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Natchez -- Longwood Plantation

Architect:
Sloan, Samuel  Search this
Owner:
Pilgrimage Garden Club  Search this
Nutt, Haller  Search this
Collection Collector:
Marchand, Richard  Search this
Extent:
1 slides (photographs)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Postcards
Place:
United States of America -- Mississippi -- Adams County -- Natchez
Longwood Plantation (Natchez, Mississippi)
General:
Longwood Plantation was located on eighty-six acres south of Natchez, Mississippi. The property was purchased in 1850 by Haller Nutt (1816-1864), who earned his fortune farming sugar and cotton in Louisiana and Mississippi. The purchase of Longwood was inspired by his wife Julia, who had always been fond of Natchez. From 1860 to 1873, Longwood was the site of geometrically-patterned gardens, trees and allées following the drive, and vast rose gardens. The gardens once covered fifteen acres of the land surrounding the house, with a full ten of the acres planted in roses. Anecdotes state that the gardens were so large that Julia Nutt had to take a horse and carriage out whenever she wanted to pick flowers. The grounds also included a small bowling alley for the family's amusement and large peach and pear tree orchards and vegetable gardens, which Julia used to feed her family when they had fallen on hard times. Surviving records suggest that Mark Kyle, a Philadelphia gardener and landscape architect had a hand in the creation of the gardens at Longwood. When the home was designed, it included four verandas overlooking the gardens and shaded by the ancient oak trees that grew on the plantation.

The house on Longwood Plantation, also known as the Octagon House or Nutt's Folly, was designed by the Philadelphia architect Samuel Sloan beginning in 1859. The octagonal house design was popular during the 1850's throughout the United States, and the form was praised for its utility and cheapness. Longwood is the largest and grandest of the octagon houses built in the United States. The Oriental Revival style residence uniquely combines both Moslem and Italianate architecture with the eclecticism and exotic romanticism, which flourished in mid-nineteenth-century American architecture. Constructed from 1860 to 1862, the palatial structure is an eight-sided, two and one-half story, brick house over a full basement and topped with a large onion-shaped "Moorish" dome. The scale of the house is immense, spanning 30,000 feet, and including thirty-two rooms, eight verandas, four porches, 115 doors, twenty-six fireplaces, twenty-four closets, twenty-six coal-burning fireplaces, and a rotunda that opens to the cupola. Construction was halted in 1861 when the Civil War broke out, with only the exterior and nine rooms on the basement level completed. In 1862, Nutt finished the basement level, and the family moved into this completed section of the mansion. The estate also included several planned outbuildings, many of which were never used for their intended purpose. These structures, still standing today, include the kitchen, necessary (privy), slave's quarters, carriage house, and stables. The Nutt family's cemetery was also kept on the grounds at a considerable distance to the southwest of the mansion.

From the first floor up through the third, the house remained an incomplete, empty shell due to the severe financial losses caused by the Civil War. By the time of his death in 1864, Nutt was deeply in debt and his unfinished home came to be known as Nutt's Folly, a symbol of his financial fall. Haller Nutt died in the home in 1864, and his wife, Julia, remained in residence until her death in 1897. The property remained in the possession of the Nutt family until 1968, when it was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Kelly McAdams, who in turn sold it to the Pilgrimage Garden Club of Natchez. In 1969, Longwood was added to the National Register of Historic Places as a National Historic Landmark. Sadly, during this time the once spacious and well-tended gardens fell into a state of disrepair, with only the path of the driveway remaining from the original garden plan. When the Pilgrimage Garden Club began restorations there were no visible surface signs of the former gardens of Longwood Plantation. The Pilgrimage Garden Club still owns Longwood today and operates it as a historic house museum and offers tours. Despite the fact that Longwood was never completed on the interior above the basement level, the exterior detailing has survived in an amazing state of preservation. The vast upper stories remain just as the workmen left them in 1861, which provides an opportunity to see a mid-19th-century house under construction. Together with the papers of the owner, Haller Nutt, and the architect, Samuel Sloan, Longwood offers a comprehensive view of the creative process and architectural theory of the period.

Persons associated include: Haller Nutt (former owner), Samuel Sloan (architect), Mark Kyle (possibly landscape architect), Mr. and Mrs. Kelly McAdams (former owner), and the Pilgrimage Garden Club (owner).
Postcard circa 1915-1950.
Varying Form:
Also known as Nutt's Folly and the Octagon House.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Mississippi -- Natchez  Search this
Mansions  Search this
Spanish moss  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Rose gardens  Search this
Architecture, Moorish Revival  Search this
Domes  Search this
Plantations  Search this
Live oak  Search this
Porches  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postcards
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Richard Marchand historical postcard collection.
Identifier:
AAG.MAR, File MS030
See more items in:
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection (35mm slides)
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection (35mm slides) / Mississippi
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-mar-ref1455

Tulsa -- Villa Philbrook

Former owner:
Phillips, Waite  Search this
Architect:
Delk, Edward Beuhler  Search this
Landscape architect:
Hare & Hare  Search this
Owner:
Philbrook Museum of Art  Search this
Collection Collector:
Marchand, Richard  Search this
Extent:
1 slides (photographs)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Postcards
Place:
United States of America -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa
Villa Philbrook (Tulsa, Oklahoma)
General:
Philbrook Museum of Art is located in Tulsa, Oklahoma at the former Waite Phillips estate. The museum housed in the Villa Philbrook, an Italianate mansion surrounded by of 25 acres of gardens. The estate was created for the wealthy oilman and philanthropist Waite Phillips (1883-1964) and his wife Genevieve Elliott Phillips (1887-1979) and their two children in 1926-1927. The gardens around the mansion were the result of a collaboration of the owners, the house's architect, and the firm of Hare & Hare, Landscape Architects & City Planners. To complement Delk's architectural designs, the garden design combined French, and English garden iconography with inspiration from Villa Lante, an Italian country estate by Giacomo Barozzi da Vignola in 1566. They followed Renaissance models with features such as formal gardens, cascading water feature, rock garden and pond terminated by a tempietto. The main emphasis was placed on the East Formal Garden, which was designed on axis with the villa's grand hall. The Italian preference for a predominately green palette was achieved with beds of English ivy, low hedges of Chinese privet, clipped spheres of bay or boxwood and tall red cedars chosen to mimic Italian cypress. Beyond the formal garden stretches a pastoral grove. Important to Genevie Philips was a scheme that featured plants native to the area. Specimens were collected from the native woods on the property, and used in along the flagstone walkways, in borders, and on slopes near house. Yuccas, cedars, dogwood, elder, and serviceberry were among the varieties incorporated into the Italianate design. Structures found throughout the gardens include the Tempietto, the Summer House built in 1933, fountains in the East Formal Garden, the grotto, and a fireplace.

To design their home, the Philips commissioned a Kansas City architect, Edward Buehler Delk (1885–1956), as well as designing Villa Philmonte for their ranch in Cimarron, New Mexico, and the Philtower office building in downtown Tulsa. For Villa Philbrook, Delk interpreted the most fashionable styles of the day in his plans for the 72-room Italian Renaissance villa. It is situated high on the property, overlooking the gardens and to get the breezes in warmer months. The façade of the house is unpretentious with spare use of classical ornament. The house and grounds are linked by the addition of arches and windows, which frame views of the garden, as well as a loggia and terrace that overlooks the most formal of the gardens.

After only eleven years living at Philbrook, the Philips family donated the estate to the community to become Tulsa's first art museum. The house underwent major renovations, and the landscape architecture firm, Hare and Hare, were brought back in to work on the conversion of the gardens from private to public. In 1939 the Philbrook Art Museum (later Philbrook Museum of Art) opened to the public. The gardens were briefly used as a botanical garden concerned with the development, preservation and exhibition of native species to Oklahoma and the Southwest. From 2002-2004, Howell & Vancuren designed another major garden renovation with the support of the Philips family. The Philips also gave Villa Philmonte and the Philmont Ranch to the Boy Scouts of America, and today both institutions continue to serve their communities.

Contributions to the construction of Villa Philbrook were made by multiple craftspeople and artists including George Gibbs, Oscar Bach, Bertram Segar, Cooper & Gentiluomo, Edward F. Caldwell & Co., and Jørgen Dreyer.

Persons associated include: Waite and Genevieve Phillips (former owner), Edward Buehler Delk (architect), S. Herbert Hare of Hare & Hare, Landscape Architects & City Planners (landscape architect), Howell & Vancuren (landscape architects), and Philbrook Museum of Art, Inc. (owner).
Postcard circa 1930-1950.
Varying Form:
Also known as Philbrook Art Museum and Philbrook Museum of Art.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Parterres  Search this
Museums  Search this
Terraces  Search this
Groves  Search this
Naturalized plantings  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postcards
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Richard Marchand historical postcard collection.
Identifier:
AAG.MAR, File OK001
See more items in:
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection (35mm slides)
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection (35mm slides) / Oklahoma
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-mar-ref1703

Fairmont -- High Gate House

Former owner:
Watson, James Edwin  Search this
Architect:
Trumbauer, Horace  Search this
Landscape architect:
Paul, Oglesby  Search this
Collection Collector:
Marchand, Richard  Search this
Extent:
2 slides (photographs)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Postcards
Place:
High Gate House (Fairmont, West Virginia)
United States of America -- West Virginia -- Marion County -- Fairmont
General:
High Gate was the estate of James Edwin Watson, heir to a West Virginia coal dynasty, and was located in his native city, Fairmont, West Virginia. Designed by notable Philadelphia architect, Horace Trumbauer, the twenty-five-room mansion was completed by 1912. Trumbauer's design was in the Jacobethan Revival style, which pulled elements from manor houses of the Jacobean and Elizabethan periods, particularly the use of half-timbered, stucco-clad walls. Also called "Stockbroker's Tudor" style, the mansion and adjacent carriage house were surrounded by immense, ornamental iron gates and fencing, which earned the property its name. Named for the immense iron gates at the entrance of the property.

A frequent collaborator of Horace Trumbauer, Philadelphia landscape architect, Oglesby Paul, designed the grounds. Around the mansion and in the courtyard of the carriage house, Paul employed flower beds, boxed hedges, shrubbery, catalpa, white birch, and magnolia trees. To the rear of the buildings, exotic trees and shrubs highlighted a box garden, tennis court, and a sunken garden, which featured lighting around stone conversation benches. The gardens also included garden ornaments such as a sundial and large bird bath. The regulation, clay tennis court was once the home of the Tiffany Cup Championship games.

Following the death of Watson, the home was sold to the Sisters of St. Joseph in 1929. The renamed it St. Joseph's Villa and used it as a rest home and later a kindergarten. It later became the Ross funeral home and the carriage house became a nursing home. In 1982, High Gate was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and was later transferred to the Vandalia Heritage Foundation, an organization promoting historic preservation throughout northern West Virginia.

Persons associated include: James Edwin Watson (former owner), Horace Trumbauer (architect), Oglesby Paul (landscape architect), the Sisters of Saint Joseph (former owner), and Vandalia Heritage Foundation (owner).

National Register of Historic Places, High Gate, Fairmont, Marion County, West Virginia, National Register #82004326.
Postcards circa 1930-1945.
Varying Form:
Also known as James Edwin Watson House, Saint Joseph's Villa, and Ross Funeral Home.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- West Virginia -- Fairmont  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Mansions  Search this
Allées  Search this
Tudor Revival  Search this
Garden borders  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postcards
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Richard Marchand historical postcard collection.
Identifier:
AAG.MAR, File WV008
See more items in:
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection (35mm slides)
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection (35mm slides) / West Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-mar-ref1809

The Garden Club of America collection

Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Names:
New York Flower Show  Search this
Extent:
37,000 Slides (35mm slides)
33 Linear feet ((garden files))
3,000 lantern slides
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Lantern slides
Plans (drawings)
Brochures
Articles
Correspondence
Clippings
Slides (photographs)
Date:
circa 1920-present
Summary:
This collection contains over 37,000 35mm slides, 3,000 glass lantern slides and garden files that may include descriptive information, photocopied articles (from journals, newspapers, or books), planting lists, correspondence, brochures, landscape plans and drawings. Garden files were compiled by Garden Club of America (GCA) members for most of the gardens included in the collection. Some gardens have been photographed over the course of several decades; others only have images from a single point in time. In addition to images of American gardens, there are glass lantern slides of the New York Flower Show (1941-1951) and trips that GCA members took to other countries, including Mexico (1937), Italy, Spain, Japan (1935), France (1936), England (1929), and Scotland.

A number of the slides are copies of historic images from outside repositories including horticultural and historical societies or from horticultural books and publications. The GCA made a concerted effort in the mid-1980s to acquire these images in order to increase its documentation of American garden history. Because of copyright considerations, use of these particular images may be restricted.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Garden Club of America was established in 1913 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, when the Garden Club of Philadelphia and eleven other garden clubs met to create a national garden club. Its purpose is to foster the knowledge and love of gardening and to restore and protect the quality of the environment through educational programs and gardening and conservation efforts. The GCA was incorporated in Delaware in 1923, with its headquarters established in New York City. Today, local clubs are organized under twelve regional zones. The GCA continues its tradition of hosting flower shows and publishing material related to gardening in the United States.

The GCA's glass lantern slides were used by The GCA for presentations and lectures about notable gardens throughout the United States dating back to colonial times. An effort was made in the late 1980s, in preparation of the 75th anniversary of the Garden Club of America's founding, to collect the disbursed slides. These slides were to eventually form the Slide Library of Notable American Parks and Gardens. The informational value of this collection is extensive since a number of images of the more than 4,500 gardens represented show garden designs that have changed over time or no longer exist. While the majority of images document a range of designed upper and upper-middle class gardens throughout the U.S., the scope of the collection is expanding as volunteers photograph and document contemporary gardens including community and vernacular gardens.

The gardens illustrate the design work of dozens of landscape architects including Marian Coffin, Beatrix Farrand, Lawrence Halprin, Hare & Hare, Umberto Innocenti, Gertrude Jekyll, Jens Jensen, Warren Manning, the Olmsted Brothers, Charles Platt, Ellen Biddle Shipman, and Fletcher Steele. Because of their proximity to the gardens, works of notable architects and sculptors may also be featured in the images.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- France  Search this
Gardens -- Italy  Search this
Gardens -- Japan  Search this
Gardens -- Mexico  Search this
Flower shows  Search this
Gardening -- United States -- societies, etc  Search this
Gardens -- England  Search this
Landscape architecture  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Spain  Search this
Gardens -- Scotland  Search this
Genre/Form:
Plans (drawings)
Brochures
Articles
Correspondence
Clippings
Lantern slides
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-gca
Online Media:

Zoo Jobs: Meet a Landscape Architect

Creator:
National Zoo  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2014-09-28T14:00:01Z
Topic:
Zoology;Animals;Veterinary medicine;Animal health  Search this
Youtube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNZP
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNZP
Data Source:
National Zoo
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_3tJkOjXqQQM

Zoo Jobs: Meet Small Mammal Biologist at National Zoo

Creator:
National Zoo  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2014-09-26T15:14:06Z
Topic:
Zoology;Animals;Veterinary medicine;Animal health  Search this
Youtube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNZP
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNZP
Data Source:
National Zoo
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_QWWLtG3J_TI

NNAVM: Presentation of Final Design Proposals 4—Leroy Transfield

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2018-06-14T20:49:49Z
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_5T-JDvjrycE

NNAVM: Presentation of Final Design Proposals 6—Harvey Pratt

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2018-06-14T20:49:49Z
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_el2fIAisJe8

Nacadia Therapy Forest Garden | Nature–Design Triennial

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2019-07-02T16:40:29Z
Topic:
Design  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_haPwtuGHz4Q

Maida Babson Adams American garden collection

Creator:
Adams, Molly, 1918-2003  Search this
Landscape architect:
Ireys, Alice Recknagel, 1911-2000  Search this
Stege, Friede  Search this
Weber, Nelva M.  Search this
Extent:
0 Photographic prints (color, 4 x 6 inches)
0 Photographic prints (black and white, 3 1/2 x 5 inches)
0 Photographic prints (black and white, 8 x 10 inches)
0 contact sheets (black and white)
35mm slides (photographs) (color, 2 x 2 inches)
0 Negatives (35mm negatives, color)
0 Negatives (black & white, 4 x 5 inches)
0 Negatives (120mm negatives, black and white, 2 x 2 inches)
0 film transparency (color, 4 x 5 inches)
0 Transparencies (120mm transparencies, color, 2 x 2 inches)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Contact sheets
Negatives
Film transparency
Transparencies
Film transparencies
Color negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Photographs
Color photographs
Slides (photographs)
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
circa 1960-1994
Summary:
The Maida Babson Adams American Garden Collection documents the work of Molly Adams, a free-lance garden photographer who photographed hundreds of private and public gardens, many of them in the mid-Atlantic region, from the late 1950s through the mid-1990s. It includes slides, photographic prints, negatives and transparencies. A significant number of images document the work of landscape designers Nelva M. Weber, Alice Recknagel Ireys, and Friede Stege. Roughly 50 gardens do not have an identified location. Some images have captions and other information written on them.
Scope and Contents:
The Maida Babson Adams American Gardens Collection includes a total of 7,606 images documenting close to 400 gardens photographed by Molly Adams from the 1950s to the 1990s. Although most images document gardens in New Jersey, the collection also includes gardens in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania. While the vast majority of gardens in the collection are private, there are also some public gardens and venues like the Frelinghuysen Arboretum in New Jersey, the International Flower Show in New York City, and the White House in Washington, D.C. A number of gardens were photographed during organized garden or horticultural tours or annual meetings of the Garden Club of America. A significant number of images document the work of landscape designers Alice Ireys, Nelva Weber, and Friede Stege. Approximately 85 gardens in the collection are unidentified as to their location and/or client. Relatively few images are captioned or dated; Adams often labeled a film envelope or back of a photograph or contact sheet with just a client surname and the designer (if it was Ireys, Weber, or Stege). In some cases, additional information about a garden's location or owner's full name was gleaned from the finding aids for the Alice Recknagel Ireys Papers or the Nelva Weber Papers. Some images were accompanied by clippings from newspapers or magazines that featured one or more related images by Adams; most of these clippings date from the 1950s and 1960s. There is also a file of general clippings of Adams' work; many of these do not identify the garden that is shown.

Most of the images are black and white, though there are a number taken in color. Adams' contact sheets and photo envelopes were sometimes marked with cropping marks or photo developing notes respectively.
Biographical / Historical:
Molly (Maida Babson) Adams (1918 - 2003) had a 40+ year career as a nationally recognized free-lance garden and wildlife photographer and conservationist. Her images were published under the name "Molly Adams." Adams was born in Orange, New Jersey and lived over fifty years in Mendham Township, New Jersey. As a teenager she became interested in photography; she later attended the New York Institute of Photography and became a member of the New York Camera Club.

Her photographs were featured in numerous newspapers and magazines including the "New York Times," "New York Herald Tribune," "House Beautiful," "Horticulture," "Home Garden," and "Audubon." During the Kennedy administration, she photographed the White House Rose Garden; these photographs were later published in "Flower Grower."

Adams provided hundreds of photographs for "How to Plan and Plant Your Own Property" (1967) by landscape architect Alice Recknagel Ireys and "How to Plan Your Own Home Landscape" (1976) by landscape designer Nelva M. Weber. Her images were also published in books including "The Reader's Digest Practical Guide to Home Landscaping," and "The Complete Illustrated Book of Garden Magic." Adams also occasionally wrote garden-themed articles. A longtime member in the Somerset Hills (NJ) Garden Club, which is part of the Garden Club of America, Adams once served as the latter's official photographer.

In the 1960's Adams' photographs drew attention to conservation issues related to the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in northwestern New Jersey. These widely publicized photographs rallied public support against the proposed destruction of the Great Swamp for the construction of an airport. Adams was also active as a member of the Mendham Township Environmental Commission and the North Jersey Conservation Foundation. In the 1980's she was awarded the Buckley Medal of Merit for Horticultural Achievement by the Garden Club of America for her photographs used in the postcard campaign "Save Our Vanishing Wild Flowers."
Related Archival Materials Note:
The Alice Recknagel Ireys Papers in the Sophia Smith Collection at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, include photographs by Molly Adams.

The Nelva Weber Papers in the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections at Cornell University Library in Ithaca, New York, likely include photographs by Molly Adams.
Separated Materials:
The North Jersey History & Genealogy Center at The Morristown & Morris Township Library in New Jersey has a collection of images by Molly Adams showcasing nature scenes and birds.
Provenance:
Adams' family donated her collection of garden images to the Smithsonian's Archives of American Gardens after her death in 2003.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Connecticut  Search this
Gardens -- Massachusetts  Search this
Gardens -- New Jersey  Search this
Gardens -- New York (State)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Film transparencies
Color negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Photographs
Color photographs
Negatives
Slides (photographs)
Contact sheets
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Maida Babson Adams American garden collection.
Identifier:
AAG.ADM
See more items in:
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-adm
Online Media:

Rudy J. Favretti collection

Creator:
Favretti, Rudy J.  Search this
Extent:
31.5 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Invoices
Research
Contracts
Reports
Pamphlets
Slides (photographs)
Date:
circa 1950-2010
Summary:
The collection contains the project design records of Rudy J. Favretti. , a landscape architect and professor noted for his extensive work in historical restoration of gardens, parks, and landscapes. He donated his collection of garden design files, plans, and images to the Smithsonian's Archives of American Gardens in March 2011.
Scope and Content Note:
The collection contains the records of landscape architect Rudy J. Favretti and includes correspondence, research notes, reports, drawings, plans (some from other engineering or design firms), photographic images, contracts, invoices, newspaper clippings, copies of historic records and other items relating to Professor Favretti's professional design work. His projects range from small private gardens to extensive garden restorations of eighteenth and nineteenth century gardens, parks, and historic sites. Professor Favretti also worked on a number of civic improvement and land use projects like parks and roadways. The majority of projects are located in New England (particularly Connecticut), the mid-Atlantic states and the southeastern United States. The collection also includes Professor Favretti's research files for his biography on landscape architect Jacob Weidenmann as well as numerous brochures and pamphlets he gathered during trips he took to gardens across the United States, and 35mm slides he took of some of these sites.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged into 4 series: Series 1: Project Files; Series 2: Administrative Files; Series 3: Jacob Weidenmann Research and Biography Filesand Biography Files; Series 4: Visited Gardens
Biographical Note:
Rudy J. Favretti was born in Mystic, Connecticut in 1932. He obtained degrees from the University of Connecticut, Cornell University, and the University of Massachusetts. Favretti holds Bachelor's degrees in horticulture, landscape design, and landscape architecture, as well as Master's degrees in ornamental horticulture, landscape architecture, and regional planning. Professor Favretti taught landscape architecture at the University of Connecticut from 1955 to 1988. Since 1988 he has been Professor Emeritus at the University of Connecticut specializing in landscape history and preservation. He has also been a visiting professor at the University of Virginia, Columbia University, and a Visiting Faculty Fellow at Yale University. In his professional career, Rudy Favretti worked on over 700 commissioned individual and collaborative design, master planning, and preservation projects. These works include notable sites such as Bartram's Garden in Philadelphia, Monticello and Mount Vernon in Virginia, the Emily Dickinson House in Massachusetts, and the Vanderbilt Estate in New York. Favretti has authored more than 20 books and monographs and over 60 journal and magazine articles on a vast range of topics though most notably on historic landscape restoration and colonial gardens He co-authored For Every House a Garden (1977) and Landscapes and Garden for Historic Buildings (1978) with his wife Joy P. Favretti. His most recent work, Jacob Wiedenmann: Pioneer Landscape Architect (2007), is a biography of the nineteenth century landscape architect.

Professor Favretti is a member of several professional and academic societies including the American Society of Landscape Architects, the National Association for Olmsted Parks, and Phi Kappa Phi. He has been awarded honors in landscape preservation by the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Garden Club of America. He is currently a member of the National Register Review Board for Connecticut and the Director of the Connecticut Olmsted Alliance. He served as the consulting landscape architect for the Garden Club of Virginia from 1978 to 1998. The Garden Club of Virginia established the Rudy J. Favretti Fellowship in his honor to support the research and documentation of historic Virginia gardens.
Related Materials:
The Rudy Favretti Papers are available at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center of the University of Connecticut. These include landscape plans dated 1962-1979 for numerous public spaces throughout Connecticut.
Provenance:
The records and files were generated and/or compiled by Rudy J. Favretti in the course of his landscape design, landscape restoration, and academic work.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
For information or study purposes only. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Monuments  Search this
Museums  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Historic sites  Search this
Horticulture  Search this
Memorials  Search this
Landscape architecture  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Invoices
Research
Contracts
Reports
Pamphlets
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Rudy J. Favretti CollectionPapers.
Identifier:
AAG.FAV
See more items in:
Rudy J. Favretti collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-fav
Online Media:

Miami -- Vizcaya

Former owner:
Deering, James, 1859-1925)  Search this
Architect:
Hoffman, Francis Burrell, 1882-1980)  Search this
Landscape architect:
Suarez, Diego, 1888-1974  Search this
Sculptor:
Calder, Alexander Stirling, 1870-1945  Search this
Collection Collector:
Marchand, Richard  Search this
Extent:
5 slides (photographs)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Postcards
Place:
Vizcaya estate (Florida)
United States of America -- Florida -- Miami-Dade County -- Miami
Date:
circa 1930-1950
General:
The Vizcaya gardens span over ten acres surrounding the former winter home of the wealthy industrialist and patron of the arts, James Deering (1859-1925). The Vizcaya estate, located in the Coconut Grove area of Miami, was conceived of by Deering and artist and designer Paul Chalfin (1874-1959). Together they traveled extensively through Europe, particularly Italy, to inspire the design for Deering's South Florida retreat. Vizcaya which means "an elevated place" in Basque, was built in the years 1914 to 1916, and transformed a jungle tract of land into one of the most celebrated houses on the Eastern Seaboard. Diego Suarez (1888-1974), a Columbia-born landscape architect trained in Florence, Italy, was commissioned to create a modern, subtropical interpretation of classical, European Renaissance and Baroque landscape design suited to Miami's climate and terrain. Suarez' extensive knowledge of Italian gardens was combined with a consciousness of architectural design to create a setting for the house.

The garden scheme was divided into various terraces and areas, including a completely walled secret garden, a maze garden, theater garden, pergola garden, and the fountain garden, which features a fountain from the town square of Sutri, Italy. Plants were chosen for their ability to withstand south Florida's climate and pests and combined with native soil and plant materials in designs inspired by gardens seen by Deering and Chalfin on their tours of Italy and France. Varieties of bougainvillea, roses, water lilies, and jasmine were among the flowers found throughout the gardens, along with potted pines and podocarpus, some carefully trimmed in the art of topiary. The gardens were trimmed with hedges and trees and feature decorative walls, balustrades, urns, and sculpture. The areas were supplied with water through designed elements meant to compliment the garden such as pools, cascades, a frescoed grotto pool, fountains, and a system of canals, which invokes scenes on the waterways of Venice.

Unique among country estates, the gardens of Vizcaya integrated statues, busts, vases and urns that ranged from antiquity to the Renaissance and Baroque periods, as well as modern art from Deering's time into the lush vegetation. As the artistic advisor of the property, Paul Chalfin, acquired artifacts as decoration rather than to create a collection. Garden artworks ranged from antique elements to new sculptural decorations by contemporary artists. The gardens also featured several structures including a Baroque casino (garden house), decorative bridges, a large boathouse with a rooftop garden, and a domed garden house called the Casba. The most celebrated outdoor feature was the Barge by artist Alexander Stirling Calder (1870–1945), located in the water in front of the house. In addition to the house and gardens, the grounds also housed a swimming pool and tennis courts. Over two-thirds of the estate, originally 180 acres of subtropical forest along the shores of Biscayne Bay, remains in its natural state. The untouched hammock, shoreline, and pineland serves as a background for the more formal main gardens and along the drive up to the house. The Vizcaya property was surrounded by a wall with decorative paintings on stone and wrought-iron grills.

The house was designed to take advantage of its location on west shore of Biscayne Bay and each side of the house had a unique relationship with the surrounding grounds with loggias, terraces, arcades, and a partially enclosed swimming pool and, from some rooms, views of the gardens and bay. Architect F. Burrell Hoffman Jr. (1884-1980) was commissioned to design the house in the manner of an Italian Renaissance-style villa. Hoffman adapted traditional Mediterranean architectural elements to the subtropical climate in the palatial 70-room mansion. The beautifully planned interior was designed around an airy garden courtyard with a peripheral gallery, originally open to the sky, that was the heart and primary living space of the home. The house embraced modern conveniences and employed the latest technology of the period with an automated telephone switch board, a central vacuum-cleaning system, central heating, several elevators, generators and a water filtration system. The house also included a billiard room, bowling alley, and smoking room. The interiors were designed by the artistic advisor Paul Chalfin around objects acquired on Deering's travels in period rooms ranging in style from the Renaissance through the Neoclassical. The villa housed entire ceilings, mural paintings, chimney pieces, carved paneling, and doorways removed from foreign palaces along with rare rugs, tapestries, and antique furnishings. A working farm called the "Village" with eleven outbuildings was also located on the estate. These buildings were designed to look like an Italian village by Hoffman to compliment the architecture of the house. The Village included barns, stables, chicken houses, mechanical shops, housing for the staff, and the gate lodge making it nearly self-sufficient. A pumphouse provided water for the flower and vegetable gardens, groves for citrus, pineapple, and other fruits, greenhouses, and a large shade house for delicate plants grown at the Village to supply the mansion.

The estate, mansion, and its interiors were celebrated in magazines of the time. Deering occupied the house for four months each winter season beginning at Christmas in 1916.The whole complex was created for entertaining and recreation and Deering frequently invited family, visitors, and houseguests to the enjoy his estate. After Deering's death in 1925, the estate passed to his brother's children. Some of the acreage was sold off, and in 1952 Dade County purchased the remaining land and house. With donations of art and furniture from the family, the Vizcaya estate, became a decorative arts museum operated by Dade County Park and Recreation Department. The property, including the house, gardens, hammock forest, and Vizcaya Village, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1994.

Other notable artists who contributed to the house and grounds were: Alexander Stirling Calder (1870-1945), Gaston Lachaise (1882-1935), Robert Chanler (1872-1930), Charles Gary Rumsey (1879-1922), Ettore Pellagatta (1881-1966), Paul Thevenez (1891-1921), and Samuel Yellin (1885-1940).

Persons associated include: James Deering (former owner), F. Burrall Hoffman, Jr. (architect), Paul Chalfin (architect of interiors), Diego Suarez (landscape architect), and Alexander Stirling Calder (sculptor), and Metro Dade County Park & Recreation Department (owner).

National Register of Historic Places, Vizcaya, Miami, Dade County, Florida, National Register #70000181.
Varying Form:
Also known as Villa Vizcaya, Vizcaya Palace, Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, and the James Deering Estate.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Seaside gardening  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Mansions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postcards
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Richard Marchand historical postcard collection.
Identifier:
AAG.MAR, File FL083
See more items in:
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection (35mm slides)
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection (35mm slides) / Florida
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-mar-ref1329

Blaisdell, Frank- landscape Architect , Boston, Mass.

Series Creator:
Warshaw, Isadore, 1900-1969  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Series Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Some items may be restricted due to fragile condition.
Series Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Series Citation:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Amusements, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Amusements
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Amusements / Business Records, Marketing Material, and Other
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0060-s01-01-amusements-ref20

Blaisdell, Frank M.

Series Creator:
Warshaw, Isadore, 1900-1969  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Landscape architect
Boston, Massachusetts
Series Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Some items may be restricted due to fragile condition.
Series Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Series Citation:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Architecture, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Architecture
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Architecture / Architects
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0060-s01-01-architecture-ref22

Lake View Cemetery

Architect:
Keller, George H.  Search this
Hubbell & Benes  Search this
Landscape architect:
Taylor, Albert Davis  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
United States of America -- Ohio -- Cuyahoga County -- Cleveland
Date:
1916
General:
Further sources of information include: Lake View Cemetery Archives and The Western Reserve Historical Society. O-22 Louis Baus photograph c. 1869. Ohio Historical Society. Permission required.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Spring  Search this
Plan views  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item OH121002
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Ohio / OH121: Cleveland -- Lake View Cemetery
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16068

Lake View Cemetery

Architect:
Keller, George H.  Search this
Hubbell & Benes  Search this
Landscape architect:
Taylor, Albert Davis  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
Ohio -- Cleveland
United States of America -- Ohio -- Cuyahoga County -- Cleveland
Date:
1930
General:
Further sources of information include: Lake View Cemetery Archives and Western Reserve Historical Society. CW 473 - Shows Angelo Palermo, gardener, making models in 1910 (E. Palermo Collection).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Spring  Search this
People  Search this
Models and modelmaking  Search this
Buildings  Search this
Cemeteries  Search this
Lakes  Search this
Men  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item OH121003
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Ohio / OH121: Cleveland -- Lake View Cemetery
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16069

Brookville -- Hillwood

Former owner:
Hutton, Edward F. Mr. Mrs.  Search this
Prime, William A. Mr. Mrs.  Search this
Post, Marjorie Merriweather  Search this
Landscape architect:
Coffin, Marian Cruger, 1876-1957  Search this
Architect:
Hart, Charles M.  Search this
Hart & Shape  Search this
Owner:
Long Island University. C. W. Post College  Search this
Suppliers:
Lewis & Valentine Nurseries, Inc.  Search this
Provenance:
North Country Garden Club of Long Island  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
New York (State) -- Brookville
Hillwood (Brookville, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Nassau County -- Oyster Bay -- Brookville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet, landscape plans, copies of photographs, and copies of articles and programs.
General:
This Hillwood was owned by Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Hutton. After the Hutton's divorce in 1935, Hillwood became the property of Marjorie (formerly Mrs. Hutton) and her second husband Joseph E. Davies. Mrs. E. F. Hutton, after several divorces, was later known as Mrs. Marjorie Merriweather Post. Long Island University bought the property in 1947 to use it as one of their off-campus locations. Classes began in the mansion in 1951. The University then named the property after Marjorie Merriweather Post's father, Charles William Post, to become C. W. Post College. In 1955, Mrs. Post built a separate estate in Washington, DC, and named it "Hillwood." This is now Hillwood Museum and Gardens.
(The Fine Arts Center, located on the college property, was originally owned by Mr. E.F. Hutton, who built it after his divorce from Marjorie. He hired Marian Coffin to design this property as well.)
Persons and organizations associated with this garden include: Mr. and Mrs. William A. Prime (former owners, 1911); Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Hutton (former owners, 1921-ca.1940); Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Davies (former owners); (Marian Coffin (landscape architect, 1921-1929); Charles M. Hart (architect, 1921); Hart & Shape (architects); and Long Island University, C.W. Post College (owners, 1947-present).
Earliest slides are taken from published sources.
Related Materials:
Hillwood related holdings consist of 3 folders (20 35 mm. slides)
Another repository of images (23) of this garden is the Richard E. Ballard Collection at Winterthur Museum, Delaware.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Brookville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY460
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref27001

Laurel Hollow (Syosset) -- Crocker Garden

Former owner:
Crocker, Chester A. (Chester Arthur)  Search this
Owner:
Crocker, Saone, 1943-2017  Search this
Landscape architect:
Stege, Friede R.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Crocker Garden (Laurel Hollow, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Nassau County -- Oyster Bay -- Syosset
Scope and Contents:
The folders include work sheets, a plant list for the herb garden, and a page from a 1968 magazine article featuring images of the garden.
General:
Laurel Harbor was the home of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Crocker. Friede Stege designed the gardens, which included an extensive herb garden, greenhouse, and outdoor living areas.
Persons and organizations associated with the property include: Mr. and Mrs. Arthur and Saone Crocker (former owners) and Friede Stege (landscape architect).
Related Materials:
Laurel Harbor related holdings consist of 2 folders (3 35 mm. slides; 3 transparencies; 27 photoprints; 41 negatives)
See others in:
Maida Babson Adams American Garden Collection, ca. 1960-1994.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Syosset  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY497
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref27003

Laurel Hollow (Syosset) -- Crocker Garden

Owner:
Crocker, Chester A. (Chester Arthur)  Search this
Crocker, Saone, 1943-2017  Search this
Landscape architect:
Stege, Friede R.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Adams, Molly, 1918-2003  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Crocker Garden (Laurel Hollow, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Nassau County -- Oyster Bay -- Syosset
Scope and Contents:
Holdings consist of 2 folders (3 35 mm. slides; 3 transparencies; 27 photoprints; 41 negatives). The folders include work sheets, a plant list for the herb garden, and a page from a 1968 magazine article featuring images of the garden.
General:
Friede Stege designed the gardens of Mr. and Mrs. Chester Authur ('Chet') Crocker, which included an extensive herb garden, greenhouse, and outdoor living areas.
Persons and organizations associated with the property include: Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Crocker (former owners) and Friede Stege (landscape architect).
See others in:
Garden Club of America Collection, ca. 1920-[ongoing].
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Syosset  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Maida Babson Adams American garden collection.
Identifier:
AAG.ADM, File NY497
See more items in:
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection / Series 1: Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-adm-ref1414

Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection

Topic:
Landscape architecture
Creator:
Sears, Thomas Warren, 1880-1966  Search this
Sears & Wendell  Search this
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Donor:
Tibbetts, Eleanor Sears  Search this
Tibbetts, Eleanor Sears  Search this
Extent:
44.5 Cubic feet (4,317 glass negatives. 363 film negatives. 182 glass lantern slides. 12 photograph albums. 56 plans and drawings. 3 monographs. )
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Blueprints
Albums
Plans (drawings)
Lantern slides
Date:
1899-1964
Summary:
The Thomas Warren Sears Photograph Collection documents examples of the design work of Thomas Warren Sears (1880-1966), a landscape architect and amateur photographer from Brookline, Massachusetts. Sears, who was based for most of his career in Philadelphia, designed a variety of different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments located primarily in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. In addition to some of Sears' design work, images in the collection document Sears' domestic and foreign travels, design inspirations, and family. The collection includes over 4,800 black and white negatives and glass lantern slides dated circa 1899 to 1930. While most images show private and public gardens, there are a significant number of unidentified views and views photographed in Europe during two trips he took there in 1906 and 1908. Few images are captioned or dated. In addition, there are over 50 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and 3 monographs by or about Sears.
Scope and Contents note:
The Thomas Warren Sears Photograph Collection documents examples of the design work of Thomas Warren Sears (1880-1966), a landscape architect and amateur photographer from Brookline, Massachusetts. Sears, who was based for most of his career in Philadelphia, designed a variety of different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments located primarily in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. In addition to some of Sears' design work, images in the collection document Sears' domestic and foreign travels, design inspirations, and family. The collection includes over 4,800 black and white negatives and glass lantern slides dated circa 1899 to 1930. While most images show private and public gardens, there are a significant number of unidentified views and views photographed in Europe during two trips he took there in 1906 and 1908. Few images are captioned or dated. In addition, there are over 50 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and monographs by or about Sears. Several of the glass lantern slides are duplicates of glass plate negatives in the collection. They apparently were chosen by Sears to illustrate some of his best design work, perhaps for lecture or client purposes.

In addition, there are 56 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. They range in date from 1917 to 1937 and from 1955 to 1964. Sears photographed some of his early plans; they are included in with the photographic images. Sears also photographed a handful of design plans by landscape architect Sibley Coslett Smith who practiced in Providence, Rhode Island; Sears and Smith shared the same business address there.

The Thomas Warren Sears Collection does not fully document the extent of Sears' design work. The use of glass plate negatives—which make up the bulk of the Thomas Warren Sears Collection—as a photography medium waned sometime during the first quarter of the twentieth century. As a result, the images in the Sears Collection capture examples of Sears' early to mid-career design work but they do not include jobs designed by Sears during the latter half of his design career.
Arrangement note:
The glass plate negatives were originally housed in numerous cardboard boxes manufactured for the sale of undeveloped glass plate negatives. Sears annotated the outside of the boxes with project or client names and/or locations, but the contents do not always match these labels. In addition, because very few of the glass plate negatives and lantern slides were labeled or captioned, it is not always evident where one job ended and another began if multiple projects were stored in the same carton. As a result, there are many instances in the Sears Collection where images have been inadvertently mislabeled because their identification is not apparent. Misidentified images are subject to correction as their proper identification is discovered. Each project has been assigned its own unique AAG job number based on its geographic origin. Those groups of images that have not been identified as to their location have been assigned a project number starting with 'SRS.' The collection is arranged into 3 series: 1) Photographic images (including glass plate negatives, film negatives, glass lantern slides, and photograph albums) 2) Plans and Drawings 3) Monographs
Biographical/Historical note:
Thomas Warren Sears was born in 1880 in Brookline, Massachusetts. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University in 1903 and Bachelor of Science degree in landscape architecture from the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard in 1906. Sears was an amateur photographer who won awards for his photography while at Harvard. In 1915 his images were published in the monograph, Parish Churches of England. After graduation he worked for the firm of Olmsted Brothers Landscape Architects for two years and then briefly practiced in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1913, Sears established a landscape design office in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where he spent the remainder of his professional career. Sears at one point was in a professional partnership; some of his design plans list the firm name of Sears and Wendell. He was made a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects in 1921.

Sears designed many different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments. His designs were primarily located in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. Just a few of his private landscapes include Marengo in Easton, Maryland; Sunnybrook, the Isaac H. Clothier, Jr. estate in Radnor, Pennsylvania; and Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland. In 1915, Sears started work on Reynolda, a country estate in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He generated design plans for the property intermittently over the next two decades. Reynolda's formal gardens, greenhouses, and acres of fields and woodlands subsequently became part of Wake Forest University.

During World War I, Sears designed Army camps in Battle Creek, Michigan and Spartanburg, South Carolina. He also helped lay out Langley Field, at that time an experimental aviation field in Hampton Roads, Virginia. In the 1940s, Sears designed the amphitheater at Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania for concerts, outdoor performances, and other special events. During that decade he also worked on Colonial Revival gardens at Pennsbury, William Penn's country estate in Bucks County, Pennsylvania located by the Delaware River. Sears retired in 1964 and died in 1966.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Philadelphia Architects and Buildings Project (PAB), administered by The Athenaeum of Philadelphia, includes references to design projects by Sears.

Harvard University's Loeb Library includes a number of images by Sears, some of them documenting gardens that he designed.

Harvard University's Fine Arts Library, Special Collections includes a collection of photographs and negatives of English parish churches by Sears, c. 1908. Some of the images were published in the monograph, Parish Churches of England.

The Reynolda House Museum of American Art in Winston-Salem, North Carolina includes plans by Sears of Reynolda in its Estate Archives.
Provenance:
Gift of Eleanor Sears Tibbetts, Sears' daughter, to the Horticulture Services Division (later Smithsonian Gardens) in 1992.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
For information or study purposes only. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Photographers  Search this
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Genre/Form:
Negatives
Blueprints
Albums
Plans (drawings)
Lantern slides
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection.
Identifier:
AAG.SRS
See more items in:
Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-srs
Online Media:

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