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Concert - The Blues: Roots, Branches and Beyond Part 1

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Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
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Tue, 16 Aug 2011 13:39:00 GMT
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Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Live Events
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Concert - The Blues: Roots, Branches and Beyond Part 2

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Podcast
MIME Type:
video/mp4
Uploaded:
Tue, 16 Aug 2011 14:39:00 GMT
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
See more episodes:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Live Events
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Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
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New York City at the Smithsonian

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
At first, it might seem like an oxymoron to talk about the "folklore" or "folklife" of one of the world's most modern cities, but daily life in New York would be impossible without this body of shared urban traditions, of collective community knowledge, customs, historical memories, and cultural understandings that constitutes the folklife of the city. lt provides the basic ground rules that shape how New Yorkers interact with their families, their colleagues, and their fellow New Yorkers. From subway etiquette to local street food to stickball games, these traditions give New York City its unique sense of place.

ln addition to a shared urban culture, most New Yorkers also have one or more reservoirs of specialized traditional knowledge, which they have acquired from their ethnic and/or religious upbringing, working in a particular occupation, or living in a specific area of the city. The innumerable, multifaceted ways in which these factors interact are what make New York and New Yorkers so fascinating. Of course, it was impossible to cover all aspects of New York's culture in a single event, but by approaching city culture thematically, and by carefully selecting examples that highlight different aspects of work, life, and leisure in New York, New York City at the Smithsonian sought to acquaint Festival visitors with both the ordinary and extraordinary aspects of life in Gotham.

What gives New York a sense of being different is not merely tbe myriad ethnic and interest groups that are found in the city, but the complex ways in which they overlap and interact. The physical landscape of New York - the lack of space, the reliance on mass transit by people of vastly differing backgrounds, neighborhoods which are home to both the very rich and the extremely poor - makes it impossible for New Yorkers to ignore the influence of "others." From kosher Chinese restaurants to lrish hip-hop groups to Mexican pizzas, cultures from all corners of the globe have influenced one another in New York, in part because of their physical proximity.

The 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated just a few of the innumerable manifestations of traditional culture in New York City. More importantly, fieldwork leading up to the Festival allowed the Smithsonian, working in close collaboration with city-based cultural organizations and ethnic and occupational communities, to document daily life in New York City at the turn of the millennium. Material collected during the course of this research, as well as information recorded during and after the Festival, will significantly enrich the Smithsonian's archival holdings about New York City. A century from now, when scholars and writers want to know what it was like to live in New York in 2001, to work on Broadway, to drive a taxi, to trade stocks on Wall Street, or teach English in a school filled with recent immigrants, they can turn to the documentation collected by this project. That body of documentation - and the recordings and photographs made during the Festival itself - took on increased importance with the events of September 11, 2001, barely three months after the Festival had closed, which emphasized to all observers how the cultural values of New Yorkers, vividly on display to Festival visitors, also provided them a reservoir of resiliency to surmount those tragic events.

Nancy Groce was Senior Curator for the program, supported by several Area Curators: Ray Allen, music; Marion Jacobson, urban fashion; Annie Hauck-Lawson, foodways; Cathy Ragland, music; Ethel Raim, music; Henry Sapoznik, media; Brian Thompson, Wall Street; Kay Turner, Wall Street; and Steve Zeitlin, neighborhood. Arlene Reiniger was Program Coordinator.

An Advisory Committee included: Ruth Abram, Director, Lower East Side Tenement Museum; Gladys Pena Acosta, Director, RAICES; Ray Allen, Director, American Studies Program, Brooklyn College/CUNY; Gage Averill, Chair, Music Department, New York University; Fatima Bercht, Chief Curator, El Museo del Barrio; Melody Capote, Executive Director, Caribbean Culture Center/African Diaspora Institute; Barbara Cohen-Stratyner, Curator, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts; Cara De Silva, Food Historian; Miriam De Uriarte, Director of Education, El Museo del Barrio; Howard Dodson, Director, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture/NYPL; Sharon E. Dunn, Senior Assistant for the Arts, New York City Board of Education; Juan Flores, Professor, Black and Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College/CUNY; Laura Hansen, Director, Place Matters, Municipal Art Society; John Haworth, Assistant Director, National Museum of the American Indian; Ellie Hisama, Director, Institute for Studies in American Music, Brooklyn College/CUNY; Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Professor, Performance Studies Department, NYU; Leah Krauss, Program Officer, The New York Community Trust; Susana Torruella Leva!, Executive Director, El Museo del Barrio; Robert MacDonald, Executive Director, Museum of the City of New York; Fay Chew Matsuda, Executive Director, Museum of Chinese in the Americas; Ethel Raim, Executive Director, Center for Traditional Music and Dance; Jan Seidler Ramirez, Vice President of Public Affairs, New York Historical Society; Frances A. Resheske, Vice President of Public Affairs, Consolidated Edison Company; Joseph Sciarra, Academic Programs, Calandra Italian American Institute, Queens College; Gabrielle Shubert, Director, New York Transit Museum; Pravina Shukla, Assistant Professor, Folklore Department, Indiana University; John Kuo Wei Tchen, Director, Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program & Institute, NYU; Brian Thompson, Director, Museum of American Financial History; Michael Wallace, Historian and Author, CUNY; Steve Wheeler, Archivist, New York Stock Exchange; Theodora Yoshikami, Multicultural Program, American Museum of Natural History; Steven Zeitlin, Executive Director, City Lore: The Center for Urban Culture.

The program was produced in collaboration with New York's Center for Traditional Music and Dance and City Lore, with major funding from the New York City Council, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Howard P. Milstein, and the New York Stock Exchange. The Leadership Committee was co-chaired by The Honorable Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Elizabeth Moynihan and corporate chairman Howard P. Milstein. Major support was provided by Amtrak, Con Edison, the Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds, Arthur Pacheco, and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Major contributors included The New York Community Trust, The Coca-Cola Company, The Durst Foundation, the May & Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Leonard Litwin, Bernard Mendik, and Stephen and Judy Gluckstern. Additional donors included Emigrant Savings Bank, Jeffrey Gural, Lester Morse, Richard Schwartz, Michael Bloomberg, Keyspan Energy, Martin Segal, and Earle Mack.
Researchers:
Jerald Albarelli, Ray Allen, Emily Botein, Lori Branston, Kathleen Condon, Martha Cooper, Amanda Dargan, Andrew Davis, Tony DeNonno, Sonia Estreich, Makale Faber, Kwali Farbes, Michael Greene, Laura Hansen, Annie Hauck-Lawson, Marion Jacobson, Denise Lynn, Elena Martinez, Cathy Ragland, Ethel Raim, Henry Sapoznik, Roberta Singer, Les Slater, Scott Spencer, Brian Thompson, Kay Turner, Tom Van Buren, Li Wangsheng, Bill Westerman, Lois Wilken, Steven Zeitlin
Presenters:
Judy Adamson, Ray Allen, Dwight Blocker Bowers, Kathleen Condon, Andrew Davis, James Early, Makale Faber, Juan Flores, Annie Hauck-Lawson, Marion Jacobson, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Wangsheng Li, Elena Martinez, Cathy Ragland, Ethel Raim, Kristin Richard, Henry Sapoznik, Les Slater, Brian Thompson, Kay Turner, Tom Van Buren, Meg Ventrudo, Cynthia Vidaurri, George Zavala, Steve Zeitlin
Participants:
Arts & Artists

Wilfreda "Bio" Feliciano, muralist, Tats Cru

Hector "Nicer" Nazario, muralist, Tats Cru

Sotero "BG 183" Ortiz, muralist, Tats Cru

Gaspar Ingui, neon sign maker

Robbie Ingui, neon sign maker

Theresa Ingui, neon sign maker

Backstage Broadway

Judy Adamson, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Jarred Aswegan, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Gary Brouwer, theatrical milliner

Kimberly Cea, actress

Edie Cowan, director, choreographer

Brian Healy, prop maker, armorer, Costume Armour

Bob Kelly, wig maker, make-up artist

Polly Kinney, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Janice Lorraine, actress

Terry Marone, Gypsy Robe, Actors' Equity

Barbara Matera, costume maker

Nino Novel lino, prop maker, Costume Armour

Peter Ray, prop maker, Costume Armour

Woody Regan, rehearsal pianist

Linda Rice, wig maker, Bob Kelly

Tom Rocco, actor

Tom Schneider, theatrical milliner

Scott Sliger, make-up artist, Bob Kelly

Josephine Spano, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Patricia Sullivan, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Brian Wolfe, prop maker, Costume Armour

Leslie Wolfe, prop maker, Costume Armour

Building Trades

George Andrucki, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Stan Bernstein, sheet metal worker, Local 28

William Bush, water tank builder

Adonis Cegisman, water tank builder

Ryszard Danielewski, water tank builder

John DeGeorge, water tank builder

Robin Delk, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Nicholas Maldarelli, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Leah Rambo, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Andrew Rosenwach, water tank builder

Thomas Schlitz, sheet metal worker, Local 28

George Treanor, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Arthur Tyburski, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Urban Fashion & Garment Industry

Britt Bowers, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Vanessa Burgos, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Lidia Carrera, needle trade worker, UNITE! Local 23-25

Esther Cheung, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Mary Costantini, mannequin sculptor

Linda Dworak, director, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Shiniji Horimura, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Elizabeth Jacobsen, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Anne Kong, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Anne Liu, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Nicole Mata, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Adrienne Muken, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Ana Perez, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Ramon Roman, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Isabel Toledo, fashion designer

Ruben Toledo, fashion designer

Monica Williamson, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

May Xian, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Foodways

Salvator Bartolomeo, Italian cook

Kam-Chung Chan, Chinese cook

Cara De Silva, food researcher, writer

Makale Faber, West African cook

Mark Federman, Jewish appetizing

Trevor Fraser, West Indian, Caribbean cook

Theresa lngui, Polish, German cook

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, food historian

Alana Grace Lawson, Polish cook

Vertamae Grosvenor, African-American cook

Molly O'Neill, food writer and chef

Ming Hua Qian, Chinese cook

Donald Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Esta Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Steve Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Community Media

Clay Berry, producer, African-American radio

Kathleen Biggins, host, Irish-American radio

Joe Franklin, host, entertainment community

Debi Jackson, producer, African-American radio

Hal Jackson, host, African-American radio

Bill Jaker, 1939-, radio historian

René Lopez, host, Latino radio

Henry Sapoznik, host, Yiddish radio

Music, Dance & Performance

Wrickford Dalgetty, Caribbean song

Julio Diaz, Latin dancer

Tony DeMarco, Irish fiddle

Linda Hickman, Irish flute

D.J. Angola, turntablist

D.J. Rehka, turntablist

ABDOULAYE DIABATE & SUPER MANDEN -- ABDOULAYE DIABATE & SUPER MANDENAbdoulaye Diabate, director, vocals, guitarChiek Barry, bassMoussa Cissoko, n'goni, guitarAboubakar Diabate, djembeMamadou Diabate, 1975-, koraTapani Sissoko, vocalsAbou Sylla, bala

APOLLO THEATRE, AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLO -- APOLLO THEATRE, AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLOVanessa Brown, Amateur Night assistantJoseph Gray, lead vocalsJane Harley, Kemet ProductionsMonteria Ivey, hostSteve Jones, production managerC.P. Lacey, The ExecutionerShirley Matthews, coordinating producerMoni-J, hostessDavid Rodriguez, executive director

RAY CHEW & THE CREW -- RAY CHEW & THE CREWRay Chew, musical directorMike Ciro, guitarBobby Douglas, keyboardArtie Reynolds, bassRalph Rolle, drums

CHERISH THE LADIES -- CHERISH THE LADIESSean Conner, step dancerDeirdre Connolly, tin whistle, vocalsMary Coogan, guitar, banjo, mandolinKatie Fox, step dancerDonna Long, piano, fiddleJoanie Madden, director, tin whistle, flute, vocalsPaul McKeown, sound engineerMary Rafferty, accordion, tin whistleMarie Reilly, fiddle

CHERES UKRAINIAN FOLK ENSEMBLE -- CHERES UKRAINIAN FOLK ENSEMBLEAndriy Milavsky, leader, woodwindsVictor Cebotari, accordionGeorge Cheremush, violinAlexander Fedoriouk, cymbaly (hammered dulcimer)Oleh Ivanyschuk, contrabass

DAVID DAVID -- DAVID DAVIDLauterio Polanco, director, lead vocals, accordionAdriel Espaillat, guieraAdelso Fernandez, bajoKenny Fernandez, tamboraMenecio Martinez, pianoHector Mota, saxophoneFernando Rodreguez, conga

FRISNER AUGUSTIN AND LA TROUPE MAKANDAL -- FRISNER AUGUSTIN AND LA TROUPE MAKANDALFrisner Augustin, 1948-2012, lead drums, vocalsRaymond Charles, third drumSteve Deats, second drumSmith Destin, dancerKethelyne Jean-Louis, dancerKesler Pierre, percussionSandy St. Cyr, dancer

HANGUK: SOUNDS OF KOREA (KOREAN TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ARTS ASSOCIATION) -- HANGUK: SOUNDS OF KOREA (KOREAN TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ARTS ASSOCIATION)Gee Soak Back, percussionHyung Joan Kim, percussionChii-Seung Kwon, percussionJi-Young Park, dancer, percussionSue Yeon Park, dancer, percussionKathy Soh, dancer, percussionMaggie Soh, percussion

LOS AFORTUNADOS -- LOS AFORTUNADOSFelix Sanabria, director, congas, bata, percussionFrancisco Cotto, bassPedro Domeich, dancer, vocalsAlbert Lusink, trumpetAbraham Rodriguez, vocals, percussionMichael Rodriguez, percussionBrandon Rosser, percussionSusan Richardson Sanabria, dancerAdam Tully, tres guitar

LOS MACONDOS -- LOS MACONDOSJorge L. Marquez, bajoEugenio R. Ortega, accordion, lead vocalsJuan A. Ortega, caja vallenata, vocalsDavid Pacheco, timbalesGuillermo E. Penate, guieroMario A. Rodriguez, congas

LOS PLENEROS DE LA 21 -- LOS PLENEROS DE LA 21Juan J. Gutierrez, leader, tamboreroAlberto Cepeda, güiro, tamboreroRoberto Cepeda, vocals, bailador de bomba, güiro, maraca, tamboreroJose Lantigua, keyboardHector Matos, vocals, tamboreroEdgardo Miranda, cuatroDonald Nicks, bassJose Rivera, vocals, tamboreroDomingo Tanco, vocalsNellie Tanco, vocals, bailadora de bomba, tamboreraVictor Velez, vocals, tamborero

MERITA HALILI & THE RAIF HYSENI ORCHESTRA -- MERITA HALILI & THE RAIF HYSENI ORCHESTRAGezim Halili, clarinet, saxophoneMerita Halili, vocalsRaif Hyseni, accordionArtan Kushi, dajreTome Lleshaj, bass guitarEdmond Xhani, laouta

MESAOUDA JUDEO-ARABIC ENSEMBLE -- MESAOUDA JUDEO-ARABIC ENSEMBLEMarc Hazan, vocalsJoshua Levitt, naiHaig Manoukian, oudTomer Tzur, percussion

MUKTHAMBAR FINE ARTS, INC. -- MUKTHAMBAR FINE ARTS, INC.A. Balaskandan, violinBala Ganesh, mrudangist (Asian Indian drum)Aarati Ramanand, dancerSaavitri Ramanand, vocals

MUSIC FROM CHINA -- MUSIC FROM CHINASusan Cheng, director, daruanChung Bun Chiu, percussionWai Wah Law, vocalsGao Renyang, dizi, xiaoGuowei Wang, erhu, zhong hu, daohuTienjou Wang, gou hu, zhong huHerman Wong, concert managerMin Xiaofen, pipaHelen Yee, yang qinYing Ying Zhu, vocals

SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA -- SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRAZoran Muncan, keyboardErnie Sau, button accordionMichael Sau, button accordionVinnie Sau, violin

SHASHMAQAM BUKHARAN JEWISH CULTURAL GROUP -- SHASHMAQAM BUKHARAN JEWISH CULTURAL GROUPAbokhay Aminov, vocals, doyra (drum)Tavriz Aronova, ensemble memberDavid Davidov, tarFiruza Junatan, dancerShumiel Kuyenov, doyra (drum)Boris Kuknariyev, accordionIzro Malakov, vocals

SIMON SHAHEEN & QANTARA -- SIMON SHAHEEN & QANTARASimon Shaheen, director, oud, violinOlga Chirino, keyboardsBilly Drewes, soprano saxJamie Haddad, world percussionFrancois Moutin, contrabassAdam Rogers, acoustic and electric guitarBassam Saba, flute, naiLuis Santiago, Latin percussionNajib Shaheen, oudSteve Sheehan, world percussionSoraya, vocalsMartin Zarzar, world percussion

SON MUNDANO -- SON MUNDANOBobby Allende, bongosJimmy Bosch, 1962-, tromboneNelson Gonzalez, Cuban tresNelson Gonzalez, Jr., lead vocalsOscar Hernandez, electric pianoRene Lopez, Jr., congasLuis Rosa, vocalsJoe Santiago, upright bass

VISION BAND

X-ECUTIONERS -- X-ECUTIONERSD.J. AngolaTotal EclipsePeter KangRoc RaiderMista SinistaRob Swift

YURI YUNAKOV ENSEMBLE -- YURI YUNAKOV ENSEMBLELauren Brody, keyboard, vocalsCatherine Foster, clarinetIvan Milev, accordionGeorge Petrov, drumsCarol Silverman, vocalsYuri Yunakov, 1958-, saxophone

Neighborhood & Community Life -- Neighborhood & Community LifeLori Brandston, urban sports and gamesSam Chwat, speech therapist, dialect coachMichael E. Clark, Citizens Committee for New York CitySonia Estreich, Citizens Committee for New York CityMichael Greene, urban sports and gamesLaura Hansen, Place Matters, Municipal Art SocietyRoberta Jones, storytellerJessica Katz, Citizens Committee for New York CityAnnie Lanzilloto, storyteller, performance artistMoe Maloney, community activist, "Mayor of Windsor Terrace"Rosalyn Perry, storytellerLiz Sevcenko, Memory Map, Lower East Side Tenement Museum

Street Life, Festival, Celebration

Mikey Enoch, steel pan tuner

Richie Richardson, Caribbean carnival costume maker

Les Slater, Caribbean carnival culture

Transit

Carissa Amash, New York Transit Museum

Bruce Alexander, subway engineer, MTA

Chris Creed, subway engineer, MTA

Sandra Lane, subway operator, MTA

Anthony Palombella, bus operator, MTA

Luz Montano, New York Transit Museum

Tarin Reid, subway operator, MTA

Charles Sachs, Sr., curator, New York Transit Museum

Gabrielle Shubert, director, New York Transit Museum

Mark Watson, New York Transit Museum

Wall Street

Richard Anderson, Jr., stock market investor, speaker

Richard Anderson, Sr., stock market investor, analyst

Richard Baratz, caricaturist, stock certificate engraver, American Bank Note Company

Madeline Boyd, trader, New York Stock Exchange

Victoria Chukwuka, New York Metro Coordinator, Stock Market Game

Joseph Cicchetti, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Anthony DeMarco, trader, New York Board of Trade

Joe Gabriel, engineer, plant manager, New York Stock Exchange

Michael Geoghan, clerk, New York Mercantile Exchange

John E. Herzog, founder, Museum of American Financial History

Scott Hess, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Myron Kandel, senior financial editor, CNN

Michael LaBranche, specialist, New York Stock Exchange

Gary Lapayover, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Michel Mark, New York Mercantile Exchange

Mark Tomasko, financial printer, engraving historian

Nancy Norton Tomasko, financial printer

Steve Wheeler, archivist, New York Stock Exchange

Jason Zweig, columnist, -- Money -- Magazine

Generations: a centennial tribute to Margaret Mead

THE FLOWERS FAMILY SINGERS -- THE FLOWERS FAMILY SINGERSRev. James N. Flowers, Jr., director, vocals, Ft. Washington, MarylandAnthony Flowers, vocals, keyboard, Seat Pleasant, MarylandYolanda Flowers, vocals, Capital Heights, MarylandMarie Hickson, vocals, Capital Heights, MarylandDorothy McDowell, vocals, Upper Marlboro, MarylandMargie Pickett, vocals, Landover, MarylandErma Reed, vocals, Landover, MarylandMildred Scruggs, vocals, Capital Heights, Maryland

WALKER CALHOUN AND THE RAVEN ROCK DANCERS -- WALKER CALHOUN AND THE RAVEN ROCK DANCERSWalker Calhoun, director, vocals, drum, rattle, Cherokee, North CarolinaAndrew Calhoun, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaJennifer Calhoun, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaChris Mahan, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaVelma Mahan, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaDelana Smith, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaPatrick Smith, dancer, vocals, Cherokee, North Carolina

THE SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA, RIDGEWOOD, QUEENS, NEW YORK -- THE SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA, RIDGEWOOD, QUEENS, NEW YORKZoran Muncan, keyboard, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkAksenti Sau, piano accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkErnie Sau, button accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkMichael Sau, button accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkNikica Sau, keyboard, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkVinnie Sau, violin, Ridgewood, Queens, New York
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref34

Special Events

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert - Bernice Johnson Reagon Song Family: Continuum of Songs, Singing and Struggle. Bernice Johnson Reagon's work as a carrier of African American congregational singing traditions spans more than four decades. During that time she worked collaboratively with Ralph Rinzler on different projects related to the preservation and sharing of traditional music and the importance of music as part of the culture of struggle and resistance. Reagon, using her southwest Georgia beginnings as a foundation, began the evening with a congregational sing. The concert also featured performances by the SNCC Freedom Singers, Sweet Honey ln The Rock, and Toshi Reagon and Big Lovely.

Power and Glory: Folk Songs of the Presidency. This concert was held in conjunction with The American Presidency: A Glorious Burden exhibition at the National Museum of American History, Behring Center, and featured Oscar Brand with John Foley, Josh White Jr., Joe Glazer, and Magpie.

Across Generations: A Centennial Tribute to Margaret Mead. Anthropologist Margaret Mead (1901-1978) was an enthusiastic supporter of the Festival, and so it was fitting that the Center paid tribute to her during her centennial year with a program that reftects a shared interest: the transmission of culture across generations. The Flowers Family Singers, Walker Calhoun and the Raven Rock Dancers, and the Sau Family Orchestra presented their traditions - old and new - and shared thoughts on the interactions between age groups by which cultural traditions are communicated, how they change, and what they mean to the tradition-bearers and the identity of their larger communities.

For the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert, Bernice Johnson Reagon was Curator and Kate Rinzler was Program Coordinator. For the Tribute to Margaret Mead, Carla Borden was Curator and James Early, Rayna Green, and Ethel Raim were presenters. For Folk Songs of the American Presidency, Howard Bass was Curator and Dennis Callahan was Associate.

The Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert was made possible by the Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds. The Tribute to Margaret Mead was made possible by the Institute for Intercultural Studies and the Office of the Senior Scholar Emeritus, Smithsonian Institution. The American Presidency exhibition was made possible by the generous support of Kenneth E. Behring; The History Channel; Chevy Chase Bank; Cisco Systems, Inc.; Elizabeth and Whitney MacMillan; and Heidi and Max Berry; with additional support provided by Automatic Data Processing, Inc.; Business 2.0; KPMG LLP; Sears, Roebuck and Co.; and T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc.
Participants:
Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert: The Bernice Johnson Reagon Song Family

Bernice Johnson Reagan

SNCC FREEDOM SINGERS -- SNCC FREEDOM SINGERSRutha Mae HarrisCharles NeblettBernice Johnson Reagan

SWEET HONEY IN THE ROCK -- SWEET HONEY IN THE ROCKBernice Johnson ReaganYsaye M. BarnwellNitanju Bolade CaselAisha KahlilShirley Childress Saxton, sign-language interpreter

TOSHI REAGON AND BIG LOVELY

Power and Glory: Folksongs of the Presidency

Oscar Brand, vocals, guitar

John Foley, guitar

Josh White Jr., vocals, guitar

Joe Glazer, vocals, guitar

MAGPIE -- MAGPIEGreg Artzner, vocals, instrumentals, Takoma Park, MarylandTerry Leonina, vocals, instrumentals, Takoma Park, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref42

American Social Dance

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The United States is blessed with a diversity of community dance traditions and new dance forms that have developed from interactions between communities. This exciting American mix has had a profound impact on the popular cultures of nations across the world. The dance program at the 1993 Festival explored social dancing traditions in five communities - an Appalachian community in southwest Virginia, Iroquois communities in upstate New York, and African American, Bolivian, and Cambodian American communities of Washington, D.C.

Tradition-bearers taught dances to Festival visitors in workshops, participated in conversations on a variety of themes, and demonstrated skills, repertoires, and performance styles from their communities. In each of these communities, dance is centrally important in the expression of cultural identity. Dancing brings members of a community together and strengthens cohesiveness by emphasizing shared ethical and aesthetic values. Performing a common vocabulary of movement, in time to a shared repertoire of music, one participates in a culture; Festival audiences became active participants during this program and had the opportunity in so doing to experience others' cultures.

Vivien Ta-Ying Chen was Curator and Marianne Hicks and Arlene Reiniger were Program Coordinators. Program Advisors included LeeEllen Friedland, Joan Frosch-Schroder, Robert Frye, Gonzalo Gutierrez, Glenn Hinson, Anthony Hovington, Adrienne Kaeppler, Martin Koenig, Ethel Raim, Denise Richards, Sally Sommer, Jane Woodside, and Vicki Risner Wulff.

American Social Dance was made possible with the support of the recording industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Fieldworkers:
Enrique Avilés, Sherrill Berryman-Miller, Paola Castellon, Chhomanath Chhuan, Phavann Chhuan, LeeEllen Friedland, Robert Frye, Anthony Hovington, Magaly E. Jarrad, Laura Larco, Linley Logan, Lidya Montes, Jaime Ortega, Denise Richards, Chan Moly Sam, Sally Sommer, Susan Eike Spalding
Presenters:
Marco Castellon, Gilka Wara Céspedes, LeeEllen Friedland, Robert Frye, Anthony Hovington, Magaly K. Jarrad, Linley Logan, Gail Matthews-DeNatale, Frank Proschan, Denise Richards, Chan Moly Sam
Participants:
Square Dancers from Southwest Virginia

Lois B. Buchanan, 1937-, Glade Spring, Virginia

Richard C. Buchanan, 1933-, Glade Spring, Virginia

Carl Farris, 1938-, Chilhowie, Virginia

Virginia Lee Farris, 1939-, Chilhowie, Virginia

Ernest French, Meadowview, Virginia

Nancy Haworth, 1945-, Abingdon, Virginia

William R. Haworth, 1942-, Abingdon, Virginia

Mildred Holley, Chilhowie, Virginia

Glenn Orfield, 1943-, Meadowview, Virginia

Sandra Orfield, 1942-, Meadowview, Virginia

George V. Owens, 1935-, Meadowview, Virginia

Mary D. Owens, 1939-, Meadowview, Virginia

David E. Salyer, Abingdon, Virginia

Janie Salyer, Abingdon, Virginia

Kirby Smith, 1926-2006, caller, Abingdon, Virginia

Jack Stevens, Meadowview, Virginia

Lala Stevens, Meadowview, Virginia

Evelyn W. Sturgill, 1933-, Chilhowie, Virginia

French Sturgill, Chilhowie, Virginia

Barbara Vance, 1942-, Chilhowie, Virginia

James Vance, 1939-, Chilhowie, Virginia

Southern Country Band -- Southern Country BandHoward Burchette, 1934-, mandolin, fiddle, guitar, vocals, Abingdon, VirginiaBarton Fritts, bass, Mountain City, TennesseeWilliam C. Kelly, 1925-, fiddle, Chilhowie, VirginiaAl Lambert, 1929-, guitar, mandolin, banjo, vocals, Abingdon, VirginiaWilliam H. McCall, 1925-, guitar, vocals, Abingdon, VirginiaSteve Starnes, mandolin, Abingdon, Virginia

Cambodian American Dancers

Phavann Chhuan, 1951-, Rockville, Maryland

Chhomanath Chhuan, Rockville, Maryland

John Kheav, Ft. Washington, Maryland

Vuthy Kheav, 1962-, Ft. Washington, Maryland

Sesane Ouk, 1972-, Sterling, Virginia

Sorabe Phann, 1953-, Bel Air, Maryland

Chan Moly Sam, 1953-, Reston, Virginia

Phillip Rithy Sok, 1973-, Sterling, Virginia

Nareine Sokhon, Potomac, Maryland

Sareth C. Sokhon, 1940-, Potomac, Maryland

Soum Sokhon, 1937-, Potomac, Maryland

Jammy Samnung Sun, Herndon, Virginia

Nadin Samnung Sun, Herndon, Virginia

Nady Samnung Sun, Herndon, Virginia

Sody T. Tek, 1971-, Alexandria, Virginia

Rady Tes, Ft. Washington, Maryland

Sochietah Ung, 1957-, Washington, D.C.

Kagnol Band -- Kagnol BandKagnol Mol, 1945-, leader, guitar, organ, Chantilly, VirginiaHamany Mol, manager, Chantilly, VirginiaSophy L. Hoeung, vocals, Alexandria, VirginiaCory Long, vocals, Silver Spring, MarylandMony Ouy, guitar, Woodbridge, Virginia

New Hello Band -- New Hello BandSamnang Sun, 1955-, leader, keyboards, Herndon, VirginiaVutha Pao, 1967-, lead guitar, Falls Church, VirginiaPhal Soeung, 1962-, vocals, Herndon, VirginiaFarom Tan, 1964-, guitar, Woodbridge, VirginiaChhin Bun Yan, 1955-, vocals, Herndon, Virginia

Bolivian Dancers

Juan Leonardo Alanes, 1956-, Riverdale, Maryland

Adela Baldarrama, Silver Spring, Maryland

Carlos Ballesteros, 1935-, Arlington, Virginia

Melody Ballesteros, Arlington, Virginia

Nancy Ballesteros, Arlington, Virginia

Marco A. Castellon, 1965-, Silver Spring, Maryland

Paola Castellon, Silver Spring, Maryland

Luis H. Fuentes, 1936-, Alexandria, Virginia

Luz Fuentes, Alexandria, Virginia

Magaly Jarrad, 1965-, Glen Burnie, Maryland

Andy Lopez, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Jhonny V. Meneses, 1964-, Alexandria, Virginia

Maria Teresa Mojica, 1946-, Oakton, Virginia

Angel F. Quinteros, 1960-, Arlington, Virginia

Leslie Quinteros, Arlington, Virginia

Lillian Quinteros, 1958-, Arlington, Virginia

Giovani Ricaldez, Arlington, Virginia

Rosemary L. Sejas, 1967-, Arlington, Virginia

Alex Urresty, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Jugo Urresty, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Generacion Luz -- Generacion LuzCharlie Barrionuevo, keyboards, vocals, Falls Church, VirginiaFermin Barrionuevo, keyboards, Falls Church, VirginiaMauricio Barrionuevo, director, percussion, vocals, Springfield, VirginiaJuan Carlos Cueto, guitar, vocals, Arlington, VirginiaLelis Cueto, percussion, Arlington, VirginiaRaul Monterrosa, piano, Arlington, VirginiaJulio Robles, bass, vocals, Arlington, Virginia

Ollantay -- OllantayEnrique Coria, charango,Alexandria, VirginiaJosé Raúl Duran, charango, flute, Silver Spring, MarylandJosé Raúl Gonzalez, charango,Alexandria, VirginiaBoris Torrico, flute, Arlington, VirginiaRodolfo Torrico, percussion, Arlington, Virginia

Iroquois Dancers

Brad Bonaparte, Mohawk Nation, Akwesasne

Sadie Buck, Seneca, Six Nations

Norman B. Hill, Jr., 1968-, Cayuga, Tonawanda

Sue Jacobs, Cayuga, Six Nations

LuAnn Jamieson, Seneca, Tonawanda

Linley Logan, Seneca, Tonawanda

Scott Logan, Seneca, Tonawanda

Mike McDonald, 1961-, Mohawk Nation, Akwesasne

Robert Shenandoah, Onondaga Nation

Keith Shenandoah, Onondaga Nation

Sherri L. Waterman-Hopper, Onondaga Nation

Hand Dancers

Florence K. Barber, 1940-, Washington, D.C.

Lawrence Bradford, 1944-, Washington, D.C.

Kenny Cheeks, Forestville, Maryland

William H. Eley, 1941-, Hyattsville, Maryland

Robert "Captain Fly" Frye, 1949-, deejay, Lanham, Maryland

Leroy Green, 1945-, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Cynthia Jefferson, 1963-, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Addie Robinson, 1947-, Washington, D.C.

Cynthia Shelton, 1949-, Hyattsville, Maryland

Luvenia Shelton, 1950-, Washington D.C.

Howard Watkins, 1938-, Fort Washington, Maryland

Hip-Hop

Anthony Hovington, Silver Spring, Maryland

John "Super Cool" Mackey, 1961-, deejay, Morningside, Maryland

Denise Richards, 1957-, Washington, D.C.

The Nasty Boys

Rosetta Fultz-Mackey, Hyattsville, Maryland

Brian Robinson, 1967-, Temple Hills, Maryland

Chuck Sanders, Washington, D.C.

Kimberly Monique Simpson, 1968-, District Heights, Maryland

Michael Smith, Washington, D.C.

Tyrone Thornton, Washington, D.C.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref18

Metro Music

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Washington, the capital city, has long been known for its official culture and public celebrations such as presidential inaugurations, Independence Day pageantry, military band concerts, state funerals, and embassy receptions. Yet it has another reality, one sometimes hidden behind official functions. Washington, the residential city, burgeons with cultures transplanted from beyond urban, state, and national boundaries as well as hybrid traditions newly rooted in an urban environment.

Metropolitan Washington, with over four million residents in 1993, was home to more than one million African Americans, 250,000 Hispanic Americans, nearly 250,000 Asian/Pacific Americans, and thousands of other peoples from around the world. The metropolitan area had been enriched by a continual influx of people from the South and, more recently, immigrants from Central America, the Caribbean, Southeast Asia, and the Horn of Africa. Viewing the city as an environment of distinctly American possibilities, people have flocked to Washington throughout its 200-year history, in search of refuge, a better life, and greater opportunities for freedom, education, power, respect, employment, and financial security. While some came with abundant wealth, others brought little more than themselves, their values, and their traditions to sustain themselves in their transition to a new situation.

Music was always among the most vital of the intangible traditional resources that helped to support these Washingtonians. Each community developed particular institutions and networks of support facilitating social interaction and exchange of information. Some of these communities were defined by geographical boundaries, such as a neighborhood, and traditions emerged out of that experience. Other communities might have lacked geographic definition but shared common characteristics such as age, ethnicity, occupation, social interests, or even family relationship. The sharing of values, perspectives, and experience created a basis for the existence and growth of tradition. Music provided a channel for the expression of community-based values, on display to Festival visitors in the Metro Music program.

Richard Kennedy and Thomas Vennum, Jr. were Program Coordinators. Metro Music was made possible with the support of the recording industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Presenters:
Enrique Avilés, Philippa Jackson, Richard Kennedy, Michael Licht, Barry Lee Pearson, Jeff Place, Thomas Vennum, Jr.
Participants:
Participants

Baltimore Korean Dancers

Ji Eun Ahn, Baltimore, Maryland

Soon Hee Ahn, Baltimore, Maryland

Ayang By Chi, Baltimore, Maryland

Nanhui Kang, Baltimore, Maryland

Eun Soo Kim, Baltimore, Maryland

Hyum Joo Kim, Baltimore, Maryland

Jung Sook Lee, Baltimore, Maryland

Hye Sook Lim, Baltimore, Maryland

Jung Sook Park, Baltimore, Maryland

Chu Me Yu, Baltimore, Maryland

Ann Yim, Baltimore, Maryland

Jum Bok Yim, Baltimore, Maryland

Chu Me Yi, Baltimore, Maryland

Ann Yim, Baltimore, Maryland

Jum Bok Vim, Baltimore, Maryland

The Country Gentlemen

Charlie Waller, guitar, vocals, Gordonsville, Virginia

Jimmy Bowen, mandolin, vocals, Nashville, Tennessee

Greg Corbett, banjo, vocals, Troy, North Carolina

Ronnie Davis, bass, vocals, Charlottesville, Virginia

Ganga, Bengali Folk Music

Hitabrata Roy, 1927-, dotara, Falls Church, Virginia

Minati Basu Roy, 1931-, khamak, Falls Church, Virginia

Broto Roy, 1957-, tabla, Falls Church, Virginia

Krishnakali Roy, 1955-, ghungar, Falls Church, Virginia

The Gospel Pearls

Beatrice Cooper, Washington, D.C.

Paulette Goodlin, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Brenda Little, 1947-, Washington, D.C.

Verna Locus, 1950-, Washington, D.C.

Connie Monroe, 1946-, Washington, D.C.

Sam Hubbard and Reverb, Gospel

Sam Hubbard, 1937-, Washington, D.C.

Steve Langley, 1959-, Washington, D.C.

Reginald Moore, Washington, D.C.

Bruce O'Neal, 1966-, Washington, D.C.

Victor Pinkney, 1960-, Washington, D.C.

John Jackson, 1924-2002, Piedmont blues, Fairfax Station, Virginia

Johnson Mountain Boys

Tom Adams, banjo, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Dudley Connell, guitar, vocals, Germantown, Maryland

David McLaughlin, 1958-, mandolin, Winchester, Virginia

Eddie Stubbs, fiddle, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Earl Yager, bass, Spring Grove, Pennsylvania

Djimo Kouyate, Senegalese griot, Washington, D.C.

Little Bit A Blues

Warner Williams, guitar, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Jay Summerour, harmonica, Poolesville, Maryland

Andy Vorhees, bass, Poolesville, Maryland

Alfredo Mojica and His Orchestra, Latin Dance Music

Alfredo Mojica, Sr., band leader, Silver Spring, Maryland

Ralph Eskenazy, 1952-, keyboards, Wheaton, Maryland

Adrianne Galler Lastra, 1954-, bass, Wheaton, Maryland

José Lopez, 1959-, percussion, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Heather McKay, 1959-, guitar, Potomac, Maryland

Alfredo Mojica, Jr., 1958-, percussion, Bethesda, Maryland

Eugene Okonsky, piano, 1965-, Silver Spring, Maryland

Scott Young, saxophone, Wheaton, Maryland

Irish Music & Dance

Winifred Horan, dancer, New York, New York

Donna Long, piano, Baltimore, Maryland

Brendan Mulvihill, 1954-, fiddle, Alexandria, Virginia

Odadaa, Ghanaian Music & Dance

Yacub Addy, master drummer, Alexandria, Virginia

Siboney, Cuban Music

Nelson Rodriguez, director, Washington, D.C.

Veltones, Doo Wop

Joe Herndon, Washington, D.C.

Larry Jordan, 1947-, Washington, D.C.

Sunny Payton, Washington, D.C.

George Spann, Washington, D.C.

Moe Warren, 1947-, Bladensburg, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref34

U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Based on research in the rich and dynamic living culture of the border, the Borderlands Festival program of 1993 was designed to provide a glimpse of the border - its histories, its diverse communities, local and regional identities, and its music, arts, crafts, healing practices, foodways, and narrative. The program was about community-based culture. It presented cultural practices found on the border and cultural expressions about the border, and it explored cultural patterns that were created by the border. It also addressed the cultural heritage, adaptability, and creativity of Native Americans and of the Mexican, Hispanic American, Anglo, and other immigrant communities that have played a part in creating the life that surrounds the Mexico-U.S. border - those who maintain it, those who cross it, those who are left behind, and those who dwell in the border region. The program explored the processes through which such groups create, adapt, and preserve culture to meet the challenges of life on the border. It sought to present and understand community codes of behavior that evolved on the border including confrontation, evasion, violence, and romance, especially as these have been transformed into narrative and other forms of artistic expression.

Music performances at the Festival included emergent forms such as the conjunto, which grew out of the interaction between different cultural communities; older forms, such as the corrido, which has been used to preserve a historical vision in the defense of disputed territory; and adapted forms such as the string band music now incorporated into the traditional repertoire of the Tohono O'odham Native American communities. Also featured in the program were five muralists, whose work reflects the traditions of Mexican cholo and United States Chicano muralism. Murals continue to be touchstones of common historical experiences, archaeologies of sociocultural movements, and powerful statements of identity, ethical principles, and community aspirations. The unique fusion of border aesthetics and handcrafted technology was embodied for Festival visitors in lowriders - distinctively customized automobiles. These lowslung, hopping cars complemented the iconography of murals as statements of cultural identity.

Vaqueros of south Texas demonstrated their skills, crafts, and foodways associated with their cowboy tradition, which dates back to the Spanish colonial era. A fisherman from the port of Brownsville demonstrated shrimping techniques. A Laredo blacksmith forged stirrups, belt buckles, and other implements of vaquero life, along with a number of traditional and contemporary decorative objects. A ropemaker demonstrated the use of the local fiber called lechuguilla (a fibrous plant of the agave family). While fine craft traditions like guitar- and furniture-making are not specific to the border, craftspeople have incorporated motifs and instruments native to the region, like the bajo sexto guitar. Other occupational groups characteristic of the border environment included federal Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) agents who regulate movement across the border; coyotes and polleros, who help migrants evade immigration regulations; and workers in maquiladora assembly line industried. Narrative sessions focused on the culture of craft and occupation in the context of the border.

Artisans also demonstrated crafts used in the home and for special celebrations, including quilt-making, flower- and piñata-making, candlemaking, and reverse-painted glass. Participants prepared regional specialties, traditional foods served for fiestas, and offered a sampling of typical vaquero outdoor cooking. Finally, the Festival presented members of the Mixteco Indian community in Tijuana, a recent migrant group, which preserves its cultural identity and contributes to the economy at the border by maintaining ties with other Mixteco communities in Oaxaca and California.

The United States-Mexico border has had a profound effect on the lives of millions of people. The then-pending NAFTA free trade agreement was only the latest in a long line of international socioeconomic arrangements with wide ranging local impacts. Critical attention in Mexico and the U.S. had increasingly focused on the historical consciousness created in this borderland and on its expression in traditional and other forms of art. Recognition of the vitality and value of borderland culture was growing in 1993 at the margins, among borderland populations, as well as in the centers of power and opinion in both countries. Scholars and political leaders increasingly realized that the cultural encounters, syntheses, and resistances characteristic of border life signaled similar cultural developments in the larger societies. This intensifying concern and scrutiny centered on the margin, but could it reduce the marginality in human rights, social dignity, and economic opportunity at the border? Festival organizers hoped that listening to community voices of the border from the Mexican and United States sides could better inform our thinking and decision-making.

Olivia Cadaval served as Program Curator, with Peter Seitel as Research Advisor; Héctor Antonío Corporán was Program Coordinator and Betty Belanus was Presentation Coordinator.

Collaborating institutions included Centro de Información de Historia Regional, Universid Autónoma de Nuevo León; Consejo Nacional para las Culturas y las Artes – El Programa Cultural de las Fronteras; El Colegio de la Frontera Norte (COLEF); El Paso-Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Embajada de México en Washington, D.C.; John E. Conner Museum, Texas A & I University; Institute of Texan Cultures; Instituto Cultural de México; Instituto de Bellaas Artes del Estado de Baja California; Instituto Nacional Indigenista; Instituto Mexicano de Cultura, San Antonio; Laredo State University; Mexican Cultural Institute; Museo Regional de la Universidad Autónoma de Baja California en Mexicali; National Museum of the American Indian; New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Pimería Alta Historical Society, Arizona; Texas A & I University; Texas Folklife Resources; Tumacácori National Historical Park, Arizona; University of Arizona Library's Southwest Folklore Center; University of Arizona – Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology; University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; University of Texas – Brownsville; University of Texas, Center for Mexican-American Studies; University of Texas – Pan American; and U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.

United States-Mexico Borderlands was made possible with the support and collaboration of the Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes - El Programa Cultural de las Fronteras, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Texas Commission on the Arts, Cerveza Tecate - Imported Beer, Texas Folklife Resources, University of Arizona Library's Western Folklore Center, Tumacácori National Historical Park, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Léon - Centro de Información de Historia Regional, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Gubierno de Nuevo Léon, Mexican Cultural Institute, and the recording industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Fieldworkers:
María Eugenia de la O, Enrique Madrid, Angel Norzagaray Norzagaray, Manuel Peña, Kathy Raglan, Michael James Ritchie, Suzie Reyes, Irene Vásquez Valle, Kathy Vargas, Felipe de Jesús Valenzuela
Presenters and fieldworkers:
Enrique Avilés, Norma Cantú, Jessica Chapin, Andrew Connors, Maricela González Felix, Mary Lou Gortárez, Everardo Garduño, James S. Griffith, Celso Garza Guajardo, Ian F. Hancock, Pat Jasper, Enrique Lamadrid, Laura Larco, Francisco Javier Moreno, Daniel Sheehy, Emily Socolov, Michael C. Stone; José Manuel Valenzuela Arce, Meynardo Vásquez, Laura Velasco Ortíz, Thomas Vennum, Jr., Cynthia Vidaurri
Participants:
Tijuana, Baja California

Olga Lidia Cortés, Mixteca, hat and basket maker, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Guadalupe Isabel Flores de Estrada, 1939-, Mixteca, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Juvencio Extrada Maceda, 1936-, Mixteco, storyteller, oral historian, candlemaker, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Gloria López López, Mixteca, vendor, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Elia Ilda Maceda Flores, 1971-, Mixteca, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Ofelia Santos López, Mixteca, vendor, oral historian, hat and basket maker, altar maker, cook, weaver, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Francisco Paulino Sierra Cruz, 1955-, Mixteca, schoolteacher, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Cathedral City, California

Carmen Moreno, guitarist, singer, Cathedral City, California

Santa Catarina, Baja California

Benito Peralta González, Paipai, storyteller, oral historian, Santa Catarina, Baja California, Mexico

Tecate, Baja California

José Luis Lee Sandoval, furniture maker, Tecate, Baja California, Mexico

Mexicali, Baja California

Taller Universitario de Teatro -- Taller Universitario de TeatroAngel Norzagaray Norzagaray, 1961-, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoHeriberto B. Norzagaray Norzagaray, 1959-, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoLoreto Ramón Tamayo Rosas, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoAlejandra Rioseco de la Pena, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoAndrés García Moreno, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoPedro Gabriel González Castro, Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico

San Simon Village, Arizona

Tohono O'odham String Band -- Tohono O'odham String BandBlaine W. Juan, 1936-, violin, dancer, San Simon Village, ArizonaJoseph Alonzo García, 1924-, violin, dancer, San Simon Village, ArizonaFrank N. Pedro, 1928-, guitar, San Simon Village, ArizonaVictor Augustine García, 1922-, violin, San Simon Village, ArizonaNacho J. Feleys, 1909-1994, snare drum, San Simon Village, ArizonaMike L. Francisco, 1926-, bass drum, dancer, San Simon Village, Arizona

Lupe Lopez, 1927-, Tohono O'odham basket maker, San Simon Village, Arizona

Marie Leon, 1930-, Tohono O'odham basket maker, San Simon Village, Arizona

Nogales, Sonora

Maria Gloria Moroyoqui de Roques, 1930-, Yaqui cook, piñata and flower maker, herbalist, Nogales, Sonora, Mexico

Imuris, Sonora

Anastasio Léon, birdcage and frame maker, Imuris, Sonora, Mexico

Francisco Silva, birdcage and frame maker, Imuris, Sonora, Mexico

Magdalena, Sonora

Felipe de Jesús Valenzuela, regional historian, Magdalena, Sonora, Mexico

Tumacácori, Arizona

María Rodríguez, 1912-2001, tortilla maker, flower maker, cook, Tumacácori, Arizona

Tucson, Arizona

Reynaldo B. Hernandez, INS border patrol, storyteller, Tucson, Arizona

Arturo Carrillo Strong, 1930-, author, oral historian, Tucson, Arizona

Los Hermanos Cuatro, Yaqui Norteño Band -- Los Hermanos Cuatro, Yaqui Norteño BandJesús Juan Yucupicio, 1965-, electric bass, Tucson, ArizonaAlbert M. Yucupicio, 1954-, accordion, Tucson, ArizonaAngel M. Yucupicio, 1966-, drums, Tucson, ArizonaPeter S. Yucupicio, 1957-, bajo sexto, Tucson, Arizona

Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua

Brigada por La Paz -- Brigada por La PazAlonso Encina Herrera, 1968-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoJesús Alberto "Pee Wee" Rodriguez Medina, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoGustavo "Sleepy" Grado Tiscareño, 1973-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoMiguel Angel "El Tandy" Sandoval Lira, 1971-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Oscar Ramírez, 1944-, guitar maker, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Los Alegres del Norte, norteño band -- Los Alegres del Norte, norteño bandJosé Flores Cordova, accordion, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoDiego Hidalgo Alvarez, 1944-, bajo sexto, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoEmilio Chaírez Muñoz, tololoche, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

El Paso, Texas

Agustín Castillo, 1950-, woodcarver, furniture maker, El Paso, Texas

Carlos Callejo, Chicano muralist, El Paso, Texas

Romulo Frías, lowrider, El Paso, Texas

El Divisidero, Chihuahua

Guadalupe Carrasco Leyva, 1923-, quilter, cook, El Divisidero, Chihuahua, Mexico

Paso de Lajitas, Chihuahua

Baltazar Rodríguez Puentes, 1942-, ranching crafts, Paso de Lajitas, Chihuahua, Mexico

Lajitas, Texas

Adolfo O. Rodríguez, 1971-, ranching crafts, Lajitas, Texas

Presidio, Texas

Richard Mark Bernholz, 1954-, INS border patrol, storyteller, Presidio, Texas

Nacimiento, Chihuahua

Gertrude Factor Vásquez, 1921-, oral historian, cook, herbalist, Nacimiento, Chihuahua, Mexico

Alice Fay Lozano, 1916-, oral historian, cook, herbalist, Nacimiento, Chihuahua, Mexico

Del Rio, Texas

Ethel I. Warrior, 1919-, oral historian, cook, Del Rio, Texas

William F. Warrior, 1927-, oral historian, storyteller, Del Rio, Texas

Laredo, Texas

Armando Flores, 1953-, blacksmith, Laredo, Texas

María Paredes de Solís, 1923-, quilter, Laredo, Texas

Monterrey, Mexico

El Palomo y el Gorrión, Norteño Band -- El Palomo y el Gorrión, Norteño BandMiguel "El Gorrión" Luna Franco, 1948-, drums, composer, vocals, Monterrey, MexicoMoisés García, guitar, Monterrey, Mexico

Hebbronville, Texas

Omar Galván, 1920-1999, vaquero, rope maker, cook, storyteller, Hebbronville, Texas

Kingsville, Texas

Joe O. Mendietta, 1961-, vaquero, horsehair braider, Kingsville, Texas

San Diego, Texas

Canuto Soliz, 1924-2006, vaquero, leatherworker, storyteller, guitarist, San Diego, Texas

Elsa, Texas

Los Hermanos Layton, Conjunto Band -- Los Hermanos Layton, Conjunto BandAntonio V. Layton, 1946-, guitar, vocals, Elsa, TexasRené Layton, drums, Elsa, TexasNorfilia Layton González, vocals, Elsa, TexasGilbert González, bass guitar, Elsa, TexasBenigno Layton, 1950-, accordion, vocals, Elsa, Texas

Brownsville, Texas

Julius Collins, 1928-, shrimper, net maker, cook, Brownsville, Texas
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref41

Musical performances at the fair

Collection Collector:
Orth, Edward J.  Search this
Exhibition Collectors Historical Organization  Search this
Container:
Box 112
Box 134
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow. Viewing film portion of collection requires special appointment, please inquire. Do not use when original materials are available on reference video or audio tapes. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Edward J. Orth Memorial Archives of the New York World's Fair, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
See more items in:
Edward J. Orth Memorial Archives of the World's Fair
Edward J. Orth Memorial Archives of the World's Fair / Series 4: Photographic Materials / 4.9: Miscellaneous
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0560-ref1021

Quilting: A Docu-Drama Sounding the Confluence of Contemporary Issues in the 18th Century American Life

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 16, Folder 14-15
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1987 June 6-7
Scope and Contents:
Three-set docu-drama presented June 6 and 7, 1987, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. Script, written by Eleanor Traylor, revealed the contradictions inherent in the fiber and soul of the American experience – contradictions as vivid as pieces of a patchwork quilt. The performance and testimony, in the words of African Americans, European settlers, and Native Americans, were drawn from text based upon writings, narratives and performance repertoire of the 18th century. Set One: Who is the American; Set Two: How Shall Americans be Governed, Set Three: The Cultural Sound of a New Nation: American Sacred Music. Performers included The American Indian Society of Washington DC, the Continuum Chamber Singers, The Kankouran West African Dance Company, the Patuxent Martial Musick, Bernice Reagon Johnson, Anna Bergman, Aplhredine Brown, and Evelyn Simpson. Program number AC408.51.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at NMAHRightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1203

Duke Ellington Youth Festival

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 22, Folder 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1993 April
Scope and Contents:
The Program in African American Culture and the Duke Ellington Collection National Museum of American in partnership with the District of Columbia Public Schools featured the creative talents of the students. Teachers challenged students to create projects encompassing themes in literature, art, dance, social studies, foreign languages, drama and music.

Performances (Listed in Order of Appearance)

Junior High School Band Salute the Duke, arranger Paul Yoder "Take the "A" Train" "Satin Doll" "Flamingo" "Perdido" Music Director: Edward B. Anderson

Junior High School String Ensemble "Don't Get Around Much Anymore," Duke Ellington Music Directors: Carolyn Bastian and Barbara Maxwell

Junior High School Choir "Come Sunday" (from Black, Brown and Beige), Duke Ellington "David Danced" (from the First Sacred Concert), Duke Ellington "Ain't But the One" (from My People), Duke Ellington Music Directors: Patricia Braswell and Jewel Jenkins Accompanists: Anita Jones and James Lewis

Rap Performance "Once Upon A Time," Yusef Trowell, Dunbar High School

Drama Act I, Scene II from The Tempest, William Shakespeare Calibran: Woodrow Wilson tenth grade ladies Prospero: Woodrow Wilson tenth grade gentleman "Such Sweet Tnunder" Shakespearean Suite, Duke Ellington/Billy Strayhorn Instructor: Delois Jones Director: Douglas Johnson

Dance The Nutcracker Suite, Duke Ellington/Billy Strayhorn "The Volga Vouty" (Russian Dance) "Sugar Rum Cherry" (Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy) "Entr'acte" Dancers: Duke Ellington School of the Arts Choreography: Melba Lucas

Senior High School Band Duke Ellington Medley "Satin Doll" "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)" "Caravan" "Sophisticated Lady" Music Director: Anthony L. Boyd

Senior High School Choir "The Lord's Prayer" from the Third Sacred Concert, Duke Ellington "Will You Be There?" from the First Sacred Concert, Duke Ellington "I'm Beginning to See the Light," arr. Joyce Garrett, Duke Ellington "Jump for Joy" from Jump for Joy, arr. Evelyn Curenton, Duke Ellington Music Director: Joyce Garrett Accompanists: Eveylyn Curenton and Kenneth King

Program number AC408.80.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at NMAHRightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1278

Duke Ellington Youth Festival

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 25, Folder 12
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1998 April 24
Scope and Contents:
The Program in African American Culture and the Duke Ellington Collection National Museum of American in partnership with the District of Columbia Public Schools featured the creative talents of the students. Teachers challenged students to create projects encompassing themes in literature, art, dance, social studies, foreign languages, drama and music. On Friday, April 24, 1998, the program included an art exhibition opening and viewing in the Information Age Auditorium and Photo Gallery; poetry and music performances in the Carmichael Auditorium, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution; and performances in the University Auditorium on the Van Ness Campus, University of the District of Columbia. The Honorary Festival Chair was Cora Masters Berry. The opening greetings were given by Niani Kilkenny, and the welcome was given by Harold A. Closter. The Mistress of Ceremonies was Luvenia A. George.

The participating schools were Alice Deal Junior High School, Ballou Senior High School, Bell Multicultural Senior High School, Coolidge Senior High School, Duke Ellington School of the Arts, Dunbar Senior High School, Eastern Senior High School, Evans Middle School, Fillmore Arts Center/Hardy Middle School, Fletcher-Johnson EC, H. D. Woodson Senior High School, Hart Middle School, Johnson Junior High School, L.G. Hine Junior High School, Patricia R. Harris EC, Roper Middle School, Rudolph ES, School Without Walls Senior High School, Stuart-Hobson Middle School, and Woodrow Wilson Senior High School.

Performances (listed in order of appearance)

Senior High School Choir

"Drop Me Off in Harlem" "Mood Indigo" "Caravan" Music Director: Samuel L.E. Bonds

Junior High and Middle School Choir

"Duke's Place" (C Jam Blues) "Come Sunday" (from First Sacred Concert) "Hit Me with a Hot Note and Watch Me Bounce" "Things Ain't What They Used to Be," Mercer Ellington Music Coordinator: Patricia Braswell

Senior Adult Jitterbug Contest

Coordinator: Kelly-Marie Berry, Facilitator: Nap Turner

Dance

"It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got that Swing) Stuart-Hobson Middle School "Perdido" Duke Ellington School of the Arts Alumni Choreographer: Deidre Neal

String Ensemble

"Don't Get Around Much Anymore" Music Director: Carolyn Bastian

Junior High/Middle School Band

"Salute to the Duke," arr. Paul Yoder "Take the "A" Train" "Satin Doll" "Flamingo" "Perdido" Music Director: Edward B. Anderson

Senior High School Jazz Band

"Old King Dooji" "Half the Fun" (from Shakespearean Suite) Music Director: Davey Yarborough Program number AC408.105.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at NMAHRightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1312

Of Songs, Peace, and Struggle Series, Fighting for My Rights

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 25, Folder 17
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2000 January 15
Scope and Contents:
As part of the commemoration of the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the Program of African American Culture presents "Of Songs, Peace, and Struggle". This annual public program series is dedicated to the presentation of Civil Rights Movement history and culture. Each year the program calls on activists of the Movement who engaged in civil disobedience and nonviolent confrontation to share their experiences with an audience, answer questions and promote discussion. The series also includes musical performances and exhibition tours. This year's program "Fighting for My Rights" focused on the theme of student activism and the role of youth in the Civil Rights Movement. The young students shared their experiences regarding the distance between themselves and their families, who were reluctant to allow them to face such dangers and risks.

Participants included:

June Johnson, former Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) organizer in the Mississippi Delta

Martha Prescod Norman, activist, former Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) field secretary, university instructor

Zoharah Simmons, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) activist

Program number AC408.110.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at NMAHRightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1317

Of Songs, Peace, and Struggle Series, Another Day's Journey: Reflections from James Edward Orange

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 25, Folder 21
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2001 January 13
Scope and Contents:
As part of the commemoration of the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the Program of African American Culture presented "Of Songs, Peace, and Struggle". This annual public program series was dedicated to the presentation of Civil Rights Movement history and culture. Each year the program calls on activists of the Movement who engaged in civil disobedience and nonviolent confrontation to share their experiences with an audience, answer questions and promote discussion. The series also included musical performances and exhibition tours. This year's program "Another Day's Journey featured reflections with the Reverend Dr. James Edward Orange, the Civil Rights Movement activist, community, political, and labor organizer, and coalition builder. His reflections were followed by Audience comments, questions, and discussion, and then songs of struggle and freedom were led by James Orange with the Program in African American Culture Community Ensemble. The program concluded with a docent-led tour of the exhibition Field to Factory and other objects related to social change in America. The program took place in the Carmichael Auditorium at the National Museum of American History of the Smithsonian Institution. It was sponsored by the Program in African American Culture.

Participants included:

The Reverend Dr. James Edward Orange, Civil Rights Movement activist; community, political, and labor organizer, and coalition builder

Program in African American Culture Community Ensemble - Tammy Adair, Michelle Lanchester, Steve Langley, Ronald Bruce O'Neal, Pam Rogers, Yasmeen Williams

Program number AC408.113.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at NMAHRightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1321

Tenth Anniversary of Duke Ellington Youth Festival Anthology

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 26, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2001 April 23
Scope and Contents:
The Duke Ellington Youth Festival is an evening of performances and presentations in the visual arts by students from the Distinct of Columbia Public Schools as part of the Duke Ellington Youth Program. The Duke Ellington Youth Program was created in 1991 as an educational outreach program aimed at introducing students to the life and work of Duke Ellington using the resources of the Ellington Collection. The program aims to promote knowledge of Duke Ellington and his contributions to the field of music with consideration to the impact that his culture had on his work. The curriculum of the program uses Ellington's music to study a variety of disciplines including music, art, English, social studies and foreign language. The Duke Ellington Youth Festival is a presentation of the projects that have been completed over the course of the Duke Ellington Youth Project. Program held on April 23, 2001 and included poetry and music performances.

The participating schools were Thurgood Marshall Elementary School, Lucy Moten Elementary School, Simon Elementary School, John O. Wilson Elementary School, Ronald H. Brown Middle School, W. Bruce Evans Middle School, Garnet-Patterson Middle School, Lemon G. Hine Junior High School, Stuart Hobson Middle School, Thomas Jefferson Junior High School, J. Hayden Johnson Junior High School, Stephen E. Kramer Middle School, Macfarland Middle School, John Philip Sousa Middle School, Bell Multicultural High School, Paul Lawrence Dunbar Senior High School, Duke Ellington School of the Arts, School Without Walls, Woodrow Wilson Senior High School, and H.D. Woodson Senior High School.

Performances (listed in order of appearance)

Junior High and Middle School Band

Salute to the Duke, Duke Ellington (arranged by Michael Sweeny) "Satin Doll" "Mood Indigo" "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)" Richard Gill, Music Director

String Ensemble

"Round Midnight" Cootie Williams and Thelonius Monk "Straight, No Chaser" Thelonius Monk Eddie Drennnon, Music Director

Senior High School Band

"Boplicity" Miles Davis (arranged by Gil Evans) Davey Yarborough playing Gerry Mulligan's baritone saxophone "Prelude to a Kiss" Duke Ellington Daniel Haedicke, guitar

The New Washingtonians/Duke Ellington School of the Arts

"I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart" Duke Ellington (David Berger) "Pyramid" Duke Ellington (David Berger) Davey Yarborough, Music Director

Junior High, Middle, and Elementary School Choir

"What a Wonderful World" George Weiss and Bob Thiele (In Memory of Louis Armstrong) "Duke's Place" Duke Ellington, arranger "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got that Swing)" Duke Ellington Thomasena Allen, Music Director

Senior High School Choir

"Big Band Bash" (Jazz Medley) Mac Huff, arranger "I Believe in God" from Gospel Mass Robert Ray Samuel L.E. Bonds, Music Director

Tap Dance

"I Let a Song Out of My Heart" Duke Ellington Maud Arnold, Dancer Charles Augins, Instructor Duke Ellington School of the Arts Duke Ellington School of the Arts Show Choir

"Tribute to Broadway" Vince Evans, arr. Samuel L.E. Bonds, Music Director

Program number AC408.115.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at NMAHRightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1323

Of Songs, Peace, and Struggle Series, Stayed on Freedom: An Interview with James Forman by Clayborne Carson

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 26, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2002 January 19
Scope and Contents:
As part of the commemoration of the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the Program of African American Culture presents "Of Songs, Peace, and Struggle". This annual public program series is dedicated to the presentation of Civil Rights Movement history and culture. Each year the program calls on activists of the Movement who engaged in civil disobedience and nonviolent confrontation to share their experiences with an audience, answer questions and promote discussion. The series also includes musical performances and exhibition tours. This year's program "Stayed on Freedom" featured an interview with James Forman, the Civil Rights Movement activist, political organizer, author, and educator, by Clayborne Carson, the scholar, author, and educator. The interview was followed by audience comments, questions, and discussion, and then songs of struggle and freedom were sung by the Program in African American Culture Community Ensemble. The program concluded with a docent-led tour of the exhibition Field to Factory and other objects related to social change in America.

The program took place in the Carmichael Auditorium at the National Museum of American History of the Smithsonian Institution. It was sponsored by the Program in African American Culture.

Participants included:

James Forman, Ph.D., Civil Rights Movement activist, political organizer, author, and educator

Clayborne Carson, Ph.D., scholar, author, and educator

Performers included:

Program in African American Culture Community Ensemble

Program in African American Culture Youth Choir

Program number AC408.116.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at NMAHRightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1324

Black American Composer Series, concert, audio cassettes, OTC 408.49.1

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 138, Cassette 31-36
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Date:
1987-05-03
Scope and Contents:
On Sunday, May 3, 1987, the Program in Black American Culture held a lecture and a concert in the Hall of Musical Instruments, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. The lecturer was Olly Wilson, and the performing artists were William E. Terry, Fred Irby, III, Carol Yampolsky, Sheila Gautreaux, Mareda Gaither Graves, John Robinson, Valerie Capers, Gregory Hopkins, Sylvia Olden Lee, Lorraine Faxio, Veronica Johnson, Gwendolyn Boyd, Reathea Holmes, James Holliday, Mark Robinson, David Daniel, Leroy Dorsey, and members of the Evelyn White Chamber Singers, directed by Evelyn White. The music performed was composed by Basile Barès, Frederick C. Tillis, Francis (Frank) Johnson, Valerie Capers, William Howard Moore, David Baker, and Olly Wilson. The program consists of audio cassette tapes.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at NMAHRightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref2322

Black American Gospel Music Series, Marion Williams

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1980 October 12
Scope and Contents:
Concert paid tribute to Marion Williams, a leading gospel music performer. Her singing career began at age three in her mother's church in Miami, Florida, where she performed her first a cappella song, "Yes, Jesus Love Me." Other early influences included the street sounds of blues, calypso, and West Indian rhythms, and the great traveling quartets such as the Kings of Harmony and Professor Smith's Jubilee Singers. By her mid-teens, Williams, a soaring soprano, was a premier local gospel singer. In 1947, at the age of 18, she joined the Ward Singers. She was a leading member of that group until 1958. In 1961, Alex Bradford and she starred in Langston Hughes's gospel musical, "Black Nativity," which played off Broadway and throughout Europe. Marion Williams performed at major European music festivals in Antibes, France; Montreux, Switzerland; and Bergamo, Italy; toured the Far East and Africa; and, with Duke Ellington, represented the United States at the First World Festival of Negro Arts in Dakar, Senegal. Since 1967, Williams has performed as a solo artist. From Notes on the Artist in Program Notes by Pearl Williams-Jones. See Program Notes for additional information about Marion Williams and the Black American Gospel Music Series. Program number AC408.8.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at NMAHRightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1069

Of Songs, Peace, and Struggle, The Sit-In Movement and the Freedom Rides, Nashville, Tennessee, photographs

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 36, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1987 January 1
Scope and Contents:
As part of the commemoration of the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the Program in African American Culture presents "Of Songs, Peace, and Struggle". This annual public program series is dedicated to the presentation of Civil Rights Movement history and culture. Each year the program calls on activists of the Movement who engaged in civil disobedience and nonviolent confrontation to share their experiences with an audience, answer questions and promote discussion. The series also includes musical performances and exhibition tours.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at NMAHRightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1443

ZooLights 2019

Creator:
National Zoo  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-11-29T17:14:05.000Z
YouTube Category:
Pets & Animals  Search this
Topic:
Zoology;Animals;Veterinary medicine;Animal health  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNZP
Data Source:
National Zoo
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNZP
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_tFih-FOftYM

Remembering Aretha Franklin

Creator:
National Portrait Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2018-08-16T15:53:24.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Portraits  Search this
See more by:
NatlPortraitGallery
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
YouTube Channel:
NatlPortraitGallery
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_F_meqpMCKGU

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