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Bodily interventions and intimate labour understanding bioprecarity edited by Gabriele Griffin and Doris Leibetseder

Editor:
Griffin, Gabriele  Search this
Leibetseder, Doris  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (vi, 271 pages)
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2020
Topic:
Human body and technology  Search this
Biotechnology--Social aspects  Search this
Biotechnology--Technology transfer  Search this
Biotechnology  Search this
Corps humain et technologie  Search this
Biotechnologie--Aspect social  Search this
Biotechnologie--Transfert de technologie  Search this
Biotechnologie  Search this
bioengineering  Search this
ART--Criticism & Theory  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156419

Japanese American millennials rethinking generation, community, and diversity edited by Michael Omi, Dana Y. Nakano, and Jeffrey Yamashita

Editor:
Omi, Michael  Search this
Nakano, Dana Y  Search this
Yamashita, Jeffrey  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (viii, 301 pages)
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Place:
United States
États-Unis
Date:
2019
Topic:
Japanese Americans  Search this
Generation Y  Search this
Américains d'origine japonaise  Search this
Génération Internet  Search this
Restrictions & Rights:
Use copy Restrictions unspecified
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156457

An Unspoken Past: Atlanta Lesbian and Gay History, 1940-1970

Author:
Chenault, Wesley  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
2008
Citation:
Chenault, Wesley. 2008. "An Unspoken Past: Atlanta Lesbian and Gay History, 1940-1970." Ph.D, University of New Mexico.
Identifier:
167252
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_167252

Hide/Seek: Portraits of Djuna Barnes and Janet Flanner - National Portrait Gallery

Creator:
National Portrait Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-04-08T15:07:23.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Portraits  Search this
See more by:
NatlPortraitGallery
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
YouTube Channel:
NatlPortraitGallery
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_47p7Gt5IHc8

"Hide/Seek" 2012 Scholarly Symposium: Jonathan D. Katz - National Portrait Gallery

Creator:
National Portrait Gallery  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-02-09T11:15:08.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Portraits  Search this
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NatlPortraitGallery
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
YouTube Channel:
NatlPortraitGallery
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_BbFLur5zdAI

“We Starve Ourselves and Each Other”: Hunger and Lesbian Self-Fashioning in 1970s America

Creator:
National Portrait Gallery  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-06-09T19:28:38.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Portraits  Search this
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NatlPortraitGallery
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
YouTube Channel:
NatlPortraitGallery
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_ZPr4wLNBETM

Hide/Seek: Self-Portrait by Romaine Brooks - National Portrait Gallery

Creator:
National Portrait Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-04-08T16:19:27.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Portraits  Search this
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NatlPortraitGallery
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
YouTube Channel:
NatlPortraitGallery
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_rYjZetmGzLA

(AT HOME) IN AND AROUND AMERICA: ARTIST TALK WITH CATHERINE OPIE

Creator:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-04-01T01:20:43.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
Topic:
Art, modern  Search this
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hirshhornmuseum
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
YouTube Channel:
hirshhornmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_O0rBm9tN-T8

Pinback Button, "Lesbian & Gay Voters For Mayor Barry"

Medium:
metal, plastic, paper
Dimensions:
3/16 × 1 3/4 in. (0.4 × 4.4 cm)
Type:
button
Cite As:
Gift of Marie S. Nahikian
Accession Number:
2022.12.109
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Anacostia Community Museum Collection
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dl809293ffc-dc4e-46b6-9ae4-a7b19d8f9fc8
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:acm_2022.12.109

Fred Karger Papers

Creator:
Karger, Fred, 1950-  Search this
Extent:
5 Cubic feet (15 boxes, 2 map folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Magazines (periodicals)
Newsletters
Newspaper clippings
Posters
Television scripts
Place:
California -- Motion pictures
Date:
1950-2015, undated
Summary:
Papers documenting Fred Karger's acting career, his activism for marriage equality, preservation of the Boom Boom Room (Laguna Beach, California) and other LGBT concerns, Karger's political consulting, and his candidacy for United States President, 2012, as the first openly gay candidate of a major political party.
Content Description:
The Fred Karger Papers consist mostly of secondary materials, film scripts, newspapers, periodicals, and clippings documenting activist and former presidential candidate Fred Karger's brief film and television acting career, his activism for preservation of the Boom Boom Room (originally the South Seas) at the Coast Inn, "Save the Boom", and material from his candidacy for president in 2012. The papers contain material related to Karger's activism for marriage equality and other LGBT concerns.

The collection includes material relating to his childhood education, such as school photographs; his acting career, scripts from television shows and motion pictures he appeared in; and brochures and flyers from his political activism, including boycotts of businesses supporting Proposition 8 (protecting "traditional marriage") in California. The bulk of material relates to Karger's efforts to save the Boom Boom Room (Laguna Beach, California) credited with being the oldest gay bar in West of the Mississippi. The collection includes protest posters, some hand made; columns, articles, clippings and magazines containing articles by and about Karger, some gay-oriented, others not. Material from his presidential campaign is also included such as yard signs, posters, and posters from the 2014 documentary, Fred. There is also a framed letter from Richard M. Nixon.

There are also vintage magazines and newspaper articles covering major events, such as President John F. Kennedy's assassination and the attack on 9/11.
Arrangement:
These papers are arranged into four series.

Series 1: Activism and Presidential Campaign, 1988-2014, undated

Series 2: Theatrical Scripts, 1971-1976

Series 3: Newspapers and Magazines, 1963-2025

Series 4: Photographs and Ephemera, 1950-2010, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Portions of this biography were supplied by the donor, Fred Karger.

Fred S. Karger was born on Januray 31, 1950 in Glencoe, Illinois, the son of Richard (1911-1998) and Jean Foreman Karger (1918-2003). He attended primary and secondary schools in Glencoe. In the mid-1970s Karger pursued an acting career in Los Angeles, California. He later pursued a career in political consulting.

"Fred Karger is an American political consultant, LGBTQ rights activist, author, political pundit, writer, public speaker, former actor and 2012 presidential candidate for the Republican nomination for President. Karger has worked on ten presidential campaigns and served as a senior consultant during the campaigns of President's Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush and Gerald Ford.

Karger was a partner in the Dolphin Group, a California based political consulting firm for 27 years. He retired in 2004 and has since worked as an LGBTQ activist. He began in 2006 trying to save a Laguna Beach, California landmark gay bar, the Boom Boom Room.

In 2008 he founded Californians Against Hate, now Rights Equal Rights and led boycotts of four of the biggest donors to California's Proposition 8. He successfully settled three of those boycotts. Immediately after Prop 8 passed, Fred called for the State of California to investigate The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormon Church) and later the states of Maine, Iowa, Hawaii and California to investigate the rabidly anti-gay National Organization for Marriage (NOM). In the summer of 2012, he launched the ongoing global Boycott of Amway after its owners, the DeVos family, contributed $750,000 to NOM.

Fred's running for the Republican nomination for president in 2012 made him the first openly gay presidential candidate from a major political party in American history, helping to pave the way for Mayor Pete Buttigieg's run in 2020." [Fred Karger Biography, AC/NMAH Control File, AC1439]

During his presidential campaign Karger appeared on six ballots; New Hampshire, Michigan, Puerto Rico, Maryland, California, and Utah. He campaigned in over 30 states and received, "widespread praise for paving the way for future LGBT candidates." Karger has been interviewed on many local, national, and international television, radio, and webcast programs. His autobiography, Fred Who? was published in 2011.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution by Fred Karger in November 2017.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Gay activists  Search this
Homosexuality  Search this
Lesbian and gay experience  Search this
LGBT  Search this
Political activists  Search this
Political campaigns  Search this
Presidential campaigns  Search this
Presidential candidates  Search this
Protest  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Magazines (periodicals)
Newsletters
Newspaper clippings
Posters
Television scripts
Citation:
Fred Karger Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1439
See more items in:
Fred Karger Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep83a324618-1842-4d58-891e-d85129e19037
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1439

Hide/Seek: Portraits by Catherine Opie, Lucas Samaras, and Deborah Kass - National Portrait Gallery

Creator:
National Portrait Gallery  Search this
Type:
Interviews
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-04-07T22:57:23.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Portraits  Search this
See more by:
NatlPortraitGallery
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
YouTube Channel:
NatlPortraitGallery
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_-RggYQj5PtA

Catherine Opie keeping an eye on the world [editors, Tone Hansen, Ana María Bresciani]

Title:
Keeping an eye on the world
Interviewee:
Opie, Catherine 1961-  Search this
Author:
Bresciani, Ana Maria  Search this
Editor:
Hansen, Tone  Search this
Writer of supplementary textual content:
Bresciani, Ana María  Search this
O'Donnell, Natalie Hope  Search this
Interviewer:
Ferguson, Russell  Search this
Host institution:
Henie-Onstad kunstsenter  Search this
Publisher:
Buchhandlung Walther König  Search this
Physical description:
194 pages illustrations (some color), portraits 32 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Interviews
Expositions
Essay
Interview
Exhibition catalogs
Photobooks
Essays
Criticism, interpretation, etc
Catalogues d'exposition
Livres de photographies
Essais
Place:
California
Date:
2017
20th century
21st century
20e siècle
21e siècle
Topic:
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Portrait photography  Search this
Sexual minorities in art  Search this
Communities in art  Search this
Lesbian photographers  Search this
Photographie artistique  Search this
Portraits (Photographie)  Search this
Minorités sexuelles dans l'art  Search this
Communauté dans l'art  Search this
Photography  Search this
Themes, motives  Search this
Lesbian artists  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156725

Joseph M. Carrier photographs of Vietnamese Central Highlanders

Creator:
Carrier, Joseph M.  Search this
Extent:
339 Color slides
Culture:
Cua (Vietnamese people)  Search this
Hrê (Vietnamese people)  Search this
Jarai (Southeast Asian people)  Search this
Bru (Southeast Asian people)  Search this
Vietnamese  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color slides
Photographs
Place:
Vietnam
Guatemala
Date:
1962-1973
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs of Vietnamese peoples and refugee camps made during Joseph M. Carrier's work in Vietnam for the Rand Corporation and the National Academy of Sciences. The collection includes images of airfields, a hospital, Viet Cong defectors, and weaving and basket-making. There are also photographs depicting people, architecture, and art, made in Guatemala circa 1964 and 1972.
Biographical/Historical note:
Joseph Michel Carrier (b. 1927) was a counterinsurgency specialist for the Rand Corporation in Vietnam, a researcher on herbicide use in Vietnam, and an anthropologist specializing in the analysis of homosexuality among Mexican and Vietnamese men. Educated at the University of Miami (BA, 1950) and Purdue University (MA, 1952), he gained employment with the Rand Corporation in 1956 as a research analyst. In 1962 and 1965-1967, Carrier was detailed to South Vietnam, where he assisted anthropologist Gerald Cannon Hickey's research on the Highland peoples and conducted fieldwork on Viet Cong morale and defection. Carrier returned to the United States in 1968 and entered the graduate program in anthropology at the University of California at Irvine. However, despite his doctoral research on homosexual men in Mexico, Carrier could find no positions in sex research after earning his PhD in 1972. With Hickey's support, Carrier found employment as a staff officer for the National Academy of Science's Herbicide Study Group, for whom he gathered data on the effects of US operations in Vietnam which used herbicides to defoliate forests to expose enemy compounds and poisoned Viet Cong food supplies. In 1974, Carrier helped author a working paper on the effects of these programs on the Vietnamese Highland populations. After his time in Vietnam, Carrier worked as an evaluator of California law enforcement programs (1973-1987) and was Chief Social Scientist for the Orange County Health Agency AIDS Community Education Project (retired 1992).
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 2014-02
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The Southeast Asian Archive, The UC Irvine Libraries and the ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives hold Joseph Carrier's papers.
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives holds the papers and photographs of Gerald Cannon Hickey.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Refugee camps  Search this
Vietnam War, 1961-1975  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 2014-02, Joseph M. Carrier photographs of Vietnamese Central Highlanders, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.2014-02
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw366fd5984-46f0-4327-9847-7946730cd89a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-2014-02

Strong Women/Strong Nations 8: Maylei Blackwell

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-03-28T17:38:48.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_cWwibTk2MnM

Q & A voices from queer Asian North America edited by Martin F. Manalansan IV, Alice Y. Hom, and Kale Bantigue Fajardo ; preface by David L. Eng

Editor:
Manalansan, Martin F. 1960-  Search this
Hom, Alice Y. 1967-  Search this
Fajardo, Kale Bantigue  Search this
Writer of preface:
Eng, David L. 1967-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xiii, 437 pages) illustrations, maps
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Place:
North America
Amérique du Nord
Date:
2021
Topic:
Asian American gays--Social conditions  Search this
Asian American lesbians--Social conditions  Search this
Asian American bisexuals--Social conditions  Search this
Gays--Identity  Search this
Lesbians--Identity  Search this
Transgender people--Identity  Search this
Bisexuals--Identity  Search this
Queer theory  Search this
Homosexuels américains d'origine asiatique--Conditions sociales  Search this
Lesbiennes américaines d'origine asiatique--Conditions sociales  Search this
Homosexuels--Identité  Search this
Lesbiennes--Identité  Search this
Transgenres--Identité  Search this
Théorie queer  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156697

Gendered domains : rethinking public and private in women's history : essays from the Seventh Berkshire Conference on the History of Women / edited by Dorothy O. Helly, Susan M. Reverby

Author:
Berkshire Conference on the History of Women (7th : 1987 : Wellesley College)  Search this
Helly, Dorothy O  Search this
Reverby, Susan  Search this
Physical description:
xiv, 349 p. : ill. ; 25 cm
Type:
Congresses
Place:
History
Date:
1992
Topic:
Women--History  Search this
Women in public life  Search this
Call number:
HQ1121.B43 1987X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_445108

QueerSpace: Becoming Light

Creator:
National Air and Space Museum  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Podcast
MIME Type:
audio/mpeg
Uploaded:
Thu, 24 Mar 2022 08:00:00 -0000
Topic:
Aircraft  Search this
Flight  Search this
Space  Search this
See more episodes:
AirSpace
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:podcasts_ee1068bbf7806a54bfead7edf8a8ae52

Website Records, 2020

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Uniform title:
Twitter  Search this
Physical description:
0 cu. ft
Type:
Electronic records
Collection descriptions
Web sites
Date:
2020
Topic:
Web sites  Search this
Blogs  Search this
Museums--Public relations  Search this
Social media  Search this
Online social networks  Search this
Special events  Search this
Sexual minorities  Search this
Transgender people  Search this
Gay pride celebrations  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 22-120
See more items in:
Website Records 1995-2020 [Smithsonian Institution]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_404771

Archives Center Lesbian Pulp Fiction Collection

Former owner:
Swann Auction Galleries  Search this
Extent:
3.1 Cubic feet (7 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1932-1999
Summary:
A collection of pulp fiction titles centering on lesbian characters and lesbianism.
Content Description:
A collection of eighty-five pulp fiction titles dealing with lesbian characters and lesbianism. Parts of this collection are extremely fragile and should be handled with care. The collection is arranged chronologically by date of publication.
Arrangement:
Collection arranged by date of publication into one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Between 1950 and 1965, over 500 distinct lesbian pulp novels were published in the US. These novels were exceptionally influential on lesbian communities in a time where LGBT media was extremely limited. Sold at the counters of grocery stores and in other common shops, these novels became a tangible way for many women to interact with a community they would otherwise have been unable to access. Some of the best loved books were the work of lesbian or bisexual women, many of whom—such as the influential Artemis Smith (Dr. Annselm L.N.V. Morpurgo) and Ann Bannon (Ann Weldy)— went on to become vocal activists and scholars in LGBT matters. Authors of this genre generally used pseudonyms for publication, which helped conceal their identity both as writers of explicit content and potentially as lesbians. Pseudonyms frequently crossed or confused the author's gender, such as in the case of Kay Addams (male author Orrie Hitt), Randy Salem (lesbian author Pat Perdue), and March Hastings (lesbian author Sally Singer). Some writers chose to use multiple pseudonyms, such as Gilbert Fox (published under Dallas Mayo and Paul Russo, among others), and some chose to use a separate name for each genre of pulp novel which they produced. This practice had the benefit of concealing some authors' outright connection to lesbian culture but was also a practice of pulp more generally. Because pulp was poor quality literature, due primarily to the constraints of cheap publishing and quick production, writers often intended these novels to be their introduction to large publishing houses. Authors would begin by writing pulp and then, once they had become accustomed to the industry, would move onto more serious works without having trashy pulp as part of their reputation.

The majority of lesbian pulp novels are original stories created for mass production by American writers. A few key exceptions to this rule existed. The first was reproductions of older lesbian literary works, including Radclyffe Hall's influential The Well of Loneliness (original 1928), Lillian Hellman's script for the play The Children's Hour (original 1934), and Anna Elisabet Weirauch's The Scorpion (original 1919, published in German). The other exception is international works, which would be translated and printed in pulp for the US. Tereska Torrès's Women's Barracks (1950), the novel which started the lesbian pulp genre, was translated from its original French for its mass production in America. Other translated works include Lucie Marchal's, The Mesh (original French, published as pulp in 1959), Francoise Mallet's The Loving and the Daring (original French, also known in English as The Illusionist, published as pulp in 1952), and Torrès's By Cecile (1963). Many of these republished works are among the most favorable to lesbians, as they reflect personal experiences of the author or are canonical entries into broader lesbian literature. While many of the best-regarded novels in the genre were written by lesbian or bisexual women, the bulk of what was produced by American publishers was by male authors for a male audience. Considered perverse erotica, lesbian pulps were written and marketed towards male gratification.

These pulp novels occupy a conflicted space in lesbian culture. Because they were published and distributed en masse, these books became a way for closeted lesbian and bisexual women in areas where there were no strong LGBT communities to find self-recognition and connection with others. Some found the books changing how they thought of their sexuality, particularly if they had only experienced straight relationships. However, buying and keeping these books could be taboo, despite their general popularity. Purchasers often tried to buy lesbian pulps as covertly as possible, and many took advantage of the disposable quality of pulp and abandoned or destroyed the books when they had finished reading them. Publishers were willing to produce lesbian novels because they were an extremely profitable genre, but the US Post Office refused to deliver "explicit" materials, including any promotion of lesbian relationships—regardless of the actual sexual content within. Authors circumvented this issue by creating narratives which appeared to condemn lesbianism. Characters would frequently be killed, go insane, convert back to heterosexuality, or be otherwise fatally punished in the conclusion of the book. In others, the entire novel's plot would include a pervasive element of shame or corruption when a young woman would be manipulated into a lesbian relationship. Compounding these issues is the trite or formulaic nature of the plots, which were often a product of the hastened publishing schedule and low budget for production. These factors create difficulty for many in the current lesbian community to relate to the condemning nature of the genre, particularly as many works of far better quality in both writing and representation have appeared in recent decades.

The cover artwork of these novels is another important aspect. Although there were some strong communities of LGBT women, particularly in urban areas, many had difficulty finding or accessing them. Particularly for those who lived in rural areas or with deep homophobia, the covers of pulp novels would be the first time they saw themselves reflected in popular culture. Lesbian pulp covers usually contained a depiction of two or more women, at least one of whom was exhibiting an identifiable lesbian desire. Common themes included women undressing in private or in communal rooms, women ignoring men in favor of gazing at another woman's body, or women in the midst of a romantic encounter. These covers generally teased at the sexual content within the books, which was typical of all pulp romances. Every identified artist for this collection's covers is a man. Although some women did paint for pulp novels and magazines, they would be frequently relegated to less controversial subjects, such as demure heterosexual romances, and in the rare case horrors, mysteries, and thrillers. Many of the artists for the lesbian novels also produced for many other pulp publications. Artists would receive the covers as an assignment from their publishing company, often without any contact with the author. Because of the tight production schedule, they would often be working off skimming the book's contents, its (publisher-generated) title, or in the lucky case a plot synopsis. Due to this, although some covers hint at community subgroups such as butch and femme aesthetics, they are generally inaccurate to the fashion of real lesbian communities.

Some cover artists of the novels remain unidentified, which can be for a multitude of reasons. First, in the early 1950s many pulp publishers did not allow artists to keep the rights to their work, and so the paintings were considered the sole property of the company. Some publishers would even reuse covers, as is the case for Kay Addams's Warped Desire (1960) and Richard Villanova's Her Woman (1962). Although artists were eventually given more rights, many were unable to claim important works as their intellectual property. Second, because of the controversial nature of the genre, many artists chose not to include specific covers in their portfolio. Like the authors, pulp was sometimes considered a way to launch a more extensive fine arts career, although successful artists often committed to long-term work in the industry. It was far more acceptable to use works from other pulp genres like mystery and horror as promotional and professional material. Paul Rader is one of the few artists who was able and willing to sign his covers. Many pulp illustrators were fresh graduates of New York art schools, but Rader entered the industry later in life. Rader's work was exceptionally suited to the demands of romance and lesbian pulps, because he was notably better at depicting "sexy" bodies than painting for other genres, like sci-fi. When Midwood Books was founded in 1957, he was one of the first to paint for them and quickly became a favorite of the publisher. Six of the novels in this collection have covers that can be attributed to Rader.

Lesbian pulps were the backdrop to an extensive fight over the right to produce and sell explicit content. The publication of Women's Barracks is famous as the event which precipitated the formation of the House Select Committee on Current Pornographic Materials from 1952-1953. The Committee ultimately accomplished little in restricting pulp novels, but it did cause editorial changes to the book (the addition of a disapproving narrator) and demonstrated political attitudes towards the genre. In 1956, a bookseller was punished with 30 days of imprisonment for selling copies of Mark Tryon's Sweeter than Life, republished after the lawsuit as The Twisted Loves of Nym O'Sullivan. This case was eventually appealed to the Supreme Court, resulting in the Smith v. California (1959) decision, which voided the California law preventing the sale of "obscene" content on the grounds that it violated the First Amendment right to free speech. Over the course of the 1960s, lawsuits continued to erode the restrictions on explicit content. Rather than boost the lesbian pulp genre, however, this caused its collapse.

The expansion of publishers' rights meant that the Postal Service could no longer deny delivering lesbian-friendly or pornographic novels on content alone. However, mass publishers were not willing to print works which portrayed lesbianism positively or which increased the amount of graphic content. Smaller presses and collectives began to emerge, which were able to siphon the market for pulps with novels that were better written and more satisfying for their audiences. Unable and unwilling to meet this new competition, publishers like Midwood and Beacon-Signal turned towards the other genres of pulp fiction. The year 1965 marks the end of the lesbian pulp era. Though lesbian fiction had improved in quality, smaller presses were unable to reach the same closeted and isolated women that pulps appealed to as they were considerably limited in their geographic distribution by the size of their operations and the cost of shipping. For many lesbians who had relied on pulps in lieu of community, their access to LGBT content became incredibly restricted in the coming decades. However, lesbian pulp fiction incentivized a new generation of writers to produce better literature through the 1970s and 80s. Publishing houses like Naiad Press were established, which were able to support the ambition of these new authors. Although genuine pulp manufacture had ceased, these presses would continue to reprint the most influential lesbian pulps for the next generation to enjoy. (Written by Sara Kunkemueller.)

Sources

Blakemore, Erin. "Pulp Fiction Helped Define American Lesbianism," Jstor Daily, 2019. Accessed through https://daily.jstor.org/pulp-fiction-helped-define-american-lesbianism/.

Fonesca, Sarah. "Reality Is a Drag: I'd Rather Live in Lesbian Pulp Fiction," them, Mar. 2019. Accessed through https://www.them.us/story/lesbian-pulp-fiction.

Frost, Natasha. "The Lesbian Pulp Fiction That Saved Lives," Atlas Obscura, May 2018. Accessed through https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/lesbian-pulp-fiction-ann-bannon. Hermes, Joke. "Sexuality in Lesbian Romance Fiction," Feminist Review, no. 42, Autumn 1992, pp. 49-66. Accessed through https://www.jstor.org/stable/1395129.

Keller, Yvonne. "'Was It Right to Love Her Brother's Wife so Passionately?': Lesbian Pulp Novels and U.S. Lesbian Identity, 1950-1965," American Quarterly, vol. 57, no. 2, Jun. 2005, pp. 385-410. Accessed through https://www.jstor.org/stable/40068271.

Munroe, Lynn. "The Notebooks of Paul Rader," Lynn Munroe Books, n.d. Accessed through http://lynn-munroe-books.com/list64/RaderHome/RaderNotebooks-home.htm.

Rabinowitz, Paula. "Slips of the Tongue: Uncovering Lesbian Pulp," American Pulp: How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street, Princeton University Press, 2014, pp. 184-205. Accessed through https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zvdxq.11.

Many cover artists for this collection identified through: "Pulp Covers: The Best of the Worst," n.d. Accessed through pulpcovers.com.

Saunders, David. "Alphabetical Index of Pulp Artists," Wild American Field Guide to Pulp Artists, n.d. Accessed through https://www.pulpartists.com/index.html.
Provenance:
Collection purchased from Swann Auction Galleries, New York, New York in September 2021. Funds for purchase provided by the Jackson Fund, NMAH.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. Portions of this collection are extremely fragile; any photocopying must first be approved by the on-site reference archivist.
Topic:
Lesbianism  Search this
Pulp literature  Search this
Paperbacks  Search this
Citation:
Archives Center Lesbian Pulp Fiction Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1513
See more items in:
Archives Center Lesbian Pulp Fiction Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep86194bb36-0607-4796-a297-6d86eced7c86
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1513

American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE), hand fan

Series Donor:
Becker, John M.  Search this
Gay Officers Action League. GOAL  Search this
Heritage of Pride (HOP)  Search this
Rohrbaugh, Richard  Search this
Series Creator:
Hirsch, Leonard  Search this
Guest, Barbara  Search this
Barna, Joseph T.  Search this
Guest, Michael E.  Search this
Container:
Box 197, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Realia
Date:
undated
Series Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.

Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow.

Do not use original materials when available on reference video or audio tapes.
Series Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Series Citation:
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Collection
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Collection / Series 2: Agencies, Associations, and Organizations
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8ded86788-9d06-4de2-a5f7-f85540f97f2c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-1146-ref3250

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