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Barbara Swan papers

Creator:
Swan, Barbara, 1922-  Search this
Names:
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Chaet, Bernard  Search this
Chaet, Ninon  Search this
Fink, Alan, 1925-  Search this
Kelly, Ellsworth, 1923-  Search this
Kumin, Maxine, 1925-  Search this
Miller, Edwin Haviland  Search this
Miller, Rosalind S., 1923-  Search this
Olsen, Tillie  Search this
Sexton, Anne  Search this
Tovish, Harold, 1921-2008  Search this
Weinberg, Elbert, 1928-  Search this
Extent:
820 Items ((partially microfilmed on 2 reels))
3 Linear feet (Addition)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1927-1992
Scope and Contents:
REELS 826-827: 697 letters, including letters to her parents and her future husband Alan Fink, and letters from Bernard Chaet, Maxine Kumin, Tillie Olsen, Anne Sexton, Andrew Stevovich, Elbert Weinberg, and the Cober Gallery; a 15-page diary; a scrapbook containing photographs, clippings, catalogs and miscellany; and many loose clippings and catalogs.
UNMICROFILMED: Photographs of Swan, Ellsworth Kelly, and other students of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston School; letters relating to Swan's career and from friends and relatives, including Bernard and Ninon Chaet and Edwin and Rosalind Miller; Christmas cards by Swan and other artists; drafts and a transcription of a talk by Swan on Harold Tovish; exhibition announcements and catalogs; clippings; and printed material on Anne Sexton.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, illustrator, draftsman, and lithographer; Boston, Mass. Studied at School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston under Karl Zerbe. Ellsworth Kelly was also a student there. Swan collaborated as an illustrator with poets Anne Sexton and Maxine Kumin.
Provenance:
Material on reels 826-827 was lent for microfilming in June of 1974 by Barbara Swan. She donated the photographs of Ellsworth Kelly in December 1974, and letters, writings, exhibition catalogs and miscellaneous printed material in 1992. Additional papers are expected.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Illustrators  Search this
Poets  Search this
Lithographers -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Draftsmen (artists) -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women illustrators  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.swanbarp
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-swanbarp

Polly Thayer (Starr) papers, 1846-2008, bulk 1921-2008

Creator:
Thayer, Polly, 1904-2006  Search this
Thayer, Polly, 1904-2006  Search this
Subject:
Sarton, May  Search this
Koval, Dorothy  Search this
Yarnall, Agnes  Search this
Abramson, Doris E.  Search this
Cortissoz, Royal  Search this
Hofer, Philip  Search this
Thayer, Ethel Randolph  Search this
Thayer, Ezra Ripley  Search this
Tudor, Tasha  Search this
Wheelwright, John  Search this
Starr, Donald C.  Search this
Friends General Conference (U.S.)  Search this
Trustees of Reservations (Mass.)  Search this
Vose Galleries of Boston  Search this
Copley Society (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston  Search this
Nucleus Club (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Interviews
Sketches
Video recordings
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Topic:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Kanto Earthquake, Japan, 1923  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6141
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216362
AAA_collcode_thaypoll
Theme:
Women
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_216362
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Polly Thayer

Interviewee:
Thayer, Polly, 1904-2006  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Cox, Gardner, 1906-1988  Search this
Hale, Philip Leslie, 1865-1931  Search this
Hawthorne, Charles Webster, 1872-1930  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Hopkinson, Charles, 1869-1962  Search this
Littlefield, William Horace, 1902-1969  Search this
Saltonstall, Nathaniel, 1903-1968  Search this
Sarton, May, 1912-  Search this
Van Ness, Beatrice Whitney, 1888-1981  Search this
Wickey, Harry  Search this
Extent:
89 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1995 May 12-1996 February 1
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Polly Thayer (Starr) conducted 1995 May 12-1996 February 1, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Thayer talks about her childhood in an upper class Boston family, thriving on drawing in charcoal from casts at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, under tutelage of Beatrice Van Ness; her social debut, 1921-1922; a trip in the summer of 1922 to the Orient with her mother and brother where she was caught in the Tokyo earthquake; Philip Hale's method of teaching drawing at the Museum School in Boston, 1923-1924, and, later, privately; Eugene Speicher's urging her to free herself from Hale's teaching; the difficulty of making the transition to painting; and winning of the Hallgarten Prize of National Academy of Design, 1929.
Studying with Charles W. Hawthorne in Provincetown, Massachusetts in the summer of 1923-1924, which countered the rigidity of her training at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston School; travels in Spain and Morocco in early 1929, at the time her large painting of a nude, "Circles," won the Hallgarten Prize; the importance to her of a letter in 1929 from the critic, Royal Cortissoz, urging her to not fall into the trap of the Boston School and become formulaic in her work; her first one-person show at Doll and Richards, Boston, which resulted in 18 portrait commissions; her ease with which she did self-portraits early in her career, but not so later; and her difficulty in holding the attention of portrait sitters.
Studying with Harry Wickey at the Art Students League, who taught her by boldly re-working her drawings for "plastic" values, which Starr quickly achieved; sketching medical operations and back-stage at theatres, which gave her the dramatic subject matter she sought in the early 1930s; her portraits; getting married in 1933 and the affect on her work; and her work at the Painter's Workshop in Boston with Gardner Cox and William Littlefield. She recalls May Sarton whose portrait she painted in 1936, Charles Hopkinson, and Hans Hofmann.
The distractions from painting brought about by marriage, children, acting, an active social life and much travel; her increased involvement in social concerns through her conversion to Quakerism; the simplification of her paintings beginning in the late 1930s and her steady execution of portrait commissions, which took less time; her exhibitions in Boston and New York through the 1940s and the rarity of them after that; being a board member of the Institute of Modern Art, Boston, and its co-founder, Nathaniel Saltonstall; her approach to painting which amounts to seeking the invisible in the visual world; and the onset of glaucoma which has ended her painting career.
Biographical / Historical:
Polly E. Thayer (1904-2006) was a painter from Boston, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 44 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.thayer95
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-thayer95
Online Media:

Polly Thayer (Starr) papers

Creator:
Thayer, Polly, 1904-2006  Search this
Names:
Copley Society (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Friends General Conference (U.S.)  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston  Search this
Nucleus Club (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Trustees of Reservations (Mass.)  Search this
Vose Galleries of Boston  Search this
Abramson, Doris E.  Search this
Cortissoz, Royal, 1869-1948  Search this
Hofer, Philip, 1898-1984  Search this
Koval, Dorothy  Search this
Sarton, May, 1912-  Search this
Starr, Donald C.  Search this
Thayer, Ethel Randolph, 1870-1953  Search this
Thayer, Ezra Ripley, 1866-1915  Search this
Tudor, Tasha  Search this
Wheelwright, John, 1897-1940  Search this
Yarnall, Agnes  Search this
Extent:
21.6 Linear feet
0.807 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Interviews
Sketches
Video recordings
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Date:
1846-2008
bulk 1921-2008
Summary:
The papers of Boston portraitist and painter Polly Thayer (Starr) (1904-2006) measure 21.6 linear feet and 0.807 GB and date from 1846 to 2008, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1921-2008. The papers document Thayer's personal life and career as a painter, portraitist, and pastel artist. Found within the papers are biographical materials, extensive family papers, correspondence with artists and art venues, interviews, writings, subject files, organization files, exhibition files, art inventory records, printed and digital materials, five sketchbooks, artwork, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Boston portraitist and painter Polly Thayer (Starr) (1904-2006) measure 21.6 linear feet and 0.807 GB and date from 1846 to 2008, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1921-2008. The papers document Thayer's personal life and career as a painter, portraitist, and pastel artist. Found within the papers are biographical materials, extensive family papers, correspondence with artists and art venues, interviews, writings, subject files, organization files, exhibition files, art inventory records, printed and digital materials, five sketchbooks, artwork, and photographs.

Biographical material includes a marriage certificate, school records, inventories of possessions, passports, files about the 1923 Great Kanto earthquake in Japan, and a few personal and scattered financial documents such as invoices and receipts for various art related expenses.

Extensive family papers on many of Polly Thayer's immediate and extended family members include obituaries, condolence letters, writings, and printed materials. The most voluminous files are about Polly Thayer's husband Donald Carter Starr, her mother Ethel Randolph Thayer, and her father Ezra Ripley Thayer.

There is limited correspondence with friends and and colleagues, including Royal Cortissoz, Philip Hofer, Tasha Tudor (photocopies), Dorothy Koval, the curator who wrote about Thayer for her first show at Vose Galleries in 2001, as well as two art consultants who helped Thayer inventory her artwork. The bulk of the correspondence is with museums, galleries, and other venues such as the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Copley Society of Boston, and Vose Galleries.

Interviews with Polly Thayer include transcripts as well as sound and video recordings. There is also a sound recording of poet and professor Doris Abramson discussing Catherine Sargent Huntington.

Writings include typescript and handwritten drafts of essays, notebooks, and notes on assorted topics. The bulk of the material was written by Thayer, with a few writings by others.

Subject files are found for people and general interests. The "People" files are collected documents about Thayer's friends, colleagues, artists, and portrait subjects. The files include short biographies, articles, obituaries, a few photographs, two videocassettes and one sound recording. The most voluminous files are on Francis DeLancey Cunningham, the Howe family, Rose Nichols, May Sarton, John Brooks Wheelwright, and Agnes Yarnall. Thayer's "Interests" files consist of articles and clippings on various topics such as animals, humor, and pacifism.

Organization files contain materials related to Polly Thayer's charitable contributions, club memberships and affiliations, including The Chilton Club, Nucleus Club, Religious Society of Friends, and Trustees of Reservations, among others. These files contain seven sound recordings.

Exhibition files contain exhibition catalogs, reviews, clippings, notes, inventory price lists, and other materials about Thayer's solo and group shows.

Art inventory records consist of dismantled binders of inventories that also include photographs of artwork and descriptive information such as the title, medium, and dimensions. There are also photographic inventories of works of art arranged by subject, and several partial art inventories.

Printed materials include two scrapbooks compiled by Polly Thayer's mother containing articles about Thayer, magazines, journals, exhibition catalogs, brochures, exhibition invitations, postcards, clippings, and miscellaneous materials. Digital materials consist of inventories and digitized audio interviews.

Five sketchbooks include figure drawings, portrait sketches, and landscape sketches. Also found are loose drawings of animals, landscapes, and people.

Disbound binders of photographs contain images of works of art that are grouped by subject, including portraits, landscapes, and "mystical/flowers/animals," as well as personal photographs of Polly Thayer and family members, houses, social events, pets, and friends. There is one small disbound photograph album of houses and properties.
Arrangement:
The Polly Thayer papers were organized and inventoried by curator Dorothy Koval and other art consultants prior to arriving at the Archives of American Art, and most likely do not reflect the original order by Polly Thayer. The Archives has maintained the arrangement imposed by Koval for the bulk of the papers. This collection is arranged as 13 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1921-2007 (0.8 linear feet; Box 1, 22, 0.582 GB; ER01-ER02)

Series 2: Family Files, 1846-2006 (2 linear feet; Box 1-3, 22)

Series 3: Correspondence, 1929-2008 (1.3 linear feet; Box 3-5)

Series 4: Interviews, 1995-2004 (0.2 linear feet; Box 5, 0.196 GB; ER03)

Series 5: Writings, 1922-2006 (1.7 linear feet; Box 5-6)

Series 6: Subject Files, circa 1900-2008 (3.3 linear feet; Box 7-10)

Series 7: Organization Files, 1931-2008 (1 linear feet; Box 10-11, 0.029 GB; ER04)

Series 8: Exhibition Files, 1928-2006 (1.9 linear feet; Box 11-13)

Series 9: Art Inventory, circa 1940-1999 (4.6 linear feet; Box 13-17)

Series 10: Printed Material, 1900-2006 (1.8 linear feet; Box 17-19, 22)

Series 11: Sketchbooks, 1930-circa 1970 (0.3 linear feet; Box 19, 23)

Series 12: Artwork, 1927-circa 1990 (0.4 linear feet; Box 19, 23, OV 25)

Series 13: Photographs, 1898-2006 (2.1 linear feet; Box 19-21, 24)
Biographical / Historical:
Polly Thayer (Starr) (1904-2006) was a Boston painter of portraits, landscapes, and still lifes.

Ethel Randolph Thayer, known as Polly, was born in Boston in 1904, the daughter of Professor Ezra Ripley Thayer, also Dean of the Harvard Law School, and Ethel Randolph Thayer, née Clark. Thayer began her drawing lessons at an early age and later attended the Westover Boarding School in Middlebury, Connecticut. Although she signed some of her early paintings Ethel Thayer, by the end of the 1920s she generally signed her work Polly Thayer. She continued to use Polly Thayer as her brush name after she married, although in 1967 she changed her name legally from Ethel Randolph Starr to Polly Thayer Starr.

After graduating from Westover School, Thayer traveled to China, Korea, and Japan with her brother and mother. While in Japan, the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 struck just as their ship was about to leave Yokohama. In the devastation that followed, their ship was used as a hospital and Polly Thayer assisted with nursing the injured.

After returning home, Thayer began her formal studies at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts from 1923 to 1925 where she took painting classes taught by Philip Hale. She eventually left the Boston Museum and began private painting lessons with Hale. While working under Hale, she painted a large nude, Circles, which was awarded the National Academy of Design's coveted Julius Hallgarten Prize in 1929. She also spent the summer of 1924 in Provincetown studying with Charles Hawthorne and traveled to Europe where she studied at the Académie Colarossi in Paris. She later studied in Madrid and, from 1930-1933, at the Art Students League in New York City.

Thayer's first solo exhibition was held on New Year's Eve, 1930 at the Doll & Richards gallery in Boston. The Globe reviewer declared it "surely settles her status as one of the foremost painters in the country." The success of the exhibition led to numerous portrait commissions --any of them exhibited at Wildenstein gallery in New York City --and launched Thayer's career as a portrait artist. Her portrait subjects include Judith Anderson, Jacques Barzun, Maurice Evans, Lewis Galantiere, Robert Hale, May Sarton, John Wheelwright, and Agnes Yarnall, among others. Additional galleries that subsequently gave Thayer solo shows were the Sessler Gallery in Philadelphia; Contemporary Arts and Pietrantonio Galleries in New York; and in Boston the Guild of Boston Artists, Grace Horne Galleries, Child's Gallery, The Copley Society, the St. Botolph Club and the Boston Public Library.

In 1933, Polly Thayer married Donald Starr, a Boston lawyer and avid sailor. They married in Italy and honeymooned in Paris while he took a break from a sailing trip around the world on his schooner "Pilgrim." They had two daughters, Victoria and Dinah. In 1942 Thayer joined the Society of Friends (Quakers) which became an important part of her life and identity. She was active in many educational, charitable and cultural institutions and local clubs. Thayer had long been fascinated by the dynamics, meaning and variety of visual experience. In 1981 the Friends Journal published her essay "On Seeing," a paper she continued to refine until she was ninety-seven.

In the 1950s and 1960s, Polly Thayer began focusing more on landscapes and still lifes and continued to be prolific artist, exhibiting in numerous solo and group exhibits in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia. In her later years she renewed an early affiliation with Vose Galleries which she maintained for the rest of her life. In 2001, she was the only living artist whose work was included in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts exhibition "A Studio of Her Own" and a banner of her portrait of May Sarton hung over the entrance to the Museum.

Polly Thayer (Starr) died on August 30, 2006.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds an oral history interview of Polly Thayer conducted May 12, 1995-February 1, 1996, by Robert F. Brown.

The Polly Thayer Starr Charitable Trust holds archival materials and artwork by Polly Thayer.
Provenance:
The Polly Thayer (Starr) papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Polly Thayer in 1998 and again in 2008 by Thayer via Stephanie S. Wright, executor. A notebook was donated in 2016 by Dinah Starr, daughter of Polly Thayer (Starr) and merged with the rest of the collection.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Portrait painters  Search this
Topic:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Kanto Earthquake, Japan, 1923  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Interviews
Sketches
Video recordings
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Polly Thayer (Starr) papers, 1846-2008, bulk 1921-2008. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.thaypoll
See more items in:
Polly Thayer (Starr) papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-thaypoll
Online Media:

Marie Danforth Page papers

Creator:
Page, Marie Danforth, 1869-1940  Search this
Names:
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Beaux, Cecilia, 1855-1942  Search this
Bellows, George, 1882-1925  Search this
Page, Calvin Gates  Search this
Thayer, Abbott Handerson, 1849-1921  Search this
Extent:
5.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Drawings
Date:
1867-2016
Summary:
The papers of Boston portrait painter Marie Danforth Page measure 5.9 linear feet and date from 1867 to 2016. The papers document her career in Boston, Massachusetts, through biographical material, correspondence, subject files, personal business records, printed material, artwork, and photographic material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Boston portrait painter Marie Danforth Page measure 5.9 linear feet and date from 1867 to 2016. The papers document her career in Boston, Massachusetts, through biographical material, correspondence, subject files, personal business records, printed material, artwork, and photographic material.

Biographical information includes award certificates and diplomas, biographical sketches, family records, membership cards, notes, notebooks, and some writings by others. The series also contains material on the artist's husband Calvin G. Page.

There is correspondence with Marie Danforth Page from family, friends, colleagues, museums, and galleries. Notable correspondents include Abbott H. Thayer, Elizabeth Bartol, George Bellows, Frank W. Benson, Aldro T. Hibbard, Jonas Lie, and Cecilia Beaux. There is also posthumous correspondence with Calvin G. Page concerning memorial exhibitions for Marie Danforth Page, and a fair amount correspondence with other family members such as daughters Margaret and Susan.

Subject files consist of card files of artwork, meeting minutes and other material for The School of the Museum of Fine Arts Council (Boston) and the Hazeltine Portrait Committee, and records related to memorial exhibitions of Marie Danforth Page's artwork.

Personal business records include estate papers, lists of artworks, loan receipts, insurance records, and insurance policies.

Printed material includes exhibition catalogs, annual reports, books, bulletins, magazines, and clippings. Works of art consist of printing plates, handmade Christmas cards, sketchbooks, and drawings.

Photographs are albums, prints, and glass plate negatives of Page, artwork, exhibitions, and other people and places.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1869-1952 (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 1, 7)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1867-2011 (1.2 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 3: Subject Files, circa 1901-1949 (0.3 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, 1867-1951 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1882-2016 (1.4 linear feet; Boxes 2-4)

Series 6: Artwork, 1881-1940 (0.7 linear feet; Boxes 4, 7)

Series 7: Photographic Material, circa 1880-1940 (1.9 linear feet; Boxes 4-8, OVs 9-11, GPN Box 12)
Biographical / Historical:
Marie Danforth Page (1869-1940) was a portrait painter in Boston, Massachusetts. Page was a member of the conservative Boston School of Painting. She studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, with Frank W. Benson and Edmund Tarbell, from 1890 to 1895. She married Dr. Calvin Gates Page in 1896.

In 1904, Page took a summer course at Harvard with Denman Ross, and she also studied informally with Abbott Handerson Thayer. She was a charter member of the Guild of Boston Artists, active in the Copley Society, and on the Board of Visitors of the Museum of Fine Arts School.
Provenance:
The Marie Danforth Page papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 1985 by Danforth Page Fales and H. Gordon Fales, Page's grandchildren. Additional material was donated in 2020 by Danforth Page Fales.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Portrait painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Drawings
Citation:
Marie Danforth Page papers, 1867-2016. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.pagemari
See more items in:
Marie Danforth Page papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pagemari

Oral history interview with John Wilson

Interviewee:
Wilson, John, 1922-2015  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Boston University. School of Fine and Applied Arts  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Aronson, David, 1923-2015  Search this
Bengtz, Ture, 1907-1973  Search this
Gaither, Edmund B.  Search this
Hurwitz, Sidney, 1932-  Search this
Kay, Reed  Search this
Kramer, Jack  Search this
Lewis, Elma  Search this
Léger, Fernand, 1881-1955  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Zerbe, Karl, 1903-1972  Search this
Extent:
497 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1993 March 11-1994 August 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of John Woodrow Wilson conducted 1993 March-1994 August, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Wilson discusses his childhood as a member of a family of middle class blacks from British Guiana (now Guyana); his father's grave disappointments in the face of racial discrimination; his parents' push for their children to succeed; early urge to read and draw; encouragement by School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston students who taught at the Roxbury Boys Club; his secondary education; and friends.
He talks about his education at the MFA School, Boston, and comments on such teachers as Ture Bengtz and Karl Zerbe and compares their exacting methods with those of Fernand Leger, his teacher in Paris.
His work of the 1940s prior to going to Paris; the importance of early awards and sales received while still a student at the MFA School; the excitement of sharing a studio with fellow students, Francesco Carbone and Leo Prince; and encouragement to stay in school during WW II with the promise of a European study fellowship after the war.
The great impact of his years in Paris (1948-49); the lack of racial prejudice; the liberating effect of Leger's teaching; his awe of the work of Masaccio and Piero della Francesca during a trip to Italy; and the deep impression made on him by seeing tribal art in the Musee de l'Homme, Paris.
Continued discussion of Leger; his teaching methods; and influences on his work.
His first teaching position at the MFA School; his involvement in civil rights in Boston; his gregariousness and the use of his studio as a meeting place for artists and political activists; his involvement with socialism in Boston and New York; and working in a socialist children's camp. He remembers meeting Paul Robeson, Charles White, Elizabeth Catlett, and Bob Blackburn, who was then setting up his printmaking atelier in New York; marriage to a fellow socialist (June 1950); move to Mexico on a fellowship to study with Jose Orozco on the advice of Leger, only to find that Orozco had died; terrors of travel as an interracial couple through the U.S.; and different racial attitudes in Mexico and the U.S.
Living in Mexico (1950-56) and anecdotes of David Alfaro Siqueiros and Diego Rivera; his wife's meeting with Frieda Kahlo and seeing her collection of folk art; their free and cosmopolitan, if impoverished, life in Mexico; his work in a printmaking atelier and on the production of frescoes, and a lengthy aside about his brilliant brother, Freddie, who because he was black was not allowed to pursue his first love, geology, for many years.
Continued discussion of his experiences in Mexico; the dreary year (1957) he spent doing commercial art for a meatpackers' union in Chicago, a city he disliked; his move to New York in 1958, taking on commercial work to support his family, and teaching anatomy at the Pratt Institute.
Teaching art at a junior high school in the Bronx, and his gaining respect of students through special projects; teaching drawing at Boston University (1965-86), his approach to teaching including his demanding standards, the seriousness of the students, his opposing rigid attendance and grading rules, and colleagues, such as David Aronson who had created the School, Reed Kay, Jack Kramer, Sidney Hurwitz, and the University president, John Silber.
Working with the black arts entrepreneur, Elma Lewis, in setting up a visual arts program for the Boston black community (late 1960s-1970s), including the selection of a curator, Edmund Barry Gaither, a young art historian, who eventually established a museum of African-American art; his participation in various black art exhibitions, despite his belief that art should be seen regardless of the ethnic origins of artists; his move toward sculpture, beginning in the early 1960s, as a medium most expressive of black persons, culminating in the 1980s in a series of colossal heads and a statue of Martin Luther King, Jr. for the U.S. Capitol (1985-86); and why he makes art and will so long as he is able.
Biographical / Historical:
John Wilson (1922- ) is an African American painter, sculptor, illustrator, printmaker, and educator from Boston, Massachusetts. Full name John Woodrow Wilson.
General:
Originally recorded on 11 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 22 digital wav files. Duration is 16 hr., 2 min.
Uneven transcription reflects Wilson's unusual speech pattern.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the transcription and microfilming of the interview provided by the Newland Foundation.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Educators -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Printmakers -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Sculptors -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.wilson93
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wilson93
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Elizabeth Saltonstall

Interviewee:
Saltonstall, Elizabeth, 1900-1990  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Boston Society of Independent Artists  Search this
Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Institute of Modern Art (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Milton Academy (Milton, Mass.) -- Faculty  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Windsor School (Boston, Mass.) -- Faculty  Search this
Windsor School (Boston, Mass.) -- Students  Search this
Benson, Frank Weston, 1862-1951  Search this
Bosley, Frederick A., 1881-1942  Search this
Chase, Frank Swift, 1886-1958  Search this
Clark, Henry Hunt  Search this
Cross, Anson K., 1862-1944  Search this
Hale, Philip Leslie, 1865-1931  Search this
James, Alexander, 1890-1946  Search this
Miller, George Charles, b. 1894  Search this
Presser, Josef, 1909-1967  Search this
Saltonstall, Nathaniel, 1903-1968  Search this
Thompson, Leslie P.  Search this
Wengenroth, Stow, 1906-1978  Search this
Extent:
34 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1981 November 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Elizabeth Saltonstall conducted 1981 November 18, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Saltonstall discusses her experiences with art as a child in Boston (mentioning Frank Weston Benson as an influence) and her subsequent art education at the Winsor School, the art school of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and independent study in Paris. She remembers the various teaching styles of the Museum School faculty (Frederick A. Bosley, Henry Hunt Clark, Anson K. Cross, Philip Leslie Hale, Alexander James, and Leslie P. Thompson), especially as they contrasted with French teaching methods. She also speaks of her teachers in France and on Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket (including Frank Swift Chase), and recalls some of her co-students (including Josef Presser). Particular mention is made of a lithography workshop taught by Stow Wengenroth, and of George C. Miller, who printed her lithography stones. Her cousin, Nathaniel Saltonstall, is discussed as a patron of the arts, especially his contributions to the establishment of the Institute of Modern Art [Institute of Contemporary Art] in Boston. She touches also on her own teaching career at Winsor School and Milton Academy, and her involvement with the Boston Society of Independent Artists and the Grace Horn Gallery.
Biographical / Historical:
Elizabeth Saltonstall (1900-1990) was a painter, printmaker, and instructor of Chestnut Hill, Mass.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound cassette. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 25 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Printmakers--Massachusetts--Boston  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Art patrons -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- France -- Paris  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- Massachusetts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.salton81
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-salton81
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Pietro Pezzati

Interviewee:
Pezzati, Pietro, 1902-1993  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Hopkinson, Charles, 1869-1962  Search this
Extent:
37 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1971 July 15
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Pietro Pezzati conducted 1971 July 15, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art. Pezzati speaks of his youth and the influence of Italian parents; the development of his artistic interests; his education at the Child-Walker School and studying under Charles Hopkinson; influences of European art; his philosophy of portraiture; the influence of his travels on his work; and his methods of painting.
Biographical / Historical:
Pietro Pezzati (1902-1993) was a painter from Boston, Mass.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 30 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Portrait painting  Search this
Sculptors -- United States -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.pezzat71
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pezzat71
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Otis Philbrick

Creator:
Philbrick, Otis, 1888-1973  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recording: (39 p. transcript), 5 in.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1971 June 30
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Otis Philbrick conducted 1971 June 30, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Otis Philbrick (1888-1973) was a painter, printmaker, educator from Boston, Mass.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 1 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 38 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Educators -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Printmakers -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.philbr71
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-philbr71
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Conger Metcalf

Interviewee:
Metcalf, Conger, 1914-1998  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Wood, Grant, 1891-1942  Search this
Zerbe, Karl, 1903-1972  Search this
Extent:
2 Items (sound cassettes. Sound recording)
41 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1982 Feb. 24
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Conger Metcalf conducted 1982 Feb. 24, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Metcalf speaks of studying with Grant Wood and Karl Zerbe; his career as a teacher of painting and drawing at Boston University; and his figural subject matter and method of working.
Biographical / Historical:
Conger Metcalf (1914-1998) was a painter and educator from Boston, Mass.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hrs., 28 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Art teachers -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.metcal82
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-metcal82
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Lawrence Kupferman

Interviewee:
Kupferman, Lawrence Edward, 1909-1982  Search this
Interviewer:
Swift, Geoffrey  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
32 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1965 Nov. 12
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Lawrence Kupferman conducted 1965 Nov. 12, by Geoffrey Swift, for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Lawrence Kupferman (1909-1982) was a painter and printmaker from Newton Centre, Mass. Born in Boston. Studied at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts School.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 1 min.
Provenance:
Conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Printmakers -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.kupfer65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kupfer65
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Lawrence Kupferman

Interviewee:
Kupferman, Lawrence Edward, 1909-1982  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Tyler, Joyce  Search this
Extent:
47 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1971 June 10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Lawrence Kupferman conducted 1971 June 10, by Robert Brown and Joyce Tyler, for the Archives of American Art. Kupferman discusses his studies, his work, printmaking, cinema paintings, teaching, the Institute of Contemporary Art, the art scene in Boston, the painter and the public, his family, and other artists.
Biographical / Historical:
Lawrence Kupferman (1909-1982) was a painter and printmaker from Newton Centre, Mass. He was born in Boston and studied at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts School.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hrs., 7 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Printmakers -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.kupfer71
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kupfer71
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Reed Kay

Interviewee:
Kay, Reed  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School -- Faculty  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School -- Students  Search this
Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture -- Faculty  Search this
Kokoschka, Oskar, 1886-  Search this
Zerbe, Karl, 1903-1972  Search this
Extent:
54 Slides
232 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1995 December 22-1996 October 4
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Reed Kay conducted 1995 December 22-1996 October 4, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art over seven sessions, in Kay's home, in Brookline, Massachusetts.
The cassettes are accompanied by 54 color slides of Kay's artwork executed between 1941 and 1993, including sketches, watercolors, and paintings.
Kay talks about his childhood in an immigrant Jewish community in Boston and the great encouragement he received from teachers and librarians; his entry into the difficult Boston Latin School at age 11; and his early entry into the art classes at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Kay continues discussion about the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston School; life-long friendships there with Jason Berger, Jack Kramer, and David Aronson; and instructors, including Karl Zerbe, head of painting.
Kay talks about his service in World War II; completion of education at MFA School; his marriage in 1946; his first teaching position at the MFA School's summer sessions under Mitchell Siporin and Leonard Baskin in 1948 and Oskar Kokoschka in 1949. He discusses Kokoschka and Zerbe as teachers and colleagues; and his travelling fellowship to Paris, Italy, and Spain, 1949-1950.
Kay continues his discussion of Karl Zerbe as a teacher; talks about the difficulty of beginning a painting career and teaching, especially in a university as Kay did from 1956 until 1989; and about various teaching colleagues at the MFA School.
Kay talks about the superb teaching of anatomy by Ture Bengtz and of perspective by Peter Dubaniewicz at MFA School in the early 1940s; on the precocious abilities of upperclassmen such as Conger Metcalf and John Wilson, and the stimulation their accomplishment gave Kay; on his work, from student drawings to his cityscape paintings of the late 1950s, which he continues to make, abandoning figural, narrative, and studio subjects.
Teaching materials and methods of painting at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (summers of 1952 and 1954-1960) and the high quality of instruction and students and his decision to leave; the pluses and minuses of teaching and the toll it took on his own work; his long tenure at the School of Visual Arts, Boston University (1956-1989).
On his writings, principally, "The Painter's Companion: a Basic Guide to Studio Methods and Material," (1961) [revised editions, titled, "Painter's Guide," (1972, 1983)], which was an outgrowth of the emphasis put on craftsmanship, permanence, and mastery of media at MFA School under Karl Zerbe; on his growing concern, expressed in writings and lectures, with the toxicity of some modern artists' materials; and his relationship with art conservators. He discusses his work, from 1959 into the early 1990s while viewing slides.
Biographical / Historical:
Reed Kay (1925- ) is a painter and teacher from Brookline, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 9 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 17 digital wav files. Duration is 12 hrs., 56 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.kay95
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kay95
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Robert Douglas Hunter

Interviewee:
Hunter, Robert Douglas, 1928-2014  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Extent:
2 Items (sound files Sound recording, digital, wav file)
43 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1973 Jan. 11-Feb. 25
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Robert Douglas Hunter conducted 1973 Jan. 11-Feb. 25, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Robert Douglas Hunter (1928-2014) was painter and educator from Boston, Mass.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Educators -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.hunter73
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hunter73
Online Media:

Oral history interview with R. H. Ives Gammell

Interviewee:
Gammell, R. H. Ives (Robert Hale Ives), 1893-1981  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recording, 5 in.)
10 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1973 Mar. 21-June 12
Scope and Contents:
An interview of R. H. Ives Gammell conducted 1973 Mar. 21-June 12, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
R. H. Ives Gammell (1893-1981) was a painter and writer from Boston, Mass.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.gammel73
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gammel73
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Allan Rohan Crite

Interviewee:
Crite, Allan Rohan, 1910-2007  Search this
Creator:
Thompson, Susan  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Rambusch (Firm)  Search this
Rambusch Glass and Decorating Company  Search this
Society of Independent Artists (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Extent:
179 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1979 January 16-1980 October 22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Allan Rohan Crite conducted 1979 January 16-1980 October 22, by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art. Also participating in the interview is Crite's assistant, Susan Thompson.
Crite describes his family background and his youth in Boston. He gives great detail about his childhood interest in art and the art classes he took as a child, sharing drawings he did then with the interviewer. He remembers his art education at the Museum of Fine Arts School and involvement with the Society of Independent Artists. Crite discusses his ideas about the Episcopal church, his religious beliefs, and his interest in the liturgy and spirituals in his artwork. He recounts his engagement in the Navy, participation in the WPA, and work with the Rambusch Company. Crite describes paintings he did of street life in Black communities of Boston in the 1930s, a series of portraits, and paintings he did to illustrate spirituals and the Episcopal liturgy. He speaks about race relations and explains his motivations for an educational project in progress entitled, "The Cultural Heritage of the United States: a Rediscovery," promoting a multicultural view of American history. The last segment of the interview includes Susan Thompson, a fabric artist and close friend collaborating with Crite on projects mostly of a religious nature, including vestments and altar cloths.
Biographical / Historical:
Allan Rohan Crite (1910-2007) was a painter and illustrator from Boston, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 7 hr., 8 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Illustrators -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Christian art and symbolism  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African American painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.crite79
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-crite79
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jan Cox

Interviewee:
Cox, Jan, 1919-1980  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Extent:
66 Pages (Transcript)
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1972 April 7-25
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jan Cox conducted 1972 April 7-25, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art. Also included is research material regarding the interview.
Biographical / Historical:
Jan Cox (1919-1980) was a painter and educator from Boston, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 3 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 34 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Educators -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.cox72
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cox72

Oral history interview with Gardner Cox

Interviewee:
Cox, Gardner, 1906-1988  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Extent:
3 Items (sound files, digital, wav file)
107 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1974 March 19-July 8
Scope and Contents:
Interview of Gardner Cox conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, in Boston, MA, from March 19-July 8.
Cox speaks of his childhood friends, his parents' artistic leanings, his early painting instructors, his education at Harvard, his training and early career in architecture; his portraits of socialites and Democratic party notables, and describes his sketches and their relationship to his portraits. He also recalls Amy Lowell, R.H. Ives Gammell, Charles Webster Hawthorne, Frank Shay, John Frazier, Aldro Hibbard, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Gardner Cox (1906-1988) was a painter from Boston, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 3 digital wav file. Duration is 4 hr., 14 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Portrait painting -- 20th century -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.cox74
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cox74
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Ruth Cobb

Interviewee:
Cobb, Ruth, 1914-2008  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Kupferman, Lawrence Edward, 1909-1982  Search this
Levine, Jack, 1915-2010  Search this
Extent:
24 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1971 October 26
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Ruth Cobb conducted 1971 October 26, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art. Cobb speaks of her childhood and the development of her interest in art; her education; going into advertising art; doing free-lance work; her interest in watercolor; her husband, Lawrence Kupferman, and their mural work together; her work in acrylic; her philosophy of art; her influences; and the Boston art scene. She recalls Jack Levine.
Biographical / Historical:
Ruth Cobb (1914-2008) was a painter from Newton Centre, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 3 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Muralists -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Watercolor painting  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.cobb71
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cobb71

Oral history interview with Dana Chandler

Interviewee:
Chandler, Dana, 1941-  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
African-American Master Artists in Residence Program  Search this
Massachusetts College of Art -- Students  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston  Search this
Northeastern University (Boston, Mass.) -- Faculty  Search this
Simmons College. Art and Music Dept. -- Faculty  Search this
Andrews, Benny, 1930-2006  Search this
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988  Search this
Catlett, Elizabeth, 1915-2012  Search this
Mazur, Michael, 1935-2009  Search this
Tovish, Harold, 1921-2008  Search this
Extent:
89 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1993 March 11-May 5
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Dana Chandler conducted 1993 March 11-May 5, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Chandler remembers his childhood in the Black community of Roxbury, Massachussets, with numerous siblings, pugnacious, hard-drinking longshoreman father, and mother who was the linchpin of the family; precocity as a reader and child artist; attendance at Saturday morning children's art classes at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and at Boston Educational High School where needed discipline was instilled in him by its all-white faculty; and as an assistant at school after graduation (1959-61).
Chandler talks about his awareness of budding civil rights movement; his attendance (1962-67) at Massachusetts College of Art while supporting his new, young family and working for the Jamaica Plain Area Planning Action Council which was funded by the federal Model Cities program; his first exhibitions (1967), in a liberal local church and a black businessmen's club; the exhibition (1969) "Twelve Black Artists from Boston," at the Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University; and his involvement, along with Harold Tovish and Michael Mazur, in the group, Artists Against the War.
He recalls his initiation of the exhibition, "Afro-American Artists/New York and Boston," at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1970, for which he was given no credit; his position as an unpaid cultural commentator for a Black newspaper and radio station; his politically-charged paintings and prints from the late 1960s onward; his meetings with senior Black artists, such as Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett Mora, and Benny Andrews; and his steady espousal of confrontation.
Chandler discusses teaching at Simmons College, Boston, 1971 to present; his creation in 1974 of the African-American Master Artists-in-Residence Program (AMARP), Northeastern University, Boston, and his direction of it until 1993, when he was relieved of the position by the University.
Chandler discusses his exhibition at Northeastern University in 1976, "If the Shoe Fits, Hear It!" under the name Akin Duro, and its evidence of the respect in which he was held; the loss of much of his work in a studio fire; and his current large-scale graphic work.
Biographical / Historical:
Dana Chandler (1941- ) is an African American painter, printmaker, and educator from Boston, Massachussets.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 51 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the transcription of this interview provided by the Newland Foundation.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Educators -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Printmakers -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
African American painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.chandl93
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chandl93
Online Media:

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