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Records Relating to South American Languages

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Correspondent:
Steward, Julian Haynes, 1902-1972  Search this
Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967  Search this
Farfán, José M. B.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
18 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of South America  Search this
Aymara Indians  Search this
Bora Indians  Search this
Asháninka (Campa/Chuncha)  Search this
Cocama Indians  Search this
Guarani Indians  Search this
Shuar  Search this
Kaingang Indians  Search this
Mataco Indians  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Quechua Indians  Search this
Puquina Indians  Search this
Uru Indians  Search this
Witoto Indians  Search this
Yagua Indians  Search this
Yunca Indians  Search this
Zaparo Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Vocabulary
Date:
1941-1948
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Mexico/Central America/South America series contains Harrington's records relating to South American languages. His research covered the following languages: Awishira, Aymara, Campa, Cholon, Cocama, Guarani, Jivaro, Kaingang, Mataco, Miranya, Otomi, Quechua, Uru-Puquina, Witoto, Yagua, Yunca, and Zaparo.

Harrington's records relating to Quechua are the most extensive set he compiled on a South American language. The first section of notes, labeled "Quechua Springboard," is a semantically arranged file consisting of lexical items extracted from Ernst W. Middendorf's Quechua dictionary. Harrington copied his entire dictionary, one item per page, in order to have a basic vocabulary for comparison with other languages of the region. The remainder of Harrington's Quechua records have to do with articles which he was preparing for publication. These include notes and drafts for the papers on Quechua phonetics and grammar that he coauthored with Valcarcel, a paper titled "Hokan Discovered in South America," and a review of "Poesia Folklorica Quechua" by J. M. B. Farfan.

Harrington's Witoto files also form a large section of this subseries. Materials include files of data for analysis as well as drafts of several papers. The first paper, titled "The Sounds of Witoto," is a brief undated article referring to the work of Preuss. Included are a two-page final version, a one-page carbon of a variant version, a two-page carbon of a Spanish translation, and a page of miscellaneous notes on phonetics. There are notes and rough drafts for articles on Witoto, Miranya, and Cocama. The highly unorganized records include excerpts from Harrington's "Cocama Grammarlet" and personal communications with Julian Steward and J. Alden Mason. There is also a comparative vocabulary of Witoto, Miranya, and Cocama. This so-called "analphabetikon" includes notes arranged under numerous semantic headings: age, rank, kinship, plants, animals, material culture, etc. This file was used in preparing vocabulary lists for inclusion in Harrington's second large paper on Witoto.

Harrington prepared at least four papers on Jivaro (abbreviated "Jiv."), a language which he felt was a "very divergent type of Arawakan." While most other linguists gave it an independent status, he felt that the resemblances with Arawak were genetic. The first article, "Jibaro Epitome," consists of a review of Juan Ghinassi's grammar (1938). The file continues with notes and drafts of "The Jivaro Language." Harrington presents ethnological data of the Jivaro by way of introduction and proceeds to give an outline of the language. A draft of a third paper, "Vocabulary of the Jivaro Language," actually consists of a working copy of a Jivaro vocabulary. The title page, labeled "Jivaro Spingboard" lists the dictionary by Ghinassi (Gh. or Ghin.) as the major source of the semantically arranged vocabulary. The file concludes with notes and a draft for the article "The Jivaro Indians."

The materials which Harrington compiled on the Miranya language are fairly extensive. The files begin with a comparative vocabulary organized in what he termed a "loose-leaf system." Miranya terms, as well as Witoto, Guarani, Cocama, and Arawak forms, are arranged in a number of standard semantic and grammatical categories. Extracts were taken from the works of Adam, Farabee, Kinder, Preuss, Rivet, Ruiz de Montoya, Tessman, and Whiffen. There are also three separate sections labeled "Farabee M. Voc.," "Tessman M. Voc.," and "Whiffen M. Voc." in which lexical items from these sources are listed, one word per page. Writings based on Harrington's study of the secondary sources follow. The file concludes with a short draft by Mason of a write-upon Miranya for "The Languages of the South American Indians" and a letter from Harrington to Steward dated April 4, 1943. Enclosed with the letter are pages one to four of a paper and pages 10 and 11 of a bibliography. They deal with a review of the problem of assigning Miranya to a larger linguistic stock.

The remaining materials on the other South American languages consist of notes from secondary sources, drafts of papers, and some correspondence. His notes on Otomi include field notes recorded by Harrington from Pablo Galicia, a native of San Juan Tutxtepec, interviewed in Xochimilco, Mexico in 1951. The miscellaneous notes section contains materials of a more general nature and include notes from conversations Harrington had with Mason and Steward. There are also notes on various South American languages with subsections on: Awishira (Abishira), Aymara, Arawakan, Campa, Chipaya, Cholon, Fitita, Guaranian, Mataco, Miranya, Okaina, Quechua, Resigaro, Tupi, Uru-Puquina, Witoto, Yunca, and Zaparo. Harrington's notes include general observations, bibliographic references, extracts from secondary sources, and partial drafts of papers. Of particular interest is an item filed under Quechua: a letter to Julian Steward from J. M. B. Farfan, dated July 9, 1943, enclosing a list of one hundred basic words in Quechua. The last four files of miscellany consist of drafts of various writings.
Biographical / Historical:
Harrington's earliest work in the field of South American languages resulted in a paper which he coauthored with Luis E. Valcarcel, director of the Museo Nacional in Lima, Peru. Correspondence indicates that the two men met during a visit which Valcarcel made to Washington in March 1941. By April 6 Harrington had already drafted a manuscript of the article "Quichua Phonetics. A Shortcut to the Scientific Writing of the Language of the Incas of Peru," which he then forwarded to Valcarcel in New York City for translation. In July Harrington rewrote the paper in English and sent it to Peru for publication.

In early 1943 Harrington was called back from the field to B.A.E. headquarters in Washington, D.C. Among his official duties at the bureau was the examination of data for the linguistic sections of the "Handbook of South American Indians." The bureau had accepted responsibility for preparing the handbook and had begun work on it in 1940 under the editorship of Julian H. Steward. J. Alden Mason of the University Museum in Philadelphia was given the task of "classifying and tabulating the languages of South America." As it was possible for Mason to make only a few independent studies of these languages himself, he relied on the assistance of scholars such as Harrington to provide information to him through correspondence. He inserted a number of Harrington's findings into his final report as notes.

For the most part Harrington's method entailed examining secondary sources, extracting and compiling linguistic and morphological data from them, and comparing these data for various languages with a view to establishing linguistic affiliations. He also had limited opportunities to obtain first-hand information from native speakers of Guarani, Quechua, and Otomi and from a non-native speaker of Jivaro.

In May 1943 Harrington undertook an extensive study of the Jivaro language. The vocabulary which he compiled and reheard was used for comparison with that of the Zaparo language. During the same year Harrington examined data on Campa and Witoto and compiled working vocabularies (which he called "springboards") for Cocama and Quechua. He also found preliminary evidence of the interrelationships of several groups of languages. He felt that Miranya was related to Tupi-Guarani, that Uru-Puquina should be grouped with Arawakan, and that Aymara should be assigned to the Hokan family. He also published "Hokan Discovered in South America," a discussion of the affinity of Quechua with Hokan in terms of phonetics, morphology, and vocabulary. Comparisons were drawn from a number of Hokan languages of North and Central America: Chimariko, Choctaw, Salinan, and Subtiaba, several of which Harrington had studied at earlier periods.

Harrington reported "winding up" a comparison of Witoto, Miranya, and Guarani in January 1944. By April he had undertaken a study of Cholon, finished a paper on Witoto ("Sobre fonetico Witoto"), and was at work on an article on Zaparo. He also prepared "a long screed on Yunca" which was later published as "Yunka, Language of the Peruvian Coastal Culture."

During the 1944-1945 fiscal year, Harrington proceeded to work on Guarani and Quechua, which he described as "the Indian languages of South America." He made use of a publication by Dr. Bertoni with whom he met briefly. In addition, he published three papers relating to Quechua: "Earliest Navajo and Quechua," "La lengua Aynlara, hermana mayor de la Quichua," and "Quechua Grammarlet."

Harrington continued to work intermittently on South American languages for the next several years. At the end of fiscal year 1947-1948 he submitted a large report on Guarani, which held official status with Spanish in Paraguay, as well as a smaller paper on Mataco which was published under the title "Matako of the Gran Chaco." He also wrote another piece on the phonetics of Quechua.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Indians of South America -- Languages  Search this
Aymara language  Search this
Bora language  Search this
Campa language  Search this
Cholon language  Search this
Cocama language  Search this
Guarani language  Search this
Shuar language  Search this
Kaingang language  Search this
Mataco language  Search this
Otomi language  Search this
Quechua language  Search this
Puquina language  Search this
Uru language  Search this
Witoto language  Search this
Yagua language  Search this
Yunca language  Search this
Zaparo language  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Wichi  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 7.7
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 7: Mexico/Central America/South America
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw354659ff9-243c-4ced-89fb-c9352299bd75
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15147
Online Media:

Boy by Cactus Fence

Creator:
Jackson, William Henry, and Company  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (013 in x 009 in)
Container:
Oversize OS:7, Folder 5
Culture:
Mexican ?  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Photographs
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00857000
Local Note:
Black and white photoprint
Place:
Mexico -- Guanajuato -- Salamanca
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 24 SPC Mexico Otomi NM No # 00857000, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects / Series 4: Latin America / Mexico, Guatemala & Costa Rica / Mexico -- Otomi
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c0214c1c-5b87-4df2-a404-c3e636ce7596
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-24-ref10201
Online Media:

People Near Thatch Huts

Creator:
Jackson, William Henry, and Company  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (013 in x 009 in)
Container:
Oversize OS:7, Folder 5
Culture:
Mexican ?  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Photographs
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00857100
Local Note:
Black and white photoprint
Place:
Mexico -- Guanajuato -- Salamanca
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 24 SPC Mexico Otomi NM No # 00857100, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects / Series 4: Latin America / Mexico, Guatemala & Costa Rica / Mexico -- Otomi
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3787040e0-3b76-4dfe-8421-6d77671c1b1a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-24-ref10202
Online Media:

People Near Thatch Huts

Creator:
Jackson, William Henry, and Company  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (013 in x 010 in)
Container:
Oversize OS:7, Folder 5
Culture:
Mexican ?  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Photographs
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00857200
Local Note:
Black and white photoprint
Place:
Mexico -- Guanajuato -- Salamanca
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 24 SPC Mexico Otomi NM No # 00857200, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects / Series 4: Latin America / Mexico, Guatemala & Costa Rica / Mexico -- Otomi
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38a754247-69e8-4023-b0f1-237a26528521
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-24-ref10203
Online Media:

Water Carriers with Burro

Creator:
Jackson, William Henry, and Company  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (010 in x 013 in)
Container:
Oversize OS:7, Folder 5
Culture:
Mexican ?  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Photographs
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00857300
Local Note:
Black and white photoprint
Place:
Mexico -- Guanajuato -- Salamanca
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 24 SPC Mexico Otomi NM No # 00857300, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects / Series 4: Latin America / Mexico, Guatemala & Costa Rica / Mexico -- Otomi
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw344da2662-fa8e-4e8b-8f6c-a7d84db1484c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-24-ref10204
Online Media:

Portrait of Woman in Native Dress with Basket

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (004 in x 006 in)
Container:
Box Mex:1, Folder 14
Culture:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Photographs
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00804200
Local Note:
Black and white photoprint
Place:
Mexico
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 24 SPC Mexico Otomi NM 37239 00804200, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects / Series 4: Latin America / Mexico, Guatemala & Costa Rica / Mexico -- Otomi
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw32a97ca97-7427-4209-b97c-95b540e93399
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-24-ref9652
Online Media:

Thatch Hut

Creator:
Hough, Walter, 1859-1935  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (004 in x 005 in mounted on 004 in x 006 in)
Container:
Box Mex:1, Folder 15
Culture:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Photographs
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00804300
Local Note:
Black and white photoprint on cardboard mount
Place:
Mexico -- Distrito Federal -- Santa Fe
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 24 SPC Mexico Otomi NM No # 00804300, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects / Series 4: Latin America / Mexico, Guatemala & Costa Rica / Mexico -- Otomi
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw340949872-9f32-4817-a18e-8fb599fd6502
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-24-ref9653
Online Media:

Group in Native Dress Outside Adobe House with Thatch Roof

Creator:
Jackson, William Henry  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (008 in x 005 in mounted on 010 in x 007 in)
Container:
Box Mex:1, Folder 15
Culture:
Mexican ?  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Photographs
Date:
1890
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00804400
Local Note:
Black and white photoprint on standard card
Place:
Mexico -- Guanajuato -- Salamanca
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 24 SPC Mexico Otomi NM No # 00804400, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects / Series 4: Latin America / Mexico, Guatemala & Costa Rica / Mexico -- Otomi
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw326ca8c58-68f4-43dc-85ae-c4f7daf3a4a1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-24-ref9654
Online Media:

Group in Native Dress Outside Adobe House with Thatch Roof

Creator:
Jackson, William Henry  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (photomechanical print, 010 in x 006 in mounted on 011 in x 008 in)
Container:
Box Mex:1, Folder 15
Culture:
Mexican ?  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Photographs
Date:
1890
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00804500
Local Note:
See SPC 008044.00, Same Image
Black and white photomechanical print on paper mount
Place:
Mexico -- Guanajuato -- Salamanca
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 24 SPC Mexico Otomi NM No # 00804500, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects
Photographs of Native Americans and Other Subjects / Series 4: Latin America / Mexico, Guatemala & Costa Rica / Mexico -- Otomi
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw323422902-94a9-4f15-bbf6-e08728a70d38
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-24-ref9655
Online Media:

MS 2003-07 Arthur Leipold field research on the Otomi and Nahua in Ixtenco and Cuauhtenco, Mexico

Creator:
Leipold, Arthur  Search this
Extent:
25 Items (2.5 inches (1 document box)
Culture:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Nahua  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Mexico
Ixtenco (Tlaxcala, Mexico)
Cuahtenco (Tlaxcala, Mexico)
Date:
bulk 1958-1959
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of photocopies of the ethnographic field notes of Arthur Leipold, who introduced solar cookers to the Otomi and Nahua of Ixtenco and Cuahtenco. Includes Otomi word lists.
Biographical / Historical:
Arthur Leipold conducted research among the Otomi and Nahua of Ixtenco and Cuahtenco in Tlaxcala, Mexico as part of a University of Wisconsin, Madison project headed by Milton Barnett. Graduate anthropology students distributed solar powered cookers developed by the university among four Native American tribes in Arizona and in Ixtenco and Cuahtenco in the late 1950s. The students studied the effectiveness of the cookers under daily use and how well the cookers were accepted.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2003-07
Topic:
Solar energy  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Cooking -- Mexico  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2003-07, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2003-07
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b3e8e2c4-7d96-4fa9-be2d-f6720f327eaa
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2003-07

Frederick Starr collection of William L. Koehne photographs of Indigenous peoples of Mexico

Collector:
Starr, Frederick, 1859-1933  Search this
Photographer:
Koehne, William L.  Search this
Extent:
60 Mounted prints (platinum)
Culture:
Chol Maya  Search this
Chontal (Chontol)  Search this
Chinantec  Search this
Chocholtec (Chocho)  Search this
Ikood (Huave)  Search this
Mayas  Search this
Cuicatec Indians  Search this
Huastec  Search this
Tepehuán (Tepehuan)  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Totonac  Search this
Nahua  Search this
Aztec (archaeological culture)  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Mixtec  Search this
Zoque  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Zapotec  Search this
Triqui (Trique Choco)  Search this
Tzeltal Maya  Search this
Mixe  Search this
Mazatec [Huautla]  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Mounted prints
Photographs
Date:
circa 1890-1902
Scope and Contents note:
Front and profile studio portraits of Indigenous peoples of Mexico, representing Aztec, Chinantec, Chocho, Chol, Chontal, Cuicatec, Huastec, Huave, Maya, Mazatec, Mixe, Mixtec, Otomi, Tarascan, Tepehua, Tlaxcalan, Totonac, Trique, Tzental, Tzotzil, Zapotec, Zapotec Tehuartepec, and Zoque tribes. The photographs were made by William L. Koehne of Chicago for publication in Frederick Starr's book, Physical Characters of Indians of Southern Mexico.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Starr (1858-1933) was an anthropologist and academic who worked as curator at the American Museum of Natural History and professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago. During his professiorship, Starr hired professional photographer and studio owner William L. Koehne to make the studio portraits for his 1902 book, Physical Characters of Indians of Southern Mexico. Additionally, Starr made several field studies in Mexico and commissioned field photographs and plaster busts.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 123
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Photographs collected by Cyrus Thomas, Robert T. Hill, Edward W. Nelson, and Edgar L. Hewitt have been relocated to Photo Lot 169, Photo Lot 170, Photo Lot 171, and Photo Lot 172, respectively.
The Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives holds the Frederick Starr negatives and lanterns slides, 1894-1910.
Correspondence from Starr held in the National Anthropological Archives is in MS 4558, MS 4821, and the Bureau of American Ethnology records.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 123, Frederick Starr collection of William L. Koehne photographs of Indigenous peoples of Mexico, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.123
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d7f3a80c-2158-41ad-b0ee-07bb8f9ac7df
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-123

Frederick Starr negatives and lantern slides

Creator:
Starr, Frederick, 1859-1933  Search this
Photographer:
Lang, Charles B.  Search this
Grabic, Louis  Search this
Extent:
152 Lantern slides
3344 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Zoque  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
Mazatec [Huautla]  Search this
Zapotec  Search this
Maya  Search this
Wampanoag  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Mazahua  Search this
Ute  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tzeltal Maya  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Triqui (Trique) [San Joan Copala]  Search this
Shuar  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Chol Maya  Search this
Totonac  Search this
Osage  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Tonkawa  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Mixe  Search this
Chinantec  Search this
Mixtec  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Chibcha  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Mehináku (Mehinacu)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Apache  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Cahuilla  Search this
Haida  Search this
Karajá (Caraja)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Teotihuacán (archaeological culture)  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Macushi (Macusi)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Negatives (photographic)
Negatives
Place:
Colombia
Washington
West Virginia
Kansas
Kentucky
New Mexico
Brazil
Ecuador
Missouri
Wisconsin
Oklahoma
Ohio
New York
Georgia
Mexico
Iowa
Arkansas
Illinois
Pennsylvania
Alaska
Date:
1894-1910
Summary:
The collection includes materials from cultures in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecuador, and Guiana: Acoma Pueblo, Apache, Arapaho, Arikara, Assiniboine, Caddo, Cahuilla, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chinantec, Chippewa (Ojibwa), Choco, Chol, Chontal, Cochiti Pueblo, Crow, Cuicatec, Eskimo, Flathead, Haida, Hopi, Huastec, Huave, Iowa, Iroquois, Isleta, Karaja, Kwakiutl, Laguna Pueblo, Macusi, Mandan, Maya, Mazahua, Mazatec, Mehinaku, Menomini, Mixe, Mixtec, Navajo, Nez Perce, Osage, Otomi, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pima, Ponca, Potawatomi, Salish, San Blas, San Felipe Pueblo, Sauk & Fox, Shuar, Sioux, Taos Pueblo, Tarasco, Teotihuacan, Tepehua, Tlaxcala, Tlingit, Tonkawa, Totonac, Triqui, Tzental, Tzotzil, Ute, Wampanoag, Zapotec, Zoque, Zuni.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Starr was born in Auburn, New York, on September 2, 1858. He received a Ph.D. in biology in 1884 at Coe College, where he was later appointed professor of biology. Starr did postgraduate work in anthropology at Yale. In 1889 he was appointed head of Ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History, and in 1892 he was chosen by William Harper to organize the Anthropology Department at the new University of Chicago. Starr remained at the University until his retirement in 1923. Besides his field studies with various Indian tribes in the United States, Starr traveled to Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Guiana, Japan, the Philippines, and Africa. He died in Tokyo, Japan, on August 14, 1933. Starr was the author of several books and scholarly articles.
General note:
Starr hired professional photographers Charles B. Lang and Louis Grabic to accompany him on his field trips. One lantern slide of Moses Ladd (Menomini) was taken by William H. Jackson.
Provenance:
Dr. Frederick Starr, Purchased, circa 1929
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Topic:
Indians of South America -- Brazil  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Colombia  Search this
Indians of North America -- Alaska  Search this
Indians of North America -- Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Midwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Ecuador  Search this
Indians of South America -- Guiana  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Lantern slides
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.052
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv40602e9f6-8984-4da6-a139-bd97c27fa824
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-052

Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona

Photographer:
Hrdlička, Aleš, 1869-1943  Search this
Owner:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Names:
Hyde Exploring Expedition (1902-1903)  Search this
Former owner:
Lumholtz, Carl, 1851-1922  Search this
Extent:
588 Photographic prints
190 Copy negatives
Culture:
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Opata  Search this
Yoeme (Yaqui)  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Cora  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Wixarika (Huichol)  Search this
Seri  Search this
Nahua  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Yoreme (Mayo)  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Tepecano  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Place:
Casa Grande (Ariz.)
Arizona -- photographs
Mexico -- Photographs
Date:
1898-1902
Summary:
This collection contains photographic prints and copy negatives taken by Ales Hrdlicka in Arizona and Mexico between 1898 and 1902. The majority of the photographs were donated by George Pepper to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in 1923. Native communities that Hrdlicka photographed during his research include--Purepecha (Tarasco), Yoeme (Yaqui), Hualapai (Walapai), Havasupai (Coconino), Piipaash (Maricopa), Mojave (Mahave), Tohono O'odham (Papapgo), Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan), Tepecano, Akimel O'odham (Pima), Opata, Cora, Seri, Wixarika (Huichol), Nahua, Otomi and Yoreme (Mayo). Ales Hrdlicka (1869-1943) was born in the Czech Republic moved to the United States in 1881. Hrdlicka became known as the "Father" of Physical Anthropology and worked at the U.S. National Museum (now the National Museum of Natural History).
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains photographic prints taken by Ales Hrdlicka in Arizona and Mexico between 1898 and 1902. It is likely that many of the photographs were taken in 1902 as a part of the Hyde exploring expeditions on behalf of the American Museum of Natural History. Some of these photographs were taken by Carl Lumholtz and not Hrdlicka. Native communities that Hrdlicka photographed during his research include--Purepecha (Tarasco), Yoeme (Yaqui), Hualapai (Walapai), Havasupai (Coconino), Piipaash (Maricopa), Mojave (Mahave), Tohono O'odham (Papapgo), Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan), Tepecano, Akimel O'odham (Pima), Opata, Cora, Seri, Wixarika (Huichol), Nahua, Otomi, and Yoreme (Mayo). Locations photographed in Mexico include--Michoacán, Sonora, Mesa del Encanto and the Ruins of Totoate in Jalisco, Ruins of La Quamada and Ruins of Teul in Zacatecas, Nayarit State, and the central altiplano. Locations photographed in Arizona include--Casa Grande in Pinal County, Fort Yuma Reservation, Supai in Coconino County and the Mission San Xavier del Bac.

The photographs include a large amount of posed portraits of men and women, none of them identified in our collection. Hrdlicka often posed his subjects both facing forward and in profile so that he could better examine their physical attributes.There are some group portraits as well as scenic shots of houses, churches and village views. Hrdlicka also photographed archaeological ruins inlcuding Casa Grande, Mesa del Encanto, Totoate, La Quamada and Teul.

The copy negatives that were made from the prints in the late 1960s by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Arrangement:
The majority of the photographs have been left in the order that they were originally cataloged. Photographs from the various tribal communities in Arizona and Mexico are in Series 1-16, each community with its own series. The final series, Series 17, contains photographs from various archaeological ruins in Arizona and Mexico.
Biographical / Historical:
Ales Hrdlicka (1869-1943) was born in Bohemia in and came to America when he was thirteen. As a young man, he was trained in medicine at New York's Eclectic Medical College and the New York Homeopathic Medical College, receiving degrees from each. His first professional work was as a private practitioner, but he gave that up in 1894 when he joined the staff of the New York State Hospital for the Insane at Middletown. There, in addition to other duties, he began studies of the physical characteristics of inmates. In 1896, in preparation for a research appointment with the Department of Anthropology in the Pathological Institute of the New York State hospitals, Hrdlicka went to Paris and studied with Leon Manouvrier. After his return to America, he worked for a short period with the Pathological Institute and came into contact with G.S. Huntington, of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. Hrdlicka arranged and studied Huntington's large collection of skeletal material, thus gaining knowledge of a well-documented collection representing largely normal persons of European ancestry. He furthermore came to the attention of Frederic Ward Putnam, of the American Museum of Natural History, who arranged for his first anthropological field studies.

Hrdlicka became a member of the Hyde Expeditions to the American Southwest and northern Mexico. In 1898, he traveled to Mexico with Carl Lumholtz to study the Tarahumaras, Huichols, and neighboring tribes. In subsequent years, he returned to Mexico and the Southwest alone and studied physical characteristics and medical conditions of several American Indian tribes. Following this experience and examinations of the Trenton and Lansing skeletal material for Putnam, Hrdlicka was appointed head of the newly formed Division of Physical Anthropology in the United States National Museum in 1903.

In 1905, Hrdlicka returned to the Southwest for studies of Pima and Apache children and, in the following year, traveled to Florida to examine allegedly ancient remains of man. In 1908, he worked among a number of Native American tribes, including the Menominee, Oglala Dakota, Quinailt, Hupa, and Mohave, in a study of tuberculosis among them. In 1909, he traveled to Egypt with an expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in order to study living Egyptians and to examine remains of Egypt's past population. The following year took him to Argentina, Peru, and Mexico. In the first of these, he again examined allegedly ancient remains of man. In Peru, he made a large collection of skeletal material near Trujillo, at Pachamac, and in the Chicama Valley.

Between 1912-1914, Hrdlicka undertook a physical anthropological exhibit for the Panama-California Exposition in San Diego and, for this, traveled to eastern Siberia, Mongolia, Peru, and Florida. He also examined fossil remains of man in Europe and directed field work of other anthropologists in South and East Africa, St. Lawrence Island in Alaska, the Philippines, eastern Siberia, and the Ukraine. In 1915, for the Department of Justice, he assessed the racial makeup of Chippewas on the Leech Lake and White Earth reservations in Minnesota and also studied Dakota Indians. In 1917, his field work was directed toward white American families with longtime residence in the United States. In 1918, he carried out a survey of ancient sites in eastern Florida for the Bureau of American Ethnology. In 1920, he traveled to Hawaii, Japan, Korea, and Manchuria in connection with an appointment to lecture at the Peking Union Medical College. As director of the American School for Prehistoric Studies in France, he again studied fossil remains of man in Europe in 1922 and 1923. In 1925, he carried out work in India, Ceylon, Java, Australia, South Africa, and Europe. In 1927, he was again in Europe to deliver the Huxley Memorial Lecture before the Royal Anthropological Society in Great Britain. Between 1929 and 1938, he traveled frequently to Alaska to carry on an anthropological survey. In 1939, he traveled to Russia and Siberia.

Beginning with much of the skeletal collection of the Army Medical Museum, which had been transferred to the Smithsonian in 1898 before he was appointed there, Hrdlicka amassed a bone collection that included, among many other specimens, the Huntington collection, casts of fossil remains of man, and a large and diverse North American collection. He also gathered a large collection of human brains. Over three hundred publications resulted from his study of this material, his field work, and his study of specimens in other museums. In addition, he was involved in many other activities. For United States government agencies, he provided services ranging from examinations of human remains for law enforcement officials to providing information and opinions concerning national origins and traits that were needed to interpret laws and form foreign policy. During World War II, he also advised government officials on policies to be pursued with certain national groups following the war.

In 1918, Hrdlicka founded the American Journal of Physical Anthropology and remained its editor until 1942. In 1928, he was the major force behind the organization of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists and served as its president in 1928-1932. He was also president of the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1907, the American Anthroplogical Association in 1925-1927, and the Washington Academy of Sciences in 1928-1929. He was chairman of Section H of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1918 and secretary of the Committee on Anthropology of the National Research Council in 1917. In addition, Hrdlicka was a member of the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences. He represented the Smithsonian at several international gatherings of scholars, including meetings of the International Congress of Americanists.

Biographical note courtesy of the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History. See Ales Hrdlicka Papers. Edited by Rachel Menyuk, Processing Archivist at the National Museum of the American Indian.
Related Materials:
The majority of Ales Hrdlicka's papers and photographs are located at the National Athropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution. In addition to the Ales Hrdlicka Papers ca. 1887-1943 additional Hrdlicka photographs can be found in photographic lots 8, Division of Physical Anthropology collection; 9, photographs of Indians for the Panama-California Exposition, San Diego; 24, Bureau of American Ethnology, United States National Museum photographs of American Indians; 70, Department of Anthropology portrait file; 78, miscellaneous negatives; 97, Division of Ethnology collection (―USNM‖ Collection); 73-26B, Aleš Hrdlička photographs; 73-26G, miscellany; 77-48, group portraits of International Congress; 79-38, Division of World Archeology collection; 83-41, Division of Physical Anthropology collection of photographs of human bones; and 92-46, anthropology lantern slides.
Provenance:
Although it is unclear when George Pepper received the photographs from Ales Hrdlicka, Pepper donated the majority of the collection of photographs to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (MAI) in 1923. The rest of the photographs were cataloged by the MAI some time in the 1920s but the provenance history is unknown.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).

There are several restricted photographs in Series 2: Yoeme (Yaqui). This have been restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona, Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.103
See more items in:
Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv428a5c065-696f-4fa2-a3cd-11e427060b67
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-103
Online Media:

Otomí (Otomi)

Collection Photographer:
Hrdlička, Aleš, 1869-1943  Search this
Collection Owner:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Extent:
123 Photographic prints
54 Copy negatives
Container:
Folder 102-118
Folder 73-80
Culture:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Date:
1898-1902
Scope and Contents:
P00923-P01003, P05079-P05120, N34631-N34648, N35547-N35558, N37630-N37654 (not N37646)
This series includes 42 photographic prints taken of Otomí (Otomi) people between 1898 and 1902 in the Hidalgo State in central Mexico. Many of the photographs were taken in the city of Ixmilquipan and the town of Tula de Allende. The Otomí (Otomi) are an indigenous group located in the central altiplano in Mexico. The photographs in this series include landscape and city views in and near Ixmilquipan, including Iglesia del Carmen, vendors in Ixmilquipan, seated posed portraits, mainly in Tula Allende, as well as images of Otomi men and women going about their daily lives.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).

There are several restricted photographs in Series 2: Yoeme (Yaqui). This have been restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona, Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.103, Series 16
See more items in:
Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv454802352-6178-4d66-92cb-82ea584e7eee
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-103-ref25

MS 1627 Miscellaneous vocabularies of 32 different tribes

Collector:
Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886  Search this
Husband, Bruce  Search this
Encinas, Fr  Search this
Whipple, Amiel Weeks, 1817?-1863  Search this
Brown, H. B.  Search this
Heintzelman, Samuel Peter, 1805-1880  Search this
Duralde, Martin  Search this
Informant:
Cawewas, Pedro  Search this
Peraza, Hieronymo  Search this
Alejo, Marcos  Search this
Ortiz, Santiago  Search this
A-he-ba-tu  Search this
Esteban  Search this
Colusio  Search this
Extent:
183 Items (numbered pages )
Culture:
Kiowa  Search this
Nahua  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Tanoan Indians  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Pujunan  Search this
Athapaskan  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Seri  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tanoan  Search this
Wakashan Indians  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Kulanapan  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Atakapa  Search this
Maya  Search this
San Luis Rey  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
On page 129-134, there is a Comanche vocabulary alongside with Spanish and Luiseno. Follows items called for in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Some Comanche terms lacking.
Contents: Bartlett, John R. "Cochimi language of Lower California obtained through Mr Robinia of Guaymas, Sonora." No date. [post 1852] Autograph document. pages 215-218 in bound volume of vocabularies. Vocabulary written in "American Ethnological Society Circular Number 1, Indian Languages of America, June, 1852," a printed outline of 200 words. Negative microfilm on file. Heintzelman, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Cocopa language. Fort Yuma, Colorado, April 19, 1854. Copy by Bartlett, pages 165-166. Heintzelmam, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Mohavi or Hum-mock-havy taken by Major Heintzelman. Copy by Bartlett, pages 167-176. Copy in another hand in printed outline published by American Ethnological Society, pages 177-180. On negative Microfilm reel #37. Comanche San Luis Rey [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. No informant or date is recorded for the Comanche vocabulary of about 150 words, pages 129-135. All pages are in the handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett. However, penciled note on another copy of the Comanche vocabulary (Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 762) states "probably of J. R. Bartlett." Approximately 5 extra Comanche terms are listed in 1627 which were not copied into the manuscript filed under 762.
Contents: San Luis Rey Comanche [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. San Luis Rey vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 128-135. May 10, 1852. All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in another copy, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 772. According to the discussion, pages 128 and 135, vocabulary was recorded from Pedro Cawewas, an old man called the captain or chief of his tribe, about 150 of which now live where the mission of San Luis Rey is situated. Tiwa: Piro [Bartlett, John R.] Piro vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 53-54, and another copy, pages 67-68. "Language of the Piros," discussion, pages 55-59. No date. [Ca. October 2, 1852: date on "Tigua" (Piro ?) vocabulary immediately following on pages 63-65.] All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-b and 458-c. According to discussion, page 55, vocabulary was recorded from Hieronymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo, principal men of the pueblo of "Sinecu" [Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua] a few miles below El Paso de Norte, on the western bank of the Rio Grande. Tiwa: Senecu del Sur (Piro ?) [Bartlett, John R.] "Tigua" vocabulary of about 200 words, pages 63-65. October 2, 1852. Copy in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but was so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-a and 458-c. Note following heading: "[Language of ?] Indians of Taos, in New Mexico (pronounced Tee-wa) [sic] taken from Santiago Ortiz (A-he-ba-tu) head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. [i. e. Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua; see Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30, II, 509.]" Bartlet's Vocabularies ? 1. Pages 17-19 Sioux vocabulary, translated into Sioux by Bruce Husband, Fort Laramie, February 26, 1849. 2 pages. 2. Pages 21-24 Kiowa vocabulary, from Esteban, a Mexican captive for 7 years among the Comanches and Kiowas in Texas. 5 pages. 3. Pages 25-27 cf. Manuscript 1139- a copy of this. Ceris (Seri) vocabulary taken from a native at Hermosillo, January 1, 1852 (note by Gatschet says 1853). Informant- Colusio. 3 pages. 4. Pages 31-34 Yaqui vocabulary by Fr. Encinas of Ures, December 1851. 4 pages, including notes. 5. Pages 37-39 Opate (Nahuatlan) vocabulary, taken at Ures, Sonora. 3 pages. 6. Pages 43-45; 49-51. Apaches of the Coppermine, taken from Mangus Colorado July, 1851. 3 pages. (also duplicate copy). 7. Pages 53-59; 57 Piro (Tanoaan) vocabulary, taken from two Indians, Hieromymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo. 2 pages. Notes 5 pages. 8. Pages 63-65 "Tigua " [Tiwa] Indians of Taos in New Mexico vocabulary, taken from Santiago Ortiz, head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. 3 pages.
Contents: 9. Pages 71-73 Vocabulary of the language of the Coco-Maricopas of the river Gila (Yumian). 3 pages. 10. Pages 77-81; 85-92; Reel #21 Vocabulary of the Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages; and 11. Los Angeles Indians, Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages. 12. Pages 93-103 Yuman or Cuchan and Comiya (Comeya) vocabulary and notes, 11 pages, including extract from Lt Whipple's diary, October 7, 1849. 13. Pages 105-6; 109-10 13. Vocabulary in the Digger (Pujunan) [Maidu] language, from manuscript in the possession of J. B. Moore obtained by H. B. Brown. 4 pages. 14. Pages 113-116 Napa Valley (Digger) [Pujunan] vocabulary. 3 pages. 15. Pages 117-123 Makah of Cape Flattery and Diggers [Pujunan] of Napa Valley- vocabulary. 6 pages. 16. Pages 125-128 Kechi (Mission of San Luis Rey) vocabulary. Taken from Pedro Cawenas, May 10, 1852, San Luis Rey. Notes. 17. Pages 129-35 San Luis Rey and Comanche vocabulary. 7 pages. Taken from Pedro Cawewas. Includes notes. 18. Pages 137-39. San Luis Obispo vocabulary. 3 pages. 19. Pages 141-144 San Jose Indian vocabulary. 4 pages including notes.
Contents: Bartlett's vocabularies. 20. Pages 145-152 H'hana of Sacramento (Kulanapan) vocabulary, 6 pages. 21. Pages 155-159 Coluse (between Sacramento River and Clear Lake), vocabulary- 6 words only. Erroneously marked Athapaskan in Hewitt's hand. Actually Patwin and Wintun; see word for "Indian"- Note by M. R. Haas. 11/58. Items 21 ans 22: See Pitkin, Harvey and William Shipley, Comparative Survey of California Penutian, IJAL, Volume 24, Number 3, July, 1958, pages 174-88. (Reference from MRH). 22. Coluse and Noema vocabulary. 3 pages. 23. Page 163 Tehama vocabulary. 1 page. 24. Pages 165-66 Cocopa vocabulary. (Fort Yuma, Colorado, Mouth of the Colorado River). 2 pages. April 19, 1854. 25. Pages 167-180 Mohave vocabulary. Major Heintzelman. 14 pages including notes. 26. Pages 181-84 Otomi (Mexico) vocabulary. 3 pages. (1767 and 1826). 27. Pages 186-201 Chitimacha and Attacapa vocabularies and notes. 15 pages. (1848) 28. Pages 203-206 Maya vocabulary. From manuscript dictionary in possession of John Carter Brown. 3 pages. 29. Pages 207-210 Tarahumara vocabulary. 3 pages. (1787 and 1826). 30. Pages 211-214 Cahita (Sonora) vocabulary. 3 pages. 31. Pages 215-18 Cochimi (of Lower California), vocabulary. 3 pages. 32. Pages 219-221 Nevome (Pima of Sonora) vocabulary. 2 pages. (printed). 33. Pages 223-224 Letter to John R. Bartlett from George Gibbs re. to vocabularies. 3 pages.
Contents: Smith, Buckingham. "Vocabulary of the Nevome, As Spoken by the Pima of Moris, A Town of Sonora." 1861, and prior. Printed document. 2 pages. On pages 219 and 221 of this Manuscript. Published excerpt from History Magazine, July, 1861, pages 202-203. Contains grammatical notes, general vocabulary, and the Lord's Prayer in the Nevome dialect of Piman.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1627
Local Note:
Manuscript document
Topic:
Dakota language; Mayo dialect (Piman); Kumiai language; Central Pomo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Seri language  Search this
Yaqui language  Search this
Opata language  Search this
Chiricahua language  Search this
Maricopa language  Search this
Yuma language  Search this
Maidu language  Search this
Makah language  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Comanche language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Cocopa language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Chitimacha language  Search this
Atakapa language  Search this
Tarahumara language  Search this
Pima Bajo language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Otomi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Athabaskan  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Wakash  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Pima (Akimel O'odham)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1627, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1627
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a26edfb4-2402-46a4-a7d1-b985e6b84b47
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1627
Online Media:

MS 48 Collectanea upon the Codex Troano, terms of the Maya and other Central American languages

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
146 Pages
Culture:
Maya  Search this
Carib  Search this
Arawak  Search this
Aztec (archaeological culture)  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Calendars
Date:
1879
Scope and Contents:
A collection of ethnographic and linguistic notes from diverse sources, aiming at an understanding of problems of reading Mayan hieroglyphic characters. Most of the notes cover Mayan vocabulary and glyphs, but Gatschet ranges almost at random over other data, ethnographic and linguistic, that may have caught his interest. He touches on the Maya calendar, day names, Landa's alphabet, Maya-Spanish vocabulary from the Motul dictionary at Providence, similar vocabulary from Brasseur, etc., some Narraganset-English vocabulary (page 57 only) from Williams, notes on day signs from Rosny, etc., cultural objects compared with glyphic designs, Brasseur's synonymy of glyph characters, lists of Southeast tribes from a French source, Otomi vocabulary notes especially on the numerals (see pages 84-85), notes on Cariban and Arawakan, etymologies of Mayan words (pages 110, 111), notes from Brinton's Maya Chronicles, notes on Codices Mendoza, Troano, Tellerano-Remensis, notes from Penafiel, Pinart, etc., names of Aztec and Mayan gods, etc. No problems are settled, nor is any problem carefully attended: the notes are all preliminary. H. Landar 7 July, 1969.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 48
Topic:
Mayas  Search this
Pictographs -- hieroglyphs  Search this
Writing systems -- hieroglyphics  Search this
Numbers  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Mexico -- Yucatan  Search this
Genre/Form:
Calendars
Citation:
Manuscript 48, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS48
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw385f78295-6850-4dfe-a408-8cc2b6e4064b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms48

Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico

Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Former owner:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
93 Photographic prints
9 Negatives (photographic)
24 Copy negatives
Culture:
Nahua  Search this
Guerrero Nahua  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Wixarika (Huichol)  Search this
Chinantec [Chinantla]  Search this
Cora  Search this
Yoreme (Mayo)  Search this
Zoque  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Copy negatives
Photographs
Negatives
Place:
Mexico
Date:
1933-1940
Summary:
Images consist mostly of portraits of the indigenous people in the Mexican states of Michoacán, Guerrero, Nayarit, Sinaloa, Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz. The collection primarily contains images of Wikarika (Huichol) people, but includes images of the Purepecha (Tarasco), Guerrero Nahua, Chinantec [Chinantla], Zoque, Otomí (Otomi), Tzotzil Maya, Yoreme (Mayo) and Zapotec peoples.
Scope and Contents:
The Donald Bush Cordry collection primarily contains photographic prints and negatives made by Cordry while he collected objects from 1935 to 1938 on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Photographic materials from his private 1933 trip to Guerreo and a few taken around 1940 are also housed in the collection. The photographs depict the native peoples of the Mexican states of Chiapas, Guerrero, Michoacán, Nayarit, Oaxaca, Sinaloa, and Veracruz and represent people preparing food, making masks, pottery and textiles, and dressing for and participating in ceremonies. In addition there are village scenes and informal portraits of individuals. Series 1: Michoacán and Guererro States, includes images shot within the Purepecha (Tarasco) and Guererro Nahua communities between 1935 and 1936. (Negatives: N21118-N21126; Prints: P11986- P12008; Copy Negatives: N36725-N36731) Series 2: Nayarit and Sinaloa States, is the largest series and includes images shot in various Wixarika (Huichol) villages in 1937 and depicts many ceremonial functions. (Prints: P12659-P12672, P12880-P12887, P13273-P13275, P13386-P13414; Copy Negatives: N36855-N36863, N41431-N41432) Series 3: Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora and Mexico States, includes images from various culture groups from around 1940. These include Chinantec [Chinantla], Zoque, Otomí (Otomi), Tzotzil Maya, Yoreme (Mayo) and Zapotec. (Prints: P15052-P15053, P15202-P15203, P15347-P15348, P16553-P16562; Copy Negatives: N37306-N37307, N37335-N37336, N37506-N37507)

The photographic prints are all silver gelatin (DOP) and are a range of sizes. The majority of the negatives are copy negatives made by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation during a photo conservation project in the 1960s.
Arrangement note:
Arranged into three series by date and geographical location. Series 1: Michoacán and Guererro States: Purepecha (Tarasco), Guererro Nahua, 1933, 1935-1936; Series 2: Nayarit and Sinaloa States: Wixarika (Huichol), 1937; Series 3: Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora States: Various communities, circa 1940. Within each series the prints and negatives are physically arranged by catalog number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Starting in high school, Donald Bush Cordry was deeply committed to theatrical set design and puppetry and while attending the Minneapolis Institute of Art began to carve his own wooden marionettes and hand puppets. In 1931, Cordry made his first trip to Mexico (Guerrero) and become fascinated by contemporary Mexican Indian art, especially mask making. In 1934, Cordry moved to New York to work as a marionette designer for puppeteer Tony Sarg and soon contacted George G. Heye to learn more about Mexican Indian art. From 1935 to 1938, Cordry collected Mexican masks and other art forms on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. On his first 1935 collecting trip for Heye, Cordry traveled throughout the states of Michoacán and Guerrero and collected carved and painted dance masks.

In 1936, Cordry married fellow artist Dorothy Mann. Shortly after their wedding, the newlyweds traveled by horseback for six months through Nayarit, Jalisco, and southern Sonora and extensively collected among and photographed the Huichol, Cora and Mayo Indians. The couple moved to Mexico in 1938, first settling in Oaxaca; in the mid-1940s, no longer working for Heye, they relocated to Mexico City. There Cordry established his own design business and produced decorative Mexican folk art-style crafts. His business was highly successful and his work was featured in House and Garden magazine. The couple moved to Cuernavaca, where in 1953 Cordry suffered a stroke and was forced to close his workshop. His stroke also put an end to his traveling and collecting activities. Deeply interested in the history and traditions of Mexican Indians, Cordry assembled an extensive reading library of pre- and post-conquest Mexico materials and together with his wife published "Costumes and Textiles of the Aztec Indians of the Cuetzalan Region, Puebla, Mexico" (1940); "The Costumes and Weaving of the Zoque Indians of Chiapas, Mexico" (1941); and, most importantly, "Mexican Indian Costumes" (1968). Cordry's monumental "Mexican Masks" (1980) was published shortly after his death. Cordry died in Cuernavaca, Mexico, at the age of 71.
Related Materials:
There are around 900 ethnographic items collected by Donald Cordry in Mexico in the National Museum of American Indian's ethnology collections. For more information about these materials contact NMAI Collections.

The National Anthropological Archives (National Museum of Natural History) holds several collections of Donald B. Cordry photographs. See: NAA Photo Lot 87-38, NAA Photo Lot 82-14, and NAA Photo Lot 80-3. The Donald Cordry Mexican mask collection at Natural History can be found in the Department of Anthropology in accession 355867.
Provenance:
The majority of the Donald Cordry photographs came to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation along with field collections in 1936 and 1938. There were additional donations of photographs made by Cordry in 1937, 1940, 1941 and 1943.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of Mexico -- Social life and cutoms  Search this
Indians of Mexico -- Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Nayarit (Mexico)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Photographic prints
Negatives
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv43995f9d3-738a-4dd3-9cf4-4b071077f0a8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-008
Online Media:

Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora, Mexico States: Various communities

Collection Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Extent:
16 Photographic prints
6 Copy negatives
Culture:
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Chinantec [Chinantla]  Search this
Zoque  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Yoreme (Mayo)  Search this
Zapotec  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Date:
circa 1940
Scope and Contents:
This series includes photographic prints and copy negatives made across Mexico sometime around 1940, after Cordry was no longer working for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. The photographs were included with additional gifts and exchanges with the MAI in 1940, 1941 and 1943. The prints include portraits of Tzotzil Maya women in San Bartolomé de los Llanos, Chiapas; Chinantec [Chinantla] women in Choapam, Oaxaca; Zoque men and women in Copainala and Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas; an Otomi fiesta in Chalma, Mexico; Yoreme (Mayo) man and woman in Huatabampo, Sonora; and a Zapotec woman in Villa Hidalgo (Yalálag), Oaxaca. There are also several images of Zoque masks Cordry collected and two photographs of watercolor paintings made by Cordry.
Prints: P15052-P15053, P15202-P15203, P15347-P15348, P16553-P16562. Copy Negatives: N37306-N37307, N37335-N37336, N37506-N37507.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008, Series 3
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4585d1176-e05f-4dc1-82b3-804e3a1a4830
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-008-ref512

Otomí (Otomi) fiesta in Chalma

Collection Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
Container:
Photo-folder 12
Culture:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Date:
circa 1940
Scope and Contents:
Outdoor view of an Otomí (Otomi) fiesta in Chalma, Mexico State, Mexico. Three large wooden crosses are being erected by men and women.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008, Item P16558
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico / Series 3: Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora, Mexico States: Various communities
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4568fdcc0-502f-4a18-9335-3f4abd0754d3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-008-ref559

Group of Otomí (Otomi) women

Collection Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
Container:
Photo-folder 12
Culture:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Date:
circa 1940
Scope and Contents:
Group of Otomí (Otomi) women sitting on a cobblestone street in Toluca, Meixco State, Mexico.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008, Item P16559
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico / Series 3: Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora, Mexico States: Various communities
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv478f97731-e583-4a57-b88f-aed1e75c32dc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-008-ref560

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