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Lake Geneva -- House in the Woods

Former owner:
Bartlett, Adolphus Clay, Mr.  Search this
Bartlett, Adolphus Clay, Mrs.  Search this
Spencer, William Marvin, colonel, Mr.  Search this
Spencer, William Marvin, colonel, Mrs.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Olmsted, John Charles, 1852-1920  Search this
Mariani Landscape  Search this
Architect:
Shaw, Howard Van Doren  Search this
Provenance:
Lake Geneva Garden Club  Search this
Arborist:
Bartlett Tree Experts  Search this
Creator:
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Place:
House in the Woods (Lake Geneva, Wisconsin)
United States of America -- Wisconsin -- Walworth -- Lake Geneva
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and articles about the house.
General:
Beauty without boundaries is the guiding principle for the more than 50 acre vacation estate. Since it was identified as one of the most beautiful country houses by Ladies Home Journal in 1912 and had gardens landscaped by John Charles Olmsted in 1905, the owners chose to restore rather than renovate when they purchased the property in 1971. The wooded shore of Lake Geneva with rockwork retaining walls transitions into an ornamentally landscaped estate. Drifts of hydrangea, hosta and buckeye at the gated entrance are succeeded by the original concrete driveway through woodland gardens with sugar maple, red oak, white oak, linden, boxwood, ground covers and perennial flowers that include daylilies, bleeding heart, phlox, and rugose roses. The formal drive circle at the house has a fountain in the center and a perimeter of flowering shrubs and variegated ivy topiaries. A grass terrace facing the lake features a rustic planted stone staircase. White roses and hydrangea are accented by a bell placed on an old tree stump. The children's garden has containers of vegetables, fruits, flowers and herbs with rustic wattle arches and furniture.
An enclosed courtyard for the swimming pool between the main house and guest house has clipped yew hedges, ground covers and perennials, trumpet, clematis and wisteria vines, and potted citrus trees. Near stands of mature trees planted more than 100 years ago there is a grotto, a mound of soil and stones topped by a statue with a stone bench nearby. One lawn is kept sculpted into a labyrinth. There is a mineral spring on the property, which is said to be restorative, that flows into a fieldstone basin surrounded by a planted rockwork wall. The other formal gardens include a rose garden planted in parterres and enclosed by espaliered apple trees and an organic potager with vegetable, herb and cutting flower beds laid out geometrically on either side of a wide path of stabilized degenerate granite with more espaliered fruit trees on the surrounding wire fence and covering a pergola.
Renovations were required for a disabled family member, including widened and level walkways with very gradual inclines, smooth stone patios and terraces with narrow joints, benches placed where there are good views of the lake, access to the house and swimming pool, and an elevator to the second floor inside the house. Trees in the woodland gardens were replaced as needed and tagged for future reference.
Persons associated with the garden include: Mr. and Mrs. Adolphus Clay Bartlett (former owners, 1905-1930); Colonel and Mrs. William Marvin Spencer (former owners, 1930-1971); John Charles Olmsted (landscape architect, 1905); Howard Van Doren Shaw (architect, 1905); Bartlett Tree Experts (arborists, 2011); Mariani Landscape (landscape architect, 1980- ).
The property was featured in "Ladies Home Journal" in 1909 when it was selected as one of the the twelve most beautiful homes in America.
Related Materials:
House in the Woods related holdings consist of 1 folder (3 35mm slides (photographs); and 21 digital images)
Records related to this site can be found at the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, Olmsted Job Number 03038, A. C. Bartlett.
See others in:
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection, circa 1900s-1970s, bulk 1920-1940s.

Eleanor Weller collection, circa 1978-2006.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Wisconsin -- Lake Geneva  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WI027
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Wisconsin
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11667

River Hills -- The Chimneys

Former owner:
Chester, Norman  Search this
Chester, Millie  Search this
Architect:
Hepburn, Andrew H., 1880-1967  Search this
Landscape architect:
Lipp, Franz, 1897-1996  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Tree Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The Chimneys (River Hills, Wisconsin)
United States of America -- Wisconsin -- Milwaukee County -- River Hills
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, a planting list and other materials.
General:
The Chimneys is a fifteen-acre property featuring extensive woodlands gardens and a red brick house modeled after the Raleigh Tavern in historic Williamsburg. Landscape architect Franz Lipp's 1950 design that surrounded the house featured yews, crabapples, hawthorns, elms and an orchard, and some of those trees are still growing, supplemented by hundreds of additional trees and shrubs that have been planted by the current owners as well as mature native trees. To the south of the house there is a five-acre lawn with a view of a pinetum and pergola near the bordering Indian Creek. Near the house there is a formal rose garden protected by a mature boxwood hedge, a perennial garden, orchards and a vegetable garden. Bordering the great lawn there is a white garden planted with rhododendron, Casa Blanca lilies and white bulbs, and a garden named for the owners' granddaughter that features dwarf conifers and maples. Three ponds along the edge of the woodlands gardens introduce the layered planting style that is featured, with an understory of bulbs and wildflowers, a middle level of flowering shrubs and trees and an upper story of mature trees.
Texture, bark and leaf color were considered when the tree collections were planted, with variegated and yellow leaf trees used as eye catchers in dark corners and along the ponds. There are fifty varieties of maple, beeches, spruce and pines, magnolias, oaks and viburnum along with bulbs and wildflowers that have been planted or replanted on the property and allowed to naturalize. In addition to preserving Lipp's scheme the current owners were influenced by European landscape and naturalized gardens by designers William Kent and William Robinson and American arboretums. Recent additions include a manmade pond, a Williamsburg-style gatehouse, and a tree house with colonial and gothic features.
Persons associated with the garden include: Emerson Noyes (former owner, circa 1930 -1950); Norman and Millie Chester (former owners, 1950-1984); Andrew H. Hepburn (architect, 1949-1950); and Franz Lipp (1897-1996) (landscape architect, 1950).
Related Materials:
The Chimneys related holdings consist of 1 folder (18 digital images; and 2 photographic prints)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Wisconsin -- River Hills  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WI041
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Wisconsin
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11685

Fox Point -- Deep Dene

Provenance:
Green Tree Garden Club  Search this
Landscape architect:
Stark, Judith Z.  Search this
Lipp, Franz, 1897-1996  Search this
Owner:
Bryson, Olive V. D.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Deep Dene (Fox Point, Wisconsin)
United States of America -- Wisconsin -- Milwaukee County -- Fox Point
Scope and Contents:
1 folder and 14 digital images. Images 001-014 were photographed by Sandy Dawson.
General:
Located on approximately five acres overlooking Lake Michigan, the owner of this garden had been gardening on the property since she was five years old. The original design included formal gardens, beds of iris and phlox, wildflowers in the surrounding ravines, and a large vegetable garden. Landscape architect Franz Lipp designed a circle of yews, two large hedged gardens, a boundary garden and a stone wall, all placed at a distance from the house to be visited as a pastime. In 1990 a garden room with French doors was built so a new rose garden could be seen and enjoyed from inside. A nine-foot tall dark green lattice fence was installed to protect the rose garden from deer. The design is formal with four parterres each centered by a rose standard with multiple bushes in each quadrant, climbing hydrangea on the fence, and a small central pool with a statue. Lush annual, perennial and shrub borders are maintained alongside the terrace, stone wall and another fountain with mature maple and crab apple dotting the lawns.

Favorite roses include Mr. Lincoln, Double Delight, Chicago Peace, Legends, and Drop Dead Red. The garden borders include day lilies and Asiatic lilies, peonies, boxwood, hosta, zinnias, dusty miller, marigolds, geraniums and more roses. Visitors include art students and members of the Garden Conservancy.

Persons associated with the garden include: Helen and William Van Dyke (former owners, 1926-1972); Olive V. D. Bryson (owner, 1972- ); Franz Lipp (1897-1996) (landscape architect, dates unknown); Judith Stark (landscape architect, 1990).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Wisconsin -- Deep Dene  Search this
Rose gardens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WI058
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Wisconsin
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref33212

Westminster West -- Hayward Garden

Gardener:
O'Donnell, Helen  Search this
Owner:
Hayward, Mary  Search this
Hayward, Gordon  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Dublin (New Hampshire)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Hayward Garden (Westminster West, Vermont)
United States of America -- Vermont -- Windham -- Westminster West
Scope and Contents:
Hayward Garden includes 63 digital images and a folder that includes worksheets, photocopies of articles and additional images including a pamphlet about a musical program created for and perfomed in the garden in 2014 as a the Yellow Barn summer program.
General:
The owners describe their one and one-half acre ornamental garden as a new garden in an old place, with its 200 year-old colonial farmhouse and attached barn, low stone walls, and old farm building foundations that have been repurposed as distinctive garden rooms within surrounding meadows and woods. They purchased the property in 1983 and spent about one year clearing the land of scrap metal and other debris, brambles and weed trees, a rotting barn, dead trees, and an old Nash Metropolitan automobile. The garden style is English, with a rectilinear format from south to north softened by lush growth in season and more evident in the long Vermont winter. The design began by drawing a straight line from the front door of the house to a 75-year-old apple tree. There is a crab apple orchard along that main axis that can be seen from the house. Brick and pea stone gravel walks, 90-foot long mixed borders, and an herb garden laid out in formal parterres are either parallel or perpendicular to the central axis of the garden. The 14 garden rooms are delineated by clipped hedges of varying heights, many of yew but also other plant materials for variation. There are four places to sit within the garden: a gazebo at the far end reached through a tunnel of pleached copper beech, an outdoor dining room on pavers under tall trees, a bench slightly above and overlooking their spring garden, and another bench next to a shed near the herb garden.
Creating a garden in harmony with the rural location was important to the owners, who subsequently purchased 19 adjacent acres and preserved the meadows and woods with the Vermont Land Trust. To instill harmony in the diverse garden rooms the owners adhere to three themes: hedges for structure, black locust posts and terra cotta containers for materials, and burgundy and other reds for the color that recurs throughout the garden rooms. Since the entire garden is unified it is possible to add variations without muddling the design. Honoring the long gone dairy farms they have turned the foundations of a milking parlor into a garden room that has low, drought tolerant plants growing among the stone flooring and three rusted milk cans. The cracked cement foundation of a former silo was turned into a pond with a fountain built into a stone wellhead and a statue of Buddha on the shore.
Gordon Hayward has written many articles for Horticulture, Taunton's Fine Gardening, and regional magazines using his own garden to teach design aesthetics and their practical application. Topics include the effective placement of planted and unplanted containers and other garden ornaments, how to build a small fountain, the importance of proportions to design, how to set vertical posts, and tips on outdoor seating and dining rooms. Good design is illustrated by reshaping lawns to complement planted borders or trees, through consistent choices of decorative materials, through applying the principles of theme and variation when choosing what to put in the garden, and through planning for the winter garden with berries and crab apples for birds and good "bones" that become evident in winter.
Persons associated with the garden include: Gordon Hayward (owner, garden designer, and gardener, 1983- ), Mary Hayward (owner, garden designer, and gardener, 1983- ), Ephraim and Lydia Johnson Ranney, and their descendants in the Buxton and Reed families (former owners, circa 1790-1983); Helen O'Donnell (gardener, 2008-2015).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Vermont -- Westminster West  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VT019
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Vermont
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11360

Alexandria -- Carriage House Garden in Old Town

Creator:
Everts, Florence  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Alexandria  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Carriage House Garden in Old Town (Alexandria, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Alexandria
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets.
General:
A walled formal garden in the English style was designed to complement the 1801 carriage house which retains its original façade and carriage doors, comprising less than an acre in an urban neighborhood. The garden is entered through a wrought iron gate next to a hedge of Nellie Stevens holly trees that provide privacy from the street. The other three sides of the garden are enclosed by high brick walls, including the neighbor's abutting wall draped with a massive trumpet vine. An allée of hornbeam trees under planted with perennial geraniums borders the brick walk that leads to the front door which is shaded by a rose arbor. The enclosed garden receives moderate sun and includes century-old boxwood, oak leaf hydrangeas, winter blooming camellias, a variegated Japanese maple, a bed of spirea, ferns, a European beech tree, and hellebores.
The Carriage House Garden in Old Town has been recognized by the American Institute of Architects, received a local civic beautiful award in 2006, and has been opened to the public for Virginia's historic garden week on two occasions.
Persons associated with the garden include John Burke (former owner, 19thc.); Anita Barnes (former owner until 1989); Florence Everts (ASLA) (landscape architect, 1990); Robert Holland (garden designer, 1990-1991); Harry Braswell (addition to house, 1991)
Related Materials:
Carriage House Garden in Old Town related holdings consist of 1 folder (13 35mm slides (photographs))
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Alexandria  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA409
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18788
Online Media:

Charlottesville -- Rabbit Run

Landscape designer:
Spencer, Brooke  Search this
Architect:
Spencer, Madison  Search this
Provenance:
Albemarle Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Rabbit Run (Charlottesville, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Albemarle -- Charlottesville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and copies of articles.
General:
When purchased in 2004 this nine-acre property had a single-story main house, an indoor pool, changing rooms, six-car garage, apartment unit and two acres of invasive bamboo, kudzu, poison ivy and akebia. The house was transformed with the addition of wings, two more stories, and a classical pediment; all the other buildings were demolished. Two hundred feet of classically styled formal gardens were installed with new outbuildings. A stone wall with two flights of stairs at the entrance to the garden also acts as a retaining wall. A garden of concentric circles replaced the swimming pool, with a round reflecting pool and bubbler fountain enclosed in limestone coping at the center, surrounded by a ring of turf, encircled by a pea gravel walkway and then a ring of boxwood. A straight pea gravel path bordered by lawn and boxwood hedges planted in a key pattern leads to another lawn enclosed by a 10-foot tall circus of hornbeam. At one end of this lawn there is a circle of boxwood around a stand of nicotiana with an urn planted with lavender at the center. The one-room dining pavilion folly at the other end of the lawn has two water tanks with bubblers. Perennials and bulbs were planted along the perimeters and in the spaces formed by boxwood designs at the front of the house.
The woodland gardens were planted with native ferns, bleeding heart, more than 50,000 Spanish bluebells (Hyacinthoides-hispanica 'Excelsior') and 40,000 scilla-siberica, interplanted to extend the blooming season. Additional outbuildings include a hexagonal garden shed that is a privy and a chicken house for 12 hens next to raised vegetable garden beds. The hens tend these beds after the growing season, consuming plant stalks, weed seeds, grubs and insects and leaving behind 1,000 pounds of organic fertilizer for the next year.
Persons associated with the garden include Brooke Spencer (landscape designer, 2004- ); Madison Spencer (architect, 2004- ).
Related Materials:
Rabbit Run related holdings consist of 1 folder (15 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Charlottesville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA488
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18815

Leesburg -- Little Oatlands

Former owner:
Carter, George  Search this
Carter, George Mrs.  Search this
Carter, George II  Search this
Eustis, William Corcoran  Search this
Eustis, William Corcoran Mrs  Search this
Finley, David E. Jr.  Search this
Finley, Margaret Morton Eustis  Search this
Williams, Dick  Search this
Williams, Joan, Mrs  Search this
Sculptor:
Righetti, Francesco  Search this
Hancock, Walter  Search this
Manship, Paul  Search this
Finley, Margaret Eustis  Search this
Provenance:
Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Little Oatlands (Leesburg, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Loudoun -- Leesburg
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopies of articles and biographical information.
General:
Little Oatlands has a two-acre formal garden originally designed in the mid-1930's by the owners David and Margaret Finley, and the garden rooms, allées, stone walls, gazebo, statues and sculptures have been maintained with few changes for 80 years. The first garden room inside the main gate was installed in 1935 and has four parterres bordered with boxwood around a central fountain, originally a sundial. The original English boxwood borders have been replaced with Korean and American box cultivars in this and the other three rooms. Three more garden rooms were developed in 1937: two bisecting cedar allées that lead to a gazebo set over the stone wall, a flowering cherry allée that leads to a wall fountain, and another room with a large planted urn, a statue of St. Francis Assisi and a swath formerly used as a bowling green bordered by statues of the four seasons. A swimming pool was added in 1952. Boxwood hedges define the rooms within the perimeter of stone walls and ornamental iron gates provide entry to the different rooms. Some of the statues and fountains were copied from classical Italian pieces, and the gazebo was copied from one in England. Original sculptures include "Suzanna at the Bath" by Paul Manship and "The Little Shepherd Boy" by Walter Hancock. In addition to the main house there is a guest cottage on the property. Recent work in the gardens includes replanting long borders of ephemeral spring bulbs under the flowering cherry allée.
In the early 18th century this country house was a tenant farmer's stone cottage on the 63,093 acre estate known as Oatlands Plantation. In 1887 the Carter family was forced to sell the large property but continued to own a few cottages and 180 acres, and called it Little Oatlands. Members of the Eustis family have owned this property since 1927 and have enlarged this house and converted the Carter's vegetable garden into the existing formal garden. In 1965 Oatlands mansion, garden and more than 250 surrounding acres were deeded to the National Trust for Historic Preservation with easements for the family.
Persons associated with the garden include George Carter (former owner, 1798-1847); Mrs. George Carter (former owner, 1847-1897); George Carter II (former owner, 1897-1926); Mr. and Mrs. William Corcoran Eustis (former owner, 1927-1932); David E. Finley, Jr. (1890-1977) and Margaret Morton Eustis Finley (1903-1977) (former owners, 1932-1977); Dick and Joan Williams (former owners, 1977-2014); Paul Manship (sculptor, 1947); Francesco Righetti (sculptor); Walter Hancock (sculptor, c. 1960); Margaret Eustis Finley (sculptor, c. 1930)
Related Materials:
Little Oatlands related holdings consist of 2 folders (21 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Leesburg  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA445
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18840

Orange -- Windholme Farm

Provenance:
Dolley Madison Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Windholme Farm (Orange, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Orange -- Orange
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopies of articles, and real estate announcements.
General:
The 238 acres of Windholm Farm were part of a grant given to John Scott in 1730, with an original section of the main house dating to 1729. It is one of two houses in Orange County that sate from the 1720s. Originally known as Clifton, Windholme was the home of the Scott family from the 1720s until the 1920s. The Virginia property was purchased in 1947 by Harry Peters whose mother was the President of the Garden Club of America from 1944-1947. At one time the property featured three bomb shelters and were large enough to accomodate Mr. Peters' staff. Peters also had an aviary in what is now a garden shed.
The current gardens feature boxwood topiaries and hedges, brick terraces with small fountains, many ornamental trees, and several millstones and sculptures. The octagon is a design element used in an open brick terrace and for a small pond with a fountain set in another shady brick terrace. There are brick walkways leading to the house and connecting the outdoor entertaining areas.
Persons associated with the garden include John Scott and descendants (former owners, 1730-1928); Harry Peters, Jr. (former owner, 1947-1984); Helen Smith (former owner, 1984-1997); Shawn Daily (former owner, 1997-2002).
Related Materials:
Windholme Farm related holdings consist of 1 folder (9 35mm slides; 16 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Orange  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA404
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18872
Online Media:

Richmond -- Robin Hill

Former owner:
Patterson, Malvern Courtney  Search this
Patterson, Malvern Courtney Mrs.  Search this
Willingham, William A.  Search this
Willingham, William A. Mrs.  Search this
Harrison, Robert  Search this
Harrison, Robert Mrs.  Search this
Rawles, James W.  Search this
Rawles, James W. Mrs.  Search this
Provenance:
James River Garden Club  Search this
Garden restoration:
Garden Graces  Search this
Terraforma  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Robin Hill (Richmond, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Henrico -- Richmond
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and other historical information.
General:
The brick walled formal garden rooms within the 4.5 acre property Robin Hill pay homage to the gardens created on this site by earlier owners - but not until the current owners undertook significant recovery and restoration. In 1915 there was a one hundred acre farm known as Hillcrest with a Tudor style mansion overlooking the James River and historic Kanawha Canal. The pleasure gardens were laid out on crossing axes with brick paths and statuary placed in niches, in the style of the country place movement of the early 20th century. Much of the land was sold to developers as the city of Richmond grew, and the property was reduced to seven acres. During a subsequent owners' forty year tenure the façade of the house was transformed to look like a farmhouse, using brick and white stucco. Brick walls, paths and edging were added as well as truckloads of enormous trees and new garden beds and borders, and another 2.5 acres were sold. But despite prodigious planting the gardens were not tended and many mature trees and shrubs were choked out by English ivy and other vines. It was left to the current owners to dig out the overgrowth, rediscovering the hardscape structure and features of the garden rooms, and to restore crumbling brick walls and arches. New plantings replaced old yews, hollies, camellias, magnolias and other trees and shrubs as necessary, and perennial and annual flowers, particularly white flowers, were added.
The garden rooms at Robin Hill lie to the south of the house and terrace with distinct lawns enclosed by mixed evergreen and deciduous borders and a hedge of mature camellia sasanqua. Alongside the largest upper lawn but separated from the lawn by a brick wall there are ten rectangular beds planted with perennial and annual flowers that spill over the irregular bluestone or basket weave brick walkways. A concrete birdbath sits in the center of these garden beds on the axis that crosses the upper central lawn and leads to a pavilion, approached via a brick walkway between hedges of hydrangea and camellia. To one side of this cross axis there is an American holly grove while on the other side there is a woodland and small pond. At the far end of the lower central lawn on the main axis there is a wall fountain and pool with a gazebo set to one side. The axial design and plant materials used in the gardens of Hillcrest and Robin Hill suggest that landscape architects Warren Manning and Charles Gillette may have worked on this property but no conclusive records have been found.
The James River Garden Club was established in 1915 during meetings at Hillcrest, and owner Juanita Massie Patterson served as its first president. The club dedicated their 1923 book Historic Gardens of Virginia to Mrs. Patterson.
Digital images include copies of lithographs from a 1940s book owned by Mrs. William A. Willingham.
Persons associated with the garden include: Mr. and Mrs. Malvern Courtney Patterson (former owners, 1905-circa 1930); Mr. and Mrs. William A. Willingham (former owners, circa 1930-1947); Mr. and Mrs. Robert Harrison (former owners, 1947-1989); Mr. and Mrs. James W. Rawles (former owners, 1989-1991); Garden Graces (garden restoration, 2011-2012); Terraforma (garden restoration, 2011-2012).
Related Materials:
Robin Hill related holdings consist of 1 folder (35 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Richmond  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA450
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18900

Vienna -- Tregaron

Provenance:
Garden Club of Alexandria  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Tregaron (Vienna, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Fairfax -- Vienna
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets.
General:
A five-acre parcel from a defunct 68-acre farm with an abandoned farmhouse was purchased in 1979 and over the years has been transformed into a rambling, European inspired garden by the owners. Boxwood hedges were planted and more boxwood was started from cuttings to create a parterre centered by a stone basin on a pedestal. An iron gate at the end of the dirt and gravel road that leads to this hilltop property is sided by white stucco walls planted with boxwood and pyracantha. The first garden installed after the new house was built, known as the wildflower-shade garden includes rhododendrons, azaleas, alliums, ferns, spring bulbs, ivy, Virginia bluebells, hellebores and whatever the birds and squirrels bring. This cottage garden is enclosed by stucco walls with plantings, primarily shrubs, on either side. Other beds were laid out with curving borders edged with Belgian block and low dry stone walls built by the owner. A long serpentine dry stone wall defines a garden room separate from the lawn, and more rooms have been added including beds for perennials and parterres for vegetables and flowers. Antique and other limestone features have been added over the years, including birdbaths, urns, statues, and obelisks.
The garden has been enclosed in a deer fence, allowing hostas, roses, daylilies and other flowers and flowering shrubs to thrive. Honeysuckle and clematis vines were planted inside the fence and varieties of tall grasses were planted outside the fence. Flowering shrubs are taking precedence over perennials and are trimmed after they bloom.
Related Materials:
Tregaron related holdings consist of 1 folder (15 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Vienna  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA446
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18915

Charlottesville -- Redlands

Creator:
Carter, Edward  Search this
Former owner:
Carter, Robert, d. 1809  Search this
Carter, Mary Eliza Coles  Search this
Carter, Sally Randolph  Search this
Carter, Margaret Smith  Search this
Carter, Robert Smith  Search this
Carter, Robert Hill  Search this
Carter, Burr Noland  Search this
Carter, Robert Hill, d.1884  Search this
Provenance:
Albemarle Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Redlands (Albemarle County, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Albemarle County
Scope and Contents:
There are 3 folders and 3 glass lantern slides and 14 digital images (2018).
General:
The two-story red brick colonial style house was built ca.1789 to ca.1809, by Robert Carter (d. 1809) whose father was John Carter. The garden was designed by Robert Carter and his wife, Mary Eliza Coles of Enniscorthy, in 1798. The house overlooks the Hardware River. The garden was laid out in squares with boxwood planted at the corners, and with broad grass walks between them. Those closest to the house were planted in flowers while the lower beds were planted in vegetables. Some flower beds were laid out to depict the Maltese cross, the insignia of the Order of Masons, which was a common practice among Masons in the 18th century. A lilac hedge screened the garden from the lawn surrounding the house. There were long flower borders on either side of the main path that led from the house.
Some of the varieties of flowers and shrubs in the garden were: cowslips, hyacinths, jonquils, white narcissi, butter and eggs, violets, peonies, bleeding hearts, Madonna lilies, chrysanthemums, four o'clocks, Jacob's ladder, larkspur, Star of Bethlehem, lily of the valley, and roses. Also mock orange, snowball, smoke tree, flowering almond, southern yellow Jessamine, fruit trees and yucca (the leaves of which were used like twine) and iris.
Persons associated with the garden include members of the Carter family: Robert Carter and Mary Eliza Coles Carter (former owner, ca.1789-1830), Robert Hill Carter (former owner, 1830-1884), Margaret Smith Carter (former owner, 1884-1894), Robert Smith Carter (former owner, 1894-1899), Miss Mary Coles Carter and Miss Sally Randolph Carter (former owners, 1899-?), Dr. Burr Noland Carter (former owner, n.d.) and Robert Hill Carter (former owner, 1944-).
Related Materials:
See also the Eleanor Weller Collection for three images. The Library of Congress also has historic images of Redlands by Frances Benjamin Johnston.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Albemarle County  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA047
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18943

Manchester -- Turkey Hill Farm

Provenance:
Bennington Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
United States of America -- Vermont -- Bennington County -- Manchester
Turkey Hill Farm (Manchester, Vermont)
Scope and Contents:
55 digital images (2019) and 1 file folder with a photocopy of cover art of this farm for a 1925 Country Life magazine.
General:
In the 1930's the owners of a farmhouse originally built in 1849 installed gardens around the house including a sunken rose garden, perennial borders, a cutting garden, and a formal terrace with a spring-fed fountain. These gardens were maintained by three generations of the Childs family and by the current owner when the 15-acre property was purchased in 1998. In 2005 a five-acre pasture was developed as a sculpture garden with contemporary works of art and complementary plantings. A dry stream bed (arroyo) that cuts through the property was turned into another garden, planted with iris, Japanese primrose, cranesbill and hosta. Between 2012 and 2015 a woodlands garden with a rustic pergola and hexagonal gazebo and a Japanese garden with a pagoda, French Art Deco gate and arched bridge were designed and installed. Some of the original perennial borders were updated with flowers in bolder colors but antique apple trees, another pergola with benches underneath for appreciating the views, a cider press, and outbuildings including a stone spring house have been preserved. A corn crib was converted into a guest cottage; a larger guest house near the main house has linear hedges and flower beds as well as a reflecting pool on the axis that leads to a sculpture.

The stone walls and hedges are meticulous, lawns are mowed in the crisscrossing pattern, and narrow brick paths have been set into wider mowed grass walkways. Clipped hedges with stone walls or artefacts highlight long views of these grounds toward distant mountains. There are two fenced vegetable gardens and a greenhouse. A large pond has a pond house nearby as well as a small sand beach. The garden has been included in tours sponsored by the Nature Conservancy and used by non-profit organizations for fund raising events. The owner is interested in preserving the property as a public space.

Persons associated with the garden include: F. Nelson and Florence Doubleday (former owners, -1931); Lowrie and Hortense Childs (former owners, 1931-1944); Charles S. and Helen Childs (former owners, 1944-1976); Charles (Pete) and Jane Childs (former owners, 1976-1998); Sylvia and Stanley Stroup (owners, 1998-2017); Stanley Stroup (owners, 2017-); Hortense Childs (house gardens designer, 1930's); North Hill Garden Design (sculpture garden and woodland garden designers, 2008 and 2007-2012); Ray Smith (Japanese garden designer, 2013); Sugar Rock Landscape (hardscape construction, 2008-2014); Janette Morrison and Ernie Dibble (gardeners, 1998- ); David Tamych (sculptor); Rita Dee (sculptor); Richard Erdman (sculptor); Phil Thorne (sculptor); Roger Di Taranto (sculptor); Thomas Ostenberg (sculptor); Mark Chatterley (sculptor); Hans Van de Bovencamp (sculptor); Peter Woytuk (sculptor); George Sherwood (sculptor); Curt Brill (sculptor); Royden Mills (sculptor).
Provenance:
The Bennington Garden Club facilitated the 2019 submission.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Vermont -- Manchester  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VT020
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Vermont
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref33198

Memphis -- The White Garden

Former owner:
Troy, Margaret  Search this
Troy, Ronald  Search this
Wilda Humphreys Estate  Search this
BHK Development Company  Search this
Kostka Investment Company  Search this
Garden designer:
Pitts, Geri  Search this
Provenance:
Little Garden Club of Memphis  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The White Garden (Memphis, Tennessee)
United States of America -- Tennessee -- Shelby -- Memphis
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and other information.
General:
The White Garden was established in 2010 when the owners moved from a larger property to a home in a cul-de-sac on less than one-third acre. The garden design is formal, predominantly green with white flowers and pockets of brightly colored roses and hydrangeas for cutting. Several varieties of boxwood clipped into hedges, spheres and cones unify the front and rear gardens. There is a formal parterre next to the front door of the house with a stone obelisk featured at its center. A rose garden next to the garage is in a sunny location and is bordered by boxwood and a low stone wall. The walled back garden has a swimming pool with a wall fountain and a brick fireplace with a tall chimney. Confederate jasmine trained to mimic lattice grows on some of the walls while climbing hydrangea covers and softens other portions. Stepping stones along the side of the property peek out under colorful hydrangeas, clematis grown on tuteurs, and a small herb garden behind the fireplace. Urns and other planters have more foliage boxwood with primarily white flowers planted underneath.
Persons associated with the garden include Wilda Humphreys Estate (former owners); BHK Development Company (former owners, 1995); Kostka Investment Company (former owners, 1996); Margaret and Ronald Troy (former owners, 2003); Geri Pitts (garden designer, 2010).
Related Materials:
The White Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (19 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Tennessee -- Memphis  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TN120
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Tennessee
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10946

Nashville -- The Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Robinson Jr. Garden

Architect:
Asmus, Christian A.  Search this
Clark, Richard R.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Page, Ben  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Nashville  Search this
Garden Club of Lookout Mountain  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Robinson Jr. Garden (Nashville, Tennessee)
United States of America -- Tennessee -- Davidson -- Nashville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopies of articles and other information.
General:
The garden and residence of Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Robinson represents one of the first "Country Place Era" gardens in Nashville. The Neoclassical home, designed by architects A. Christian Asmus and Richard R. Clark, was built in 1929 by F.J. McCarthy and his wife Mary Byrd McCarthy. When the current owners assumed ownership of the property in 1987, the garden areas near the house were primarily lawns surrounded by towering boxwood hedges, formal and static in design. With the desire to allow more light into the Neoclassical style house as well as to create terraces to accommodate an eight foot change in elevation and a garden room for a swimming pool, the owners turned to their sons-in-law, landscape architect Ben Page (ASLA) and architect Stephen P. Rick (AIA) to renovate the property. The four garden rooms that were designed are arranged laterally alongside and below the house with surrounding high walls and interior low walls. A pre-existing 50-foot antique wrought iron fence and a pergola built on massive piers were incorporated into the design and separate the garden rooms from the natural garden that comprises the rest of the property. The first room is a large terrace that can be tented for special events, with steps down to a more intimate sunken terrace for family use, followed by more steps to a formal parterre rose garden with a pool and fountain in the middle and pear trees espaliered against one wall, and lastly a landscaped pool and new pool house converted from a three car garage with cutting and vegetable gardens nearby. A door in the garden wall closes off the swimming area when it is out of season.
This garden features plant material and hardscape with provenance, starting with the Seven Sisters climbing roses that were transplanted from another family property in the 1930s. Peonies planted by the current owner's mother still thrive below the pool house and border the cutting and vegetable gardens. The antique wrought iron fence was salvaged from another Nashville property and bricks used for the walks once comprised East Nashville sidewalks laid in the late 1800s. A Charlie Hunt sculpture "Dove of Peace" was carved from a foundation stone salvaged from an East Nashville church, Saint Ann's Episcopal (1882-1998). Native limestone and Tennessee Crab Orchard stone are local materials used for the walls and terraces.
In early spring a row of Yoshino cherry trees blooms along one side of a brick walkway just inside the high limestone wall with tulips blooming on the other side. Pansies and tulips surround the fountain in the rose garden for early color. In summer Annabelle hydrangeas border the swimming pool, and perennial flower beds come into bloom.
The gardens on the estate provide ample opportunities for a wide variety of social, civic and charitable events. One such event was the 1993 Swan Ball Patron's Party for the benefit of Cheekwood Botanical Barden and Museum of Art. The current owner has also hosted a series of literary salons to benefit the Nashville Public Library. Numerous local non-profits have benefited from fundraisers and garden tours hosted at the estate.
Persons associated with the garden include Mr. F.J. and Mary Byrd McCarthy (former owners, 1929-1931); Mr. Edwin Wilson Craig and Elizabeth Wade Craig (former owners, 1931-1987); Christian A. Asmus and Richard R Clark (architects, 1929-1939); Ben Page, ASLA (landscape architect, 1988-1990); Stephen P. Rick (architect, 1988-1990); William Ralston (sculptor); Charlie Hunt (sculptor); Pink Ray (groundskeeper, 1931-1958); Mark Owen (groundskeeper, 1948-1971); Roy Goddard (groundskeeper, 1972-1981); Malcolm Campbell (grounds manager, 1981-1990); Norman David Pugh (grounds manager, 1990-present); Michele Webber (gardener, 2010-present).
Related Materials:
The Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Robinson Jr. Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (69 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Tennessee -- Nashville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TN076
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Tennessee
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10964

Charleston -- William Gibbes Garden

Provenance:
The Palmetto Garden Club of South Carolina  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Charleston -- Charleston
William Gibbes House (Charleston, South Carolina)
Scope and Contents:
31 digital images (2011, 2018), 1 lantern slide, and 1 35mm slide and 3 file folders. Other documents about the property and garden design plans are included in folder 3.
General:
In 1928 Cornelia Roebling commissioned landscape architect Loutrel Briggs to design formal gardens for her late 18th century Georgian-style home that would incorporate the spirit of the past and utilize local plant and hardscape materials. His design for this one acre property came to be known as the Charleston Garden Style that he replicated successfully many times. The current owner is restoring and enhancing Briggs' design with eleven distinct rooms, all behind screens formed by 19th century high brick walls and tall plants. The rooms are linked by shell flagstone or brick axial walkways with repeated colors, plant materials and shapes creating harmony. Magnolias, cedars, live oaks, crepe myrtles, palms, hollies, cypress, pittosporum, yew, boxwood, camellias, azaleas, liriope, mondo grass and ferns are repeated in many garden rooms, with pink, purple or white flowers predominating. The lawn garden to one side of the main residence is surrounded by shell walkways edged in brick with borders planted with conifers, hydrangeas, azaleas, boxwood, privet, tall hollies, and a large magnolia. The restored old garden that predates Briggs has four boxwood parterres planted with roses with a birdbath in the center. The three-foot pond with ogee corners has a pyramid-shaped boxwood in each corner, seasonal beds inside the wall with boxwood edging, island beds planted with camellias and mondo grass, and a small terrace with a bench off to one side shaded by wisteria. Cedars and crepe myrtles also provide shade in warm weather. A brick, unroofed summer house built in the 19th century by owner John Grimke Drayton has an 18th century marble entablature and is draped with white roses.

Next to the summer house along the brick wall there is a new garden with two formal diamond- shaped beds planted in purple and white and two beds with magnolias. The east-west axial long walk behind the house was broken up by a later 25-foot square swimming pool; it is bordered by brick columns connected by chains draped with yellow roses and a pittosporum hedge clipped like waves. In the pool garden there are Meyer lemon standards, yoshino cherries, and verbenas. The court garden terrace behind the house is bordered by beds with camellias, ferns, liriope, aspidistra, mondo grass and ferns growing in brick walls. Beds alongside the drive and around the parking area feature a mature live oak, azaleas, roses, crepe myrtles and seasonal plantings that complement the pink stucco walls of the guest house. The old brick privy court is used for storage and for growing tomatoes, with a white picket fence atop a low brick wall. A trellis planted with confederate jasmine and a row of Italian cypress mark the transition to the citrus garden on the site of the old drying yard. There are grapefruit, kumquat, orange and lemon trees planted in two rows of octagonal beds, repeating the formal design of the parterre gardens. The property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Persons associated with the garden include: William Gibbes and family (former owners, 1772-1794); Sarah Moore Smith family and descendants (former owners, 1794-circa 1885); J.B.E. Sloan family and descendants (former owners, 1885-circa 1928); Cornelia W. Roebling family and descendants (former owners, 1926-1984); Historic Charleston Foundation (former owner, 1984-1986); Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson Leath (former owners, 1986-1996); Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Trainer (former owners, 1996-circa 2006); Loutrel Winslow Briggs (1893-1977) (landscape architect, 1928); Dr. Eugene Johnson (landscape designer, 2018).
Related Materials:
See also the Eleanor Weller Collection for a 35mm reproduction of SC074001.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Charleston  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File SC074
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / South Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12460

Greenville -- Lowrey Garden

Former owner:
Howard, Alice E.  Search this
Heiner, Stephen  Search this
Heiner, Kelsey  Search this
Gilbert, John  Search this
Gilbert, Dianna  Search this
Provenance:
Carolina Foothills Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Lowrey Garden (Greenville, South Carolina)
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Greenville County -- Greenville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, a narrative garden description, site plans, and other information.
General:
The Lowrey Garden is lcoated a one-half acre lot in Greenville, South Carolina with horticultural specimen plantings of perennials, bulbs, shrubs and trees in garden rooms. The location in town on a busy street figures into the garden design which features Japanese maple trees and shrubs screening the open front yard of the 1949 house. The side and back garden rooms are bordered by pierced brick walls with plantings that bloom sequentially throughout the year. A sunny courtyard behind the house and a pond are set off by stonework walls. American boxwood hedges also define the separate garden rooms.
The garden has been developed by the present owners since 1993. Plants were chosen that suit the environment, such as zoysia grass, which will retain its green color year-round in the warm climate. In the spring flowering dogwood trees, azaleas, camellias, daffodils and bluebells are in bloom. For summer color there are hydrangeas, Oriental and day lilies, Ostrich ferns, Chinese fringe flower shrubs, and annuals planted in containers. The Japanese maple trees and various shrubs add color and texture in the colder months. The bulbs and shrubs in one corner of the garden have naturalized, with bluestone steps leading to a specimen Japanese maple tree.
Persons associated with the property include: Alice E. Howard (former owner, 1949-1980); Stephen and Kelsey Heiner (former owners, 1980-1982); John and Dianna Gilbert (former owners, 1983-1993).
Related Materials:
Lowrey Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (19 35 mm. slides (photographs))
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Greenville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File SC091
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / South Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12486

Beaumont -- Birdwell Garden

Architect:
Steinman and Goldman  Search this
Provenance:
Magnolia Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Birdwell Garden (Beaumont, Texas)
United States of America -- Texas -- Jefferson -- Beaumont
Scope and Contents:
33 digital images and 1 folder including worksheets, planting list, and other documentation.
General:
The original gardens for the Federal style house built in 1939 had privet hedges for privacy, beds of azaleas, and mature oak trees when the current owners began adding features in 1982. They maintained the formal symmetry that included parterres on either side of the house, added 300 clipped boxwoods along existing brick walkways, and established beds of camellias, hydrangeas, roses and other native plantings. There are three distinct garden areas: the street entrance garden in front of the house comprised of an open lawn with magnolias, oaks and perimeter beds; the drive entrance garden along the west side of the house with parterres, antique statues depicting the four seasons, crushed granite walkways, roses, azaleas, ferns and clipped jasmine shaded by a large oak. The third and largest garden behind the house, called the central garden, has a large lawn of St. Augustine grass bordered by clipped boxwoods. The surrounding gardens are rectangular and symmetrical and include camellias, fruit trees, blue plumbago, gardenias, hydrangeas, azaleas and other flowering trees and shrubs suited to the southern climate, some of which are planted in containers. Flowering vines including clematis, coral vine, passion vine, climbing roses and wisteria grow profusely on fences, iron trellises and the house. A bench marking the end of the central axis of the property has angel statues placed on either side, and there are other statues in the parterres.
This garden was damaged extensively by Hurricane Rita in 2005, which felled a large oak tree near the house in the central garden and also destroyed two rose gardens, container gardens, brick walkways and terraces and other shade plants. The hole left from the oak tree was transformed into a brick koi pond surrounded by jasmine and planted antique urns. The garden was restored to its formal symmetry once again in 2008 following damage from Hurricane Ike. One twenty-five-year-old climbing rose in this garden has survived both storms.
Persons associated with the garden include Captain Gerald Johnson (former owner, 1939-1941); Mr. and Mrs. Robert Robertson (former owners, 1941-1954); Mr. and Mrs. Joe Broussard (former owners, 1954-1982); and Steinman and Goldman (architects, 1939).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Texas -- Beaumont  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TX126
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Texas
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref13459

Dallas -- Barbara Hunt Crow Garden

Architect:
Davis, Richard Drummond  Search this
Landscape architect:
Presnall, Betty  Search this
Landscape designer:
Johnston, Kelly  Search this
Simpson, David  Search this
Stone mason:
Gialdi, Lazaro  Search this
Horticulturist:
Gant, Hillary  Search this
Erickson, Helena  Search this
Turner, Jimmy  Search this
Cauble, Chad  Search this
Cauble, Emily  Search this
Clint, Chip  Search this
Provenance:
Founders Garden Club of Dallas  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Barbara Hunt Crow Garden (Dallas, Texas)
United States of America -- Texas -- Dallas
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes an information sheet, a features plan, a slide view plan, a slide list and a plant list.
General:
The Barbara Hunt Crow Garden is a less than one acre garden in the Old Highland Park neighborhood in Dallas, Texas. It was established in 2001 and is comprised of multiple gardens rooms, including a cottage garden, a woodland garden, a shade garden, a stone terrace and two small meditation gardens. Prominent features of this garden include a large lawn in front of the house, high holly hedges, a large oak tree, perennial garden beds and a wide variety of plants suited for the Texas climate and soil.
This garden was redocumented in 2013 to show the addition of hte Peggy Martin Rose
Persons associated with the property include: Betty Presnall (landscape architect, 1999-2001), Kelly Johnston (landscape designer and project manager, 1999-2001), David Simpson (landscape designer of the rear terrace and fountain, 2001-2002), Lazaro Gialdi (stone mason of the rear terrace and fountain, 2002), Hillary Gant (horticulturist, 2002-2005), Helena Erickson (horticulturist, 2001-2003), Jimmy Turner (horticulturist, 2005-present), Chad and Emily Cauble (horticulturists, 2005-present) and Chip Clint (horticulturist, 1998-present).
Related Materials:
Barbara Hunt Crow Garden related holdings consist of 2 folders (17 35 mm. slides (photographs) + 1 photographic print)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Texas -- Dallas  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TX082
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Texas
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref13471

Dallas -- Elizabeth's Garden

Provenance:
Founders Garden Club of Dallas  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Elizabeth's Garden (Dallas, Texas)
United States of America -- Texas -- Dallas
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and an article.
General:
This small city garden is located on a corner lot of approximately one sixth of an acre overlooking the Dallas Country Club Golf Course. The garden was established in either 1991 or 1997 when the property was purchased by the current owners who downsized from a much larger two acre property. "Climbing Royal Sunset" roses are planted in all the beds and planters around the house. Some have climbed two stories tall and bloom until frost.
A walkway lined with topiaries lead to the stairs of the entrance of the house. Plantings include azaleas and roses. A stacked limestone rock wall borders the southern and eastern edge of the property and is planted with perennials and annuals.
The property includes two garden areas for seating and dining at the front and back of the house. The front garden (on the south end of the property) is protected by an 8 foot holly hedge which may be entered from the sidewalk through an arch in the hedge. The front garden features a blue stone slate terrace furnished with garden furniture for dining. The terrace is surrounded by beds planted with roses, hydrangeas, perennials such as irises, delphinium, daisies and tulips and daffodils in the spring. Two Japanese maples in planters provide year-round color.
The back garden (on the northwest corner of the property) is also bordered with roses and includes a terrace and patio, both of brick. A barbeque grill and smoker have been built into the eastern brick wall bordering the patio. A wooden pergola provides structure around the terrace seating area. Seasonally rotated perennials and annuals are planted in containers throughout the back garden.
Related Materials:
Elizabeth's Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (10 35 mm. slides (photographs))
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Texas -- Dallas  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TX090
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Texas
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref13478

Dallas -- Mulford Family Garden, The

Landscape architect:
Page, Benjamin G. Jr  Search this
Fields, Paul  Search this
Provenance:
Founders Garden Club of Dallas  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The Mulford Family Garden (Dallas, Texas)
United States of America -- Texas -- Dallas
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and plans.
General:
The Mulford Family Garden, located on two acres, was purchased in 1998 by the current owner. At the time, the house was surrounded by giant oak trees and a garden had so completely overgrown that the creek was not visible. The owners envisioned its potential and hired Nashville landscape architect Benjamin G. Page, Jr. (ASLA) to design an extensive garden renovation.The garden is now a special refuge for wildlife and a place of adventure and discovery for their children and their friends. Features include a tree house, forts and secret paths cut behind the hedges. The design incorporated the view of the creek, but rather than make it the focal point of the garden its view is meant to be a surprise. The final landscaping phase was the construction of a bridge to connect the property to the home of the owner's sister across the creek. Each summer, the property serves as a day camp for about fifty young children, organized in different areas of the garden.
Other properties designed by Benjamin Page include the residence of the Vice President of the United States at the Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C., The Dixon Gallery and Gardens in Memphis, Tennessee. The design for the Mulford house was implemented by Paul Fields (ASLA), President and Director of Design for Lambert's Landscape Company of Dallas.
Persons associated with the garden include Benjamin G Page, Jr. (landscape architect, 1998), Paul Fields (landscape architect, 2000),Schoelkopf family (1933), Shelby family (dates unknown) and Perrin family (dates unknown).
Related Materials:
The Mulford Family Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (27 35 mm. slides (photographs) + 1 photographic print)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Texas -- Dallas  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TX095
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Texas
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref13482
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