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Records

Creator::
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Mt. Hopkins Department  Search this
Extent:
2.5 cu. ft. (5 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Color transparencies
Place:
Santa Rita Mountains (Ariz.)
Date:
1966-1970
Descriptive Entry:
These records document the early history of the Mt. Hopkins Observatory and concern site development, the construction of buildings, the development of astronomical instruments for use at Mt. Hopkins, and projects conducted by SAO and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Observatory. The records include a contracts file, 1966-1970; a projects file, 1967-1970; administrative records, 1966-1970; and photographs and color slides of the Observatory, 1969.
Historical Note:
In October 1965, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) Director Fred L. Whipple visited the southwestern United States for the purpose of choosing a site for a new branch observatory. The location selected was Mt. Hopkins in the Santa Rita Mountains of Arizona. Development of the site began in 1966, and the observatory was officially opened on October 23, 1968. Research activities at Mt. Hopkins included optical and laser satellite tracking for geodetic and geophysical studies, spectroscopic observation of both stellar and planetary bodies, and gamma-ray astronomy.

During 1965 and 1966, the Mt. Hopkins Observatory project was administered by the Office of the Director. Jack A. Coffey served as the first Project Administrator from December 1965 to December 1966 (except during March and April 1966 when Raymond Watts served in the position). In 1967, the newly created Programs Management Office assumed responsibility for Mt. Hopkins, with John J. Burke as chief administrative officer. In 1969, the Mt. Hopkins Department was established, with Ronald R. LaCount as Manager. Charles Tougas was appointed Field Manager of the Mt. Hopkins site in 1966. He was assisted by Werner Kirchhoff who served as Special Technical Advisor.
Topic:
Artificial satellites -- Tracking  Search this
Geodetic astronomy  Search this
Geodesy  Search this
Geophysics  Search this
Spectrum analysis  Search this
Gamma ray astronomy  Search this
Astronomical observatories  Search this
Astronomical instruments  Search this
Astrophysical observatories  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Color transparencies
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 262, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Mt. Hopkins Department, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 262
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0262

International Ultraviolet Explorer Videohistory Collection

Extent:
4 videotapes (Reference copies). 7 digital .wmv files and .rm files (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Transcripts
Date:
1990
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Videohistory Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 1986 until 1992, used video in historical research. Additional collections have been added since the grant project ended. Videohistory uses the video camera as a historical research tool to record moving visual information. Video works best in historical research when recording people at work in environments, explaining artifacts, demonstrating process, or in group discussion. The experimental program recorded projects that reflected the Institution's concern with the conduct of contemporary science and technology.

Smithsonian historians participated in the program to document visual aspects of their on-going historical research. Projects covered topics in the physical and biological sciences as well as in technological design and manufacture. To capture site, process, and interaction most effectively, projects were taped in offices, factories, quarries, laboratories, observatories, and museums. Resulting footage was duplicated, transcribed, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives for scholarship, education, and exhibition. The collection is open to qualified researchers.
Descriptive Entry:
David DeVorkin, curator at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum (NASM), interviewed scientists about the creation, design, manufacture, administration, and use of the IUE. Interviews took place on March 2 and 5, 1990, at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. DeVorkin documented the IUE image processing lab and control center, recorded an observing session with a guest astronomer where data was collected and discussed, and examined specific pieces of equipment that formed the IUE. His general interest was in observational techniques and the effect of new technologies on astronomical data gathering.

This collection consists of two interview sessions, totalling approximately 6:40 hours of recordings, and 185 pages of transcript. There are three generations of tape for each session: originals, dubbing masters, and reference copies. In total, this collection is comprised of 20 original videotapes (20 Beta videotapes), 7 dubbing master videotapes (7 U-Matic videotapes), and 4 reference copy videotapes (4 VHS videotapes). The collection has been remastered digitally, with 20 motion jpeg 2000 and 20 mpeg digital files for preservation, and 20 Windows Media Video and 20 Real Media Video digital files for reference.
Historical Note:
The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) geosynchronous satellite, launched in 1978, was the creation of diverse interests in Europe (European Space Agency), the United Kingdom (Scientific & Engineering Research Council), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center. It was, until the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope in April 1990, the only astronomical telescope working in orbit. Many notable discoveries emerged from the IUE, including the detection of sulfur in the nucleus of a comet, the observation of a massive hot halo of gas surrounding our galaxy, and the continuous monitoring of Supernova 1987A.

Key participants were Carol Ambruster, Albert Boggess, Yoji Kondo, and George Sonneborn. Charles Loomis, Lloyd Rawley, and Mario Perez assisted during the observing session. Carol Ambruster, assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Villanova University was visiting IUE astronomer during the videohistory session. She used the IUE to detect activity of 10 million- and 100 million-year old stars. Ambruster received her Ph.D from the University of Pennsylvania in 1984. She held a number of teaching and research positions before arriving at Villanova in 1987, including a pre-doctoral research position at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., and was a post-doctoral research associate at the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics at the University of Colorado.

Albert Boggess was one of many architects of the IUE. He trained as an astronomer at the University of Michigan, and received his Ph.D in astronomy from there in 1954. He was appointed a fellow at the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University in 1954 and a year later began work as a physicist at the Naval Research Laboratory. He remained there until 1958. From 1959 through 1973 he held head positions at Goddard Space Flight Center with the Interstellar Medium Section, the Astronomy Systems Branch, and the Advanced Systems Development Branch. He also participated in the Sounding Rocket Program and the Orbital Astronomical Observatory. In 1983 Boggess was appointed associate director of science for the Space Telescope Sciences Directorate.

Yoji Kondo was appointed project scientist for the IUE in 1982 and in 1988 assumed additional responsibilities as the project scientist for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUE) Satellite. He received a B.A. from Tokyo University of Foreign Studies in 1958, and a Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Pennsylvania in 1965. He was an assistant professor of astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania until 1968, when he joined NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, as an astronomer. He became an astrophysicist for the Goddard Space Flight Center in 1978.

George Sonneborn joined the IUE program in January 1982 as a supervisor for telescope operations and thereafter held a series of technical management positions. He was eventually appointed project scientist for the EUE. Sonneborn received a Ph.D. in astronomy in 1980 from Ohio State University.

Charles Loomis and Lloyd Rawley were technical assistants during the recording of the IUE observing session; Mario Perez was the on-duty resident astronomer. Loomis received a B.S. in physics and astronomy from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, researched old disk pulsating stars (type II Cepheids), and began as the telescope operator for the IUE in 1989. Rawley was in-training for a resident astronomer position. Perez received a Ph.D in physics and astronomy from Brigham Young University and an M.S. in electrical engineering from Universidad Santa Maria in Valparaiso, Chile. Before becoming resident astronomer for the IUE in 1988, Perez was a research and teaching assistant at Brigham Young University, and held engineering positions for various Chilean agencies and observatories.
Topic:
Astronomy  Search this
History of science and technology  Search this
Telescopes  Search this
Comets  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Astrophysics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9543, International Ultraviolet Explorer Videohistory Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 9543
See more items in:
International Ultraviolet Explorer Videohistory Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9543

Herbert Stephen Desind Collection

Creator:
Desind, Herbert Stephen.  Search this
Extent:
109 Cubic feet (305 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Outer space -- Exploration
Date:
1950-1992
Summary:
The collection consists of 109 cubic feet of material, primarily photographs with some additional documentation, covering aerospace topics. The bulk of the material relates to US space exploration, including extensive photo files on US manned missions through the Space Shuttle, and satellite and sounding rocket work. The first series consists of unmanned spacecraft material, the second series consists of manned spacecraft material, and the third series consists of aircraft material.
Scope and Contents:
The Herbert Stephen Desind Collection (acc. 1997-0014) contains approximately 109 cubic feet of material relating to aviation and space flight. The material is primarily photographic in nature and focuses on manned and unmanned space flight activities.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Unmanned Space Programs

Series 2: Manned Space Programs

Series 3: Aviation subjects

Series 4: Country files

Series 5: Miscellaneous files

Series 6: Press Kits
Biographical / Historical:
Herbert Stephen Desind was a Washington, D.C. area native born on January 15, 1945, raised in Silver Spring, Maryland and educated at the University of Maryland. He obtained his BA degree in Communications at Maryland in 1967, and began working in the local public schools as a science teacher. At the time of his death, in October 1992, he was a high school teacher and a freelance writer/lecturer on spaceflight. Desind also was an avid model rocketeer, specializing in using the Estes Cineroc, a model rocket with an 8mm movie camera mounted in the nose. To many members of the National Association of Rocketry (NAR), he was known as "Mr. Cineroc." His extensive requests worldwide for information and photographs of rocketry programs even led to a visit from FBI agents who asked him about the nature of his activities.

Mr. Desind used the collection to support his writings in NAR publications, and his building scale model rockets for NAR competitions. Desind also used the material in the classroom, and in promoting model rocket clubs to foster an interest in spaceflight among his students.

Desind entered the NASA Teacher in Space program in 1985, but it is not clear how far along his submission rose in the selection process. He was not a semi-finalist, although he had a strong application.

In 1991, Desind was named Science Teacher of the Year by Prince George's County and the Potomac Electric Power Company.

Desind died October 16, 1992, having succumbed to colon cancer.

On November 17, 1994, the Herbert Desind Memorial Space Awareness Center, a state-of-the-art facility, was created and dedicated at Laurel High School. Today that Center houses the Cooperative Satellite Learning Project (CSLP) class as well as other science classes. The CSLP is a business, government, and educational partnership, focusing on space sciences and engineering. One of the sponsors of CSLP is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

In 1997, Desind's father and sister donated his collection to the National Air and Space Museum.
Provenance:
Barbara Desind Kernan, Gift, 1997
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Topic:
Manned space flight  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Space shuttles  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Herbert Stephen Desind Collection, Accession 1997-0014, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1997.0014
See more items in:
Herbert Stephen Desind Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1997-0014
Online Media:

Jacques Tiziou Space Collection

Names:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
146 Cubic feet (204 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Moon -- Exploration
Date:
bulk 1960s through 2010
Summary:
Jacques Tiziou (1939-2017) was a professional journalist and photographer, concentrating on aerospace topics. This collection includes materials from Tiziou's archive of historical documents, photography, and ephemera from the space program (both national and international) as well as his own photography and writings.
Scope and Contents:
Always an avid collector, Tiziou amassed an impressive archive of both historical documents and collectible memorabilia from the space program (both national and international), including over 800 cubic feet of press files, films, photography (including autographed crew photographs) and various souvenirs, from Sputnik to the US Space Shuttle Program. This archival collection consists of 146 cubic feet of materials drawn from Tiziou's original collection, including documents, ephemera, photographs, slides, and video/film, created or collected by Jacques Tiziou on space flight history. Much of the material was gathered from various sources such as NASA, but the collection also contains Tiziou's own photographs and writings.
Arrangement:
The material in the "Files" series has been removed from Tiziou's original file boxes and rehoused into new acid-free containers preserving the original order of each box's contents. The collection's boxes have been rearranged into subseries grouped by regional identity (USA, USSR, International, etc.) and then alphabetically by broad subject matter.

The "Photography" series has not yet been processed.
Biographical / Historical:
Jacques Tiziou (1939-2017) was a professional journalist and photographer, concentrating on aerospace topics. Born in Montélimar, France, he began his career while still a teen as a freelance journalist, and even before graduating in 1962 from the French engineering school Estaca he had worked for various European publications, radio, and television. Between 1965 and 1968, he was the Editor in Chief of the first Encyclopedia of Space and in 1969 he published A l'assault de la lune (A Storm of the Moon). Tiziou then moved to Florida, where he closely followed the Apollo and Skylab programs as a correspondent for Aviation Magazine, French TV channels and photo agencies, including Dalmas, Gamma, and Sygma (Corbis). While in Florida, Tiziou became friends with most American astronauts, and entertained them at his home. Tiziou was also interested in space policy affairs, and after the end of the Skylab program, he moved to Washington DC. Jacques Tiziou was awarded the Silver Feathers and Gold of the French Press, was named a correspondent for the Air and Space Academy in 1993, and was elected to the French National Academy of Air and Space in 1993.
Provenance:
Jacques-Jean Tiziou, Gift, 2018, NASM.2018.0078.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Supersonic transport planes  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Ballistic missiles  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Cold War -- 1950-1970  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Mercury Project  Search this
Gemini Project  Search this
Soyuz Program (Russia)  Search this
Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Project Vanguard  Search this
Vostok (manned satellite)  Search this
Citation:
Jacques Tiziou Space Collection, Acc. 2018.0078, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2018.0078
See more items in:
Jacques Tiziou Space Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2018-0078

Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO) Collection [Werner M. Neupert ]

Creator:
Neupert, Werner  Search this
Extent:
2.18 Cubic feet ((2 record center boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Reports
Notebooks
Charts
Transcripts
Place:
Sun
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists Werner Neupert's files and collection of publications relating to the Orbiting Solar Observatories and and the experiments associated with each. Much of the collection documents artifacts in the collection of the National Air and Space Museum, transferred from NASA by Neupert. Included are a loose-leaf notebook of charts and graphs detailing the "Bendix Electron Multiplier Tests," a loose-leaf reproduction of the June 1957 SID 66-1338-7 "Appendix 7: Ion Chambers for Detection of Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation;" publications by contractor Ball Brothers Research Corporation; minutes of NASA's Solar Physics Subcommittee of the Space Science Steering Committee; a binder of the 1962 ZETA Command Schedule and data; the original stenographic transcript of the 14 March 1963 NASA Satellite Symposium (with lantern slides); and miscellaneous material that includes original strip chart recordings of OSO-1 telemetry. Reports found in this collection include: Appraisal and Recommendations on the Orbiting Solar Observatory Program from NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications, 1968; Space Research: Directions for the Future (Parts 1,2 and 3), published by the Space Science Board, National Academy of Sciences, 1965 and 1966; NASA Reports to the Space Science Board; NASA's America's Next Decades in Space: A Report for the Space Task Group, 1966; Solar Satellite Report from the Harvard College Observatory, 1967; and Goddard Space Flight Center's Twenty-Year Mission Plan.
Biographical / Historical:
Werner M. Neupert is known for his contributions to the fields of solar physics and spectroscopy. While at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center, Neupert was an essential part of the US Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO) program. This program launched a series of eight satellites between 1962 and 1971 to collect data on the sun and to study solar flares. (The "Neupert Effect" of solar flares is named for Werner Neupert.)
Provenance:
David H. DeVorkin, Transfer, 2002
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Solar activity  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Astronomical spectroscopy  Search this
Orbiting solar observatories  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Notebooks
Charts
Transcripts
Citation:
Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO) Collection [Werner M. Neupert ], Accession 2002-0057, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2002.0057
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2002-0057

Tracking and Data Relay Satellites System (TDRSS) Documentation

Creator:
Contel Federal Systems, Fairfax, VA  Search this
Names:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
0.9 Cubic feet ((2 letter document boxes, 1 slim letter document box))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Lists
Specifications
Reports
Diagrams
Date:
1976-1979
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains TDRSS documentation from the years 1976 through 1979. Materials include: a Pricing Manual, a Program Acronym List, Program Space Segment Specifications, a Baseline Report, Project Plans, a Proposal Kickoff Package, the Proposal Preparation, a Test Plan, the Review Boards Notebook, a Shuttle User Draft, Contracts, a System Design Report, Performance Specifications, a Statement of Work, and Flow Diagrams.
Biographical / Historical:
Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) are the largest, most advanced privately developed communications satellites. TDRS provide global coverage of Earth-orbiting spacecraft. In the past, spacecraft could communicate with Earth only when they were in sight of a ground tracking station, typically less than one fifth of the time. The TDRS system enables spacecraft to communicate with Earth for about 85 to 100 percent of the orbit by having a system of orbiting telecommunication satellites operated from a single ground terminal link. The first TDRS was launched from Kennedy Space Center on April 4, 1983. TDRS is owned and operated by the Technical Services Division of Contel Federal Systems, Fairfax, VA. However, its services are being leased to NASA for a ten-year period.
Provenance:
Daniel K. Elliot, Gift, 2002
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Tracking and Data Relay Satellites System (TDRSS)  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Communications equipment  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lists
Specifications
Reports
Diagrams
Citation:
Tracking and Data Relay Satellites System (TDRSS) Documentation, Accession 2002-0046, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2002.0046
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2002-0046

Payload flight assignments-- NASA mixed fleet

Title:
Payload flight assignments--National Aeronautics and Space Administration mixed fleet
Author:
United States Office of Space Flight  Search this
Subject:
United States Office of Space Flight  Search this
Physical description:
v. ; 8 x 12 cm
Type:
Periodicals
Date:
19uu
199u
Topic:
Artificial satellites--Launching  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1092389

International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite Notebooks

Creator:
Harner, Dick  Search this
Extent:
0.36 Cubic Feet ((1 box))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Notebooks
Date:
bulk 1973-1976
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of two 8 by 10 inch green notebooks, which chart the construction of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite. Book one records from October 1, 1973 until September 16, 1974. Book two records from September 17, 1974 until January 9, 1976. The books contain black and white photographs with related notations.
Biographical / Historical:
The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) was the first experiment to explore the full range of ultraviolet radiation from the universe. The IUE was a satellite sponsored and operated jointly by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the United Kingdom's Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) and the European Space Agency (ESA), and dedicated to gathering astronomical data in the ultraviolet range of the spectrum. The IUE was launched by a Thor-Delta rocket on January 26, 1978 and placed into a geosynchronous orbit around the Earth. It carried a 45-centimeter Cassegrain reflecting telescope with two spectrographs, collected spectral data in real time and was capable of being operated by a visiting astronomer at one of two ground stations: in Madrid, Spain, and at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The observer could perform preliminary evaluation and analysis during the observing session, operating the system much like a modern ground-based telescope. In its18 years of operation the IUE provided data for thousands of scientific papers. IUE real time operations terminated on September 27, 1996.
Provenance:
Dick Harner, Gift, 2012
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Artificial satellites -- Tracking  Search this
Ultraviolet spectrometry  Search this
International Ultraviolet Explorer  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notebooks
Citation:
International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite Notebooks, Accession 2012-0022, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2012.0022
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2012-0022

Report: Oral Histories in Meteoritics and Planetary Science: XIII: Fred L. Whipple

Author:
Marvin, Ursula B  Search this
Subject:
Carmichael, Leonard 1898-1973  Search this
Ripley, Sidney Dillon 1913-2001  Search this
Whipple, Fred Lawrence 1906-  Search this
Nininger, Harvey  Search this
LaPaz, Lincoln  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Prairie Meteorite Network  Search this
Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory  Search this
Mt. Hopkins Observatory  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
Harvard College Observatory  Search this
Multiple Mirror Telescope Observatory  Search this
Meteoritical Society  Search this
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory  Search this
Satellite Tracking Program  Search this
Sputnik  Search this
Moonwatch Program  Search this
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics  Search this
Physical description:
Number of pages: 15; Page numbers: A199-A213
Date:
2004
Topic:
Biography  Search this
Meteorites  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Meteors  Search this
Telescopes  Search this
Astrophysicists  Search this
Comets  Search this
Baker-Nunn Camera  Search this
Meteoritics  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
International Geophysical Year, 1957-1958  Search this
Secretaries  Search this
Astrophysics  Search this
Continental drift  Search this
Publisher:
Arizona Board of Regents, University of Arizona: The Meteoritical Society
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_11372

Orbital flight handbook [by George Townsend and others]

Author:
Martin Marietta Company Space Systems Division  Search this
Townsend, George  Search this
George C. Marshall Space Flight Center  Search this
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration Scientific and Technical Information Division  Search this
Physical description:
3 v. illus. ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1963
[1963]
Topic:
Artificial satellites--Orbits  Search this
Call number:
TL796 .M38 1963
TL796.M38 1963
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_320515

Satellite power system : concept development and evaluation program

Author:
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
United States Department of Energy Office of Energy Research  Search this
Physical description:
ix, 310 p. in various pagings : ill. ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1979
Topic:
Satellite solar power systems  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Call number:
TK1056 .S25 1979
TK1056.S25 1979
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_330605

Flight performance handbook for orbital operations; orbital mechanics and astrodynamic formulae, theorems, techniques, and applications. Edited by Raymond W. Wolverton, staff engineer, Systems Analysis Dept. [Contributing authors: Alphonso Ambrosio and others, members of the technical staff]

Author:
Space Technology Laboratories, inc., Los Angeles  Search this
Wolverton, Raymond W  Search this
Physical description:
1 v. (various pagings) maps, diagrs. 29 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1961
Topic:
Astrodynamics  Search this
Artificial satellites--Orbits  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Call number:
TL1050.S6X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_201766

Abstracts : March 5-9, 1973, Sheraton Motor Inn - New Carrollton, Maryland / sponsored by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

Author:
Symposium on Significant Results Obtained from the Earth Resources Technology Satellite--1 (1973 : New Carrollton, Md.)  Search this
Goddard Space Flight Center  Search this
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Physical description:
xviii, 165 l. ; 27 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
1973
1973?]
Topic:
Astronautics in earth sciences--Congresses  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Call number:
QE33.2.A7 S951 1973
QE33.2.A7S951 1973
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_264765

A summary of major NASA launches, October 1, 1958 - December 31, 1979

Author:
John F. Kennedy Space Center  Search this
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Physical description:
1 v. (various pagings) ; 22 x 28 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1980
Topic:
Artificial satellites--Launching  Search this
Call number:
TL796 .J65 1980
TL796.J65 1980
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_140584

Satellite handbook : a record of NASA space missions, 1958-1980 / compiled by Alfred Rosenthal for the Goddard Space Flight Center

Author:
Rosenthal, Alfred  Search this
Goddard Space Flight Center  Search this
Subject:
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Physical description:
xi, 829 p. : ill. ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1981
Topic:
Artificial satellites, American  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Call number:
TL796.5.U5 S31 1981
TL796.5.U5S31 1981
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_198697

Symposium on Passive Gravity-Gradient Stabilization, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, May 10-11, 1965; [papers]

Author:
Symposium on Passive Gravity-Gradient Stabilization (1965 : Ames Research Center)  Search this
Ames Research Center  Search this
Physical description:
vi, 269 p. illus. 27 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1966
Topic:
Artificial satellites--Attitude control systems  Search this
Call number:
TL3260 .S95 1965
TL3260 .S95 1965X
TL3260.S95 1965
TL3260.S95 1965X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_2498

Proceedings

Author:
Conference on Physics of the Solar System and Reentry Dynamics (1961 : Virginia Polytechnic Institute)  Search this
Virginia Polytechnic Institute  Search this
Langley Research Center  Search this
Physical description:
2 v. illus., diagrs. 23 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
1962
Topic:
Astrophysics  Search this
Space sciences  Search this
Artificial satellites--Atmospheric entry  Search this
Call number:
QB501 .C6 1961
QB501.C6 1961
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_78331

Tracking and data relay satellite system : hearing before the Subcommittee on Space Science and Applications of the Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-fourth Congress, second session, September 21, 1976

Author:
United States Congress House Committee on Science and Technology Subcommittee on Space Science and Applications  Search this
Subject:
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration Procurement  Search this
Physical description:
iii, 34 p. ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1976
Topic:
Artificial satellites--Tracking  Search this
Call number:
KF27 .S3995 1976cX
KF27.S3995 1976cX
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_88376

The Vanguard satellite launching vehicle : an engineering summary

Author:
Klawans, Bernard B. 1921-2011  Search this
Burghardt, J  Search this
Bridger, J. M  Search this
Martin Company  Search this
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
United States Navy  Search this
Subject:
Project Vanguard  Search this
Physical description:
vii, 188, A1-A5 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
1960
[1960]
Topic:
Artificial satellites--Launching  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
International Geophysical Year, 1957-1958  Search this
Call number:
TL796.5.U6 V36X 1960
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1054603

A record of NASA space missions since 1958 / compiled by Alfred Rosenthal for the Goddard Space Flight Center

Author:
Rosenthal, Alfred  Search this
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Goddard Space Flight Center  Search this
Physical description:
877 p. : ill ; 29 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1982
Topic:
Space flight  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Call number:
TL790 .R68 1982
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_908194

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