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William Lyman Phillips photograph collection

Creator:
Phillips, William Lyman, d. 1966  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet (1 box., 30 glass negatives and 2 glass autochromes., 3 x 4 inches.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Positives (photographs)
Negatives
Date:
circa 1920s-1940s
Summary:
The William Lyman Phillips Collection includes thirty glass negatives and two glass autochromes showing a sampling of gardens presumably designed by landscape architect William Lyman Phillips. The gardens are located in Massachusetts, Florida and unidentified locations.
Arrangement note:
Images believed to be from Massachusetts are indicated in their catalog records as being from Unidentified Garden in Massachusetts, No. 1, in order to differentiate them from other unidentified Massachusetts images in the AAG collections. The unidentified Massachusetts slides in this series are likely from multiple sites.
Biographical/Historical note:
William Lyman Phillips (d. 1966) was a landscape architect credited with popularizing the use of tropical and subtropical plants in landscape design. His most famous project was the design of the Fairchild Tropical Garden in Coral Gables, Florida. Phillips studied at Harvard, graduating cum laude in 1910, and the next year joined the Olmsted Brothers firm. He worked in Canada and New York, and laid out the townships of Balboa and San Miguel Ellende in the Panama Canal Zone. He designed many estates and parks for the Olmsted firm and traveled to Europe to study villas and gardens. During World War I, Phillips built cantonments in the United States for the U. S. Army Quartermaster Corps. He was later in charge of landscaping American military cemeteries in France, after which he returned to the United States to work once again with the Olmsted firm.

In 1923 Phillips took charge of the Olmsted Brothers' projects of Bok Tower Gardens and the adjacent Mountain Lake Colony in Lake Wales, Florida. In 1929 he was hired to site the house and gardens for Charles Austin Buck, the president of Bethlehem Steel. The estate, "El Retiro," now called Pinewood, was in the Mountain Lake Colony. Phillips collaborated with the architect, Charles Wait, on the Buck estate until 1932. Phillips worked for the Civilian Conservation Corps in Dade County, Florida, supervising the construction of several state parks, and he designed the Dade County parks. In 1936, while Phillips was working with the Civilian Conservation Corps, he was hired by Robert H. Montgomery to design the Fairchild Tropical Garden.
Related Archival Materials:
Materials relating to Olmsted Brothers' projects that Phillips worked on are at the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site in Brookline, Massachusetts.
Provenance:
Images donated by Faith Reyher Jackson, biographer of William Lyman Phillips, 1997.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Tropical plants  Search this
Gardens -- Massachusetts  Search this
Gardens -- Florida  Search this
Plants  Search this
Landscape architecture  Search this
Flowers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Positives (photographs)
Negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, William Lyman Phillips photograph collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WLP
See more items in:
William Lyman Phillips photograph collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-wlp
Online Media:

Perry H. Wheeler collection

Creator:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Names:
Arlington National Cemetery (Arlington, Va.)  Search this
National Arboretum (U.S.)  Search this
Washington National Cathedral (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Bonnet, Henri, Ambassador  Search this
Bonnet, Henri, Madam  Search this
Estes, Billie Sol  Search this
Harriman, Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward, 1920-1997  Search this
Johnson, Lady Bird, 1912-  Search this
Mellon, Paul  Search this
Mellon, Paul, Mrs.  Search this
Mesta, Perle Skirvin, 1889-1975  Search this
Onassis, Jacqueline Kennedy, 1929-1994  Search this
Palmer, Bertha Honoré, 1849-1918  Search this
Truman, Margaret  Search this
Extent:
25.75 Cubic feet
3,958 photographic items
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lists
Awards
Certificates
Invoices
Negatives
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographs
Invitations
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Plans (drawings)
Place:
Canada
White House (Washington, D.C.)
Africa
Europe
Caribbean
South America
West (U.S.)
Georgetown (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1880-1984
bulk 1950-1965
Summary:
The Perry H. Wheeler Collection includes the design, client and business records of Perry H. Wheeler, a landscape architect best known for his work on numerous townhouse gardens in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C., during the 1960s as well as the redesign of the White House Rose Garden in collaboration with Rachel Lambert ('Bunny') Mellon during the Kennedy administration.
Scope and Contents note:
The Perry H. Wheeler Collection includes the design, client and business records of Perry H. Wheeler, a landscape architect best known for his work on numerous townhouse gardens in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. during the 1960s as well as the redesign of the White House Rose Garen in collaboration with Rachel ('Bunny') Lambert Mellon during the Kennedy adminstration. The collection includes photographic images, plans, drawings, client correspondence, plant lists, invoices, newspaper and magazine clippings, certificates, awards, and invitations. The bulk of the collection and most of the professional papers date from about 1950 to 1965 and relate to various garden design projects by Wheeler, many of them located in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Of particular note are documents for Wheeler's public design work including the White House grounds, Washington National Cathedral, U. S. National Arboretum, President John F. Kennedy's gravesite in Arlington National Cemetery, and the British and Cambodian Embassies in Washington, D.C. Noteworthy correspondents include President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy, Ladybird Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, and Margaret Truman.

There are also over 3,000 35mm slides dating from the 1950s and 1960s that document Wheeler's personal travels to Europe, Africa, South America, the Caribbean, Canada, and the American West.
Biographical/Historical note:
Perry Hunt Wheeler (1913-1989), a Georgia native, began his higher education at Emory University, going on to graduate from the University of Georgia with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1937. Immediately afterward Wheeler enrolled in Harvard University from which he earned a graduate degree in Landscape Architecture in 1938. After graduation, Wheeler collaborated on garden projects in Atlanta, Georgia with fellow landscape architect Helen Hawkins Clarke. During World War II, Wheeler moved to Washington, D.C. to serve under the Office of Civilian Defense and the Office of Strategic Services Camouflage Division. Following the war, Wheeler worked at Garden House a Georgetown shop where he advised homeowners on tasteful garden design, accessories, and furnishings. By 1948 Wheeler had established a landscape architecture practice in Washington, D.C. His practice grew via word of mouth through Washington's social circles and through a shared office with landscape architect Rose Ishbel Greely, and later with architect Gertrude Sawyer.

In 1947, he formed a 'bachelor household' in Georgetown with James Snitzler. Later, at the invitation of Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon, he and Snitzler created a second home outside of Washington called "Spring Hill" on property owned by Mellon. Shortly after Snitzler's death in 1968, Wheeler moved permanently to Middleburg, Virginia and continued to travel, lecture, and consult with clients. Wheeler semi-retired in 1981 to 'Budfield,' a property in Rectortown, Virginia where he passed away in 1989, leaving his estate to his partner, James M. Stengle.

Wheeler is best known for his work on private gardens in Washington's Georgetown neighborhood. He frequently employed the use of intricate brickwork, low-maintenance planting, and simple water features in creating his charming and functional designs. His most noteworthy commissions outside the private realm include collaboration with Bunny Mellon on the White House Rose Garden, designing a Garden Club of America-commissioned gazebo and its surroundings for the U.S. National Arboretum, and plantings for the National Cathedral and President John F. Kennedy's gravesite in Arlington National Cemetery.
Provenance:
Gift from the estate of James M. Stengle, 1993.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Presidents -- United States  Search this
Landscape architects  Search this
Presidents' spouses -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lists
Awards
Certificates
Invoices
Negatives
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographs
Invitations
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Plans (drawings)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-whe
Online Media:

Untermyer Family Slide collection

Photographer:
Untermyer, Samuel, II  Search this
Creator:
Lord And Burnham  Search this
Samuel Untermyer Park and Gardens  Search this
Former owner:
Waring, John, b. 1820  Search this
Tilden, Samuel J., 1814-1886  Search this
Untermyer, Samuel, 1858-1940  Search this
Donor:
Untermyer, Frank  Search this
Landscape architect:
Bosworth, Welles, 1869-1966  Search this
Architect:
Freelander, Joseph H., 1870-1943  Search this
Hatch, John Davis  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Cubic feet (119 glass 35mm slides; 1 photographic print (2 1/2 X 3 1/2 in). , 2" x 2")
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
New York (State) -- Yonkers
Greystone (Yonkers, New York)
Date:
circa 1940
Summary:
The Untermyer Family Slide Collection includes 119 glass 35mm slides documenting the grounds of Samuel Untermyer's estate, Greystone. In addition to general garden views, the images depict architectural features, vistas from the property, and interior shots of Greystone's greenhouse. The slides are not captioned or dated. The photographer was Samuel Untermyer II, the grandson of Samuel Untermyer.
Biographical/Historical note:
Samuel Untermyer was born in 1858 in Lynchburg, Virginia, the son of German immigrants. Untermyer was a New York lawyer who began practicing law at 18 and was admitted to the bar in New York in 1879. He established himself as a corporation attorney and became known for corporate mergers and arranging financing for industries and real estate developments. His most famous merger was with Utah Copper Co. and the Nevada Consolidated Companies which created Bethlehem Steel. Untermyer purchased Greystone in 1899 at an auction of the estate of Samuel J. Tilden.

The first owner of Greystone was John Waring, a hat manufacturer, from Yonkers, New York. The house was named Greystone for the grey granite that was quarried nearby and used to construct the house. John Davis Hatch designed the residence.

Samuel J. Tilden, a lawyer and former governor of New York (1874-1876) and unsuccessful Presidential candidate against Rutherford B. Hayes (1876) bought Greystone for a summer residence in 1879. Tilden constructed a large greenhouse complex including a Lord & Burnham greenhouse. Tilden died in 1886 leaving the bulk of his estate to what was later to become the New York Public Library. His two nephews contested the will, and it took ten years to resolve the estate.

Untermyer owned Greystone from 1899-1940. He hired the architect Joseph H. Freelander to remodel the mansion. The estate was 150 acres and famous for its Beaux-Arts gardens designed by William Welles Bosworth. Bosworth's gardens included the Greek Garden; a long staircase, known as the Vista, with a Hudson River view; a rock garden with an overlook called the Eagle's Nest; and an Italian-style vegetable garden constructed as five large terraces. At Untermyer's death in 1940, the estate was divided and sixteen acres donated to the city of Yonkers as "Samuel Untermyer Park and Gardens."
Related Materials:
Three photographic prints of Greystone in the Alfred Branam manuscript.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Yonkers  Search this
Orchids  Search this
Sundials  Search this
Greenhouses  Search this
Rock gardens  Search this
Pergolas  Search this
Rose gardens  Search this
Vista  Search this
Vegetable gardening  Search this
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Untermyer Family Slide Collection
Identifier:
AAG.UNT
See more items in:
Untermyer Family Slide collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-unt
Online Media:

Boris V. Timchenko collection

Creator:
Timchenko, Boris V.  Search this
Boris Timchenko and Associates  Search this
Extent:
3 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Plans (drawings)
Architectural drawings
Correspondence
Diplomas
Application forms
Clippings
Certificates
Brochures
Place:
Watergate Gardens (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1919-1975
Summary:
The Boris V. Timchenko collection includes project files, business records, and personal papers of Boris Timchenko, a modernist landscape architect based in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area known for his work on The Watergate Development and the annual National Capital Flower and Garden Show.
Scope and Contents:
The collection contains the professional files of landscape architect Boris V. Timchenko. These include architectural drawings and photographic prints from landscape design projects; a client list; brochures Timchenko used to promote his firm; and photographic prints showing him at work. There are a few architectural drawings related to his work on The Watergate Development in 1965 and many photographic prints from the National Capital Flower and Garden Show dated 1950-1961. The collection also contains some personal papers, including forms and licenses Timchenko acquired from the Russian and United States governments; certificates from a French university he attended; correspondence; portraits and photographic prints of his leisure activities; and newspaper profiles and obituaries about him. The collection documents only a portion of Timchenko's known professional design work and personal life.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into three series. Series 1: Project Files (arranged alphabetically by state and city). Series 2: Business Records (arranged by format, with Subseries 3: Photographs arranged alphabetically by state and city, then event). Series 3: Personal Papers (arranged by format).
Biographical / Historical:
Boris Timchenko (1898-1975) was a modernist landscape architect based in the Washington, D.C. area. Boris Vladimir Timchenko, who occasionally spelled his last name "Timtchenko" early in his life, was born in Tambov, Russia on October 1, 1898 to Vladimir Peter Timchenko and Nataly Nazarewsky. He lived in Lipetsk, Russia until he attended Moscow University from 1916-1918. From 1918-1920, he served in the White Russian Army but fled to France when Communist Bolsheviks defeated his army. He studied landscape architecture at what he termed a "Horticulture School" (possibly the École Nationale Supérieure d'Horticulture) in Versailles until 1924, and earned a degree in Agricultural Engineering at the École Nationale de Agriculture de Grignon in Grignon, France in 1926. A year later, he emigrated to the United States and worked for a landscape contractor, A. Gude Sons and Company, in Washington, D.C.

Timchenko started his own landscape architecture firm, Boris Timchenko and Associates, in Washington in 1938. Along with his colleague Leonard Bartlett, Jr., Timchenko designed outdoor spaces in the D.C. metropolitan area, Pennsylvania, and coastal Florida. He is perhaps best known as being the landscape architect for The Watergate Development in Washington, D.C. and the consulting designer for the National Capital Flower and Garden Show from 1950 to 1967. He also created private gardens for notable clients such as former First Lady Mamie Eisenhower and the Auchincloss family, owners of Hammersmith Farm in Newport, Rhode Island. Organizations and businesses, such as the International Brotherhood of Teamsters in D.C. and the historic Gadsby's Tavern in Alexandria, Virginia, hired him as well. Timchenko was a member of professional organizations including the American Institute of Landscape Architects (later American Society of Landscape Architects) and the Texas Association of Nurserymen, and he was a founding member of the Russian Orthodox Church of St. Nicholas in D.C. By the time he died in 1975, Timchenko had contributed significantly to the design of D.C.'s urban landscape.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Landscape architecture  Search this
Landscape design  Search this
Flower shows  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Office buildings  Search this
Hotels -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Department stores  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Plans (drawings)
Architectural drawings
Correspondence
Diplomas
Application forms
Clippings
Certificates
Brochures
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Boris V. Timchenko Collection.
Identifier:
AAG.TIM
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-tim

The Garden Club of America collection

Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Names:
New York Flower Show  Search this
Extent:
37,000 Slides (35mm slides)
33 Linear feet ((garden files))
3,000 lantern slides
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Lantern slides
Plans (drawings)
Brochures
Articles
Correspondence
Clippings
Slides (photographs)
Date:
circa 1920-present
Summary:
This collection contains over 37,000 35mm slides, 3,000 glass lantern slides and garden files that may include descriptive information, photocopied articles (from journals, newspapers, or books), planting lists, correspondence, brochures, landscape plans and drawings. Garden files were compiled by Garden Club of America (GCA) members for most of the gardens included in the collection. Some gardens have been photographed over the course of several decades; others only have images from a single point in time. In addition to images of American gardens, there are glass lantern slides of the New York Flower Show (1941-1951) and trips that GCA members took to other countries, including Mexico (1937), Italy, Spain, Japan (1935), France (1936), England (1929), and Scotland.

A number of the slides are copies of historic images from outside repositories including horticultural and historical societies or from horticultural books and publications. The GCA made a concerted effort in the mid-1980s to acquire these images in order to increase its documentation of American garden history. Because of copyright considerations, use of these particular images may be restricted.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Garden Club of America was established in 1913 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, when the Garden Club of Philadelphia and eleven other garden clubs met to create a national garden club. Its purpose is to foster the knowledge and love of gardening and to restore and protect the quality of the environment through educational programs and gardening and conservation efforts. The GCA was incorporated in Delaware in 1923, with its headquarters established in New York City. Today, local clubs are organized under twelve regional zones. The GCA continues its tradition of hosting flower shows and publishing material related to gardening in the United States.

The GCA's glass lantern slides were used by The GCA for presentations and lectures about notable gardens throughout the United States dating back to colonial times. An effort was made in the late 1980s, in preparation of the 75th anniversary of the Garden Club of America's founding, to collect the disbursed slides. These slides were to eventually form the Slide Library of Notable American Parks and Gardens. The informational value of this collection is extensive since a number of images of the more than 4,500 gardens represented show garden designs that have changed over time or no longer exist. While the majority of images document a range of designed upper and upper-middle class gardens throughout the U.S., the scope of the collection is expanding as volunteers photograph and document contemporary gardens including community and vernacular gardens.

The gardens illustrate the design work of dozens of landscape architects including Marian Coffin, Beatrix Farrand, Lawrence Halprin, Hare & Hare, Umberto Innocenti, Gertrude Jekyll, Jens Jensen, Warren Manning, the Olmsted Brothers, Charles Platt, Ellen Biddle Shipman, and Fletcher Steele. Because of their proximity to the gardens, works of notable architects and sculptors may also be featured in the images.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- France  Search this
Gardens -- Italy  Search this
Gardens -- Japan  Search this
Gardens -- Mexico  Search this
Flower shows  Search this
Gardening -- United States -- societies, etc  Search this
Gardens -- England  Search this
Landscape architecture  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Spain  Search this
Gardens -- Scotland  Search this
Genre/Form:
Plans (drawings)
Brochures
Articles
Correspondence
Clippings
Lantern slides
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-gca
Online Media:

Frederic H. Leubuscher slide collection

Landscape architect:
Leubuscher, Frederic  Search this
Photographer:
Costain, Harold Haliday  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet (106 slides, 35mm)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Date:
circa 1930-1940
Summary:
The Frederic H. Leubuscher Collection contains 106 duplicate 35mm slides documenting examples of Leubuscher's landscape architecture design work in New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island and other locations.
Biographical/Historical note:
Landscape architect Frederic H. Leubuscher (1906-1995) studied civil and mechanical engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institution, but his interest in landscape design arose after he created an artificial pool and stream on his father's estate in Essex Fells, NJ. Leubuscher became well-known throughout New England, thanks to his many award-winning exhibits at the International Flower Show and his 6 gold medals from the American Rock Garden Society and the Garden Club of America. He retired from the practice of landscape design in 1945 and went on to design drafting tools for Keuffel and Esser Co.
Provenance:
Donated to the Smithsonian Institution's Horticulture Services Division by Leubuscher's daughter in 2000.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- New York  Search this
Gardens -- New Jersey  Search this
Gardens -- Rhode Island  Search this
Gardens -- North Carolina  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Frederick H. Leubuscher Slide Collection.
Identifier:
AAG.LBR
See more items in:
Frederic H. Leubuscher slide collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-lbr
Online Media:

Mary Riley Smith Records

Extent:
6.75 Cubic feet (design records; plans and drawings)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1986-2013
bulk 1995-2005
Summary:
The Mary Riley Smith Records document the decades-long career of Manhattan-based garden designer, writer, and lecturer Mary Riley Smith. It includes drawings, plans, planting lists, notes, correspondence, invoices, estimates, 35 mm slides, negatives, photographs, digital files on CDs, and other materials relating to many of Smith's garden design projects, dating from 1986-2013.
Scope and Contents Note:
The Mary Riley Smith Records document the decades-long career of Manhattan-based garden designer, writer, and lecturer Mary Riley Smith. It includes drawings, plans, planting lists, notes, correspondence, invoices, estimates, 35 mm slides, negatives, photographs, digital files on CDs, and other materials relating to many of Smith's garden design projects, dating from 1986-2013. The bulk of Smith's projects were private, residential gardens of all sizes in urban, suburban, and rural areas in Manhattan, Long Island, and Connecticut. One such project included in the collection is Smith's own garden that she designed for her home on Long Island, New York. Other projects Smith worked on include gardens for apartment buildings, libraries, colleges, religious institutions, and social clubs. Her public commissions include the Battery Park entrance gardens, Lincoln Square Business Improvement District, Rockefeller Center, and Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, all in Manhattan. A significant portion of the materials are textual in nature; the remainder are drawings and plans, many of which are oversized.

The client files document design decisions made between Smith and her clients. The collection records the collaborative work between Smith, landscape architects, contractors, and other individuals who helped build the gardens. These materials detail the process of planning the garden, outlining the work to be done, establishing a budget, providing estimates, and setting a schedule to complete the work. While the bulk of the materials relate to Smith's design projects, the collection also contains materials from her professional practice. These include clipping files, 35mm slides, photographs, drawings, plans, and notes from lectures and presentations given by Smith. Also included are two copies of Smith's book that was published in 1991, The Front Garden: New Approaches to Landscape Design.
Arrangement Note:
The collection is organized in series according to the type of garden as designated by Mary Riley Smith: Series 1: Urban Residential Series 2: Suburban/Rural Residential Series 3: Apartment Buildings Series 4: Clubs and Non-Profits Series 5: Business Improvement Districts Series 6: Corporations Within each garden type, the files are arranged geographically by state and city.
Biographical Note:
Garden designer Mary Riley Smith grew up in a family of gardeners and developed an affinity for gardens at an early age. After studying horticulture and garden design at the New York Botanical Garden she began her own landscape design firm, Mary Riley Smith Garden Design Inc., in the early 1990s. During her professional career Smith designed and implemented several types of gardens, though the majority were private and residential. Her projects are located in Manhattan, the greater New York area, Long Island, and Connecticut. The private gardens are found in a variety of settings including urban, suburban, and rural. In addition to private gardens, Smith designed and coordinated the installation of sidewalk, terrace, and courtyard gardens for a number of co-op buildings in Manhattan. Smith designed a number of public gardens and spaces including planting beds at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in Manhattan where she undertook design work and supervised installation for twenty years. She also worked in Manhattan on other public, corporate, college, religious institution, and social club gardens. Smith collaborated with landscape architects Donna Gutkin and Alessandra Galletti on some of her garden designs. She worked with numerous contractors and other individuals to complete her projects. Throughout her decades-long career, she designed and completed more than 80 projects.

In addition to her work as a landscape designer, Smith has also written and lectured on the subject. Her book, The Front Garden: New Approaches to Landscape Design, was published in 1991. She has written articles for various periodicals including Garden Design, Countryside, BBG Garden Record, and Long Island Monthly. Smith has taught and lectured on the subject of garden design to various gardening and horticultural groups at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum and New York Botanical Garden. Smith's garden designs, including her own, have been featured in Traditional Home, Better Homes and Gardens, House Beautiful, The New Yorker, and Garden Design.
Provenance:
Mary Riley Smith donated her collection of garden design records to the Archives of American Gardens in 2014.
Restrictions:
Access to original materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
For information or study purposes only. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Mary Riley Smith Records
Identifier:
AAG.MRS
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-mrs

Lois W. Poinier slide collection

Landscape architect:
Wodell, Helen Page  Search this
Cottrell, Lois Page  Search this
Poinier, Lois W.  Search this
Extent:
154 lantern slides
1 Album
2,243 color slides
2.25 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Albums
Color slides
Slides (photographs)
Date:
circa 1920-1999
Summary:
The Lois W. Poinier Collection documents the work of Lois W. Poinier, a self-taught garden designer who designed scores of gardens, most of them in New Jersey.
Scope and Contents note:
The Lois W. Poinier Collection contains 1,089 35mm slides documenting before-and-after images of almost 100 gardens designed by garden designer and Garden Club of America member Lois W. Poinier of New Jersey. Most gardens are located in New Jersey, but there are some in California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. The collection includes some gardens designed by Poinier's mother, Helen Page Wodell, and aunt, Lois Page Cottrell, who practiced under the firm name of Wodell & Cottrell. The collection is particularly helpful as it shows the evolution of gardens under construction and in their 'finished' state.

The collection also includes an album of images documenting gardens owned by Lois W. Poinier and her mother, Helen Page Wodell in New Jersey and Connecticut as well as an extensive slide lecture and script compiled by Poinier entitled "Ninety Years in a Garden" that documents the story and evolution of three of those gardens in New Jersey. Another series of glass lantern slides of numerous gardens dating from the 1920s and 1930s was used extensively for garden lecture purposes by both women. Finally, there are images by Lois W. Poinier of numerous private and public gardens throughout the United States and the United Kingdom that she visited.
Biographical/Historical note:
Lois W. Poinier is a self-taught garden designer who began her career in association with her mother, Helen Page Wodell. Wodell, along with her sister, Lois Page Cottrell, had established the garden design firm of Wodell & Cottrell, in Short Hills, New Jersey in 1931. The majority of Lois W. Poinier's design work was in New Jersey. Mrs. Poinier is a member of the Garden Club of America.
Provenance:
Lois W. Poinier donated materials to the Archives of American Gardens in 2003, 2011, 2012, and 2014. The 2003 donation was facilited by Catha Rambusch of Wave Hill in Bronx, NY.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Landscape gardening  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Rhode Island  Search this
Gardens -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Gardens -- New York  Search this
Gardens -- New Jersey  Search this
Gardens -- Massachusetts  Search this
Gardens -- Connecticut  Search this
Gardens -- California  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Lois W. Poinier slide collection.
Identifier:
AAG.PNR
See more items in:
Lois W. Poinier slide collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-pnr
Online Media:

Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection

Topic:
Landscape architecture
Creator:
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Sears, Thomas Warren, 1880-1966  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Donor:
Tibbetts, Eleanor Sears  Search this
Tibbetts, Eleanor Sears  Search this
Extent:
44.5 Cubic feet (4,317 glass negatives. 363 film negatives. 182 glass lantern slides. 12 photograph albums. 56 plans and drawings. 3 monographs. )
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Blueprints
Albums
Plans (drawings)
Lantern slides
Date:
1899-1964
Summary:
The Thomas Warren Sears Photograph Collection documents examples of the design work of Thomas Warren Sears (1880-1966), a landscape architect and amateur photographer from Brookline, Massachusetts. Sears, who was based for most of his career in Philadelphia, designed a variety of different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments located primarily in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. In addition to some of Sears' design work, images in the collection document Sears' domestic and foreign travels, design inspirations, and family. The collection includes over 4,800 black and white negatives and glass lantern slides dated circa 1899 to 1930. While most images show private and public gardens, there are a significant number of unidentified views and views photographed in Europe during two trips he took there in 1906 and 1908. Few images are captioned or dated. In addition, there are over 50 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and 3 monographs by or about Sears.
Scope and Contents note:
The Thomas Warren Sears Photograph Collection documents examples of the design work of Thomas Warren Sears (1880-1966), a landscape architect and amateur photographer from Brookline, Massachusetts. Sears, who was based for most of his career in Philadelphia, designed a variety of different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments located primarily in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. In addition to some of Sears' design work, images in the collection document Sears' domestic and foreign travels, design inspirations, and family. The collection includes over 4,800 black and white negatives and glass lantern slides dated circa 1899 to 1930. While most images show private and public gardens, there are a significant number of unidentified views and views photographed in Europe during two trips he took there in 1906 and 1908. Few images are captioned or dated. In addition, there are over 50 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and monographs by or about Sears. Several of the glass lantern slides are duplicates of glass plate negatives in the collection. They apparently were chosen by Sears to illustrate some of his best design work, perhaps for lecture or client purposes.

In addition, there are 56 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. They range in date from 1917 to 1937 and from 1955 to 1964. Sears photographed some of his early plans; they are included in with the photographic images. Sears also photographed a handful of design plans by landscape architect Sibley Coslett Smith who practiced in Providence, Rhode Island; Sears and Smith shared the same business address there.

The Thomas Warren Sears Collection does not fully document the extent of Sears' design work. The use of glass plate negatives—which make up the bulk of the Thomas Warren Sears Collection—as a photography medium waned sometime during the first quarter of the twentieth century. As a result, the images in the Sears Collection capture examples of Sears' early to mid-career design work but they do not include jobs designed by Sears during the latter half of his design career.
Arrangement note:
The glass plate negatives were originally housed in numerous cardboard boxes manufactured for the sale of undeveloped glass plate negatives. Sears annotated the outside of the boxes with project or client names and/or locations, but the contents do not always match these labels. In addition, because very few of the glass plate negatives and lantern slides were labeled or captioned, it is not always evident where one job ended and another began if multiple projects were stored in the same carton. As a result, there are many instances in the Sears Collection where images have been inadvertently mislabeled because their identification is not apparent. Misidentified images are subject to correction as their proper identification is discovered. Each project has been assigned its own unique AAG job number based on its geographic origin. Those groups of images that have not been identified as to their location have been assigned a project number starting with 'SRS.' The collection is arranged into 3 series: 1) Photographic images (including glass plate negatives, film negatives, glass lantern slides, and photograph albums) 2) Plans and Drawings 3) Monographs
Biographical/Historical note:
Thomas Warren Sears was born in 1880 in Brookline, Massachusetts. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University in 1903 and Bachelor of Science degree in landscape architecture from the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard in 1906. Sears was an amateur photographer who won awards for his photography while at Harvard. In 1915 his images were published in the monograph, Parish Churches of England. After graduation he worked for the firm of Olmsted Brothers Landscape Architects for two years and then briefly practiced in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1913, Sears established a landscape design office in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where he spent the remainder of his professional career. Sears at one point was in a professional partnership; some of his design plans list the firm name of Sears and Wendell. He was made a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects in 1921.

Sears designed many different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments. His designs were primarily located in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. Just a few of his private landscapes include Marengo in Easton, Maryland; Sunnybrook, the Isaac H. Clothier, Jr. estate in Radnor, Pennsylvania; and Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland. In 1915, Sears started work on Reynolda, a country estate in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He generated design plans for the property intermittently over the next two decades. Reynolda's formal gardens, greenhouses, and acres of fields and woodlands subsequently became part of Wake Forest University.

During World War I, Sears designed Army camps in Battle Creek, Michigan and Spartanburg, South Carolina. He also helped lay out Langley Field, at that time an experimental aviation field in Hampton Roads, Virginia. In the 1940s, Sears designed the amphitheater at Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania for concerts, outdoor performances, and other special events. During that decade he also worked on Colonial Revival gardens at Pennsbury, William Penn's country estate in Bucks County, Pennsylvania located by the Delaware River. Sears retired in 1964 and died in 1966.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Philadelphia Architects and Buildings Project (PAB), administered by The Athenaeum of Philadelphia, includes references to design projects by Sears.

Harvard University's Loeb Library includes a number of images by Sears, some of them documenting gardens that he designed.

Harvard University's Fine Arts Library, Special Collections includes a collection of photographs and negatives of English parish churches by Sears, c. 1908. Some of the images were published in the monograph, Parish Churches of England.

The Reynolda House Museum of American Art in Winston-Salem, North Carolina includes plans by Sears of Reynolda in its Estate Archives.
Provenance:
Gift of Eleanor Sears Tibbetts, Sears' daughter, to the Horticulture Services Division (later Smithsonian Gardens) in 1992.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
For information or study purposes only. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Photographers  Search this
Landscape architects  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Switzerland  Search this
Gardens -- Scotland  Search this
Gardens -- Italy  Search this
Gardens -- Germany  Search this
Gardens -- France  Search this
Gardens -- England  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Blueprints
Albums
Plans (drawings)
Lantern slides
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection.
Identifier:
AAG.SRS
See more items in:
Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-srs
Online Media:

The Gertrude Farrington diaries

Creator:
Farrington, Gertrude  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet (3 diaries)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Date:
1977-1992
Content Description:
This collection contains three 5-year diaries kept by Ridgefield Garden Club member Gertrude Farrington from 1978 to 1992.
Topic:
Gardens -- Connecticut  Search this
Women gardeners  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Identifier:
AAG.GCA.FAR
See more items in:
The Gertrude Farrington diaries
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-gca-far
4 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View The Gertrude Farrington diaries digital asset number 1
  • View The Gertrude Farrington diaries digital asset number 2
  • View The Gertrude Farrington diaries digital asset number 3
  • View The Gertrude Farrington diaries digital asset number 4
Online Media:

Robert M. Fletcher slide collection

Creator:
Fletcher, Robert M., d. 1995  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Cubic feet (268 35mm slides., color, 35mm)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Date:
circa 1979-1995
Summary:
The Robert M. Fletcher Collection contains 268 35mm color slides documenting Southern California gardens designed by landscape architect Robert M. Fletcher.
Biographical/Historical note:
Robert M. Fletcher (d. 1995) was a landscape architect who specialized in private gardens in Southern California. Born in Los Angeles, Fletcher received his B.A. in landscape architecture from UC-Berkeley in 1977 and established his residential practice later that year. He taught at the UCLA Extension Program Department of Arts from 1981-1985. As a member of the American Horticultural Society, Southern California Horticultural Society, The National Trust and the California Historical Society, Fletcher was also a speaker at many symposiums and professional meetings. His gardens were featured in numerous journals, including House and Garden, Sunset Magazine, Elle Decor and the Los Angeles Times Magazine. In addition to his residential projects, Fletcher's commercial projects included the Ingram Paper headquarters and warehouse, City of Industry; Henry Company headquarters, Huntington Park; R.J. Plaza Building, Sherman Oaks; Plaza Hermosa, Hermosa Beach; Martin Luther King, Jr. Shopping Center, Watts; Manhattan Village Medical Building, Manhattan Beach; San Julian S.R.O., Los Angeles; The Beach Club, Santa Monica; St. Martin of Tours Church and Elementary School, Brentwood; Mark Taper Building, Reseda; and Westwood Place, Westwood.
Provenance:
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Burton L. Fletcher, parents of Robert M. Fletcher. Donation faciliated by the Garden Club of America.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Seaside gardening  Search this
Xeriscaping  Search this
Landscape architecture  Search this
Gardens, Japanese  Search this
Gardens -- California, Southern  Search this
Gardens -- California  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Robert M. Fletcher slide collection.
Identifier:
AAG.FLE
See more items in:
Robert M. Fletcher slide collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-fle
Online Media:

Rudy J. Favretti collection

Creator:
Favretti, Rudy J.  Search this
Extent:
31.5 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Invoices
Research
Contracts
Reports
Pamphlets
Slides (photographs)
Date:
circa 1950-2010
Summary:
The collection contains the project design records of Rudy J. Favretti. , a landscape architect and professor noted for his extensive work in historical restoration of gardens, parks, and landscapes. He donated his collection of garden design files, plans, and images to the Smithsonian's Archives of American Gardens in March 2011.
Scope and Content Note:
The collection contains the records of landscape architect Rudy J. Favretti and includes correspondence, research notes, reports, drawings, plans (some from other engineering or design firms), photographic images, contracts, invoices, newspaper clippings, copies of historic records and other items relating to Professor Favretti's professional design work. His projects range from small private gardens to extensive garden restorations of eighteenth and nineteenth century gardens, parks, and historic sites. Professor Favretti also worked on a number of civic improvement and land use projects like parks and roadways. The majority of projects are located in New England (particularly Connecticut), the mid-Atlantic states and the southeastern United States. The collection also includes Professor Favretti's research files for his biography on landscape architect Jacob Weidenmann as well as numerous brochures and pamphlets he gathered during trips he took to gardens across the United States, and 35mm slides he took of some of these sites.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged into 4 series: Series 1: Project Files; Series 2: Administrative Files; Series 3: Jacob Weidenmann Research and Biography Filesand Biography Files; Series 4: Visited Gardens
Biographical Note:
Rudy J. Favretti was born in Mystic, Connecticut in 1932. He obtained degrees from the University of Connecticut, Cornell University, and the University of Massachusetts. Favretti holds Bachelor's degrees in horticulture, landscape design, and landscape architecture, as well as Master's degrees in ornamental horticulture, landscape architecture, and regional planning. Professor Favretti taught landscape architecture at the University of Connecticut from 1955 to 1988. Since 1988 he has been Professor Emeritus at the University of Connecticut specializing in landscape history and preservation. He has also been a visiting professor at the University of Virginia, Columbia University, and a Visiting Faculty Fellow at Yale University. In his professional career, Rudy Favretti worked on over 700 commissioned individual and collaborative design, master planning, and preservation projects. These works include notable sites such as Bartram's Garden in Philadelphia, Monticello and Mount Vernon in Virginia, the Emily Dickinson House in Massachusetts, and the Vanderbilt Estate in New York. Favretti has authored more than 20 books and monographs and over 60 journal and magazine articles on a vast range of topics though most notably on historic landscape restoration and colonial gardens He co-authored For Every House a Garden (1977) and Landscapes and Garden for Historic Buildings (1978) with his wife Joy P. Favretti. His most recent work, Jacob Wiedenmann: Pioneer Landscape Architect (2007), is a biography of the nineteenth century landscape architect.

Professor Favretti is a member of several professional and academic societies including the American Society of Landscape Architects, the National Association for Olmsted Parks, and Phi Kappa Phi. He has been awarded honors in landscape preservation by the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Garden Club of America. He is currently a member of the National Register Review Board for Connecticut and the Director of the Connecticut Olmsted Alliance. He served as the consulting landscape architect for the Garden Club of Virginia from 1978 to 1998. The Garden Club of Virginia established the Rudy J. Favretti Fellowship in his honor to support the research and documentation of historic Virginia gardens.
Related Materials:
The Rudy Favretti Papers are available at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center of the University of Connecticut. These include landscape plans dated 1962-1979 for numerous public spaces throughout Connecticut.
Provenance:
The records and files were generated and/or compiled by Rudy J. Favretti in the course of his landscape design, landscape restoration, and academic work.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
For information or study purposes only. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Monuments  Search this
Museums  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Historic sites  Search this
Horticulture  Search this
Memorials  Search this
Landscape architecture  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Invoices
Research
Contracts
Reports
Pamphlets
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Rudy J. Favretti CollectionPapers.
Identifier:
AAG.FAV
See more items in:
Rudy J. Favretti collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-fav
Online Media:

Archives of American Gardens Biographical Information vertical file

Extent:
10.5 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1920-
Summary:
The Archives of American Gardens biographical information vertical file contains biographical material on numerous landscape architects, garden designers and horticulturists compiled from various published sources.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Landscape architects  Search this
Horticulturists  Search this
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Archives of American Gardens Biographical Information vertical file.
Identifier:
AAG.BIO
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-bio

Maida Babson Adams American garden collection

Creator:
Adams, Molly, 1918-2003  Search this
Landscape architect:
Ireys, Alice Recknagel, 1911-2000  Search this
Stege, Friede  Search this
Weber, Nelva M.  Search this
Extent:
0 Photographic prints (color, 4 x 6 inches)
0 Photographic prints (black and white, 3 1/2 x 5 inches)
0 Photographic prints (black and white, 8 x 10 inches)
0 contact sheets (black and white)
35mm slides (photographs) (color, 2 x 2 inches)
0 Negatives (35mm negatives, color)
0 Negatives (black & white, 4 x 5 inches)
0 Negatives (120mm negatives, black and white, 2 x 2 inches)
0 film transparency (color, 4 x 5 inches)
0 Transparencies (120mm transparencies, color, 2 x 2 inches)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Contact sheets
Negatives
Film transparency
Transparencies
Film transparencies
Color negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Photographs
Color photographs
Slides (photographs)
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
circa 1960-1994
Summary:
The Maida Babson Adams American Garden Collection documents the work of Molly Adams, a free-lance garden photographer who photographed hundreds of private and public gardens, many of them in the mid-Atlantic region, from the late 1950s through the mid-1990s. It includes slides, photographic prints, negatives and transparencies. A significant number of images document the work of landscape designers Nelva M. Weber, Alice Recknagel Ireys, and Friede Stege. Roughly 50 gardens do not have an identified location. Some images have captions and other information written on them.
Scope and Contents:
The Maida Babson Adams American Gardens Collection includes a total of 7,606 images documenting close to 400 gardens photographed by Molly Adams from the 1950s to the 1990s. Although most images document gardens in New Jersey, the collection also includes gardens in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania. While the vast majority of gardens in the collection are private, there are also some public gardens and venues like the Frelinghuysen Arboretum in New Jersey, the International Flower Show in New York City, and the White House in Washington, D.C. A number of gardens were photographed during organized garden or horticultural tours or annual meetings of the Garden Club of America. A significant number of images document the work of landscape designers Alice Ireys, Nelva Weber, and Friede Stege. Approximately 85 gardens in the collection are unidentified as to their location and/or client. Relatively few images are captioned or dated; Adams often labeled a film envelope or back of a photograph or contact sheet with just a client surname and the designer (if it was Ireys, Weber, or Stege). In some cases, additional information about a garden's location or owner's full name was gleaned from the finding aids for the Alice Recknagel Ireys Papers or the Nelva Weber Papers. Some images were accompanied by clippings from newspapers or magazines that featured one or more related images by Adams; most of these clippings date from the 1950s and 1960s. There is also a file of general clippings of Adams' work; many of these do not identify the garden that is shown.

Most of the images are black and white, though there are a number taken in color. Adams' contact sheets and photo envelopes were sometimes marked with cropping marks or photo developing notes respectively.
Biographical / Historical:
Molly (Maida Babson) Adams (1918 - 2003) had a 40+ year career as a nationally recognized free-lance garden and wildlife photographer and conservationist. Her images were published under the name "Molly Adams." Adams was born in Orange, New Jersey and lived over fifty years in Mendham Township, New Jersey. As a teenager she became interested in photography; she later attended the New York Institute of Photography and became a member of the New York Camera Club.

Her photographs were featured in numerous newspapers and magazines including the "New York Times," "New York Herald Tribune," "House Beautiful," "Horticulture," "Home Garden," and "Audubon." During the Kennedy administration, she photographed the White House Rose Garden; these photographs were later published in "Flower Grower."

Adams provided hundreds of photographs for "How to Plan and Plant Your Own Property" (1967) by landscape architect Alice Recknagel Ireys and "How to Plan Your Own Home Landscape" (1976) by landscape designer Nelva M. Weber. Her images were also published in books including "The Reader's Digest Practical Guide to Home Landscaping," and "The Complete Illustrated Book of Garden Magic." Adams also occasionally wrote garden-themed articles. A longtime member in the Somerset Hills (NJ) Garden Club, which is part of the Garden Club of America, Adams once served as the latter's official photographer.

In the 1960's Adams' photographs drew attention to conservation issues related to the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in northwestern New Jersey. These widely publicized photographs rallied public support against the proposed destruction of the Great Swamp for the construction of an airport. Adams was also active as a member of the Mendham Township Environmental Commission and the North Jersey Conservation Foundation. In the 1980's she was awarded the Buckley Medal of Merit for Horticultural Achievement by the Garden Club of America for her photographs used in the postcard campaign "Save Our Vanishing Wild Flowers."
Related Archival Materials Note:
The Alice Recknagel Ireys Papers in the Sophia Smith Collection at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, include photographs by Molly Adams.

The Nelva Weber Papers in the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections at Cornell University Library in Ithaca, New York, likely include photographs by Molly Adams.
Separated Materials:
The North Jersey History & Genealogy Center at The Morristown & Morris Township Library in New Jersey has a collection of images by Molly Adams showcasing nature scenes and birds.
Provenance:
Adams' family donated her collection of garden images to the Smithsonian's Archives of American Gardens after her death in 2003.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Connecticut  Search this
Gardens -- Massachusetts  Search this
Gardens -- New Jersey  Search this
Gardens -- New York (State)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Film transparencies
Color negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Photographs
Color photographs
Negatives
Slides (photographs)
Contact sheets
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Maida Babson Adams American garden collection.
Identifier:
AAG.ADM
See more items in:
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-adm
Online Media:

Somerville -- Four Oaks Farm

Former owner:
Eccles, Mary Hyde, Viscountess, 1912-2003  Search this
Landscape architect:
Weber, Nelva M.  Search this
Geiffert, Alfred, 1890-1957  Search this
Gardener:
Knapp, George  Search this
Collection Creator:
Adams, Molly, 1918-2003  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Four Oaks Farm (Somerville, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Somerset County -- Somerville
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets, correspondence, a photocopy of a book section about the garden, and other information.
General:
Four Oaks Farm was the home of noted bibliophile Mary Morley Crapo Hyde, Viscountess Eccles. Gardener George Knapp was responsible for much of the five-acre site's design, although Nelva M. Weber and Alfred Geiffert also contributed their expertise. Surrounding an 18th-century farmhouse with an added Greek Revival portico, the garden was started in 1946. Existing brick and cobblestone terraces provided a basis for the overall design, which involved the development of individual garden areas adjacent to the terraces, among other features. Water was highlighted in several locations, including a small pool overlooked by a statue of Shakespeare, a pond made by damming an old creek, and another creek whose banks were planted with Japanese iris, hemlock, and other shrubs. Individual garden areas included a walled garden, a crabapple garden, a vegetable and cutting garden, and the Bear Garden, named for a bear fountain set against the brick wall of this space. Shade trees and views of surrounding sheep and cow pastures and the Raritan River enhanced the rural setting of the site.
Related Materials:
Four Oaks Farm related holdings consist of 2 folders (22 slides (photographs))
See others in:
Garden Club of America Collection, ca. 1920-[ongoing].
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Somerville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Maida Babson Adams American garden collection.
Identifier:
AAG.ADM, File NJ217
See more items in:
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection / Garden Images by Subject / Connecticut
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-adm-ref1196

South Orange -- Gotelli Garden

Former owner:
Gotelli, William T.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Jennings, John J.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Adams, Molly, 1918-2003  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Gotelli Garden (South Orange, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Essex County -- South Orange
Scope and Contents:
The folders include work sheets, a brochure, a narrative description of her visit to the collection (in New Jersey) by photographer Molly Adams, and other information.
General:
This was the private garden of William T. Gotelli, a building contractor and collector of dwarf and slow-growing conifers. With design assistance from landscape architect John J. Jennings, Gotelli amassed about 1,500 specimens within a 15-year period from nurseries, estates, and botanical gardens in the United States, Canada, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand. Thirty genera were represented by numerous varieties of fir, cedar, false cypress (Chamaecyparis), juniper, spruce, pine, Cryptomeria, yew, arborvitae, hemlock , and other genera. Considered to be one of the most extensive collections of its type, all of the plants, rocks, sculpture, and other features were donated by Gotelli to the United States National Arboretum in 1962 and were removed to Washington, D.C., where they are known as the Gotelli Dwarf and Slow-Growing Conifer Collection. A virtual tour of the collection as it presently exists may be found on the arboretum's website.
Related Materials:
Gotelli Garden related holdings consist of 2 folders (14 photographic prints; 29 contact prints; 11 safety film negatives)
See others in:
Roche Collection, ca. 1954-1970.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- South Orange  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Maida Babson Adams American garden collection.
Identifier:
AAG.ADM, File NJ426
See more items in:
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection / Garden Images by Subject / Connecticut
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-adm-ref1203

Summit -- Reeves-Reed Arboretum, "The Clearing"

Former owner:
Wisner, John  Search this
Wisner, Isabelle  Search this
Reeves, Richard E.  Search this
Reeves, Susie Graham  Search this
Reed, Charles L., Jr  Search this
Reed, Ann Reeves  Search this
Landscape architect:
Vaux, Calvert, 1824-1895  Search this
Shipman, Ellen  Search this
Pilat, Carl F.  Search this
Provenance:
Poinier, Lois W.  Search this
Adams, Molly, 1918-2003  Search this
Weller, Eleanor C.  Search this
The Summit Garden Club  Search this
Architect:
Babb, Cook & Willard  Search this
Garden designer:
Wodell & Cottrell  Search this
Collection Creator:
Adams, Molly, 1918-2003  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Reeves-Reed Arboretum (Summit, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Union -- Summit
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, maps and other information.
Varying Form:
The Clearing, formerly known as.
General:
During the Revolutionary era, the area was part of a farm. An estate, once known as The Clearing, was created on the site in 1889 by John Hornor Wisner. He built the present Colonial revival residence, which now serves as the administrative and educational center for the Arboretum. Mr. Wisner plotted the original gardens and Mrs. Wisner planted the first daffodils. Each April the daffodil display, enlarged from earlier times, is a major Arboretum attraction. In 1916, the new owners, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Reeves, hired a New York landscape architect to develop an overall design for the property. Mrs. Reeves was also a member of the Summit Garden Club. The Reeves family increased the daffodil plantings and, around 1925, started the rose garden. The Charles L. Reed family became the last private owners in the 1960s, adding the herb garden and creating the woodland trails.
The property became a public institution, the Reeves-Reed Arboretum, in 1974, when Summit citizens acted to protect the 12.5 acres of woodlands, glacial contours and dells, rolling lawns, and inspired gardens from encroaching development.
Persons associated with the garden include John and Isabelle Wisner (former owners, 1888-1918); Richard E. Reeves and Susie Graham Reeves (former owners, 1918-1968); Charles L. Reeves, Jr. and Ann Reeves Reed (former owners, 1968-1974); Calvert Vaux (landscape architect); Ellen Shipman (landscape architect); Carl F. Pilat (landscape architect, 1925); Babb, Cook & Willard (New York City, architect); Wodell & Cottrell (garden designers).
Related Materials:
Reeves-Reed Arboretum related holdings consist of 5 folders (9 lantern slides, 2 4x5 negatives, 1 8x10 photographic prints, 2 35 mm slides (duplicates))
See others in:
Garden Club of America collection, ca. 1920-[ongoing].
Lois W. Poinier slide collection, circa 1920-1999.
Eleanor Weller collection, circa 1981-2006.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Summit  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Maida Babson Adams American garden collection.
Identifier:
AAG.ADM, File NJ052
See more items in:
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection / Garden Images by Subject / Connecticut
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-adm-ref1210

Unidentified Location -- Unidentified Garden in New Jersey, No. 3

Landscape architect:
Weber, Nelva M.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Adams, Molly, 1918-2003  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Unidentified Garden No. 3 (New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and other information.
General:
This site was apparently a favorite of Nelva M. Weber, for it is featured several times in her 1976 book. Despite this prominence, however, its identification has proved to be elusive, although it was probably in New Jersey. Two outdoor living areas--a roofed brick patio and an open flagstone terrace--were highlights of the design that complemented the colonial-style house. The roofed patio provided a shaded space from which to view an expansive lawn with a gazebo on its far side. The flagstone terrace was built around a large shade tree, but also bordered a large lawn and was backed by other trees and shrubs. This country estate also featured grass walkways with hosta borders, a decorative brick walkway with a millstone center, and a wooden fence with espaliers at the entrance to the property leading in to the house from the driveway and parking area.
Persons associated with the garden include Nelva M. Weber (landscape architect, ca. 1965-1973).
Related Materials:
Unidentified Garden in New Jersey, No. 3 related holdings consist of 1 folder (1 slide (photograph); 45 contact prints; 32 safety film negatives)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Maida Babson Adams American garden collection.
Identifier:
AAG.ADM, File NJ417
See more items in:
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection / Garden Images by Subject / Connecticut
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-adm-ref1236

Bedford -- Lockwood Garden

Former owner:
Lockwood, Henrietta Sedgwick  Search this
Lockwood, John E.  Search this
Bulloch family  Search this
Horticulturist:
Zitter, Robin  Search this
Gardener:
Zitter, Robin  Search this
Landscape architect:
Weber, Nelva M.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Adams, Molly, 1918-2003  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Lockwood Garden (Bedford, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Westchester County -- Bedford
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets, an abbreviated garden plan, a plan of the parterre garden, photocopies of articles about the garden, and a letter from Henrietta Lockwood to Nelva M. Weber.
General:
This garden in Westchester County was established in 1938 on an old farm. The owners, John and Henrietta Lockwood, began a process of remodeling, design, and land development that continued for over 60 years until Mrs. Lockwood's death. Growing places may be found throughout the multi-acre property (of the eventual 100+ acres all but 13 have been deeded to a local nature conservancy). A lean-to greenhouse on the north end of the kitchen wing provides the winter display area for streptocarpus, camellias and other potted plants. It is here that seeds of all sorts are sown and grown under fluorescent light until they are large enough to be taken to the much larger greenhouse across the drive. A winding path through a grassy meadow planted with apple trees leads from the house to the flower and vegetable gardens. The site now features a patterned design based on a medieval, four-part parterre garden--two diamond shapes and two round--using bricks as edging for the beds, and also includes four iron umbrella tripods that serve as supports for clematis. Beyond the flower garden is an extensive vegetable garden and berry patch that produce fresh summer harvests for the table as well as the freezer. Many varieties of clematis are found tumbling informally atop stone walls, weaving through bushes and climbing obediently up the tan house walls, reflecting the owner's passion for this plant. Daphne is another particular favorite.
Each fall on the east side of the guest house an ingenious portable greenhouse is erected to house many tender potted plants, particularly winter-flowering camellias. Nearby a rock ledge forms a terrace for the guest house; beyond is a severe drop into the cool, dark woods. Featured plants in this area include yellow corydalis, mimosa trees, ferns, and woodland flowers. Just outside the guest house potted fig trees and an arbor of grapes provide shade. Inside the main house is a tiny greenhouse. To the rear of the house, along the edge of the brick terrace, blue pansies bloom with spring flowers and are later joined by pots of standard fuchsias and roses. The old well house still stands in the middle of a brick terrace surround by white alyssum volunteers. Beautiful clay pots of unusual collected plants are everywhere. This is a perfect country garden with its meadow views and unusual plant combinations, a tribute to its owners' lifelong devotion to its design, development, and care.
Persons associated with the garden include: John E. and Henrietta Sedgwick Lockwood (former owners, 1938-2001); the Bulloch family (former owners, before 1938); Nelva M. Weber (landscape architect); and Robin Zitter (horticulturist and gardener, 1984 to date).
Related Materials:
Lockwood Garden related holdings consist of 2 folders (19 35 mm. slides; 2 photoprints; 1 120 mm. transparency; 29 negatives)
See others in:
Garden Club of America Collection, ca. 1920-[ongoing].
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Bedford  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Maida Babson Adams American garden collection.
Identifier:
AAG.ADM, File NY464
See more items in:
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection / Garden Images by Subject / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-adm-ref1271

Brooklyn -- Broughton Garden

Landscape architect:
Ireys, Alice Recknagel, 1911-2000  Search this
Former owner:
Broughton, Philip F., 1893-1974  Search this
Broughton, Esther T., b. 1896  Search this
Collection Creator:
Adams, Molly, 1918-2003  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Broughton Garden (Brooklyn, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Kings County -- Brooklyn
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and other information.
General:
Located in Brooklyn Heights, this home garden was designed by Alice Recknagel Ireys. Working within a narrow, confined space, she prepared a design that provided variety in texture and plant material. A more formal bricked area near the house featured urns and a cast-iron bench. Beyond this was a more naturalistic part of the garden, with white birch trees marking the division between the two spaces. Wooden fencing and latticework provided support for climbing plants and the background for a large birdhouse.
Related Materials:
Broughton Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (9 contact prints; 2 photographic prints)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Brooklyn  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Maida Babson Adams American garden collection.
Identifier:
AAG.ADM, File NY1023
See more items in:
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection
Maida Babson Adams American garden collection / Garden Images by Subject / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-adm-ref1276

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