Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
10,665 documents - page 1 of 500Result pages are truncated to 500.

Board Banquet at Smithsonian Commons

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2014-03-27T13:26:56.000Z
YouTube Category:
People & Blogs  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
See more by:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
YouTube Channel:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_e6hzvJ1aaZ8

John Singleton Mosby

Artist:
Edward Virginius Valentine, 1838 - 1930  Search this
Foundry:
Modern Art Foundry  Search this
Sitter:
John Singleton Mosby, 6 Dec 1833 - 30 May 1916  Search this
Medium:
Bronze
Dimensions:
With Base: 73.7 x 50.8 x 26.7cm (29 x 20 x 10 1/2")
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
1972 cast after 1866 original
Topic:
John Singleton Mosby: Male  Search this
John Singleton Mosby: Law and Law Enforcement\Lawyer  Search this
John Singleton Mosby: Literature\Writer  Search this
John Singleton Mosby: Military\Army\Officer\Civil War\Confederate  Search this
John Singleton Mosby: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Real Estate Agent  Search this
John Singleton Mosby: Politics and Government\Diplomat\Consul\US Consul  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.72.117
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4efb06b6b-e762-43a1-880d-516c58efcc40
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.72.117
Online Media:

Abraham Lincoln

Cast after:
Clark Mills, 13 Dec 1810 - 12 Jan 1883  Search this
Sitter:
Abraham Lincoln, 12 Feb 1809 - 15 Apr 1865  Search this
Medium:
Plaster
Dimensions:
17.1 x 20.3 x 29.8cm (6 3/4 x 8 x 11 3/4")
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
c. 1917 cast after 1865 original
Topic:
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Beard  Search this
Mask\Life mask  Search this
Abraham Lincoln: Male  Search this
Abraham Lincoln: Law and Law Enforcement\Lawyer  Search this
Abraham Lincoln: Military\Soldier  Search this
Abraham Lincoln: Politics and Government\President of US  Search this
Abraham Lincoln: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Environmentalist  Search this
Abraham Lincoln: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Merchant  Search this
Abraham Lincoln: Politics and Government\US Congressman\Illinois  Search this
Abraham Lincoln: Politics and Government\Government Official\Surveyor  Search this
Abraham Lincoln: Politics and Government\State Senator\Illinois  Search this
Abraham Lincoln: Politics and Government\Government Official\Postmaster  Search this
Abraham Lincoln: Crafts and Trades\Boat builder  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; transfer from the National Museum of American History
Object number:
NPG.71.26
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
America's Presidents (Reinstallation September 2017)
On View:
NPG, South Gallery 240
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm49e671628-d164-4d6e-8f74-39e90d448f47
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.71.26
Online Media:

Agency history, 1978-1980

Creator:
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Department of the History of Science  Search this
Subject:
Finn, Bernard S. 1932-  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Electricity and Modern Physics  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Mathematics  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Mechanisms  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Medical Sciences  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Physical Sciences  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Department of Science and Technology  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.)  Search this
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Date:
1978
1978-1980
Topic:
Science and civilization  Search this
Historical museums  Search this
Science--History  Search this
Local number:
SIA AH00256
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_222973

Agency history, 1978-1980

Creator:
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Department of the History of Technology  Search this
Subject:
Schlebecker, John T  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Extractive Industries  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Mechanical and Civil Engineering  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Photographic History  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Textiles  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Transportation  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Department of Science and Technology  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.)  Search this
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Date:
1978
1978-1980
Topic:
Technology--History  Search this
Historical museums  Search this
Local number:
SIA AH00255
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_222974

Hezekiah Bissell Papers

Creator:
Bissell, Hezekiah  Search this
Names:
Boston and Maine Railroad  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Cubic feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Genealogies
Memoirs
Writings
Place:
Utah -- maps
Date:
1920-1928
Summary:
Collection documents the reminiscences of Hezekiah Bissell, a railroad engineer who worked in the western United Statesstates with the Union Pacific Railroad, and in Peru.
Content Description:
The collection contains writings by Bissell, including fragmented reminiscences describing his experiences as an railroad engineer with the Boston & Maine (B&M) Railroad, Union Pacific Railroad, and in Peru. Also included are a journal article honoring Bissell after his death, a map of northeastern Utah, and genealogical information about the Bissell family.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as a single series.
Biographical / Historical:
Hezekiah Bissell (February 27 1835 - June 23 1928) was a railroad engineer and a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers. Born in East Windsor Connecticut, Bissell studied at Yale University before enlisting in the Army during the American Civil War. After his discharge, Bissell served as one of the lead engineers in the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad. He later surveyed and located rail lines for the Adirondack Railroad in Upstate New York and a rail line in Peru. Bissell served as the Chief Engineer for the Boston & Maine (B&M) Railroad, a position he held for 31 years until his retirement in 1909.
Provenance:
Originally donated to the National Museum of American History (then called the National Museum of History and Technology) by Bissell's granddaughter, Geraldine Carroll.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Railroads -- 19th century -- Peru  Search this
Railroads -- Employees  Search this
Railroads -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Genealogies
Memoirs
Writings -- 20th century
Citation:
Hezekiah Bissell Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1445
See more items in:
Hezekiah Bissell Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1445

Paradise Valley Folklife Project- "Buckaroos in Paradise" Exhibit

Collection Creator:
Rinzler, Ralph  Search this
Container:
Box 10 (Series 6)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
1979-1981
Scope and Contents note:
File consists of correspondence and memoranda, exhibit publication order form, opening reception invitations, clippings. Materials relate to Smithsonian National Museum of History and Technology and American Folklife Center joint exhibition.
Collection Restrictions:
Large portions of this collection are digitized, and while these materials are being prepared for public access through this finding aid, researchers can request digital copies by contacting the Rinzler Archives at rinzlerarchives@si.edu or (202) 633-7322.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for information.
Collection Citation:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.RINZ, File RINZ_06_010_006
See more items in:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings / Series 6: Meetings and Organizations / 6.2: American Folklife Center
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-rinz-ref3439

Western Union Telegraph Company Records

Creator:
United Telegraph Workers.  Search this
Western Union Telegraph Company  Search this
Extent:
452 Cubic feet (871 boxes and 23 map folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Administrative records
Articles
Books
Clippings
Contracts
Drawings
Photographs
Patents
Newsletters
Photograph albums
Scrapbooks
Specifications
Technical documents
Date:
circa 1820-1995
Summary:
The collection documents in photographs, scrapbooks, notebooks, correspondence, stock ledgers, annual reports, and financial records, the evolution of the telegraph, the development of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and the beginning of the communications revolution. The collection materials describe both the history of the company and of the telegraph industry in general, particularly its importance to the development of the technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The collection is useful for researchers interested in the development of technology, economic history, and the impact of technology on American social and cultural life.
Scope and Contents:
The collection is divided into twenty-six (26) series and consists of approximately 400 cubic feet. The collection documents in photographs, scrapbooks, notebooks, correspondence, stock ledgers, annual reports, and financial records, the evolution of the telegraph, the development of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and the beginning of the communications revolution. The collection materials describe both the history of the company and of the telegraph industry in general, particularly its importance to the development of the technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The collection is useful for researchers interested in the development of technology, economic history, and the impact of technology on American social and cultural life.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into twenty-seven series.

Series 1: Historical and Background Information, 1851-1994

Series 2: Subsidiaries of Western Union, 1844-1986

Series 3: Executive Records, 1848-1987

Series 4: Presidential Letterbooks and Writings, 1865-1911

Series 5: Correspondence, 1837-1985

Series 6: Cyrus W. Field Papers, 1840-1892

Series 7: Secretary's Files, 1844-1987

Series 8: Financial Records, 1859-1995

Series 9: Legal Records, 1867-1968

Series 10: Railroad Records, 1854-1945

Series 11: Law Department Records, 1868-1979

Series 12: Patent Materials, 1840-1970

Series 13: Operating Records, 1868-1970s

Series 14: Westar VI-S, 1974, 1983-1986

Series 15: Engineering Department Records, 1874-1970

Series 16: Plant Department Records, 1867-1937, 1963

Series 17: Superintendent of Supplies Records, 1888-1948

Series 18: Employee/Personnel Records 1852-1985

Series 19: Public Relations Department Records, 1858-1980

Series 20: Western Union Museum, 1913-1971

Series 21: Maps, 1820-1964

Series 22: Telegrams, 1852-1960s

Series 23: Photographs, circa 1870-1980

Series 24: Scrapbooks, 1835-1956

Series 25: Notebooks, 1880-1942

Series 26: Audio Visual Materials, 1925-1994

Series 27: Addenda
Biographical / Historical:
In 1832 Samuel F. B. Morse, assisted by Alfred Vail, conceived of the idea for an electromechanical telegraph, which he called the "Recording Telegraph." This commercial application of electricity was made tangible by their construction of a crude working model in 1835-36. This instrument probably was never used outside of Professor Morse's rooms where it was, however, operated in a number of demonstrations. This original telegraph instrument was in the hands of the Western Union Telegraph Company and had been kept carefully over the years in a glass case. It was moved several times in New York as the Western Union headquarters building changed location over the years. The company presented it to the Smithsonian Institution in 1950.

The telegraph was further refined by Morse, Vail, and a colleague, Leonard Gale, into working mechanical form in 1837. In this year Morse filed a caveat for it at the U.S. Patent Office. Electricity, provided by Joseph Henry's 1836 "intensity batteries", was sent over a wire. The flow of electricity through the wire was interrupted for shorter or longer periods by holding down the key of the device. The resulting dots or dashes were recorded on a printer or could be interpreted orally. In 1838 Morse perfected his sending and receiving code and organized a corporation, making Vail and Gale his partners.

In 1843 Morse received funds from Congress to set-up a demonstration line between Washington and Baltimore. Unfortunately, Morse was not an astute businessman and had no practical plan for constructing a line. After an unsuccessful attempt at laying underground cables with Ezra Cornell, the inventor of a trench digger, Morse switched to the erection of telegraph poles and was more successful. On May 24, 1844, Morse, in the U.S. Supreme Court Chambers in Washington, sent by telegraph the oft-quoted message to his colleague Vail in Baltimore, "What hath God wrought!"

In 1845 Morse hired Andrew Jackson's former postmaster general, Amos Kendall, as his agent in locating potential buyers of the telegraph. Kendall realized the value of the device, and had little trouble convincing others of its potential for profit. By the spring he had attracted a small group of investors. They subscribed $15,000 and formed the Magnetic Telegraph Company. Many new telegraph companies were formed as Morse sold licenses wherever he could.

The first commercial telegraph line was completed between Washington, D.C., and New York City in the spring of 1846 by the Magnetic Telegraph Company. Shortly thereafter, F. O. J. Smith, one of the patent owners, built a line between New York City and Boston. Most of these early companies were licensed by owners of Samuel Morse patents. The Morse messages were sent and received in a code of dots and dashes.

At this time other telegraph systems based on rival technologies were being built. Some companies used the printing telegraph, a device invented by a Vermonter, Royal E. House, whose messages were printed on paper or tape in Roman letters. In 1848 a Scotch scientist, Alexander Bain, received his patents on a telegraph. These were but two of many competing and incompatible technologies that had developed. The result was confusion, inefficiency, and a rash of suits and counter suits.

By 1851 there were over fifty separate telegraph companies operating in the United States. This corporate cornucopia developed because the owners of the telegraph patents had been unsuccessful in convincing the United States and other governments of the invention's potential usefulness. In the private sector, the owners had difficulty convincing capitalists of the commercial value of the invention. This led to the owners' willingness to sell licenses to many purchasers who organized separate companies and then built independent telegraph lines in various sections of the country.

Hiram Sibley moved to Rochester, New York, in 1838 to pursue banking and real estate. Later he was elected sheriff of Monroe County. In Rochester he was introduced to Judge Samuel L. Selden who held the House Telegraph patent rights. In 1849 Selden and Sibley organized the New York State Printing Telegraph Company, but they found it hard to compete with the existing New York, Albany, and Buffalo Telegraph Company.

After this experience Selden suggested that instead of creating a new line, the two should try to acquire all the companies west of Buffalo and unite them into a single unified system. Selden secured an agency for the extension throughout the United States of the House system. In an effort to expand this line west, Judge Selden called on friends and the people in Rochester. This led, in April 1851, to the organization of a company and the filing in Albany of the Articles of Association for the "New York and Mississippi Valley Printing Telegraph Company" (NYMVPTC), a company which later evolved into the Western Union Telegraph Company.

In 1854 there were two rival systems of the NYMVPTC in the West. These two systems consisted of thirteen separate companies. All the companies were using Morse patents in the five states north of the Ohio River. This created a struggle between three separate entities, leading to an unreliable and inefficient telegraph service. The owners of these rival companies eventually decided to invest their money elsewhere and arrangements were made for the NYMVPTC to purchase their interests.

Hiram Sibley recapitalized the company in 1854 under the same name and began a program of construction and acquisition. The most important takeover was carried out by Sibley when he negotiated the purchase of the Morse patent rights for the Midwest for $50,000 from Jeptha H. Wade and John J. Speed, without the knowledge of Ezra Cornell, their partner in the Erie and Michigan Telegraph Company (EMTC). With this acquisition Sibley proceeded to switch to the superior Morse system. He also hired Wade, a very capable manager, who became his protege and later his successor. After a bitter struggle Morse and Wade obtained the EMTC from Cornell in 1855, thus assuring dominance by the NYMVPTC in the Midwest. In 1856 the company name was changed to the "Western Union Telegraph Company," indicating the union of the Western lines into one compact system. In December, 1857, the Company paid stockholders their first dividend.

Between 1857 and 1861 similar consolidations of telegraph companies took place in other areas of the country so that most of the telegraph interests of the United States had merged into six systems. These were the American Telegraph Company (covering the Atlantic and some Gulf states), The Western Union Telegraph Company (covering states North of the Ohio River and parts of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Minnesota), the New York Albany and Buffalo Electro-Magnetic Telegraph Company (covering New York State), the Atlantic and Ohio Telegraph Company (covering Pennsylvania), the Illinois & Mississippi Telegraph Company (covering sections of Missouri, Iowa, and Illinois), and the New Orleans & Ohio Telegraph Company (covering the southern Mississippi Valley and the Southwest). All these companies worked together in a mutually friendly alliance, and other small companies cooperated with the six systems, particularly some on the West Coast.

By the time of the Civil War, there was a strong commercial incentive to construct a telegraph line across the western plains to link the two coasts of America. Many companies, however, believed the line would be impossible to build and maintain.

In 1860 Congress passed, and President James Buchanan signed, the Pacific Telegraph Act, which authorized the Secretary of the Treasury to seek bids for a project to construct a transcontinental line. When two bidders dropped out, Hiram Sibley, representing Western Union, was the only bidder left. By default Sibley won the contract. The Pacific Telegraph Company was organized for the purpose of building the eastern section of the line. Sibley sent Wade to California, where he consolidated the small local companies into the California State Telegraph Company. This entity then organized the Overland Telegraph Company, which handled construction eastward from Carson City, Nevada, joining the existing California lines, to Salt Lake City, Utah. Sibley's Pacific Telegraph Company built westward from Omaha, Nebraska. Sibley put most of his resources into the venture. The line was completed in October, 1861. Both companies were soon merged into Western Union. This accomplishment made Hiram Sibley leader of the telegraph industry.

Further consolidations took place over the next several years. Many companies merged into the American Telegraph Company. With the expiration of the Morse patents, several organizations were combined in 1864 under the name of "The U.S. Telegraph Company." In 1866 the final consolidation took place, with Western Union exchanging stock for the stock of the other two organizations. The general office of Western Union moved at this time from Rochester to 145 Broadway, New York City. In 1875 the main office moved to 195 Broadway, where it remained until 1930 when it relocated to 60 Hudson Street.

In 1873 Western Union purchased a majority of shares in the International Ocean Telegraph Company. This was an important move because it marked Western Union's entry into the foreign telegraph market. Having previously worked with foreign companies, Western Union now began competing for overseas business.

In the late 1870s Western Union, led by William H. Vanderbilt, attempted to wrest control of the major telephone patents, and the new telephone industry, away from the Bell Telephone Company. But due to new Bell leadership and a subsequent hostile takeover attempt of Western Union by Jay Gould, Western Union discontinued its fight and Bell Telephone prevailed.

Despite these corporate calisthenics, Western Union remained in the public eye. The sight of a uniformed Western Union messenger boy was familiar in small towns and big cities all over the country for many years. Some of Western Union's top officials in fact began their careers as messenger boys.

Throughout the remainder of the nineteenth century the telegraph became one of the most important factors in the development of social and commercial life of America. In spite of improvements to the telegraph, however, two new inventions--the telephone (nineteenth century) and the radio (twentieth century)--eventually replaced the telegraph as the leaders of the communication revolution for most Americans.

At the turn of the century, Bell abandoned its struggles to maintain a monopoly through patent suits, and entered into direct competition with the many independent telephone companies. Around this time, the company adopted its new name, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T).

In 1908 AT&T gained control of Western Union. This proved beneficial to Western Union, because the companies were able to share lines when needed, and it became possible to order telegrams by telephone. However, it was only possible to order Western Union telegrams, and this hurt the business of Western Union's main competitor, the Postal Telegraph Company. In 1913, however, as part of a move to prevent the government from invoking antitrust laws, AT&T completely separated itself from Western Union.

Western Union continued to prosper and it received commendations from the U.S. armed forces for service during both world wars. In 1945 Western Union finally merged with its longtime rival, the Postal Telegraph Company. As part of that merger, Western Union agreed to separate domestic and foreign business. In 1963 Western Union International Incorporated, a private company completely separate from the Western Union Telegraph Company, was formed and an agreement with the Postal Telegraph Company was completed. In 1994, Western Union Financial Services, Inc. was acquired by First Financial Management Corporation. In 1995, First Financial Management Corporation merged with First Data Corporation making Western Union a First Data subsidiary.

Many technological advancements followed the telegraph's development. The following are among the more important:

The first advancement of the telegraph occurred around 1850 when operators realized that the clicks of the recording instrument portrayed a sound pattern, understandable by the operators as dots and dashes. This allowed the operator to hear the message by ear and simultaneously write it down. This ability transformed the telegraph into a versatile and speedy system.

Duplex Telegraphy, 1871-72, was invented by the president of the Franklin Telegraph Company. Unable to sell his invention to his own company, he found a willing buyer in Western Union. Utilizing this invention, two messages were sent over the wire simultaneously, one in each direction.

As business blossomed and demand surged, new devices appeared. Thomas Edison's Quadruplex allowed four messages to be sent over the same wire simultaneously, two in one direction and two in the other.

An English automatic signaling arrangement, Wheatstone's Automatic Telegraph, 1883, allowed larger numbers of words to be transmitted over a wire at once. It could only be used advantageously, however, on circuits where there was a heavy volume of business.

Buckingham's Machine Telegraph was an improvement on the House system. It printed received messages in plain Roman letters quickly and legibly on a message blank, ready for delivery.

Vibroplex, c. 1890, a semi-automatic key sometimes called a "bug key," made the dots automatically. This relieved the operator of much physical strain.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Additional moving image about Western Union Telegraph Company can be found in the Industry on Parade Collection (AC0507). This includes Cable to Cuba! by Bell Laboratory, AT & T, featuring the cable ship, the C.S. Lord Kelvin, and Communications Centennial! by the Western Union Company.

Materials at Other Organizations

Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, Delaware.

Western Union International Records form part of the MCI International, Inc. Records at the First Data Corporation, Greenwood Village, Colorado.

Records of First Data Corporation and its predecessors, including Western Union, First Financial Management Corporation (Atlanta) and First Data Resources (Omaha). Western Union collection supports research of telegraphy and related technologies, and includes company records, annual reports, photographs, print and broadcast advertising, telegraph equipment, and messenger uniforms.

Smithsonian Institution Archives

Western Union Telegraph Expedition, 1865-1867

This collection includes correspondence, mostly to Spencer F. Baird, from members of the Scientific Corps of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition, including Kennicott, Dall, Bannister, and Elliott; copies of reports submitted to divisional chiefs from expedition staff members; newspaper clippings concerning the expedition; copies of notes on natural history taken by Robert Kennicott; and a journal containing meteorological data recorded by Henry M. Bannister from March to August, 1866.
Separated Materials:
Artifacts (apparatus and equipment) were donated to the Division of Information Technology and Society, now known as the Division of Work & Industry, National Museum of American History.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Western Union in September of 1971.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but Series 11 and films are stored off-site. Special arrangements must be made to view some of the audiovisual materials. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Communications equipment  Search this
Communication -- International cooperation  Search this
Electric engineering  Search this
Electric engineers  Search this
Electrical equipment  Search this
Electrical science and technology  Search this
Telegraphers  Search this
Telegraph  Search this
Genre/Form:
Administrative records
Articles
Books
Clippings
Contracts
Drawings
Photographs -- 19th century
Patents
Photographs -- 20th century
Newsletters
Photograph albums
Scrapbooks -- 19th century
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Specifications
Technical documents
Citation:
Western Union Telegraph Company Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0205
See more items in:
Western Union Telegraph Company Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0205
Online Media:

Donald H. Sultner-Welles Collection

Collector:
Sultner-Welles, Donald H. (Sultner, Donald Harvey), 1914-1981  Search this
Printer:
Janus, Allan  Search this
Interviewee:
Hanfstaengl, Erna  Search this
Names:
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra  Search this
Chautauqua Institute  Search this
Colonial Williamsburg Foundation  Search this
Holland-America Cruises  Search this
Hitler, Adolf, 1889-1945  Search this
Extent:
87.6 Cubic feet (331 boxes, 2 map-folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Passports
Photographs
Travelogs
Receipts
Ephemera
Files
Filmstrips
Lecture notes
Personal papers
Silver-dye bleach process
Contracts
Notebooks
Prints
Press releases
Ships' passenger lists
Project files
Magnetic tapes
Posters
Postcards
Vertical files
Dye destruction process
Travel diaries
Letters (correspondence)
Professional papers
Bank statements
Correspondence
Audiotapes
Series 12.
Clippings
Card files
Concert programs
Dye destruction photoprints
Biography files
Awards
Business records
Birthday cards
Date:
circa 1790-1981
bulk 1945-1980
Scope and Contents:
This collection is primarily the work of one individual, Donald Harvey Sultner, known professionally as Donald Sultner-Welles (1914-1981). The collection forms a written and visual record of Sultner's family, life, and career from 1913-1980. Its major strength is Sultner's photographic documentation of the world during his travels, ca. 1950-1980. Work by other photographers and artists, correspondence, greeting cards, and contemporary memorabilia and ephemera are included, along with fewer than fifty examples of earlier materials, ca. 1790-1900, collected by Sultner.

The entire collection reflects Sultner's lifework and interests. Housed in boxes the collection is organized into eleven series: Personal Papers; Professional Papers; Lecture Materials; Biographical Materials; Transparencies; Photoprints; Photonegatives; Prints, Drawings, Mixed Media; Audio Tapes; Miscellaneous; and Steve Eyster Addenda. The arrangement within each series is based as closely as possi-ble on Sultner's own organization of the materials. However, in several instances similar materials were found separated and have been placed together. In addition, obvious filing mistakes and spelling errors have been corrected. The spelling of geographic place names is based on Official Standard Names prepared by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names, Office of Geography, U.S. Department of the Interior. Not all names given by Sultner were found in the gazetteers, so there may be errors.

The bulk of the collection consists of 2-1/4-inch by 2-1/4-inch color transparencies (Series 5). However, the manuscript materials (Series 1-4) provide a detailed complement to the transparencies. For example, from the mid-1950s until the late 1970s, Sultner kept a travel diary (Se-ries 1). Written on the backs of postcards, this stream-of-consciousness journal reflects not only his daily trips, but his impressions of the countries and thoughts on his photography. A juxtaposition of cards with images is especially useful in understanding what Sultner photographed as well as why and how he photographed it. Sultner's professional corre-spondence (Series 2) documents the various types of groups before which he performed and equipment manufacturers dealt with for cameras, projectors, and so on. Notes, drafts, and final lectures (Series 3) present the performance side of Sultner. This material, when viewed with tapes of concerts and slides, begins to recreate the photo-concert as Sultner presented it. Scrapbooks (Series 4), kept by Sultner from the 1940s to the 1980s, present Sultner's life and career in chronological fashion.

The transparency portion of the collection (Series 5), containing over 87,000 images, is especially rich because of its documentation of the countries of the world. People are seen at their daily tasks, such as washing clothes, marketing, shopping, and eating. Cities are documented as they changed over the years. Two areas in particular will be of spe-cial interest to European and Asian researchers. The first is Sultner's USIS Asian tour in 1959. He visited Japan, Java, India, Korea, the Phil-ippines, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. The serene, prewar cities and coun-tryside of Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam evince nothing of the devastation to come in the 1960a and 70s.

The second area of interest is Sultner's passion for documenting archi-tecture. As a guest of the German government in 1954, Sultner documented the devastation of World War II and photographed both the reconstruction of bombed buildings and the construction of buildings reflecting "new" postwar architectural styles. In addition to photographing post-WW II styles, throughout his career Sultner documented Palladian, baroque and Rococo architecture. This interest manifested itself in several of his lectures.

A third subject area of interest to Sultner was gardens. Among his first lectures following his USIS tour was "Gardens of the World." Sultner de-veloped this theme into an ongoing commitment to ecology, culminating in a filmstrip, "The Time is Now" (Series 10), prepared for the Hudson River Conservation Society in the 1960s. Carl Carmer, a noted author, wrote the text for the filmstrip. Sultner's taped interviews, lectures, and program music (Series 9) complement the transparencies. During his USIS-sponsored Asian tour in 1959, Sultner recorded impressions of his trip on tape. Interviews with people living in the countries he visited, radio interviews, and his own personal reflections are included. Of particular interest are his "No Harm Asking" interviews in Manila (tape #2), his interview of two French hotel managers in Saigon discussing post-French control conditions (tape #9), and--perhaps the most unusual--his discussion with Erna Hanfstaengl about her personal relationship with Adolf Hitler (tape #107). Scripts for lectures (Series 3) round out the documentation of Sultner's profes-sional work.

Because of the arrangement of the transparencies, it is necessary to check several areas for the same subject. For example, Vietnam images are in the "World" section alphabetically under Vietnam (box 81). Sult-ner also lectured on Vietnam, so there are Vietnamese images in the "framed subjects" (Boxes 137-138). Another example, perhaps more compli-cated, but more common to Sultner, was his distinguishing between images of unidentified "People" and identified "Portraits." Transparency stud ies of human beings will be found under the subseries "People." "Subjects --Portraits," various countries in the subseries "World," and "Lectures." There are also individuals in the black-and-white photoprints (Series 6), and photonegatives (Series 8). The painter and print-maker Charles Shee-ler appears in a number of locations, as does tenor Roland Hayes. Another area of complexity with regard to people concerns the transparencies and negatives. Sultner interfiled his transparencies and negatives of iden-tified individuals. For appropriate storage, these two different formats have been arranged in separate series. Therefore, instead of container lists for the two series, there is a combined alphabetical index to both (pp. 166-206).

Of tangential interest are the photoprints (Series 6), etchings, wood-cuts, and other prints (Series 8) collected by Sultner. One particular subseries of interest contains photographs presented to Sultner by Asian photographers during his 1959 tour. Over 45 images were given to Sultner and represent the standards of camera-club photography in the 1950s. Thesecond subseries consists of over 25 prints by the Italian-American art-ist Luigi Lucioni (1900- ). For further information on this artist,see The Etchings of Luigi Lucioni, -A Catalogue Raisonne', by Stuart P.Embury (Washington, 1984). Lucioni also painted Sultner's portrait in1952 and the "People" section of the transparencies contains a number of images of Lucioni at work. Another significant category is the Japanese prints, including two by a major nineteenth-century artist, Ando Hiro-shige (1797-1858).
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into eleven series.

Series 1: Personal Papers, 1923-1981

Series 2: Professional Papers, 1954-1980

Series 3: Lecture Materials, 1952-1980

Series 4: Biographical Materials, 1954-1980

Series 5: Transparencies, 1947-1980

Series 6: Photoprints, 1913-ca. 1980

Series 7: Photonegatives, 1929-1981

Series 8: Prints, Drawings, Mixed Media, ca. 1790-1979

Series 9: Audio Tapes, 1947-1980

Series 10: Miscellaneous, 1947-1980

Series 11: Steve Eyster Addenda, 1937-1980
Biographical / Historical:
Donald Harvey Sultner was bom in York, Pennsylvania, on April 13, 1914, the son of Lillian May Arnold Sultner and Harvey A. Sultner. In 1923 Sultner attended the Lewis Institute in Detroit, Michigan, to overcome a speech impediment. He entered the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1932 and graduated in 1936. Sultner studied merchandising and sang in the glee club, then under the direction of composer Harl MacDonald. Sultner, a baritone, continued his interest in music and studied voice with Reinald Werrenrath and with Florence Benedict and Bruce Benjamin in New York City. In the late 1940s and early 1950s he appeared in concert with accompanists at schools, clubs, and resort hotels along the East Coast. It appears that photography was always an important part of Sultner's life. Using a small format (120) camera, he recorded his vacation travels around the United States and Canada, parties, and his family. While living in New York, Sultner continued photographing friends and family and began photographing the famous people he encountered on his concert tours. In the early 1950s he began taking 2-1/4-inch by 2-1/4-inch color transparencies (slides) of landscapes and architecture as he traveled giving concerts.

Sultner, who had taken the stage name of "Sultner-Welles," began what was to be his lifework as a professional "photo-lecturer" in 1952. He illustrated his talks on nature, art, architecture, and the environment with his color slides. In 1954 Sultner toured West Germany as a guest of the Bonn government, and in 1959 he lectured in Asia under the auspices of the U.S. State Department. He was dubbed the "camera ambassador." Constantly adding new material to his collection of slides, Sultner traveled extensively throughout the United States, speaking before garden clubs, cultural organi-zations, and schools. He also appeared aboard various ships of the Holland-America line during a number of cruises abroad.

Sultner had established his performance style by the early 1960s. He expanded his lectures to include a combination of art, words, and music. The expanded presentation resulted in the "photo-concert," a unique synthesis of light and sound that Sultner frequently per-formed with a symphony orchestra. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra commissioned "Concertino for Camera and Orchestra" by Eric Knight with Sultner in mind. The world premiere was in Baltimore in March 1979. While he spoke on many art, garden, and architectural topics, Sultner specialized in subjects relating to the baroque and rococo periods and Palladian architecture.

Sultner died of cancer in York, Pennsylvania, on March 25, 1981, at the age of 67.

1914 -- April 13, born York, Pennsylvania.

1929 -- In Detroit at Lewis Institute to overcome a speech impediment.

1932 -- To University of Pennsylvania.

1935 -- Summer trip to Roanoke (VA), Picketts, Hershey (PA); fall trip to New England for fraternity (AXP) convention.

1936 -- Spring glee club trip; graduated from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania; summer trips to Newport News (VA), northern trip to Canada, Picketts (PA).

1937 -- Fall trip to Williamsburg (VA), Duke University (NC); Sultner family begins building "Glen Hill" (Dover, PA).

1938 -- Summer at home, and Picketts (PA), Camp Pratt.

1939 -- Spring trip to Washington, D.C.; September trip to The Homestead (WV), Hot Springs (WV), Virginia; Lake Mohonk (NY).

1940 -- Summer trip to New Orleans, Blowing Rock (NC); winter trip to Skytop Club (NY); fall trip to Atlantic City (NJ), Philadelphia (PA), Annapolis (MD).

1941 -- Winter 1941-42 appearance in "Hit the Deck." Lake Mohonk (NY) with Ted Walstrum (Sept. 22-23); Skytop Club (NY) (February); summer trip to Canada, Lake Chazy (NY) (Aug. 17-23).

1942 -- Spring in Atlantic City (NJ); summer to Buck Hill Falls, Lakes Chazy and Mohonk.

1943 -- Summer trip to Mohonk (NY).

1944 -- Summer: To Toronto (Ontario), Muskoka Lake, Bigwin Island, Montreal (Quebec), Mohonk (NY).

1945 -- Summer: To Winnepesauke (ME), Woodstock (NY), Ogunquit (ME), Bridgeport (CT).

1946 -- To Mohonk (NY), Ogunquit (ME), Old Saybrook (CT), Nantucket (RI).

1947 -- Singing tour of Canada and New England; winter-spring tour to Georgia and Florida.

1948 -- To Florida and Nassau, Feb.-Mar., Vermont, July-Aug.; Nassau-Havana-Miami-Bermuda, October.

1949 -- Singing tour of North and South Carolina.

1950 -- Summer trip to South.

1951 -- To District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, [New Jersey?], New York, Vermont.

1952 -- January 9: first public photo-concert, Pennsylvania Academy of the Arts, Philadelphia; trips to Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont.

1953 -- To Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont.

1954 -- Guest of German government for a study tour in the fall. To District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia.

1955 -- To Holland; Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia.

1956 -- To California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia.

1957 -- Holland-America Cruise to Germany, Austria, Italy. To Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia.

1958 -- Holland-America Cruises to Germany, Austria, Holland, Italy, Switzerland. To Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota., Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Wisconsin.

1959 -- United States Information Service (USIS)-sponsored tour of Asia: Burma, Cambodia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaya, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam. Also visited Austria, Czechoslovakia, Germany, Greece, Iran, Italy, Spain; Alaska, California, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania.

1960 -- Holland-America Cruise to Austria, Belgium, Caribbean, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Morocco. To Arizona, California, Florida, Indiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin.

1961 -- To Canada, France, Germany, Switzerland; Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode.Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin.

1962 -- Portfolio, "Autumn in Vermont," with introduction by Carl Carmer, published in Autumn issue of Vermont Life. Holland-America Cruise to Denmark, England, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Sweden. To Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia.

1963 -- Holland-America Cruise to Caribbean, Canada, Sweden, Thailand. To Alabama, California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, N;w York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Washington.

1964 -- Holland-America Cruise to Germany, Canada, England, Holland, Wales. To Delaware, District of Columbia, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia.

1965 -- Holland-America Cruise to Austria, Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, Holland, Portugal, Wales. To Arkansas, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Indiana, Kentucky, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia.

1966 -- Holland-America Cruise to Caribbean, Germany, France, Holland, Italy, Portugal, Switzerland. To New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia.

1967 -- Holland-America Cruise to Caribbean, Austria, Denmark, England, Germany, Holland, Italy, Portugal, Sweden, Wales. To Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia.

1968 -- To Germany; Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia.

1969 -- To England, France, Germany, Holland, Switzerland; Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia.

1970 -- Holland-America Cruise to Caribbean, Denmark, Iceland, Sweden. To Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia.

1971 -- Holland-America Cruise to Caribbean, Canada, Denmark, Italy, Portugal, Sweden. To Alabama, Georgia, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania.

1972 -- Holland-America Cruise to Asia, Pacific, Caribbean, Africa, Austria, Italy, Japan, Thailand, Turkey. To California, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia.

1973 -- Holland-America Cruise to Austria, Denmark, Germany, Holland, Iceland, Sweden. To California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont.

1974 -- To Germany, Switzerland; California, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia.

1975 -- To Austria; California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia.

1976 -- To Canada; Connecticut, District of Columbia, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utah.

1977 -- To Canada, Germany; New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia.

1978 -- To Scotland; Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina.

1979 -- To England; Florida.

1980 -- To Florida.

1981 -- March 25: Sultner dies of cancer, York, Pennsylania.
Introduction:
The Donald H. Sultner-Welles Collection, ca. 1790-1981, came to the National Museum of American History in 1982 from the estate of Mr. Sultner. The collection was created by Sultner over his adult life and represents one of the most extensive collections of color transparencies created by one individual and held in a public repository. Sultner's emphasis was on world culture. He took the majority of his photographs in the eastern United States, western Europe, and Asia. Gardens, architecture, and people are the three major subject areas represented in the collection. Of additional interest are Sultner's taped impressions of his 1959 United States Information Service (USIS)-sponsored Asian tour. The collection occupies 309 boxes and covers more than 83 cubic feet.

The Donald H. Sultner-Welles Collection is open to researchers in the Archives Center, third floor east, of the National Museum of American History, between 12th and 14th Streets, on Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20560. The Archives Center is open Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Written and telephone (202/357-3270) inquiries are welcome and researchers are encouraged to contact the Archives Center before their arrival. The FAX number is 202/786-2453.

This is the eleventh in a series of occasional guides to collections in the Archives Center. Finding aids to other collections are available. The Guide to Manuscript Collections in the National Museum of History and Technology (1978) and an updated compilation contain brief descriptions of all archival holdings in the Museum. All current Archives Center holdings are available for search on the Smithsonian Institution Bibliographic Information System (SIBIS), an online database.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but a portion of the collection is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.

A small number of letters and photographs are restricted until the year 2031. Identification list in box.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Portraits -- 20th century  Search this
Lecturers  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Gardens -- Photographs -- 1300-1980  Search this
Architecture -- Photographs -- 1300-1980  Search this
Travel photography -- 1950-2000  Search this
Genre/Form:
Passports
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Travelogs
Receipts -- 20th century
Ephemera
Files
Filmstrips
Lecture notes
Personal papers -- 20th century
Silver-dye bleach process
Contracts
Notebooks
Prints
Press releases
Ships' passenger lists
Project files
Magnetic tapes
Posters
Postcards
Vertical files
Dye destruction process
Travel diaries
Letters (correspondence) -- 20th century.
Professional papers
Bank statements
Correspondence -- 1930-1950
Photographs -- Phototransparencies -- 20th century
Audiotapes -- 1940-1980
Series 12. -- Cibachrome (TM)
Photographs -- 20th century
Clippings
Card files
Concert programs
Dye destruction photoprints
Biography files
Awards
Business records
Birthday cards
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0145
See more items in:
Donald H. Sultner-Welles Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0145
Online Media:

National Museum of History and Technology, Smithsonian Institution

Collection Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Container:
Box 34
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Department of Anthropology records / Series 24: Antiquities Act Permits / 24.3: Antiquities Act Permits – Post 1960
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0311-ref13105

Photographs relating to Native American dwellings and archeology

Publisher:
McAllister, T. H.  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative
10 Lantern slides
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Kickapoo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Filipinos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Ute  Search this
Yavapai  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Lantern slides
Place:
Arizona -- Antiquities
Colorado -- Antiquities
Date:
circa early 20th century
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs relating to various Native American tribes and archeological sites in the American Southwest. The lantern slides in the collection appear to have been collected from multiple sources, and include a grouping that largely depicts dwellings (possibly collected by W. C. Peekhaus), another set focused on archeologiy and portraits of Native Americans, a hand-colored Besseler slide of a bust wearing a headress, and a negative and positive transparency depicting Philippine people outside of a dwelling, possibly at the St. Louis exposition in 1904.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 4995
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Manuscript 4995, Photographs relating to Native American dwellings and archeology, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.4995
See more items in:
Photographs relating to Native American dwellings and archeology
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-4995

Curatorial Records, 1847-2020

Creator:
National Museum of American History (U.S.) Division of Work and Industry  Search this
Subject:
Langley, Harold D  Search this
Lubar, Steven D  Search this
Daniel, Pete  Search this
Jones, Lu Ann  Search this
Mitman, Carl Weaver 1889-  Search this
Taylor, Frank A (Frank Augustus) 1903-2007  Search this
Kendall, Edward C  Search this
Sharrer, G. Terry  Search this
Schlebecker, John T  Search this
Lewton, Frederick L (Frederick Lewis) 1874-1959  Search this
Chapelle, Howard Irving  Search this
Johnson, Paula J. 1954-  Search this
Gilbert, Chester Garfield  Search this
Bishop, Philip W  Search this
Hoffman, John Nathan 1923-  Search this
Houston, Charles O (Charles Orville) 1918-2001  Search this
Wyer, Samuel S. 1879-1955  Search this
Walther, R. G (Robert G.)  Search this
Wessel, Thomas R  Search this
Doyle, Aida M  Search this
Rosson, Mrs. E. W  Search this
Roche, Francis D  Search this
Wright, Helena 1946-  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.) Division of the History of Technology  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.) Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.) Division of Industry and Technology  Search this
United States National Museum Department of Arts and Industries  Search this
United States National Museum Section of Transportation and Civil Engineering  Search this
United States National Museum Division of Technology  Search this
Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Manufactures and Heavy Industries  Search this
United States National Museum Division of Engineering  Search this
United States National Museum Division of Crafts and Industries  Search this
United States National Museum Division of Mineral Technology  Search this
United States National Museum Department of Mineral Technology  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Department of Science and Technology  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Extractive Industries  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Manufacturing  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Agriculture and Mining  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Agriculture and Forest Products  Search this
Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Industrial Cooperation  Search this
United States National Museum Section of Organic Chemistry  Search this
United States National Museum Section of Manufacturers  Search this
United States National Museum Division of Textiles  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Department of Arts and Manufactures  Search this
Physical description:
17 cu. ft. unprocessed holdings
Type:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Brochures
Compact discs
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Color transparencies
Video recordings
Drawings
Illustrations
Phonograph records
Black-and-white negatives
Pamphlets
Electronic records
Electronic mail
Date:
1847
1847-2020
Topic:
Technology--History  Search this
Military history  Search this
Lectures and lecturing  Search this
Material culture  Search this
Agriculture--History  Search this
Museums--Collection management  Search this
Mining engineering  Search this
Mineral industries--History  Search this
Production engineering  Search this
Chemical engineering  Search this
Agriculture machinery  Search this
Forest products  Search this
Congresses and conventions  Search this
Speeches, addresses, etc  Search this
Research grants  Search this
Committees  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Local number:
SIA RS00390
Restrictions & Rights:
Materials less than 15 years old Restricted. Contact reference staff for details
See more items in:
Curatorial Records 1847-2020 [National Museum of American History (U.S.) Division of Work and Industry]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_219965

A Nation of Nations, The National Museum of History and Technology, Smithsonian Institution

Designer:
Steff Geissbühler, Swiss, b.1942  Search this
Firm:
Chermayeff & Geismar Associates, New York, New York, USA  Search this
Medium:
Offset lithography on white wove paper
Dimensions:
101.4 x 65.4 cm (39 15/16 x 25 3/4 in. )
Type:
graphic design
Poster
Object Name:
Poster
Made in:
USA
Date:
1976
Credit Line:
Gift of Ken Friedman
Accession Number:
1997-19-245
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kq4e88048ee-3226-42b6-a5bd-15b24cfebb91
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1997-19-245

Jacob Kainen in Graphic Arts Hall, Smithsonian Institution Building

Author:
Unknown  Search this
Subject:
Washington, George 1732-1799  Search this
Greenough, Horatio 1805-1852  Search this
Kainen, Jacob  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.) Division of Graphic Arts  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.) (NMAH)  Search this
United States National Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Building West Wing  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Building (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 10w x 8h; Type of Image: Person, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Person, candid
Date:
c. 1960
Topic:
Horatio Greenough Statue of George Washington  Search this
Graphic arts  Search this
Printing presses  Search this
Statues  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Standard number:
43950-E or MAH-43950E
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_10042

Vice President Dan Quayle

Author:
Long, Eric  Search this
Subject:
Quayle, James Danforth  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.) (NMAH)  Search this
United States. Office of the Vice President  Search this
Star-Spangled Banner (Flag)  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.)  Search this
Physical description:
Color: Color; Size: 10w x 8h; Type of Image: Group, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Group, candid
Date:
1989
Topic:
Regents  Search this
Quayle, Marilyn  Search this
Quayle, Corine  Search this
Flags  Search this
Standard number:
89-2618-9
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_10114

Smithsonian Chamber Players

Author:
Penland, Dane A  Search this
Subject:
Slowik, Kenneth  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.) Division of Musical History  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.) (NMAH)  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.)  Search this
Smithsonian Chamber Players  Search this
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 8w x 10h; Type of Image: Group, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Group, candid
Date:
1990
Topic:
Godburn, Dennis  Search this
Green, Lowell  Search this
Willens, Michael  Search this
Quan, Linda  Search this
McDonald, Laurence  Search this
McDonald, Marily  Search this
Graybeal, Melissa  Search this
Musicology  Search this
Musical instruments  Search this
Standard number:
86-13881-26
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_10147

Shirley Cherkasky

Author:
Vargas, Rick  Search this
Subject:
National Museum of American History (U.S.) (NMAH)  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.)  Search this
More Perfect Union: Japanese-Americans and the U.S. Constitution (Exhibition) (1987: Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 10w x 8h; Type of Image: Person, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Person, candid
Date:
1991
Topic:
Cherkasky, Shirley  Search this
Department of Public Programs (NMAH)  Search this
Congresses and conventions  Search this
Museum--employees  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Standard number:
91-17383-19
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_10157

Hands On History Room

Author:
Long, Eric  Search this
Subject:
National Museum of American History (U.S.) (NMAH)  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.) Hands on History Room  Search this
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 8w x 10h; Type of Image: Persons, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Group, candid
Date:
1992
Topic:
Museum visitors  Search this
Children  Search this
Students  Search this
Museums and people with disabilities  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Museums--Educational aspects  Search this
Disabilities  Search this
People with disabilities  Search this
Standard number:
92-14291-12 or 92-14291.12
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_10167

Opening of Post Office in NMHT

Author:
Unknown  Search this
Subject:
Ripley, Sidney Dillon 1913-2001  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.) (NMAH)  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Division of Postal History  Search this
Postmaster General  Search this
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 8w x 10h; Type of Image: Event; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Event
Date:
1971
Topic:
Secretaries  Search this
Blount, Winton M  Search this
Post Office (NMAH)  Search this
Division of Philately and Social History  Search this
Secretariats  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Event  Search this
Standard number:
71-1115-7 or 71-1115.07
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_10223

Lunar Module and Wright Plane in A&I

Author:
Farrar, Richard  Search this
Subject:
Arts and Industries Building  Search this
National Air and Space Museum  Search this
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 8w x 10h; Type of Image: Event; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Date:
1975
Topic:
Lunar Module  Search this
Artifacts  Search this
Arts and Industries Building--North Hall  Search this
Wright Military Plane  Search this
Renovations  Search this
Fire and Water (Tile panel)  Search this
Moving of artifacts  Search this
Museum buildings  Search this
Airplanes  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Ceramics  Search this
Tiles  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Event  Search this
Standard number:
75-11096-16
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_10262

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By