search this
Kipp, Joseph, 1849-1913  Search this
Extent:
1 Volume
23 Pages (8 1/2 in x 7 in)
Culture:
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Volumes
Pages
Vocabulary
Date:
December 1891
Scope and Contents:
Includes names of Blackfoot divisions, Piegan bands, cardinal numbers, words not yet verified, river names, names for other tribes, proper names, and miscellaneous vocabulary.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1996
Local Note:
Autograph document signed
Place:
Washington D. C.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Blackfoot  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Citation:
Manuscript 1996, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1996
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1996

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