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Missionary Work

Collection Creator:
Higley, Elmer Ellsworth  Search this
Extent:
71 Lantern slides
Container:
Box 15
Box 16
Box 17
Box 17
Box 18
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Lantern slides
Date:
1919-1924
Scope and Contents:
This subseries contains 71 glass lantern slides depicting Elmer E. Higley's missionary work. Images include Methodist Episcopal Church buildings and Indian Mission School buildings on numerous Native American reservations, missionary work with Mexican immigrant families in the Los Angeles area, and lantern slides with textual information relating to Higley's lectures.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Some photographs in this colletion are restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Topic:
Methodist church buildings  Search this
Missions -- Mission School  Search this
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Elmer E. Higley collection, NMAI.AC.228; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.228, Subseries 1.6
See more items in:
Elmer E. Higley collection
Elmer E. Higley collection / Series 1: Lantern Slides
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv46a3f0e29-03f4-4672-bceb-e288e5e489f4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-228-ref8

Elmer E. Higley collection

Topic:
Methodist Episcopal Church
Higley, Elmer Ellsworth
Creator:
Higley, Elmer Ellsworth  Search this
Extent:
534 Lantern slides
0.2 Linear feet
Culture:
Pikuni (Piegan) [Blackfeet Nation, Browning, Montana]  Search this
Nooksack  Search this
Tulalip  Search this
Haida  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles)  Search this
Wasco  Search this
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
Mohawk  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
American Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Date:
bulk circa 1900-1968
Summary:
This collection consists of 534 glass lantern slides depicting Indigenous groups throughout North America. It also includes a small number of publications written by Elmer E. Higley and others about Native Americans and missionary work during the early twentieth century.
Scope and Contents:
The Elmer E. Higley collection consists of both Lantern Slides and Printed Materials. Series 1: Lantern Slides, 1900-1924, includes 534 glass lantern slides, many hand-colored. The lantern slides were used by Higley in lectures to promote his missionary and reform work with the Joint Committee on Indian Work of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he was the Superintendent from 1919 to 1923. While Higley was the photographer of some of the lantern slide images, specifically those taken in Mesa Verde, the majority of the photographs were not taken by Higley, but rather collected by him for use in his lectures as he traveled around the country. Series 2: Printed Materials, 1914-1968, includes a small number of early twentieth-century publications written by Higley and others about Native Americans and missionary work in the United States during this time.
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into two series. Series 1: Lantern Slides, 1900-1924 and Series 2: Printed Materials, 1914-1968.
Biographical / Historical:
Elmer Ellsworth Higley was born in Ohio in 1867. He attended high school and college in northwestern Pennsylvania before marrying Alice C. Dowler in 1892. Higley later also attended the Drew Theological Seminary and afterwards worked as a pastor in a number of Methodist churches around the country. In approximately 1919 Higley was appointed Superintendent of the Joint Committee on Indian Work of the Methodist Episcopal Church, with his office based in Chicago, Illinois. Employed in this work until 1923, Higley traveled the United States, visiting Native reservations and promoting Christian reform efforts for American Indian education. While traveling, Higley frequently presented illustrated lectures on his missionary work to audiences, using the glass lantern slides now residing in the collections of the National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. In the years after 1923, Higley continued as a pastor in both Ames, Iowa, and Evanston, Illinois, the latter where he eventually died in 1931.
Provenance:
Gift of Mrs. R. S. Jensen and Family in 2018 and 2019.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Some photographs in this colletion are restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Topic:
Missionaries  Search this
cliff dwellings -- Colorado -- Mesa Verde National Park  Search this
Methodist church buildings  Search this
Missions -- Mission School  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Elmer E. Higley collection, NMAI.AC.228; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.228
See more items in:
Elmer E. Higley collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv45ca4b0f8-01c2-4114-b663-3d3cb3d59f0c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-228
Online Media:

Leuman Maurice Waugh collection

Creator:
Waugh, Donald.  Search this
Waugh, Leuman Maurice, 1877-1972.  Search this
Names:
American Association of Dental Schools  Search this
American Board of Orthodontics  Search this
Columbia University  Search this
Nanuk Mi-kin-inni (Yacht)  Search this
New York Athletic Club  Search this
Northland (Coast Guard cutter: WPG-49)  Search this
United States. Public Health Service  Search this
Extent:
2.1 Linear feet ((5 boxes; 1 map case drawer))
1,749 Photographic prints
1,035 Lantern slides
1579 Negatives (photographic)
80 Film reels (16mm)
Culture:
Inuit  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Lantern slides
Negatives (photographic)
Film reels
Writings
Dental records
Printed ephemera
Maps
Correspondence
Clippings
Realia
Place:
Labrador (N.L.)
Alaska
Date:
1909-1963
Summary:
The Leuman Maurice Waugh collection contains papers, photographs, and film holdings that were created by Waugh during his dental research expeditions to indigenous communities in Newfoundland and Labrador in eastern Canada and in Arctic Alaska.
Scope and Contents:
The Leuman Maurice Waugh collection contains materials created and compiled by Dr. Leuman Waugh during his research expeditions to Arctic Alaska and the Newfoundland and Labrador regions of Eastern, Canada circa 1909-1963. During these trips, Waugh studied the dental health of Indigenous communities in the region and treated patients.

The collection contains materials that were created and collected by Waugh during his research trips and include raw dental data and community census information; professional and personal correspondence; clippings, articles, and essays; reports and lectures; logistics and trip planning documents; postcards; journals; and sketches and drawings, among other materials.

The collection also contains over 4,000 photographs and 80 16mm film reels that were shot by Waugh during his research trips and document his work with Indigenous communities in Alaska and eastern Canada.
Arrangement note:
Waugh's original order was disturbed over the years after his death and during transfer from the Waugh family to the Rankin Museum. NMAI archivists elected to arrange the collection chronologically.

The records are organized in the following series: I. Dental study data and logistics, II. Correspondence, III. Writings, IV. Realia and ephemera, V. Press clippings and public relations materials, VI. Maps and other oversized materials.Chronological arrangement.
Biographical/Historical note:
Born on March 6, 1877 in New Dundee, Ontario, Canada, Leuman Maurice Waugh, moved to Rochester, New York, with his family at the age of nine. He acquired his love for photography in Rochester, which always attributed as the "Kodak city." Following in his father's dentistry footsteps, Waugh attended the University of Buffalo, from which he received his D.D.S. in 1900. He took post-graduate studies in Histology, Bacteriology, and Pathology at Buffalo's School of Medicine, and within two years was appointed Professor of Histology and Embryology at his alma mater. In 1912, Waugh pioneered the design of a unit-type x-ray machine for use at the dental chair, which was later studied and adopted by large dental apparatus manufacturers. By the time he left Buffalo in 1914 to specialize in the infant field of orthodontics in New York City, he had served as Professor of Special Pathology and Officer of the Governing Faculty at the university.

In 1915, Waugh served on the Organization Committee of the Columbia Dental School and shortly thereafter became its Secretary of the Dental Faculty, and sequentially Secretary of the Administrative Board and Professor of Histology and Embryology. In 1921 he was appointed Professor and Director of the Orthodontic Division of the school, and later served as Associate Director, Acting Director and Associate Dean. Waugh's affiliation with Columbia lasted through 1945. He served as Director of the American Board of Orthodontics from 1949 to 1953, and was asked to serve as Secretary-Chairman of the Orthodontia section of the American Association of Dental Schools in 1930, and as President in 1935. Waugh married Helen "Esty" Marshall, and had a son, Donald (also a dentist), and a daughter, Dorothy.

An active member of the Explorer's Club and Commodore of the Yachting Department of the New York Athletic Club, Waugh volunteered to undertake Alaskan studies on caries research among the Inuit for the U.S. Public Health Service. In 1929, the Health Service appointed Waugh Dental Director (Reserve) at the rank of Colonel. Waugh was apparently inspired by a lecture he heard as a student in 1908 from Dr. Ales Hrdlicka, Smithsonian Curator of Physical Anthropology at the Institute of Dental Pedagogics, on the dental conditions of human populations. Waugh privately carried out a Labrador study between 1921 and d1927 over the course of five summers. Under the sometimes-partial aegis of the U.S. Public Heath Service, Waugh also studied twelve Alaskan Inuit communities between 1929 and 1938. He was the first dental officer in the U.S. Public Service ever assigned to the Coast Guard Cutter Northland's cruise area of the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. During his trips, Waugh compiled data on the teeth, mouth, and diet of indigenous communities. In addition, he took many photographs and films of both dental subjects and indigenous communities.

Waugh's son, Donald, accompanied him on his 1935 expedition up the Kuskokwim River (Alaska) in their custom designed and built 29 foot yacht Nanuk Mi-kin-inni (Polar Bear Cub). In 1936, Waugh was appointed to a position with the Alaska Health Service by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior via the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This position allowed him to further his studies of tooth decay throughout Alaska and the Bering Sea region. Waugh's 1937 expedition included three dentists (one a biochemist), a physician and a nurse, and involved extensive air travel in small planes. A popular lecturer and prolific writer, Waugh continued to advocate for the health of the northern indigenous communities he visited long after his trips ended. He spent the remainder of his professional career at Columbia University, where he rose from Professor of Orthodontia (1923-19435) to (concurrently) Chief of Orthodontia and Director of the Department of Orthodontics. Waugh continued to be active in professional organizations well after his retirement, until a few years before his death at his home in Betterton, Maryland, on May 6, 1972.
Related Archival Materials note:
The National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution hold twenty Waugh photographs which located in the Division of Physical Anthropology Photograph Collection #NAA2223a. NAA also has Waugh material in the Henry Bascom Collins, Jr. Papers, #NAA3131. The Archives and Special Collections at the Augustus C. Long Health Sciences Library, Columbia University holds the School of Dental and Oral Surgery Records, 1892, 1915-1976 as well as the School of Dental and Oral Surgery, Historical Collection, 1892-1989.
Provenance:
The National Museum of the American Indian purchased the Waugh collection in 2001 from the Rankin Museum of American and Natural History in Ellerbee, N.C.
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the NMAI Archivist for an appointment to access the collection.

Access restricted. Some dental records may be restricted from access, reproduction, or publication under personal health information privacy provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996. Researchers should contact the NMAI Archies Center 301-238-1400 or nmaiarchives@si.edu for an appointment to access the collection.
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Dentists  Search this
Dentists  Search this
Topic:
Missions, Medical -- Kuskokwim River (Alaska)  Search this
Nutrition and dental health -- Alaska  Search this
Missions, Medical -- Labrador (N.L.)  Search this
Anthropology -- Alaska  Search this
Dentistry -- Alaska  Search this
Dentistry -- Labrador (N.L.)  Search this
Orthodontists  Search this
Inuit -- Names, Personal  Search this
Anthropology -- Labrador (N.L.)  Search this
Missions, Medical -- Alaska  Search this
Inuit -- Census -- Alaska  Search this
Teeth -- Radiography  Search this
Inuit -- Dental care -- Alaska  Search this
Nutrition and dental health -- Labrador (N.L.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Writings
dental records
Printed ephemera
Maps
Correspondence
Clippings
Realia
Citation:
Leuman Maurice Waugh collection, 1909-1963. National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.003
See more items in:
Leuman Maurice Waugh collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4f2207394-2b79-4c80-af41-5a58bea2a006
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-003
Online Media:

Deaconess Harriet M. Bedell photographs

Creator:
Bedell, Harriet M., 1875-  Search this
Extent:
233 Photographic prints (black and white)
115 Copy negatives (black and white)
Culture:
Gwich'in (Kutchin)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Southern Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Alaska
Oklahoma
Florida
Date:
1910-1939
Summary:
Photographs in this collection include indoor and outdoor portraits, domestic scenes, landscapes of Gwich'in (Kutchin), Seminole and Cheyenne Indians taken by Deaconess M. Bedell from her work as missionary between 1907-1939.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of photographs made by Deaconess Bedell while she worked as an Episcopal missionary among the Southern Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne), Gwich'in (Kutchin), and Seminole peoples in Oklahoma, Alaska, and Florida respectively. Although Bedell work in Oklahoma from 1907 to 1916, the Southern Tsitsistas/Suhtai photographs are dated from 1910 to 1915 and consist of informal group portraits of men, women, and children dressed in both traditional and Anglo American clothing; group pictures of school children--boys and girls--at the Whirlwind Mission school and the mission campus itself; and traditional and Anglo American dwellings of Southern Tsitsistas/Suhtai individuals. Among these photographs are studio portraits collected but likely not made by Bedell. Bedell worked in Alaska from 1916 to 1931; the Alaska photographs in the collection date from 1926 to 1931. Among the photographs are informal, outdoor group portraits of Gwich'in men, women, and children, and photographs depicting the landscape, dog sled teams, and Gwich'in dwellings, summer camps, and men fishing and boxing.The Florida photographs date from 1933 to 1939 and depict informal, outdoor group and single portraits of Seminole men, women, and children in traditioanl clothing, photographs depicting men rowing dugouts, Seminole dwellings (chickees), camps, and baskets. Most of these photographs were made at the Glade Cross Mission in the Everglades. The negatives are primarily copy negatives.
Arrangement note:
Prints: organized in folders; arranged by print number

Negatives: organized in envelopes; arranged by negative number
Biographical/Historical note:
Harriet Mary Bedell was born on March 19, 1875, in Buffalo, New York, to Horace Ira Bedell and Louisa Sophia Oberist. Bedell was confirmed in the Episcopalian church and graduated from Normal School in 1894. Following graduation, Bedell worked as a school teacher before deciding to enroll in the New York City Training School for Deaconesses in 1906. She also spent several months in Buffalo at a local hospital learning the rudiments of nursing. Between 1907 and 1916 Bedell was sent to the Whirlwind mission in Blaine County, Oklahoma. There, she worked as a missionary-teacher among the Cheyenne alongside Deacon Oakerhater (Cheyenne). During her time in Oklahoma Bedell contracted Tuberculosis and spent some time in Denver, Colorado recovering. By 1916 plans were made to close the Mission and Bedell was told she was to be transferred to Alaska where her teaching skills were needed. She accepted the remote post in Stevens Village, Alaska, among the Gwich'in (Kutchin) people. In 1922, Bedell left Alaska briefly to be officially ordained as a Deaconess in Portland, Oregon. During her time in Alaska, Bedell also established a boarding school in nearby Tanana but due to the stock market crash of 1929 and the scarcity of funds the boarding facility was unable to remain open. In 1931, following an unsuccessful trip to Buffalo to try and raise money, it was decided that there was no reason for Bedell to return to Alaska.

In 1933, Bedell travelled to Florida by invitation to speak and was appalled by the living conditions she witnessed among the Seminole in southern Florida. Bedell worked to reopen the Glade Cross Mission in Everglades City which had closed in 1914 as well as opening a new Mission in Collier City. In addition to focusing on health and education, Bedell encouraged the Seminole women she worked with to revive traditional doll-making, basket-weaving and intricate patchwork designs. Bedell worked in South Florida until 1960 when hurricane Donna destroyed her home and the Glade Cross Mission and she decided to retire. Bedell lived to be 94 and spent her final years at the Bishop Gray Inn in Davenport, Florida until her death on January 8, 1969. In the year 2000 Bedell was named a "Great Floridian" and in the diocese of Southwest Florida celebrate Harriet Bedell Day annually on January 8th.
Related Materials:
The Harriet Bedell Collection of 126 prints of Bedell working among the Seminole Indians in South Florida from 1933 to 1960 is located at the State Library and Archives of Florida. Information can be found here: Harriet Bedell Collection.
Provenance:
In 1940 Harriet Bedell sent her negatives to the Museum of the American Indian, via William Stiles, to be made into prints. These prints are the bulk of the collection [P14817-P14911, P14955-P15050]. Later in 1940 Bedell presented the museum with an additional 29 prints [P14913-P14941] and in 1941and 1942 Bedell sent two additional gifts totaling 13 prints [P15328-P15330, P15355-P15364].
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Gwich'in Indians -- Missions -- Photographs  Search this
Cheyenne Indians -- Missions -- Photographs  Search this
Seminole Indians -- Missions -- Photographs  Search this
Women missionaries -- United States  Search this
Women in the Episcopal Church  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Photographic prints
Citation:
Deaconess Harriet M. Bedell photographs, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.037
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4bbe6bf3a-feb9-4284-b57c-0aa52492283a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-037
Online Media:

Reverend James O. Arthur photograph collection

Creator:
Arthur, James (James Osborne)  Search this
Names:
Reformed Church of America (New York)  Search this
Arthur, James (James Osborne)  Search this
Extent:
699 Nitrate negatives (3 1/4 x 5 1/2 or smaller)
0.25 Linear feet (envelopes)
2 Gelatin silver prints
Culture:
Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache (New Mexico)  Search this
Chiricahua Apache  Search this
Mescalero Apache  Search this
Winnebago [Nebraska]  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Nitrate negatives
Gelatin silver prints
Place:
Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico -- Missions
Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico
Date:
1913-1928
bulk 1914-1919
Summary:
This collection of photographs, shot by Reverend James O. Arthur while serving as a missionary for the Reformed Church of America, documents the activities on the Winnebago Reservation in Nebraska in 1913 as well as Mescalero and Chiricahua Reservation in White Tail, New Mexico from 1914-1919. Additional images depict vacations and travels throughout the United States by the Arthur family and friends between the years 1913-1928.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 701 photographs shot by Reverend James O. Arthur while serving as a missionary for the Reformed Church of America and documents the activities on the Winnebago Reservation in Nebraska in 1913, and on the Mescalero Apache and Chiricahua Apache Reservation in White Tail, New Mexico from 1914-1919. The photographs depict informal portraits of Winnebago, Mescalero Apache, Chiricahua Apache, and Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache people; Reverend James O. Arthur, his family, and friends on the reservations and their travels throughout the United States between the years 1913 to 1928; groups such as Indian school children, quilt sewing circles, and Indian police and fire brigade; activities such as church life, fairs, picnics, sports, hunting, horticulture, agriculture, and building construction; and animals such as cattle, deer, turkeys, and wolves. Notable images include those of an elderly Chief Naiche (Chiricahua Apache), Jasper Kanseah [nephew of Goyathlay (Geronimo)], and Eugene Chihuahua (son of Chihuahua).The majority of the images were photographed by Rev. James O. Arthur himself, except for the few images in which he appears. This collection also contains Reverend Arthur's negative envelopes which include his typed notes about the photographs such as dates, subject matter, and his ratings of the photographs. Arthur used a Vest Pocket Kodak camera from circa 1913-1914 and a 3A Folding Kodak camera from circa 1914-1928.

The titles of the photographs were assigned by the photographer.
Arrangement note:
The collection is intellectually arranged in 15 series by location and then chronologically.

The nitrate negatives were originally physically organized by Reverend James O. Arthur in two sets of envelopes first by image size and then by chronology. Upon donation, NMAI image numbers where assigned to the nitrate negatives and then physically stored according to this number in four boxes; Box 1 (N53103-N53272), Box 2 (N53273-N53460), Box 3 (N53461-N53663), Box 4 (N53664-N53801). The 2 prints are stored in Photo Folder 1. Box 5 contains the envelopes in series 5. In 2008 the nitrate negatives were moved to an offsite storage facility.
Biographical/Historical note:
Reverend James Osborne Arthur (1887-1971) and his wife Katherine Arthur (1883-1960) were missionaries for the Reformed Church of America, working on the Nebraska Winnebago Reservation from 1912 to 1914 and among the Chiricahua and Mescalero Apaches in the Whitetail section of the Mescalero Apache Reservation in New Mexico from June 1914 to 1919.

Arthur was born in South Dakota in 1887 to Frank G. Arthur (1861-1948) and Jean O. Schuler (Scouller; 1863-1914), but spent his early life in Iowa. James had 5 siblings Margaret W. Arthur (b. 1889), F. Gale Arthur (1892-1952), Dorothy M. Arthur (b.1894), Jeanie (Jeanne) Arthur (1896-1961), and Jessie M. Arthur (1899-1992).

On June 26, 1911, James Arthur married Katherine Magdeline Gottberg Rhoades (1883-1960). The Arthurs had five children who are documented in this collection: Margaret Jean (1913-2010), James, Jr. (1915-2002), John Paul (1917-1987), Robert Lee (1919-2000) and Kathryn (1923-). Reverend Arthur died in August 1971 in Lomita, California.
Related Materials:
The following book documents the Arthurs' work and life on the Mescalero Apache Reservation: Herbert, D. and R. K. Herbert. Yah Et-Te: A Struggling Missionary's Record of Work Among Geronimo's People on the Mescalero Apache Reservation in 1914-1919. Philadelphia: Xlibris Corporation, 2000.
Provenance:
This collection was donated to NMAI in 2007 in memory of Reverend James O. Arthur and Katherine Arthur by Barbara Jane Arthur Jacobs (the Arthurs' granddaughter) and family.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Missions -- Nebraska  Search this
Missionaries -- New Mexico  Search this
Missionaries -- Nebraska  Search this
Missions -- New Mexico  Search this
Winnebago Indians -- Missions  Search this
Chiricahua Indians -- Missions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Nitrate negatives -- 1900-1960
Gelatin silver prints
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Reverend James O. Arthur photograph collection; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.057
See more items in:
Reverend James O. Arthur photograph collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv472facc35-17d2-431d-b9ce-4bdc450007a4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-057
Online Media:

Ferdinand Anthony Stahl photographs from the Peruvian Amazon

Creator:
Stahl, Ferdinand Anthony, 1874-1950  Search this
Extent:
3 Negatives (photographic)
18 Photographic prints
6 Copy negatives
Culture:
Asháninka (Campa/Chuncha)  Search this
Yagua (Yahua)  Search this
Amahuaca  Search this
Amazonia  Search this
Indians of South America -- Peru  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Date:
1925
1928
Summary:
Photographic prints and negatives taken by Seventh-day Adventist missionary Ferdinand Anthony Stahl amongst indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon. These include the Asháninka (Campa/Chuncha), Yagua (Yahua) and Amahuaca communities.
Scope and Contents:
The majority of the photographs in this collection include portraits of indigenous community members in the Peruvian Amazon taken by Ferdinand Anthony Stahl while on Mission for the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Some of the photographs include images of Ferdinand Stahl and his wife Ana posing with community members and it is unclear who the photographer was for these images. The photographs were shot in 1925 and 1928 in the Ucayali (Atalaya Province), Junin (Chanchamayo Province) and Loreto regions in Peru. The bulk of the photographs were taken among the Asháninka (Campa/Chuncha) and includes images of women weaving; group portraits along the Río Perené with canoes; as well as posed group portraits in front of the Stahl's Mission. There are also photographs of Yagua (Tahua) tribal members posed in traditional dress.

Negatives include N14915-N14917. Prints include P07956-P07965, P08614-P08619, P09483-P09484. Copy negatives include N36121-N36124, N36262-N36263. The copy negatives were created by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (NMAI's predecessor museum).
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
Ferdinand Anthony Stahl, 1874-1950, was a Seventh-day Adventist missionary to South America. Along with his wife Ana, Stahl converted to Seventh-day Adventism in 1902 and trained as a nurse at the Battle Creek Sanitarium in Battle Creek, Michigan. In 1909 the Stahls, along with their children, were sent as missionaries to La Paz, Bolivia by the General Conference in order to evangelize the indigenous communities in the area. In 1911, they moved to the Peru side of Lake Titicaca, establishing schools among the Aymara and Quechua communities. In 1920 the Stahls moved from Lake Titicaca to the headwaters of the Amazon in Iquitos, Peru where they established the Metraro Mission Station and launched mission boats downriver. They returned to the United States in 1939.

See "Ferdinand Stahl, Missionary to Peru" Adventist Heritage - Vol. 12, No. 2, summer 1988 by Robert G. Wearner for more information.
Related Materials:
See Box 307, Folder 7 in the Museum of the Amrican Indian, Heye Foundation records (NMAI.AC.001) for an original catalog list of Peruvian and Bolivian Artifacts purchased from Stahl by the MAI in 1927.
Provenance:
Gift of Ferdinand A. Stahl in 1927 (N14915-N14917) and part of a 1929 purchase along with ethnographic objects (P07956-P07965). It is unclear when the remainder of the prints (P08614-P08619, P09483-P09484) were acquired by the Museum.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Peru  Search this
Missionaries  Search this
Missions -- Peru -- Photographs  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Ferdinand Anthony Stahl photographs from Peruvian Amazon, image #, NMAI.AC.141; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.141
See more items in:
Ferdinand Anthony Stahl photographs from the Peruvian Amazon
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv40a410b74-f867-4d46-a3a3-6a3d2ca7c5b7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-141
Online Media:

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