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Can You Guess What I Found in the NMAI Collections?

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-12-19T16:10:39.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_1hN3YbQMBao

Works of art in situ

Collection Creator:
Drewal, Henry John  Search this
Drewal, Margaret Thompson  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
Lagos Museum Oto (Near Iddo Island) No info - [Representationof copulating couple. Similar in style to mask carved by Seriki of Oto near Igbessa] [index card notes p54]. The date on the slide is JUL 71.
Local Numbers:
45-2

I 2 YRB 71
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. Copyright held by John and Margaret Drewal. To publish images from this collection, permission must be given by Henry and Margaret Drewal. Contact Archives staff for further information. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Gelede -- Photographs  Search this
Art in situ -- Photographs  Search this
Works of art in situ  Search this
Collection Citation:
Henry and Margaret Drewal Photographs, EEPA 1992-028, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.1992-028, Item EEPA 1992-028-00956
See more items in:
Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal Collection
Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal Collection / Nigeria / 1971
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo747a5bdda-7e45-4eef-999f-c48cb5683194
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1992-028-ref1398

Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
A woman hums songs to a child. Three old ladies sing as they pick choke-cherries or cactus buds, husk corn, or dig camas root. A woman's high-pitched lu-lu-lu-lu rises over the men's voices at the end of an honoring song for returned veterans. "Chorus girls" back up the men's lead song at the drum during a war dance. The pulsating, driving hand-drum beats and magic-making songs women sing at a stick game. The woman whose songs make the Sun Dance circle right. These are the voices of Native women. Like the drum whose heartbeat is that of a woman, these women and their songs are at the heart of Indian Country. But unlike the drum, their songs and voices are rarely heard beyond their communities.

Along with the first of two recordings made available on Smithsonian/Folkways (Heartbeat: Voices of First Nations Women, SF 40415) the two-week presentation at the 1995 Festival and its accompanying program book essay were part of an effort to present an overview of music by Native women - traditional, new, innovative, and little known. Included were traditional women's songs from tribes in the United States and Canada as well as material usually sung by men and recently taken up by women. The recording, essay, and festival program also emphasized fresh material, Native women's music that merged traditional music with many styles of popular American music.

Very little women's music is known and appreciated, even by those who value and know Native American music. People may see Native women dancing when public performances take place, whether they are on stage or in a community setting. Still, men's dancing dominates the public arena. Because much of Native women's traditional singing occurs in a private setting associated with family, clan, ceremonial, or work activities, those who are unfamiliar with these traditions rarely see or hear women sing. Thus the common perception is that women have little presence or significance in the performance and preservation of Native musical traditions. A few tribal or regional collections have included women's singing and instrumental music. Recordings by contemporary Indian women musicians like Buffy Sainte-Marie first received favorable attention in the late 1960s. Since then, the ranks of such women have grown.

In recent years, particularly in the Northern Plains, changes are also underway with respect to the place of women at the drum, previously seen by most as an exclusively male domain. Increasingly, women describe being called to the drum, to sit at the drum, to be the drumkeeper in the way that men have talked about it. Increasingly, powwow singing in the Northern Plains has brought the advent of mixed drum groups and - as demonstrated at the Festival - all-female groups.

All these ways of singing and music-making exist among Native women. Much of the old music exists today, joined by newer ways. As Festival audiences could experience at the 1995 Festival, Native women's music is vital and dynamic, very much a part of the process through which Native peoples are preserving and revitalizing Native life and culture.

Rayna Green and Howard Bass were Curators, and Arlene Reiniger was Program Coordinator.

Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women was produced in collaboration with the Division of Cultural History at the National Museum of American History, with support from The Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds, the Smithsonian Educational Outreach Fund, the American Encounters Project, the National Museum of the American Indian, the National Museum of American History, the John Hammond Fund for the Performance of American Music, and the Smithsonian Institution Special Exhibition Fund.
Presenters:
Barry Bergey, Olivia Cadaval, Harold Closter, Judith Gray, Orin Hatton, Charlotte Heth, Marjorie Hunt, Phil Minthorn, Betsy Peterson, Alice Sadongei, Gwen Shunatona, Tom Vennum, Jr.
Participants:
ASSINIBOINE-NAKOTA SINGER-SONGWRITER

Georgia Wettlin-Larsen, vocals, hand drum, rattles, River Falls, Wisconsin

IROQUOIS WOMEN'S SOCIAL DANCE

SIX NATIONS WOMEN SINGERS -- SIX NATIONS WOMEN SINGERSSadie Buck, vocals, water drum, Six Nations Reserve, Ontario, CanadaCharlene Bomberry, vocals, rattles, Six Nations Reserve, Ontario, CanadaBetsy Buck, vocals, rattles, Six Nations Reserve, Ontario, CanadaPat Hess, vocals, rattles, Six Nations Reserve, Ontario, CanadaJanice Martin, vocals, rattles, Six Nations Reserve, Ontario, CanadaMary Monture, vocals, rattles, Six Nations Reserve, Ontario, Canada

KIOWA SINGERS

Mary Ann Anquoe, 1931-2002, vocals, Tulsa, Oklahoma

Dorothy Whitehorse DeLaune, vocals, hand drum, Anadarko, Oklahoma

Anita Anquoe George, vocals, hand drum, Sapulpa, Oklahoma

Gigi Horse, vocals, Washington, D. C.

MAKAH SONGS & DANCE

Melissa Peterson, vocals, hand drum, rattles, Makah Reservation, Neah Bay, Washington

Samantha Della, vocals, dance, Makah Reservation, Neah Bay, Washington

MALISEET-PASSAMAQUODDY DRUM

THE WABUNOAG SINGERS -- THE WABUNOAG SINGERSMargaret Paul, Fredericton, New Brunswick, CanadaAlma Brooks, Fredericton, New Brunswick, CanadaConnie LaPorte, Fredericton, New Brunswick, CanadaJoan Milliea-Caravantes, Fredericton, New Brunswick, CanadaAlice Claire Tomah, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada

MOHAWK SINGER-SONGWRITER

ElizaBeth Hill, vocals, guitar, Ohsweken, Canada

NAVAJO SINGER-SONGWRITERS

Geraldine Barney, vocals, flute, guitar, Tohatchi, New Mexico

Sharon Burch, vocals, guitar, Fairfield, California

NAVAJO SOCIAL DANCE SONGS

SWEETHEARTS OF NAVAJOLAND -- SWEETHEARTS OF NAVAJOLANDLillian Ashley, vocals, water drum, Navaho Reservation, Chinle, ArizonaDarlene Hardie, vocals, Navaho Reservation, Chinle, ArizonaEileen Reed, vocals, Navaho Reservation, Chinle, ArizonaAlberta Wilson, vocals, Navaho Reservation, Chinle, Arizona

NORTHERN PLAINS DRUM

CRYING WOMAN SINGERS -- CRYING WOMAN SINGERSCelina Jones, Fort Belknap Reservation, MontanaJackie Blackbird, Fort Belknap Reservation, MontanaToni Blue Shield, Fort Belknap Reservation, MontanaCora Chandler, Fort Belknap Reservation, MontanaChristina Jones, Fort Belknap Reservation, MontanaRamona Smith, Fort Belknap Reservation, MontanaGarrett Snell, Fort Belknap Reservation, MontanaRochelle Strike, Fort Belknap Reservation, MontanaSandra Wuttunee, Fort Belknap Reservation, Montana

RED EAGLE SINGERS, WIND RIVER RESERVATION, WYOMING -- RED EAGLE SINGERS, WIND RIVER RESERVATION, WYOMINGColleen Shoyo, Wind River Reservation, WyomingClaudenise Hurtado, Wind River Reservation, WyomingChardell Shoyo, Wind River Reservation, WyomingEvalita Shoyo, Wind River Reservation, WyomingLaMelia Shoyo, Wind River Reservation, WyomingBernadine Stacey, Wind River Reservation, Wyoming

PLAINS BIG DRUM

LITTLE RIVER SINGERS -- LITTLE RIVER SINGERSJohn Fitzpatrick, Washington, D.C.Bernard Covers Up, Washington, D.C.Gene Elm, Washington, D.C.Jerry Gipp, Washington, D.C.Roger Iron Cloud, Washington, D.C.

POMO SONG TRADITIONS

Bernice Torres, vocals, hand drum, rattles, Sebastopol, California

SEMINOLE SINGER AND STORYTELLER

Betty Mae Jumper, 1923-, vocals, Hollywood, Florida

SOUTHERN PLAINS SONGS

Gwen Shunatona, Pawnee-Otoe, vocals, Washington, D. C.

TRADITION-BASED CONTEMPORARY SONGS

ULALI -- ULALIPura Fe, Cherokee-Tuscarora, vocals, rattles, hand drum, Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaJennifer Kreisberg, Cherokee-Tuscarora, vocals, rattles, hand drum, Hartford, ConnecticutSoni Moreno-Primeau, Aztec-Maya, vocals, rattles, hand drum, Staten Island, New York

WARM SPRINGS AND WASCO SONG TRADITIONS

Mary Ann Meanus, vocals, hand drum, Warm Springs, Oregon

YUPIK SONG TRADITIONS

Elena Charles, 1918-, vocals, hand drum, Bethel, Alaska

Mary Stachelrodt, vocals, hand drum, Bethel, Alaska

ZUNI CEREMONIAL DANCE AND SONG

OLLA MAIDENS -- OLLA MAIDENSCornelia Bowannie, vocals, hand drum, frog box, Zuni Reserve, Zuni, New MexicoLoretta Beyuka, dance, Zuni Reserve, Zuni, New MexicoJoy Edaakie, dance, Zuni Reserve, Zuni, New MexicoArliss Luna, vocals, hand drum, frog box, Zuni Reserve, Zuni, New Mexico
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5af059044-f437-45ba-a9b3-b63c1e017c1d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1995-ref34

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Making Our Own Songs; Called to the Drum

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Heartbeat Program 1995 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Place, Janet L. (recorder)  Search this
Walker, Tracy (recorder)  Search this
Artist:
Hill, Elizabeth  Search this
Ashley, Lillian  Search this
Burch, Sharon  Search this
Shunatona, Gwen  Search this
Crying Woman Singers  Search this
Wabunoag Singers  Search this
Performer:
Hill, Elizabeth  Search this
Ashley, Lillian  Search this
Burch, Sharon  Search this
Shunatona, Gwen  Search this
Crying Woman Singers  Search this
Wabunoag Singers  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Americans  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Mohawk Indians  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
Pawnee Indians  Search this
Oto Indians  Search this
Cree Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Arizona
California
Ontario
Canada
Chinle (Ariz.)
Fairfield (Calif.)
Ohsweken (Ont.)
Montana
New Brunswick
Fredericton (N.B.)
Fort Belknap Indian Reservation (Mont.)
Date:
1995 June 24
Track Information:
101 Making Our Own Songs / Elizabeth Hill, Lillian Ashley, Sharon Burch. Guitar,Water-drum.

102 Called to the Drum / Crying Woman Singers, Wabunoag Singers, Gwen Shunatona. Drum.
Local Numbers:
FP-1995-CT-0482
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 24, 1995.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Folksong revival  Search this
Singer-Songwriters  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Guitar  Search this
Water-drum  Search this
Drum  Search this
Popular music -- Writing and publishing  Search this
Composition (Music)  Search this
Identity (Philosophical concept)  Search this
Gender  Search this
Malecite Indians  Search this
Passamaquoddy Indians  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995, Item FP-1995-CT-0482
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk531f1f623-ffc7-45fb-a5a4-e99308bd0148
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1995-ref837

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Called to the Drum; Recording Indian Women's Music; Good Time Music

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Heartbeat Program 1995 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Place, Janet L. (recorder)  Search this
Walker, Tracy (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Shunatona, Gwen  Search this
Heth, Charlotte  Search this
Gray, Judith  Search this
Vennum, Thomas  Search this
Torres, Bernice  Search this
DeLaune, Dorothy Whitehorse  Search this
Stachelrodt, Mary  Search this
Crying Woman Singers  Search this
Wabunoag Singers  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Americans  Search this
Malecite Indians  Search this
Atsina Indians  Search this
Pomo Indians  Search this
Kiowa Indians  Search this
Yupik Eskimos  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Montana
Fort Belknap Indian Reservation (Mont.)
Oklahoma
Alaska
California
Sebastopol (Calif.)
Anadarko (Okla.)
Bethel (Alaska)
Date:
1995 June 24
Track Information:
101 Called to the Drum / Crying Woman Singers, Wabunoag Singers, Gwen Shunatona. Drum.

102 Recording Indian Women's Music / Charlotte Heth, Judith Gray, Thomas Vennum.

103 Good Time Music / Bernice Torres, Dorothy Whitehorse DeLaune, Mary Stachelrodt.
Local Numbers:
FP-1995-CT-0483
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 24, 1995.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Lullabies  Search this
Drum  Search this
Cree Indians  Search this
Otoe  Search this
Gender  Search this
Pawnee Indians  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Assinboine Indians  Search this
Audio recording  Search this
Ethnomusicology  Search this
Fieldwork  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995, Item FP-1995-CT-0483
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk514f658f9-73b7-48f6-a220-0f12048998c1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1995-ref838

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Powwow Songs; Ways of our Grandmothers

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Heartbeat Program 1995 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Mullen, Mary (recorder)  Search this
Walters, Wendy (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Torres, Bernice  Search this
Shunatona, Gwen  Search this
Crying Woman Singers  Search this
Kiowa Singers  Search this
Wabunoag Singers  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Americans  Search this
Kiowa Indians  Search this
Atsina Indians  Search this
Cree Indians  Search this
Pomo Indians  Search this
Pawnee Indians  Search this
Oto Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Montana
New Brunswick
Canada
Fredericton (N.B.)
Fort Belknap Indian Reservation (Mont.)
California
Sebastopol (Calif.)
Date:
1995 June 25
Track Information:
101 Powwow Songs / Crying Woman Singers, Kiowa Singers, Wabunoag Singers. Drum.

102 Ways of Our Grandmothers / Bernice Torres, Gwen Shunatona. Hand drums,Rattle (Musical instrument).
Local Numbers:
FP-1995-CT-0486
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 25, 1995.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Drum  Search this
Hand drums  Search this
Rattle (Musical instrument)  Search this
Malecite Indians  Search this
Passamaquoddy Indians  Search this
Gender  Search this
Generations  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Family  Search this
Assinboine Indians  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995, Item FP-1995-CT-0486
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk54bec08ce-1833-4ce9-ba06-6f3a64717850
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1995-ref841

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Ways of our Grandmothers; Navajo Singers; Making Our Own Songs

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Heartbeat Program 1995 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Mullen, Mary (recorder)  Search this
Walters, Wendy (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Torres, Bernice  Search this
Shunatona, Gwen  Search this
Burch, Sharon  Search this
Hill, Elizabeth  Search this
Sweethearts of Navajoland  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Americans  Search this
Pomo Indians  Search this
Pawnee Indians  Search this
Oto Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
Mohawk Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
California
Sebastopol (Calif.)
Arizona
Chinle (Ariz.)
Fairfield (Calif.)
Ontario
Canada
Ohsweken (Ont.)
Date:
1995 June 25
Track Information:
101 Ways of Our Grandmothers / Bernice Torres, Gwen Shunatona. Hand drums,Rattle (Musical instrument).

102 Navajo Singers / Sweethearts of Navajoland, Sharon Burch. Drum,Harmonica,Guitar.

103 Making Our Own Songs / Bernice Torres, Sharon Burch, Elizabeth Hill. Rattle (Musical instrument),Guitar.
Local Numbers:
FP-1995-CT-0487
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 25, 1995.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Folksong revival  Search this
Singer-Songwriters  Search this
Hand drums  Search this
Rattle (Musical instrument)  Search this
Drum  Search this
Harmonica  Search this
Guitar  Search this
Gender  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Generations  Search this
Family  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Identity (Philosophical concept)  Search this
Composition (Music)  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995, Item FP-1995-CT-0487
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5fc3038e5-b410-450c-bd1d-3207c049e5f4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1995-ref842

Diary

Collection Collector:
Robinson, Franklin A., Jr., 1959- (actor)  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 4
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1944
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but negatives and audiovisuial materials are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Some papers of living persons are restricted. Access to restricted portions may be arranged by request to the donor. Gloves required for unprotected photographs. Viewing film portions of the collection and listening to LP recording requires special appointment. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
The Archives Center does not own exclusive rights to these materials. Copyright for all materials is retained by the donor, Franklin A. Robinson, Jr.; permission for commercial use and/or publication may be requested from the donor through the Archives Center. Military Records for Franklin A. Robinson (b. 1932) and correspondence from Richard I. Damalouji (1961-2014) are restricted; written permission is needed to research these files. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
The Robinson and Via Family Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
See more items in:
Robinson and Via Family Papers
Robinson and Via Family Papers / Series 2: Robinson Family / 2.6: Robinson, Franklin A.
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8d451e306-0493-47c5-8e54-5b55390f8ba2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0475-ref166
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
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Diary

Collection Collector:
Robinson, Franklin A., Jr., 1959- (actor)  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1926
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but negatives and audiovisuial materials are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Some papers of living persons are restricted. Access to restricted portions may be arranged by request to the donor. Gloves required for unprotected photographs. Viewing film portions of the collection and listening to LP recording requires special appointment. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
The Archives Center does not own exclusive rights to these materials. Copyright for all materials is retained by the donor, Franklin A. Robinson, Jr.; permission for commercial use and/or publication may be requested from the donor through the Archives Center. Military Records for Franklin A. Robinson (b. 1932) and correspondence from Richard I. Damalouji (1961-2014) are restricted; written permission is needed to research these files. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
The Robinson and Via Family Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
See more items in:
Robinson and Via Family Papers
Robinson and Via Family Papers / Series 2: Robinson Family / 2.3: Robinson, Frank A.
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep84cfeef02-beb2-4607-aa01-532ed0d558f2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0475-ref99
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Diary digital asset number 1

Hidatsa/Mandan/Crow

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
5 Boxes
Culture:
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Date:
1950-1951
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Plains series contains Harrington's Mandan, Hidatsa, and Crow research. The materials primarily consist of comparative vocabulary, comparative grammar, ethnographic notes, texts, and grammar. Small selections of Oto, Quapaw, Shawnee, Arikara, and Sioux terms are interspersed among the vocabulary and grammatical notes.

The vocabulary section (former B.A.E. ms. 6009pt.) is semantically arranged and covers eighteen categories. Carl R. Sylvester (abbreviated "Syl.") provided the Hidatsa terms and the Mandan came from Mark Mahto. There are comparatively few Crow terms. The material contains substantial linguistic elaborations; some ethnographic observations are also included, particularly in the plant vocabulary. While in Billings, Montana, Harrington evidently planned to rehear a Crow clan and relationship vocabulary copied from Robert H. Lowie's Notes on the Social Organization and Customs of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Crow Indians (1917). Few expressions, however, were reheard (former B.A.E. ms. 6003). Hidatsa material is sometimes identified by the term "Hir." Presumably Harrington was using Hira'tsa, an orthography variously applied in his notes to the language, people, or "ancient" village of Hidatsa. This interchange of "d" and "r" occurs elsewhere in the field notes--Chiwe-dhe for Chiwere, for example. The etymology of the name Hidatsa is apparently vague; there are some pertinent references to this subject among the mythology and tradition notes.

As with the vocabulary notes, there is more information on Hidatsa and Mandan than on Crow in Harrington's grammatical material. Phonetics and morphology are covered, with subcategories labeled by Harrington. This series was formerly catalogued as part of B.A.E. ms. 6009.

Also among Harrington's files is an article titled "New Materials in the Coracle of the Mandan Indians," which he submitted for publication in the American Anthropologist. He obtained most of the information from Crowsheart on September 26, 1950, and from Crowsheart's daughter, Annie Eagle, both of whom lived on the Fort Berthold Reservation in North Dakota. The content of the final draft is almost entirely ethnographic. The notes, however, indicate an attempt to provide a linguistic treatment of the subject, with Hidatsa and Crow comparisons from Sylvester and Mahto. This article (former B.A.E. ms. 6008) was not published.The route of Harrington's trip to Crowsheart's home and a bus trip from Brunswick to Kansas City are described in detail. There is a brief section on mythology and traditions (former B.A.E. ms. 6009pt.).

There is also a small set of reading notes from Washington Matthews' Ethnography and Philology of the Hidatsa Indians (1877) that deals mainly with the name "Missouri River." Additional information covers names of persons, a bibliography, and a few unsorted notes (former B.A.E. ms. 6009pt.). Other miscellaneous material was labeled "Rejects" by Harrington, including an interview in Bismark with a Mrs. Rubia, who had a Hidatsa mother and a Mandan father.
Biographical / Historical:
Between July and December 1950, John P. Harrington spent time at the Crow Indian reservation in southern Montana and at Fort Berthold in North Dakota. He returned to Washington on December 19 and spent from then until March 9, 1951, reporting on his fieldwork. The bulk of information was elicited from Carl R. Sylvester, a Hidatsa Indian, and from Mark Mahto, a Mandan. He interviewed Mahto's ninety-four-year-old father-in-law, Crowsheart, on September 26, 1950, after which he drafted a proposed article on Mandan coracles, or bullboats. In 1951 he tried unsuccessfully to secure Bureau of American Ethnology backing for the construction of a coracle, under Crowsheart's direction, for display in the National Museum.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Mandan language  Search this
Hidatsa language  Search this
Crow language  Search this
Oto language  Search this
Shawnee language  Search this
Arikara language  Search this
Dakota language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Mythology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Coracles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 5.2
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 5: Papers relating to the Native American History, Language and Culture of the Plains
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw395fd8962-1929-42cb-9898-d79225972262
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14745
Online Media:

Siouan

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
La Flesche, Francis, d. 1932  Search this
Deloria, Ella C.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Date:
1919-circa 1945
bulk 1937-1939
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Plains series consists primarily of Harrington's research on Dakota and Lakota languages. The Dakota notes are based mainly on the dictionaries of Stephen R. Riggs and John P. Williamson, with some original linguistic and ethnographic information inserted. The bulk of Lakota material centers around a proposed primer written in collaboration with John Bad Heart Bull, a Siouan artist who worked with Harrington at Fort Wingate in July 1939. Harrington's fervor for primers traces as far back as 1923. It continued sporadically until about 1936 and escalated from then until July 1939, when, at the direction of the Bureau of American Ethnology, he went to Fort Wingate to assist in the Office of Indian Affairs primer program. That same year he also consulted with the Federal Works Projects Administration on the translation of Sioux legends. Correspondence with Ella Deloria and extracts from her "Dakota Grammar," written in collaboration with Franz Boas, form part of this section. Small amounts of additional Siouan data include Oto and Dhegiha linguistic notes, and miscellaneous notes on the Dakota, Chiwere, Omaha/Ponca, Osage/Kansa, Kiowa, and Kansas/Kaw languages. Information regarding Omaha and Osage came from Francis LaFlesche. Also among the Siouan files are a brief Tutelo vocabulary and eight Saponi placenames extracted from various secondary sources.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Siouan languages  Search this
Dakota language  Search this
Lakota dialect  Search this
Oto language  Search this
Dhegiha language  Search this
Omaha language  Search this
Osage language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Otoe  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 5.4
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 5: Papers relating to the Native American History, Language and Culture of the Plains
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33a36c8e2-73bf-439d-8a26-9a6a58b25433
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14765

Oto Linguistic Notes

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 934
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 17
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 5: Papers relating to the Native American History, Language and Culture of the Plains / 5.4: Siouan
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3394ba1d7-9322-4b3a-a54f-dde1a9b213f8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14778

Delaware (Oklahoma and Ontario)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Siebert, Frank T. (Frank Thomas), 1912-1998  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Munsee Delaware  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Correspondence
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Date:
1940
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's research on two Delaware languages, now distinguished by linguists as Unami (in Oklahoma) and Munsee (in Ontario). Harrington, following local usage, referred to both as Delaware.

His Unami linguistic notes consist of a randomly accumulated vocabulary with some phonetic and grammatical structures interspersed. Included also are historical and cultural comments. The largest single group was apparently collected by C. F. Voegelin and is labeled "Voeg." Other smaller groups represent collections by Voegelin from individually named informants, followed by Harrington's notes from the same informants. Harrington's material consists of both new and reheard terms, with a general emphasis on developing the etymology of state names and placenames. Voegelin inserted some Munsee, Shawnee, Kaw, and Ojibwa equivalences. The Munsee terms may have been those of Frank T. Siebert, Jr., as notes indicate that Voegelin was in possession of some of Siebert's vocabulary lists, which had been collected in June 1938 from Nicodemus Peters at Smoothtown. The most substantial placename information concerns the name Wyoming.

A selection of extracts from Brinton and Anthony (1888) and a few from Truman Michelson's "Preliminary Report on the Linguistic Classification of Algonquian Tribes" (1912) contain comments by Voegelin. Scattered Abenaki comparisons were probably inserted at least a decade later. Filed with this 1940 collection are three pages of notes heard from "the old woman west of Anadarko" in June 1939.

There are also four untitled texts (former B.A.E. ms. 6023pt.) collected by Voegelin in April 1940 with partial interlinear translations by Jesse Longbone. Harrington made handwritten copies of fifteen short songs also collected by Voegelin. Although there are wide variations between Voegelin's orthography and Harrington's, these songs were apparently incorporated into Voegelin's "Word Distortions in Delaware Big House and Walam Olum Songs" (1942). There are scattered notes in English but no translations.

The Unami files also contain miscellaneous notes consisting of a few grammatical notes, correspondence, and names of persons. There are also several pages relating to the Swedish author Amandus Johnson.

Harrington also collected a variety of linguistic notes from Delaware speakers of Ontario. Raw field notes obtained from Josiah Montour and Jesse Moses in the area of Smoothtown, Ontario, include general vocabulary, tribenames, names of persons, and a few grammatical constructions. Montour also contributed Munsee origins associated with the name Wyoming. There are also materials from when Voegelin gave Harrington a list of Walam Olum terms to rehear with Josiah Montour, which Harrington presumably did in the first days of that month. Another small section of field notes contains material from Jane Pattice, Josiah Montour's sister. In addition, there are a few undated pages dealing mainly with the location of the Munsee Reserve in Canada and how to get there.
Biographical / Historical:
In April 1940, John P. Harrington and C. F. Voegelin were in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, on a joint field trip where they interviewed a number of Delaware-speaking Indians. The exact itinerary is difficult to reconstruct. Field notes and correspondence indicate that they were together in Bartlesville at least between April 8 and 20, and early in May, they were in Greencastle, Indiana, where Voegelin gave Harrington a list of Delaware terms to investigate in Smoothtown, Ontario on Six Nations Reserve. Of the two notes that locate Harrington in that vicinity, only one is dated (May 4, 1940-see "Mohawk Linguistic Notes"). It must have been a brief stop as he was in Seattle en route to Alaska on May 7.

In June 1940 Harrington and Voegelin made another trip to Oklahoma. They visited May Haas at Eufaula and Frank T. Siebert,Jr., at Oklahoma City and Norman. On that occasion they worked with a number of Delawares, Shawnees, Otoes, and others. During the first week of August, after his return to Washington, D.C., Harrington reorganized the notes for which Voegelin had requested clarification.

In Oklahoma, Harrington visited the city of Bartlesville; the towns of Dewey and Copan; and Claremore, the location of the Indian Health Services Hospital. Among the people he interviewed were Mabel Bobb Beaver (Mabel) and Henry Duncan Beaver (Duncan); Sally and John Fallleaf (spelled "Fall-Leaf" by Harrington); Annie (Mrs. Lb.) and Jesse Longbone (Jesse, Jes) and his brothers Roy and William (William Lb.); Jake Parks; and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Washington and their son Fred (Mrs. Wash., Fred Wash.). In Ontario, those he interviewed included Josiah Montour, his seventy-five-year-old sister Jane Pattice, and Jesse Moses.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Delaware language  Search this
Shawnee language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.8
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31bd6d541-c4e2-4688-bb63-0595d46f8fdc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15032

Fissidens cristatus Wilson & Mitt.

Biogeographical Region:
38 - Eastern Asia  Search this
Collector:
T. Kodama  Search this
H. Deguchi  Search this
Min. Elevation:
600  Search this
Place:
Shinohara, Oto-mura, Yoshino-gun, Nara Prefecture., Nara, Japan, Asia-Temperate
Collection Date:
24 Dec 1970
Taxonomy:
Plantae Bryophyta Bryopsida Dicranales Fissidentaceae
Published Name:
Fissidens cristatus Wilson & Mitt.
Barcode:
04488831
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3018c8124-c1eb-4a15-9ea4-a406ca163a37
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_16428327

Dicranodontium denudatum (Brid.) E. Britton

Biogeographical Region:
38 - Eastern Asia  Search this
Collector:
T. Kodama  Search this
Min. Elevation:
1000  Search this
Place:
Japonici. Ôtô, Yoshino, Nara Prefecture., Nara, Japan, Asia-Temperate
Collection Date:
4 Oct 1964
Taxonomy:
Plantae Bryophyta Bryopsida Dicranales Dicranaceae
Published Name:
Dicranodontium denudatum (Brid.) E. Britton
Barcode:
04480738
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/38fcd038c-084d-4e18-946a-d0ec0e8924b2
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_16429251

Barbula unguiculata Hedw.

Biogeographical Region:
74 - North-Central U.S.A.  Search this
Collector:
Steven P. Churchill  Search this
Place:
The Great Plains. County Otoe. Just north of Dunbar, off Hwy 2; Sec.11, T8N, R12E. N-facing roadcut., Nebraska, United States, North America
Collection Date:
16 May 1975
Taxonomy:
Plantae Bryophyta Bryopsida Pottiales Pottiaceae
Published Name:
Barbula unguiculata Hedw.
Barcode:
04499640
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/37baca73f-4300-4e6f-aa11-b02b886f7763
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_16425026

Campylopus japonicus Broth.

Biogeographical Region:
38 - Eastern Asia  Search this
Collector:
T. Nakajima  Search this
Min. Elevation:
450  Search this
Place:
Japonici. Sakaidani, upstream area of Yasukawa River, Oto-mura, Nishimuro-gun, Wakayama Prefecture., Wakayama, Japan, Asia-Temperate
Collection Date:
28 Mar 1971
Taxonomy:
Plantae Bryophyta Bryopsida Dicranales Dicranaceae
Published Name:
Campylopus japonicus Broth.
Barcode:
04489608
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/36e46c8aa-0893-4dcc-9fd3-3c317ee26f6e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_16423333

Alanson Buck Skinner Photograph Collection, 1870-1923

Creator:
Skinner, Alanson 1886-1925  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Photographer:
Smith, Huron H. (Huron Herbert), 1883-1933  Search this
Van Schaick, C.J  Search this
Physical description:
454 Negatives
99 b&w Photo prints
5 Lantern slides
Culture:
Arapaho Indians  Search this
Cheyenne Indians  Search this
Iowa Indians  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Mahican Indians  Search this
Menominee Indian Tribe  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Oto Indians  Search this
Plains Cree  Search this
Potawatomi Indians  Search this
Seminole Indians  Search this
Seri Indians  Search this
Shinnecock Indians  Search this
Siksika Indians  Search this
Sioux Nation  Search this
Winnebago Indians  Search this
Zuni Indians  Search this
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Lantern slides
Place:
Great Plains
New York (State)
Wisconsin
Great Lakes Region
Southern States
New Mexico
Canada
Costa Rica
Florida
Mexico
Minnesota
New York
Oklahoma
Wyoming
Date:
1870
1870-1923
Topic:
Indians of North America  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.036
Restrictions & Rights:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_248794

M-P

Collection Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Container:
Box 44
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
Includes mirrors—Japanese, Mission Indians, Mohave Indians, Mongols, names, Nanticoke, Nez Perce, New Zealand, nomenclature, numerals, Osages, Otoe and Omaha, Pamunkey, Panama, Parsees, Patagonia, and Pawnees.
Collection Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Department of Anthropology records / Series 17: Division of Ethnology / 17.1: Manuscript and Pamphlet File / Miscellany
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c1beaa06-74e1-45cf-9c84-e66b679479b1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0311-ref15001

Manuscript and Pamphlet File

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. National Museum of Natural History. Department of Anthropology. Division of Ethnology  Search this
Mason, Otis Tufton, 1838-1908  Search this
Hough, Walter, 1859-1935  Search this
Williams, Talcott  Search this
Hawley, Edwin H.  Search this
Wilson, Thomas  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
41 Linear feet
Culture:
Baubi  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Innuit  Search this
Jamomadi  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Mission  Search this
Moro  Search this
Naltunnetunne  Search this
Pygmies  Search this
Tesuque  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Modoc  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Osage  Search this
Dyak  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Haida  Search this
Makah  Search this
Maya  Search this
Carib  Search this
Shuar/Achuar  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Seri  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Chinook  Search this
Washo Indians  Search this
Nez Percé Indians  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Cuna  Search this
Bannock  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Yavapai  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Oto  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Wintun  Search this
Samoan  Search this
Cossacks  Search this
Arabs  Search this
Diegueño Indians  Search this
Goajira  Search this
Hittites  Search this
Kabyles  Search this
Kirghese  Search this
Luiseño Indians  Search this
Maori (New Zealand people)  Search this
Wichí (Mataco)  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Parsee  Search this
Quichua  Search this
Quinaielt  Search this
Tonga?  Search this
Tulalip  Search this
Dayak (Indonesian people)  Search this
Samoans  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Inuit  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Letters
Notes
Drawings
Maps
Photographs
Printed materials
Processed materials
Paper specimens
Reports
Manuscripts
Catalogs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Bibliographies
Place:
British Columbia
District of Columbia
Europe
Hawaii
India
Iran
Ireland
Japan
Korea
Madagascar
Madeira Islands
Micronesia
Mongolia
Morocco
New Guinea
Papua New Guinea
Peru
Nubia
Puerto Rico
Spain
Tahiti
Philippines
Thailand
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Date:
1840s
1860-1962
1972
1997
Scope and Contents:
For those who are searching for anthropologically substantive materials, special note should be made of the Manuscript and Pamphlet File. A potpourri of documents, the file includes correspondence, notes, drawings, maps, photographs, printed and processed materials, paper specimens, reports, writings, catalogs, motion picture film (now in the Smithsonian's Human Studies Film Archives), bibliographies, and other types of documents. Of concern is a wide variety of subjects such as anthropological specimens, museology and museums, Smithsonian history, archaeological and ethnological methods, exhibits, expeditions, history of anthropology, and so forth.

The file seems to have been maintained in the Division of Ethnology — in one document it was referred to as Herbert W. Krieger's morgue — and the subject matter is largely ethnological. Nevertheless, some documents relate to archeology and physical anthropology. The file also contains administrative materials, such as records relating to the Department of Anthropology's use of Work Projects Administration workers during the 1930s. In addition, the file is the main location of materials not generally accepted as being strictly anthropological in the modern sense. It includes, for example, material on period costumes, fish and fisheries, whaling, religions, armor, biblical studies, modern appliances, the seal industry, European music and musical instruments, lace, aeronautics, and other similar subjects. In addition, the file includes sets of papers of Edwin H. Hawley ,Walter Hough, Otis T. Mason, Talcott Williams and Thomas Wilson. Some documents, both primary and secondary research materials, concern the following cultural groups and geographic areas: Arabs, Bannock, Baubi, Blackfoot, British Columbia, Caddo, Carib, Chinook, Cochiti, Comanche, Cossacks, Cuna, Delaware, Diegueño, District of Columbia, Dyak, Eskimo, Europe, Fox, Goajira, Haida, Hawaii, Hittites, Hupa, India, Innuit, Iran, Ireland, Jamomadi, Japan, Jivaro, Kabyles, Kiowa, Kirghese, Klamath, Korea, Luiseño, Madagascar, Madiera, Maidu, Makah, Maori, Mataco, Maya, Micmac, Micronesia, Mission, Modoc, Mohave, Mongolia, Moro, Morocco, Naltunnetunne, Nanticoke, Narragansett, Navaho, New Guinea, Nez Perce, Nubia, Omaha, Onandaga, Osage, Oto, Papua, Parsee, Pawnee, Peru, Philippines, Pomo, Pueblo, Puerto Rico, Pygmies, Quichua, Quinaielt, Samoa, Sauk, Seminole, Seri, Shoshoni, Spain, Tahiti, Tesuque, Thailand, Texas, Tolowa, Tonga, Tulalip, Utah, Virginia, Washo, Wichita, Wintun, Yavapai, and Zuni.
The manuscript and pamphlet file is virtually a potpourri of documents, including correspondence, notes, drawings, maps, photographs, printed and processed materials, paper specimens, reports, writings, catalogs, motion picture film, bibliographies, and other types of documents. Of concern is a wide variety of subjects such as anthropological specimens, museology and museums, Smithsonian history, archeological and ethnological methods, exhibits, expeditions, history of anthropology, and so forth. The file seems to have been maintained in the Division of Ethnology--in one document it was referred to as being Herbert W. Krieger's morgue--and the subject matter is largely ethnological.

Some documents, however, concern archeology and physical anthropology. The file also contains some administrative materials--records relating to the Department of Anthropology's use of Work Projects Administration workers, for example. In addition, it is the main location of materials not generally accepted as being strictly anthropological in the modern sense. It includes, for example, material on the First Ladies' Gown exhibit now in the National Museum of American History, fish and fisheries, whaling, religions, armour, biblical studies, modern appliances, the seal industry, European music and musical instruments, lace, aeronautics, and other similar subjects.

The file includes the papers of many different persons. The file also includes sets of papers of Otis Tufton Mason, Walter Hough, Talcott Williams, Edwin H. Hawley, and Thomas Wilson. It includes documents, sometimes of a secondary nature, about the following cultural groups and geographic areas; Arabs, Bannock, Baubi, Blackfoot, British Columbia, Caddo, Chinook, Cochiti, Comanche, Cossacks, Cuna, Delaware, Diegueno, District of Columbia, Dyak, Eskimo, Europe, Fox, Goajira, Haida, Hawaii, Hittites, Hupa, India, Innuit, Iran, Ireland, Jamomadi, Japan, Jivaro, Kabyles, Kiowa, Kirghese, Klamath, Korea, Luiseno, Madagascar, Madeira, Maidu, Makah, Maori, Mataco, Maya, Micmac, Micronesia, Mission, Modoc, Mohave, Mongolia, Moro, Morocco, Naltunnetunne, Nanticoke, Narragansett, Navaho,

New Guinea, Nez Perce, Nubia, Omaha, Onandaga, Osage, Oto, Papua, Parsee, Pawnee, Peru, Philippines, Pomo, Pueblo, Puerto Rico, Pygmies, Quichua, Quinaielt, Samoa, Sauk, Seminole, Seri, Shoshoni, Spain, Tahiti, Tesuque, Thailand, Texas, Tolowa, Tonga, Tulalip, Utah, Virginia, Washo, Wichita, Wintun, Yavapai, and Zuni.
Collection Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Lace and lace making  Search this
Musical instruments  Search this
Seal industry  Search this
Electric apparatus and appliances  Search this
Fish and fisheries  Search this
First Ladies' Gowns  Search this
Whaling  Search this
Religions  Search this
Armor  Search this
Biblical studies  Search this
Tipai-Ipai  Search this
Luiseno  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Mi'kmaq  Search this
Sauk & Fox  Search this
Otoe  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Eskimo ?  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Blackfeet  Search this
Genre/Form:
Letters
Notes
Drawings
Maps
Photographs
Printed materials
Processed materials
Paper specimens
Reports
Manuscripts
Catalogs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Bibliographies
Collection Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0311, Subseries 17.1
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Department of Anthropology records / Series 17: Division of Ethnology
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b2f3180c-4348-4175-ab6f-c61e477eafc5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0311-ref53

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