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Arthur C. Clarke Collection of Sri Lanka

Creator:
Clarke, Arthur C., Sir (Arthur Charles), 1917-2008  Search this
Extent:
95.02 Cubic feet (188 legal size boxes; 5 15 x 12 x 3 flat boxes; 1 16 x 20 x 3 flat box; 4 12 x 8 x 5 shoeboxes)
88.55 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1932-2012
bulk 1950-2008
Summary:
Sir Arthur C. Clarke is one of the preeminent science-fiction writers of the 20th century.
Scope and Contents:
Contains personal and business correspondence, manuscripts of most of Clarke's fiction works in various draft states, short stories, articles, addresses, speeches, movie outlines, Apollo 11 broadcast material, datebooks & notebooks, reference materials, business cards of visitors & contacts, photos & slides. There is some material by people other than the creator such as manuscripts and film/TV scripts.

This collection also includes audio-visual material. Please contact the Media Archivist for access.
Arrangement:
Series were based on the creator's original arrangement of material.

Arranged into 7 Series:

Series 1: Correspondence

Series 2: Original Writing

2.1: "Clarkives"

2.2: Non-"Clarkives"

2.3: Articles, Short Stories

2.4: Lectures, Speeches

Series 3: Media & Publicity

Series 4: Awards & Tributes

Series 5: Manuscripts written by others relating to Clarke's Literary Works

Series 6: Miscellaneous

Series 7: Images

7.1: Photos

7.2: Slide Albums
Biographical / Historical:
Born on December 16, 1917, in Minehead, England, Arthur Charles Clarke became obsessed with science fiction and astronomy at a young age. He was the eldest of four children born into a farming family, however he would become, with his brother Fred Clarke acting as a business associate, one of the leading names in science fiction.

During World War II Clarke served as a radar instructor and in his free time became one of the early members of the British Interplanetary Society. In 1945, Clarke made one of his earliest predictions (he called them "extrapolations") when he came up with the idea of communication satellites. He became known for this uncanny prescience which is seen in so much of his work.

In 1948 Clarke graduated from King's College, London with honors in math and physics. By 1951, Clarke had gained respect as both a fiction and non-fiction writer with Interplanatary Flight and Prelude to Space, respectively.

In 1956, Clarke emigrated to Sri Lanka, then known as Ceylon, where he could indulge a new obsession - skin diving. He remained in Sri Lanka for the rest of his life, creating a diving company and funding many science education programs in the country.

Perhaps Clarke's most recognizable feat came when he was able to work with Stanly Kubrick over a course of 4 years in order to create the book and film 2001: A Space Odyssey which was loosely based on the earlier Clarke story "The Sentinel."

Clarke accomplished an amazing amount of writing, speaking tours, TV appearances and humantarian work despite suffering from post-polio syndrome for decades. He won numerous awards, mostly for his science fiction but also for popularizing science. He was knighted in 1998. He died, age 90, March 19, 2008.
Provenance:
Arthur C. Clarke Trust, gift, 2014
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Permissions Requests
Topic:
Underwater archaeology -- 1960's  Search this
nonfiction novels  Search this
Interplanetary voyages  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Apollo 11 Flight  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Science fiction  Search this
Citation:
Arthur C. Clarke Collection of Sri Lanka, Acc. 2015-0010, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2015.0010
See more items in:
Arthur C. Clarke Collection of Sri Lanka
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2015-0010
Online Media:

Yuri Gagarin (1934-1968)

Subject:
Gagarin, Yuri Alekseyevich 1934-1968  Search this
Fogel, Lawrence J  Search this
Konecci, Eugene B  Search this
General Dynamics Corporation Astronautics Division  Search this
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration Office of Advanced Research and Technology  Search this
Physical description:
Gelatin silver prints;
Type:
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
Soviet Union
Topic:
Aeronautics--History  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Aerospace industries  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2008-1796]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
Copyright Not Evaluated
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_383172

Yuri Gagarin (1934-1968)

Creator:
United Press International  Search this
Subject:
Gagarin, Yuri Alekseyevich 1934-1968  Search this
Physical description:
Gelatin silver prints
Type:
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
Soviet Union
Date:
1961
4-12-1961
Topic:
Aeronautics--History  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2008-1800]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
Copyright Not Evaluated
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_383177

left to right: Eugene Martin Zuckert, Albert Arnold Gore, Sr., and Commander Major General William Loveland Rogers

Subject:
Gore, Albert 1907-1998  Search this
Zuckert, Eugene M. 1911-2000  Search this
Rogers, William L (William Loveland) 1911-1968  Search this
United States Congress Senate  Search this
United States Department of the Air Force  Search this
Arnold Engineering Development Center  Search this
Type:
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
Arnold Air Force Base (Tenn.)
Date:
1961
June 23, 1961
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2008-1998]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
Copyright Not Evaluated
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_384270

Laurel van der Wal (d. 2009)

Subject:
Roennau, Laurel V  Search this
University of California (1868-1952)  Search this
Society of Women Engineers  Search this
Space Technology Laboratories, inc  Search this
Type:
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1961
Topic:
Women engineers  Search this
Aerospace engineering  Search this
Women scientists  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2010-0311]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
Copyright Not Evaluated
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_306559

Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers

Creator:
Sullivan, Kathryn  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
11.5 Cubic feet (15 boxes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1970s - 2010s
Summary:
This collection consists of approximately 11.5 cubic feet of papers, photographs, certificates, and video/film, created or collected by Kathryn Sullivan, spanning her lifetime of achievement.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately 11 cubic feet of papers, photographs, certificates, and video/film, created or collected by Kathryn Sullivan. The papers show her myriad contributions to space science and exploration, and spans her lifetime of achievements.
Arrangement:
This collection has not been processed; only a box listing is available.
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan (b. 1951) has had a long career as a distinguished scientist, astronaut, and oceanographer. She was one of the first six women selected into the NASA astronaut corps in 1978 and was the first American female astronaut to walk in space (October 11, 1984.) During her 15-year NASA career, Dr. Sullivan flew on three space shuttle missions, notably the one that deployed the Hubble Space Telescope. In 1993, Dr. Sullivan left NASA to accept the presidential appointment to the post of Chief Scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). From 1996 - 2006, Dr. Sullivan served as President and CEO of the hands-on science center, Central Ohio Science Institute (COSI) in Columbus, Ohio. Dr. Sullivan then served as the Inaugural Director of the Battelle Center for Mathematics and Science Education Policy in the John Glenn School of Public Affairs at the Ohio State University. Dr. Sullivan, a specialist in deep-sea geology, finished her career back at NOAA as the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, where she oversaw a broad portfolio of research and technology programs in such diverse areas as fisheries biology, climate and global change, satellite instrumentation and marine biodiversity. Dr. Sullivan was the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's 2017 Charles A. Lindbergh Chair of Aerospace History; her topic was the development of satellite service of the Hubble Telescope. Dr. Sullivan was also an oceanography officer with the United States Navy Reserve (1988-2006), retiring with the rank of captain.
Provenance:
Kathryn D. Sullivan, Gift, 2018, NASM.2019.0007
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Space sciences  Search this
Hubble (Large) Space Telescope  Search this
Oceanography  Search this
Citation:
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers, NASM.2019.0007, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2019.0007
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2019-0007
Online Media:

NASA Letter to Susan Scott

Creator:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
0.01 Cubic feet (folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
June 18, 1962
Summary:
This is a June 18, 1962, letter from O. B. Lloyd, Jr., Director, Office of Public Services and Information, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), to Susan Scott.
Scope and Contents:
This is a June 18, 1962, letter from O. B. Lloyd, Jr., Director, Office of Public Services and Information, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), to Susan Scott. The letter thanks Scott for her recent letter regarding the possibility of women astronauts, but informs her that NASA has no plans to train women for space flight as there is no shortage of qualified male candidates.
Arrangement:
One item.
Provenance:
Susan Strong, Gift, 2019, NASM.2019.0058
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Astronauts  Search this
Citation:
NASA Letter to Susan Scott, NASM.2019.0058, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2019.0058
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2019-0058

Apollo 11 Training Material

Names:
Apollo 11 (Spacecraft)  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Printed material
Technical literature
Printouts
Date:
1969
Summary:
The Apollo program began as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) long-term plan for lunar exploration. Dr. Donald R. Maitzen worked with NASA's Flight Planning Branch as the Task Manager for On-Board Data for Apollo 11. This collection consists of material pertaining to the Apollo program inlcuding correspondence, photographs, and publications.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a memorandum from the Chief, Flight Planning Branch to the Chief, Crew Station Branch regarding the proper placement of instructional decals on equipment, including seven enclosures with black and white photographs of the equipment showing the decals; one 8 x 10 inch black and white photograph of a mockup of the EVA (extravehicular activity) "cuff card" for the Lunar Module Pilot; computer printout of draft of cue cards for One Man EVA; six pages of proofs for One-Man Pre- through Post- EVA data card kit along with a drawing showing the deployed and stowed positions of the data card kit inside the lunar module; and final NASA printed publications "Final EVA Procedures Apollo 11" (May 26, 1969) and "Lunar Surface Checklist" (June 16, 1969).
Arrangement:
Collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
The Apollo program began as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) long-term plan for lunar exploration. Following President Kennedy's speech of May 25, 1961, which called for a lunar landing by the end of 1969, NASA accelerated its development scheme accordingly. Apollo 11 (16 July - 24 July 1969) was the fourth manned flight of the program and the first manned landing on the moon. The mission objectives were to "perform a manned lunar landing and return; conduct scientific experiments; [and] collect soil and rock samples for return to Earth." The three-man crew, Neil A. Armstrong (Commander), Michael Collins (Command Module Pilot), and Edward E. Aldrin, Jr. (Lunar Module Pilot) accomplished all mission objectives. Armstrong and Aldrin landed on the moon in the Sea of Tranquility at 3:17pm on July 20, 1969, and, six hours later, Armstrong became the first person to set foot on the moon at 9:55pm. The two men spent two hours outside the lunar module and gathered 21kg of lunar samples before lifting off at 12:54am July 21, 1969, to rendezvous with Collins.

Dr. Donald R. Maitzen worked with NASA's Flight Planning Branch as the Task Manager for On-Board Data for Apollo 11.
Provenance:
Donald R. Maitzen, Gift, 2009, NASM.2009.0007
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Printed material
Technical literature
Printouts
Citation:
Apollo 11 Training Material, NASM.2009.0007, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2009.0007
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2009-0007

Mercury Project, Redstone Launch Vehicle Advanced Electrical Schematic Drawings

Creator:
Redstone Arsenal  Search this
Extent:
0.07 Cubic feet (4 map folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Technical drawings
Date:
1960
Summary:
The Redstone engine is one of the most significant developments in US rocket technology. This collection consists of 36 pages of 17 x 11 inch schematic drawings of the Redstone launch vehicle's advanced electrical systems.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 36 pages of 17 x 11 inch schematic drawings of the Redstone launch vehicle's advanced electrical systems. The drawings have been marked and corrected ("redlined"). The packet is stamped "Systems Test Section" on the first page.
Arrangement:
Collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
The Redstone engine is one of the most significant developments in US rocket technology. As the power plant for the Redstone missile, it was this country's first large-scale operational rocket engine. It went on to power the Jupiter-C, a modification of the Redstone missile that placed the US's first artificial satellite, Explorer 1, in 1958. In 1961, another modified Redstone, the Mercury-Redstone 3, launched the first American into space, Alan B. Shepard. The thrust of the engine as used in the Redstone missile was 78,000 lbs. As modified for use as a booster for Shepard's Mercury spacecraft, it produced 83,000 lbs of thrust.
Provenance:
Tom Hancock, Gift, 2008, NASM.2008.0014
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Launch vehicles (Astronautics)  Search this
Mercury Project, Redstone Launch Vehicle  Search this
Genre/Form:
Technical drawings
Citation:
Mercury Project, Redstone Launch Vehicle Advanced Electrical Schematic Drawings, NASM.2008.0014, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2008.0014
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2008-0014

Power Driven Articulated Dummy Final Report

Creator:
Illinois Institute of Technology  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reports
Technical drawings
Date:
1965
Summary:
An articulated dummy was built in the early 1960s for NASA's Manned Spacecraft Center by the Illinois Institute of Technology to support the development of space suits. This collection contains the Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute (IITRI) final report for Project No. K6051, Power Driven Articulated Dummy.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute (IITRI) final report for Project No. K6051, Power Driven Articulated Dummy. This project was under Contract No. NAS 9-1370 and ran from May 22, 1963 through July 31, 1965. The report was prepared by J. Slowik for the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas and is dated December 14, 1965. The report is 8.5 by 11 inches, plastic spiral bound, and is 70 pages long plus three appendices, and includes images as well as several schematic drawings that fold out to full size.
Arrangement:
Collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
An articulated dummy was built in the early 1960s for NASA's Manned Spacecraft Center by the Illinois Institute of Technology to support the development of space suits. It used hydraulic and electrical actuators to replicate many of the joint motions of the human body, with realistic forces. Sensors placed throughout the dummy measured forces that a prototype suit might exert on a human being when wearing the suit in a space environment. That enabled suit designers to measure how much force a human would need to move an arm or leg, or turn his or her head, when wearing a suit in space. By using this dummy instead of a human being during the design and testing of a space suit, tests could proceed that might otherwise be painful, tedious, or dangerous for a human being.
Provenance:
Dr. Clare Slowik, Gift, 2008, NASM.2008.0015
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Space suits  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Technical drawings
Citation:
Power Driven Articulated Dummy Final Report, NASM.2008.0015, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2008.0015
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2008-0015

Final Farewell to the Space Shuttle

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2010-11-29T21:38:30Z
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianMagazine
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianMagazine
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_1Nrnp1i9w0I

Sally K. Ride Papers

Creator:
Ride, Sally, 1951-2012  Search this
Extent:
24 Cubic feet (63 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1970-2012
Summary:
The Sally K. Ride Papers consists of over 23 cubic feet of papers, photographs, certificates, and film, created or collected by Sally Ride and chronicling her career from the 1970s through the 2010s. The papers document Ride's lifetime of achievements and include material relating to her astronaut training and duties; her contributions to space policy; her work as a physicist; and her work as an educator, including Sally Ride Science and related STEM projects.
Scope and Contents:
The Sally Ride Papers reflect Ride's careers as a student, astronaut, physicist, professor, author, and CEO of Sally Ride Science. This collection consists of material gathered by Sally Ride over the course of her life. This material is particularly rich in training materials from her astronaut days, but also provides significant insight into her career in academia and her interest and support of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) education.

The bulk of this collection consists of materials related to Ride's professional work. This includes correspondence, memoranda, meeting minutes, reports and papers, notes, speeches, photographs, brochures, pamphlets, programs, newsletters, newspaper and magazine articles, and miscellaneous materials. Materials of a personal nature were retained by her family and therefore do not figure in this collection.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized chronologically into the following 12 series:

Series 1: Schooling

Series 2: NASA Career

Subseries 2.1: Training and Flights

Subseries 2.1.1: T-38 Training

Subseries 2.1.2: Space Shuttle Flight Training, General

Subseries 2.1.3: STS-7 Challenger Flight Training

Subseries 2.1.4: STS-41G Space Shuttle Challenger Flight Training

Subseries 2.1.5: Miscellaneous Space Shuttle Flight Training

Subseries 2.2: NASA Commissions and Reports

Subseries 2.2.1: Presidential Commission on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accident (Rogers Commission Report) 1986

Subseries 2.2.2: NASA Leadership and America's Future in Space: A Report to the Administrator [Ride Report] 1987

Subseries 2.2.3: Columbia Accident Investigation Board / NASA's Implementation Plan for Space Shuttle Return to Flight and Beyond Report 2003

Subseries 2.2.4: Review of United States Human Space Flight Plans Committee (Augustine Committee)

Subseries 2.3: White House Commissions and Reports

Subseries 2.3.1: President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST)

Subseries 2.3.2: Briefing for the Vice President of the United States, 1986

Subseries 2.3.3: Briefing for the Clinton/Gore Transition, 1992

Series 3: Space.com

Series 4: Academia Subseries 4.1: Physics Research Papers by Ride

Subseries 4.2: Ride's Physics Research Proposals and Projects

Subseries 4.3: Physics Research Files

Subseries 4.4: Physics Classes Taught by Ride

Subseries 4.5: Non-Physics Classes Taught by Ride

Subseries 4.6: Physics Conferences and Seminars

Subseries 4.7: Miscellaneous Department of Physics Materials

Subseries 4.8: California Space Institute

Series 5: Sally Ride STEM [science, technology, engineering and mathematics] Education Projects

Subseries 5.1: KidSat/EarthKAM Project Subseries 5.2: Imaginary Lines/Sally Ride Science

Subseries 5.3: STEM Books

Series 6: Space and STEM Education Advocacy

Subseries 6.1: Space Advocacy

Subseries 6.1.1: Space Advocacy Articles

Subseries 6.1.2: Space Advocacy Speeches

Subseries 6.1.3: Space Advocacy Committees.

Subseries 6.2: STEM Advocacy, Committees and Conferences

Series 7: Awards and Publicity

Subseries 7.1: Awards

Subseries 7.2: Correspondence/Invitations

Subseries 7.3: Boards

Subseries 7.4: Publicity Files

Series 8: Research Files

Subseries 8.1: Space:

Subseries 8.1.1: Space Articles, Reports, and NASA Publications

Subseries 8.1.2: Space Files – Commission, Workshops, and Special Reports

Subseries 8.2: Education

Series 9: Miscellaneous

Series 10: First Day Covers/Autographs

Series 11: Oversized material

Series 12: Films, Audio Tapes, and Media
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Sally K. Ride became a national icon of achievement in science and space on June 18, 1983, when she became the first American woman to fly in space. Born in 1951 in suburban Encino, California, she took up tennis as a teenager and within a few years was ranked eighteenth nationally. In 1968, she enrolled at Swarthmore College as a physics major, but she dropped out after three semesters to train full-time at tennis. In 1970, Ride gave up tennis and entered Stanford University, where she took a double major in physics and English literature. She went on to complete a Masters and Ph.D. in physics from Stanford. Her doctoral dissertation dealt with the theoretical behavior of free electrons in a magnetic field.

While completing her Ph.D. in physics, she saw an announcement that National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was looking for young scientists to serve as mission specialists and she immediately applied. She passed NASA's preliminary process and became one of 208 finalists. Ride was flown to Johnson Space Center outside Houston for physical fitness tests, psychiatric evaluation, and personal interviews. Three months later, she was an astronaut and one of six women selected for the class of 1978.

While learning to use a new space shuttle remote manipulative arm for a future mission, Ride acted as backup orbit Capsule Communicator (CAPCOM) for STS-2 and prime orbit CAPCOM for STS-3. She was named a mission specialist on the seventh flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1983. As a mission specialist in the first five-member Shuttle crew, she operated a variety of orbiter systems and experiment payloads; she participated in the launch of two commercial communications satellites and also operated the remote manipulator system arm to maneuver, release, and retrieve a free-flying satellite. Ride also flew on a second mission, STS-41G in 1984, again on the Challenger. She spent a total of more than 343 hours in space.

Ride's career and legacy extended well beyond her missions in space. Ride had completed eight months of training for her third flight (STS-61-M, a TDRS deployment mission) when the space shuttle Challenger disaster occurred, and she was named to the Rogers Commission (the presidential commission investigating the accident) and headed its subcommittee on operations. Following the investigation, Ride was assigned to NASA headquarters where she led a strategic planning effort for NASA that yielded the 1987 report NASA Leadership and America's Future in Space: A Report to the Administrator (also known as the Ride Report), and she served as the first chief of the new NASA Office of Exploration. In 1993, she was named to the Columbia Accident Board, appointed to investigate the causes and to recommend remedies after that tragic loss.

In 1987, Ride left NASA to become a full-time educator. She first worked at the Stanford University Center for International Security and Arms Control and in 1989 she became a professor of physics at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and Director of the California Space Institute. From the mid-1990s until her death, Ride led two public-outreach programs for NASA — the ISS EarthKAM and GRAIL MoonKAM projects, in cooperation with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and UCSD. The programs allowed middle school students to request images of the Earth.

Ride continued her endeavors to improve science education and encourage young people to study science through her independent initiatives as an author or co-author of seven books on space aimed at children, and as a co-founder of Sally Ride Science, a company founded in 2001 that creates entertaining science programs and publications for upper elementary and middle school students, with a particular focus on science education for girls.

Ride died on July 23, 2012, at the age of 61, seventeen months after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.
Provenance:
Gift of Tam O'Shaughnessy, received March 2014.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Space shuttles  Search this
Science -- Study and teaching  Search this
Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator Arm  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Physics  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Citation:
Sally K. Ride Papers, Acc. 2014-0025, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2014.0025
See more items in:
Sally K. Ride Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2014-0025
Online Media:

Apollo Stowage Lists

Creator:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
National Air and Space Museum (U.S.). Division of Space History  Search this
Extent:
0.39 Cubic feet ((1 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reports
Date:
bulk 1969-1972
2019
Summary:
This collection consists of a complete set of printed stowage lists, including revisions lists, from the Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 missions. The collection also includes fully searchable pdf files of the lists created in 2019 by a special project initiated by the National Air and Space Museum's Department of Space History and executed by the Smithsonian's Transcription Center.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a complete set of printed stowage lists, including revisions lists, from the Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 missions. The collection also includes fully searchable pdf files of the lists created in 2019 by a special project initiated by the National Air and Space Museum's Department of Space History and executed by the Smithsonian's Transcription Center.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged by mission.
Biographical / Historical:
At the time of each Apollo mission launch, NASA prepared a set of printed "as flown" stowage lists to document what items were stored on the spacecraft (both the Command Module and Lunar Module), as well as which items were to be transferred from one spacecraft to another.
Provenance:
NASM's Space History Department, Transfer, 2015, NASM.2015.0018
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Manned space flight  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Apollo 17 Flight  Search this
Apollo 16 Flight  Search this
Apollo 15 Flight  Search this
Apollo 12 Flight  Search this
Apollo 11 Flight  Search this
Apollo 14 Flight  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Citation:
Apollo Stowage Lists, NASM.2015.0018, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2015.0018
See more items in:
Apollo Stowage Lists
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2015-0018
Online Media:

Carl Pascaloff (Lunar Rover Vehicle) Papers

Creator:
Pascaloff, Carl.  Search this
Extent:
0.72 Cubic feet ((2 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Correspondence
Calculations
Photographic prints
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following: Carl Pascaloff's notes and calculations; various reports, incuding the Lunar Rover Vehicle; Stress Analysis Report - Master Sheets for the Lunar Rover Vehicle; photographs and related press release information on Apollo 15 though Apollo 17, especially the Lunar Rover Vehicle; and drawings.
Biographical / Historical:
After graduating from University of California, Berkeley with a degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1940, Carl Pascaloff entered the Navy. Following World War II, Pascaloff accepted a position with North American Aviation as an Aircraft Structural Analyst. In 1951, he became Contract Structures Engineer for Beech Aircraft. Two years later he became Structures Engineer for Northrop Aircraft. While working for Northrop, Pascaloff received his Masters Degree (also in Mechanical Engineering) in 1960. Soon after, he accepted a position with Delco Electronics; the company he would stay with until his retirement 29 years later. He was one of the main design engineers with the Lunar Rover Vehicle program, as his work focused primarily on the design of the wheels of the Lunar Rover vehicle. In addition, Pascaloff designed the pressure hull for GM's deep-diving research submarine, which was used by the Navy for research studies. Following the premature death of his wife in 1965, Pascaloff became a single parent of four while still continuing to contribute greatly with his designs of various vehicles.
Provenance:
Joanne Deltener, Gift, 2006
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Manned space flight  Search this
Apollo Lunar Module  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Lunar excursion module  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Correspondence
Calculations
Photographic prints
Citation:
Carl Pascaloff (Lunar Rover Vehicle) Papers, 2006-0040, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2006.0040
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2006-0040

Vostok Scrapbook

Names:
Gagarin, Yuri Alekseyevich, 1934-1968  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet ((1 scrapbook))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Clippings
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Place:
Outer space -- Exploration -- Soviet Union
Outer space -- Exploration
Date:
1961-1964
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains a variety of documentation pertaining to the Vostok capsule. Included are: engineering drawings by Donald J. Ritchie of the capsule, the cabin instrument panel, the cabin control panel and the ejection seat; detailed pencil drawings of the capsule and the cabin instrumentation, in English and in Russian, most are signed and dated; an article from 'Aviation Week and Space Technology' May 31, 1965, magazine and newspaper clippings; and sixty-five black and white photographs of the capsule, cabin instrument panel, cabin control panel, ejection seat, and space suit.
Biographical / Historical:
The former Soviet Union began manned space flight on April 12, 1961, when they launched cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin into orbit around the Earth aboard the Vostok space capsule. The single-seat Vostok remained in use for five more flights, until 1964, when it was replaced with the multi-seater space capsule Voskhod.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Frank Winter, Gift, 1996, XXXX-0583, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Vostok (manned satellite)  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Astronauts  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Clippings
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0583
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0583

Project Mercury "Big Joe" Installation Records (Eiband Collection)

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
Big Joe (Space capsule)  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Project Mercury (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
2.18 Cubic feet ((2 records center boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Correspondence
Notes
Drawings
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains data on the Big Joe capsule and its operation. The material includes blueprints of the thermocouple, telemetry, cooling, instrument, intercom, and other systems. It also contains notes and information on operations, afterbody assembly, personnel assignments, and safety measures, as well as other aspects of the work performed with the capsule during the Big Joe project.
Biographical / Historical:
Soon after the organization of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in October 1959, that agency selected Project Mercury as the first United States manned space program. The project was planned to launch a single man into Earth orbit and return him to Earth. Before launching a manned flight NASA planned a series of unmanned launches with the Mercury spacecraft/launch vehicle combinations to insure the success of later manned flights. The first successful launch of an instrumented Mercury boiler plate capsule, dubbed 'Big Joe' occurred on 9 September 1959 on an Atlas-10D booster from Cape Canaveral. The capsule reached an altitude of 161km (100 miles)e successfully reentering the atmosphere.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
A. Martin Eibrand, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Gift, unknown, XXXX-0189, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Manned space flight  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Correspondence
Notes
Drawings
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0189
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0189

Skylab (McDonnell-Douglas) Collection

Creator:
McDonnell Douglas Corp. McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co.  Search this
Names:
McDonnell Douglas Corp. McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co.  Search this
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Skylab Program  Search this
Extent:
1.53 Cubic feet ((1 records center box) (1 flatbox))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Drawings
Reports
Date:
1970-1974
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of McDonnell-Douglas Astronautics Co. documents relating to the construction of NASA's Skylab Orbital Workshop in 1970-1972. It contains still photographs covering the construction of the vehicle and its transportation to Kennedy Space Center, Florida, which were submitted to NASA every month during the project. Also included are daily status reports during the operating life of Skylab (29 May 1973 - 8 February 1974), as well as engineering drawings of the vehicle prepared by McDonnell-Douglas for the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum.
Biographical / Historical:
Skylab was a manned space station launched into Earth orbit by the United States in May 1973. It was made from the third stage of a Saturn V launch vehicle. A crew of three astronauts occupied Skylab during each of three missions. The longest mission, which ended in February 1974, lasted almost three months. The Skylab missions obtained vast amounts of scientific data, and they demonstrated to the American public that people could live and work productively in space for months at a time. The Orbital workshop (OWS) was a modified Saturn 4B stage that served as crew quarters. It could hold provisions for a three-man crew for up to 84 days each. Skylab crews lived and did most of their scientific research in the workshop.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
No donor information, Gift, unknown, XXXX-0090, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Skylab Orbital Workshop  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Drawings
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0090
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0090

Litton Industries Space Suit Collection

Creator:
Litton Industries  Search this
Extent:
0.36 Cubic feet ((1 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Newsclippings
Drawings
Reports
Date:
bulk 1960-1969
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately 0.36 cubic feet of material relating to the development of space suits at Litton Industries. Materials included in the collection include a copy of the Litton Industries publication, The Extravehicular and Lunar Surface Suit Progress Report; copies of papers authored by Litton Industries staff on the development of a self-contained, articulated undersea suit; Litton Industries, Space Sciences Laboratories presentation, "UX Self-Contained One-Atmosphere Diving Suit"; a news-clipping and National Aeronautics and Space Administration press release on the Litton space suits; copies of drawings of various aspects of the Litton suits and their equipment; a hand-painted insignia (signed, W. Suitor '67) showing an astronaut wearing a Litton suit on the Moon; and numerous photographs of the Litton suits, their development, and testing. There is caption information for some of the images. Also included in the collection is a signed photograph of astronaut Eugene A. Cernan and a lithograph print showing the flight insignia and astronauts' signatures from Gemini missions.
Biographical / Historical:
In 1954, the United States Air Force was looking for solutions to problems with vacuum tubes in electronics which were prone to overheating and were unreliable. Dr. Siegfried Hansen was working with vacuum tubes at Litton Industries and realized that working in a vacuum would facilitate his research. The U.S. Air Force built a vacuum chamber at Litton Industries to further Dr. Hansen's research and Hansen began to develop a special suit to wear in the chamber that would be flexible enough to work in but that could be fully pressurized. The suit that Hansen developed, completed in 1957, eventually became known as the Litton Mark I suit. In 1963, NASA contracted with Litton Industries to develop and build a protective "hard" suit that could be pressurized for extravehicular activity and Litton introduced the RX-1 suit in 1964. Over the next several years, Litton Industries developed a series of these suits, all given the RX designation.
Provenance:
Carol Haislip, Gift, 2010
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space suits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Newsclippings
Drawings
Reports
Citation:
Litton Industries Space Suit Collection, Accession 2010-0015, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2010.0015
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2010-0015

Darrell C. Romick Papers

Creator:
Romick, Darrell C.  Search this
Names:
Goodyear Aerospace Corporation  Search this
Extent:
50 Cubic feet ((40 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Reports
Drawings
Correspondence
Audiotapes
Date:
bulk 1940s-1980s
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately 45 cubic feet of papers, photographs, audio recordings, reports, drawings, correspondence and film, created or collected by Darrell Romick. The papers highlight his visionary space engineering, especially during his time at Goodyear during the 1950s and early 1960s.
Biographical / Historical:
Darrell C. Romick (1915-2008) was a missile engineer for Goodyear during the 1950s and 1960s and one of the most significant American visionaries of space travel. He made hundreds of presentations all over the country, appeared on national television and was quoted in most major newspapers and magazines. Romick's best know design was Project METEOR, an acronym for Manned Earth-satellite Terminal evolving from Earth-Orbit ferry Rocket vehicles. The project was a space exploration plan to produce a fleet of reusable Shuttle-like orbital launch vehicles to service an orbiting space city. Romick graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana with a Bachelor of Science in engineering physics. He became an engineer in the aircraft industry, and he worked for Taylorcraft as a chief engineer. He then worked as a designer for Moulton Taylor on a flying car project before he was hired by Goodyear in 1946 as a project engineer for an experimental missile project. While that particular missile project was canceled, Romick continued working for Goodyear in its missile department. During this time he became very active in the American Rocket Society (ARS) and the British Interplanetary Society, and began his long friendships with other rocket visionaries, including Hermann Oberth, Werner Von Braun, Willy Ley, and Krafft Ehricke. In 1949, Romick became head of Goodyear's General Missile Design Group and he started his staff working unofficially on a space ship design that would become part of METEOR. The design work became an official project of Goodyear after Romick's presentation at the ARS annual meeting in 1954, which made an immediate impact as many of the leading magazines and newspapers covered the story. By 1957 Romick and his Goodyear design team had devised a reduced-scale plan, due to the projected expense of METEOR. Romick presented the METEOR Jr. System Concept at the International Astronautical Federation Congress shortly after the launch of Sputnik 1. However, even as Project METEOR generated headlines, its direct contribution to the development of space flight as the reusable vehicle model was eclipsed as the United States space programs turned to expendable boosters as opposed to reusable vehicles. In 1964, Goodyear shifted its resources from the METEOR project to defense missile work and water-recovery balloons for the Gemini Project. While this shift in resources ended the METEOR Project, several of its basic principles survived and influenced the proposed reusable single stage to Earth orbit vehicles.
Provenance:
Randy Liebermann, Gift, 2013
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space colonies  Search this
Space shuttles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Reports
Drawings
Correspondence
Audiotapes
Citation:
Darrell C. Romick Papers, Accession 2014-0015, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2014.0015
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2014-0015

Skylab Food Heating / Serving Tray Collection

Creator:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Skylab Program  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reports
Drawings
Date:
[ca. 1970s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the NASA Acceptance Data Packages and drawings for Skylab Food Heating / Serving Trays Serial Numbers 4904, 4913 and 4914, as well as material relating to tray Serial Number 4912.
Biographical / Historical:
Skylab was a manned space station launched into Earth orbit by the United States in May 1973. To prepare meals, the Skylab crew placed desired food packages into the food warmer tray. This was the first device capable of heating foods (by means of conduction) during space flight. Foods consisted of products such as ham, chili, mashed potatoes, ice cream, steak, and asparagus.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Collections Management, NASM, Transfer, 1999, 1999-0019, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Manned space flight  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Space vehicles -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Drawings
Identifier:
NASM.1999.0019
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1999-0019

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