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Washington -- Victory Garden

Horticulturist:
Brunetti, Joseph  Search this
Howell, Walter  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
General:
The Victory Garden is a produce garden on the east lawn of the National Museum of American History (NMAH), at 9th Street NW in Washington, D.C. The garden first opened on the west side of NMAH in May 15, 2001. Its creation coincided with NMAH's exhibition "Within These Walls..." - an entire two-and-a-half story New England house, originally built in the 1700s. Horticulturist Walter Howell of the Horticulture Services Division (later Smithsonian Gardens) maintained the garden until 2006, when it was sidelined due to construction on the NMAH building. When construction finished in autumn 2008, horticulturist Joseph Brunetti brought the garden out of dormancy. The Victory Garden continued until spring 2013, when Brunetti reestablished it on the east side of NMAH. While this new incarnation contains a few traditional single-crop garden rows that characterized the first garden, Brunetti designed the new space to be less traditional and more inviting, with curvilinear paths and companion planting. The original garden site was returned to general landscaping.
The creation of the Smithsonian's Victory Garden was inspired by the American victory gardens of the 1940s. These were vegetable gardens grown by citizens on the home front during World War II, promoted by the U.S. government so that farm produce could be saved for the armed forces. A similar program existed during World War I, but the World War II movement was extremely popular. At its peak, there were nearly twenty million garden plots, and their harvests made up 44 percent of America's total vegetables.
The vegetables in the Victory Garden are heirloom varieties that were available to gardeners during WWII. There are more than fifty organically-grown vegetable varieties. Different crops grow between the spring and fall. Some of the harvest is used in the kitchen of NMAH's Stars and Stripes Café.
Starting in 2014, the Victory Garden has been the site of an annual late-summer event called FOOD in the Garden, a collaboration between Smithsonian Gardens and American History (After Hours) which educates attendees on the historical and cultural connections between gardens and communities.
Plantings include Bronze Arrow lettuce (Lactuca sativa), D'Anjou pear trees (Pyrus communis 'D'Anjou'), Mortgage Lifter tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum), eggplant (Solanum melongena), and pole beans (Phaselous vulgaris 'Dow Purple Podded').
Persons associated with the garden include: Walter Howell (horticulturist, 2001-2008), Joseph Brunetti (horticulturist, 2008- ).
Related Materials:
Victory Garden related holdings consist of (35mm slides (photographs), negatives, photographic prints, and digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG007
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref10

Washington -- Native Landscape at the National Museum of the American Indian

Creator:
Sakiestewa, Ramona, design collaborator  Search this
EDAW Inc., landscape architectural firm  Search this
Artist:
Naranjo-Morse, Nora, 1953-  Search this
House, Donna.  Search this
Building architect:
Cardinal, Douglas  Search this
Landscape architect:
Jones, Johnpaul A., 1941-  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
General:
The Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) and its surrounding Native Landscape garden opened on September 21, 2004. At a total of 4.25 acres, the building and landscape lie east of 4th Street SW and south of Jefferson Drive, on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Rather than a controlled, linear style that is found in much of the surrounding buildings, the NMAI museum and landscape evoke feelings of fluidity and connection with nature. The landscape contains more than 33,000 plants of approximately 150 species, all of which are native to the Piedmont region between the Atlantic coastal plain and the Appalachian Mountains. Additionally, all of the species have an ethnobotanical use for Native Americans, whether for food, medicine, fiber, dye, or ceremonial purposes.
Legislation was enacted to create NMAI on November 28, 1989. Leaders from nearly 150 native communities spanning North and Central America were consulted, culminating in a planning document entitled "The Way of the People," published in 1993. Architect Douglas Cardinal (Blackfoot tribe) of Ottawa, Canada, designed the building of the museum. For the landscape, the architectural firm EDAW, Inc. (now part of AECOM) collaborated with ethnobotanist Donna House (Navajo/Oneida) on the design and plant selection, and with landscape architect Johnpaul Jones (Choctaw/Cherokee) and artist Ramona Sakiestewa (Hopi).
The Native Landscape is comprised of four habitats of the natural regional landscape: upland hardwood forest (on the north side of the museum), wetlands (east), cropland (southeast), and meadow (southwest). The 24,000-square-foot forest habitat is divided into three zones with different soil moisture levels that affect the kinds of plants that grow in each zone. The 6,000-square-foot wetlands is a lush aquatic landscape filled with water lilies and cattails, inspired by the site's geologic history as a swamp. The 5,200-square-foot cropland is an organically sustained garden, maintained through Native American strategies of crop rotation and companion planting, along with the use of natural pest-predators such as ladybugs. Produce harvested from the cropland is used in NMAI's café and for on-site ceremonies. The 5,500-square-foot meadow lies on both sides of the south entrance, and is comprised of wildflowers, grasses, and two American elm trees.
Art and architecture adorn the landscape. Ever-evolving clay sculptures entitled "Always Becoming," designed by Nora Naranjo-Morse (Santa Clara Pueblo), have stood in the meadow habitat since 2007. The north side of NMAI features an acclaimed waterfall feature which represents Tiber Creek, a former tributary of the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. An offering area and many places of rest and reflection are built into the architecture of the landscape. Performances are held at the fire pit and outdoor amphitheater or at the Welcome Plaza. Astronomical artworks are engraved in the pavement at the museum's north and east entrances.
Four stone cardinal direction markers lie along the east-west and north-south axes of the building. These large boulders come from four corners of the western hemisphere, and date from different epochs: North (Canada, Basins Group era), south (Chile, Cretaceous period), east (Maryland, Cambrian period), and west (Hawaii, ca. 1662). Forty additional boulders lie along the landscape's perimeter, to serve as protective bollards and also symbolize the longevity and memories of native tribes. These "Grandfather Rocks" were blessed by American Indians in both Canada (from which they originated) and the United States.
Plantings include columbine (Aquilegia canadensis), flowering dogwood (Cornus florida), serviceberry (Amelanchier arborea), yellow wakerobin (Trillium luteum), mannagrass (Glyceria striata), wild rice (Zizania aquatica), buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis), goldenrod (Solidago sp.), watercress (Nasturtium officinale), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), corn (Zea mays), barley (Hordeum vulgare).
People associated with this garden include: EDAW (landscape architectural firm, circa 1989-2004). Donna House (Navajo/Oneida) (ethnobotanist, circa 1990-2004). Johnpaul Jones (Cherokee/Choctaw) (landscape architect, circa 1990-2004). Ramona Sakiestewa (Hopi) (design collaborator, circa 1990-2004). Nora Naranjo-Morse (Santa Clara Pueblo) (artist, 2007- ). Douglas Cardinal (Blackfoot) (building architect, circa 1990-2004).
Related Materials:
Native Landscape at the National Museum of the American Indian related holdings consist of (35mm slides (photographs), negatives, photographic prints, and digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG008
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref11

Washington -- Common Ground Garden

Landscape architect:
Lindell, Paul H.  Search this
Swanson, Karen  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Varying Form:
Heirloom Garden formerly known as.
General:
The Heirloom Garden is a one-third-acre terrace garden which surrounds the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. It was originally designed by landscape architects Paul Lindell and Karen Swanson of the Smithsonian's Horticulture Services Division (later Smithsonian Gardens), and opened in 1998.
The Heirloom Garden was comprised of plant varieties that were planted in American gardens from colonial times up until 1950, when agricultural practices became more industrialized. The garden was filled with annuals, perennials, bulbs, shrubs and trees, all of which are either natural species or varieties that have long been cultivated. Broadly considered "old-fashioned," these plant varieties are typically not used in large-scale agriculture, and are even uncommon in modern gardens. Heirloom plants were sprouted from seeds and bulbs carried from European homelands to America, where they have been passed down through generations of gardeners. Many of these classic flowers and herbs have historical uses rooted in folkways and/or legitimate medicine, including those from Medieval England and Ancient Greece.
In 2017, the Heirloom Garden was re-named Common Ground: Our American Garden to connect to the "Many Voices, One Nation" exhibition at the National Museum of American History. Common Ground shares the stories of Americans who have grown flowers and herbs as a way of honoring memory, providing healing, promoting discovery, and inspiring ingenuity.
Plantings in the former Heirloom Garden included Japanese wisteria (Wisteria floribunda), valerian (Centranthus ruber), feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), golden columbine (Aquilegia chrysantha), crape myrtle (Lagestroemia 'Sioux'), chive (Allium schoenoprasum), purple sage (Salvia officinalis 'Purpurea'), zinnia (Zinnia acerosa 'Cut and Come Again'), nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus 'Vesuvius').
People associated with this garden include: Paul Lindell (landscape architect, 1998), Karen Swanson (landscape architect, 1998).
Related Materials:
Common Ground Garden related holdings consist of (35mm slides (photographs), negatives, photographic prints, and digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG010
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref13

Washington -- Enid A. Haupt Garden

Donor:
Haupt, Enid A. (Enid Annenberg), 1906-2005  Search this
Principal architect:
Carlhian, Jean Paul  Search this
Consultant:
Collins, Lester, -1993  Search this
Stonecarver:
Seferlis, Constantine, 1928-2005  Search this
Architect:
Renwick, James, 1818-1895  Search this
Creator:
Ripley, S. Dillon (Sidney Dillon), 1913-2001 (Smithsonian secretary)  Search this
Sasaki Associates  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Varying Form:
Victorian Garden, formerly known as.
General:
The Enid A. Haupt Garden was dedicated on May 22, 1987. It is located between the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arts and Industries Building, and south of the Smithsonian Institution Building, commonly referred to as the Castle. This 4.3 acre area actually sits atop the Quadrangle complex - an underground facility made up of three Smithsonian museum spaces: the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, the National Museum of African Art, and the S. Dillon Ripley Center. Above-ground kiosk entrances to the Sackler and African Art museums are located in the Haupt Garden itself. The Haupt Garden contains three discrete gardens within it: the Parterre, the Moongate Garden, and the Fountain Garden.
After the Castle's construction was completed in 1855, the area to its south became known as the South Yard. In 1887, it functioned as a zoo for bison to promote the conservation of their over-hunted population. The bison were moved to the newly-established National Zoological Park in 1889, and for nearly a century, the South Yard was home to a number of different buildings including the Aerodrome Shop, a solar radiation lab, a bug house (where beetles cleaned skeletal remains of animal specimens), temporary storage and collection buildings, a U.S. Army hangar, and a greenhouse and Quonset hut for the Office of Horticulture. In 1976, the Smithsonian's Office of Horticulture (now Smithsonian Gardens) planted the Victorian Garden parterre on the South Yard, in celebration of America's Bicentennial and to complement a Victoriana exhibition on horticulture in the adjacent Arts and Industries Building. This garden was inspired by a similar parterre made for the 1876 Centennial celebration in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter authorized $500,000 for the planning and construction of the Quadrangle - an underground complex built in the South Yard - to house the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, the National Museum of African Art, and the S. Dillon Ripley Center. In 1982, the Victorian Garden was removed. Construction on the Quadrangle spanned from June 21, 1983 to 1987. Architect Jean Paul Carlhian of the firm Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson and Abbot was in charge of designing the Quadrangle complex which incorporated an initial design concept by Japanese architect Junzo Yoshimura.
Once basic construction was complete and soil returned to the ground-level (i.e. roof) of the Quadrangle, it was clear that there was more room for gardens beyond the reincorporated parterre. Smithsonian Secretary S. Dillon Ripley invited philanthropist Enid A. Haupt to tour the garden site, hoping Mrs. Haupt would finance a Zen garden west of the parterre. In fact, she financed the entire design and construction of the new garden with a $3 million endowment, stipulating that the garden be mature when it opened in 1987. With funds in place, work on the garden began, with the primary goal being to harmonize the stylistically varied buildings in and around the Quadrangle (the three entrance pavilions to the underground museums, the Smithsonian Castle, Freer Gallery of Art, and the Arts and Industries Building). The design of the garden was a collaborative effort between principal architect Jean Paul Carlhian, the landscape architectural firm Sasaki Associates, Inc., landscape architect Lester Collins, and James R. Buckler, Director of the Smithsonian's Office of Horticulture. Together they designed the three gardens described below.
Enid A. Haupt (1906-2005) was a publishing heiress and philanthropist who especially supported American horticulture. In addition to this garden, Mrs. Haupt's horticultural philanthropy created and/or preserved several renowned garden spaces including The Enid A. Haupt Glass Garden at the Howard A. Rusk Institute, NYU Medical Center in New York City; the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, New York; The Haupt Fountains on the Ellipse in Washington, D.C.; River Farm in Alexandria, Virginia; and The Cloisters in New York City. In 1994, the American Horticultural Society awarded her the Liberty Hyde Bailey award for her philanthropy.
The Parterre is the Victorian-style centerpiece of the Haupt Garden. It is a carefully manicured garden with a changing palette of colors and textures, laid out in symmetrical patterns that are redesigned every few seasons. Designs incorporate such motifs as diamonds, fleurs-de-lis, and scallops. While parterre is a French term meaning "on the ground," parterres as an ornamental garden style originated in 16th century Renaissance Italy.
The Moongate Garden is next to the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, and was inspired by the Temple of Heaven in Beijing, China. The Temple of Heaven was designed using a geometrical, axial layout, centered on the cardinal points of the compass. The Moongate Garden's dominant features are stone and water, which symbolize the body and spirit of the earth in Chinese culture. Two 9-foot-tall pink granite moon gates stand on the southwest and northeast corners of the garden; two more lie as benches in the opposite corners. A circular platform lies in the center of a granite-paved square pool, connected by bridges to each side of the square.
The Fountain Garden is next to the National Museum of African Art, and was modeled after the Court of the Lions at Alhambra, a 13th-century Moorish palace in Granada, Spain. As with most Islamic gardens, the Fountain Garden is symmetrical and includes a central fountain with four water channels. Respectively, these channels represent paradise itself, and the four rivers of paradise described in the Koran: water, milk, honey, and wine. At the garden's north end is a chadar - a patterned, sloping stone ramp that has water running down it.
The Renwick Gates are cast iron carriage gates at the garden's entrance on Independence Avenue. The gates were erected in 1979, based on an 1849 drawing by James Renwick, Jr., architect of the Castle. The design includes piers made of the same sandstone that went into the Castle's great reddish walls from a quarry in Seneca, Maryland.
A European linden tree once stood in the northeast corner of the South Yard. When construction on the Quadrangle began, Secretary Ripley directed that the tree remain unharmed. Construction personnel and arborists minded the tree, helping it live through the end of construction. However, it died of old age two years later, in 1989.
The Downing Urn was originally erected on the National Mall in 1856 in memory of landscape designer and horticulturist Andrew Jackson Downing (1815-1852). The urn was restored in 1972. In 1989, it was moved to where the linden tree had stood in the Haupt Garden.
Plantings include saucer magnolia (Magnolia x soulangeana), Wollemi pine (Wollemia nobilis), weeping Higan cherry (Prunus pendula 'Pendula Rosea'), golden shrimp plant (Pachystachys lutea), coneflower (Echinacea), dusty miller (Senecio cineraria), and pansy (Viola x wittrockiana).
Persons associated with the garden include: Enid A. Haupt (donor, 1987). Jean Paul Carlhian (principal architect, 1987). Lester Collins (landscape architect consultant, 1987). Constantine Seferlis (stonecarver, 1979). James Renwick Jr. (architect, 1849). James Goode (SI Castle keeper, design and construction supervisor, 1979-1987). S. Dillon Ripley (Smithsonian Secretary, 1964-1984). Michael Riordan (horticulturist, 1995- ).
Related Materials:
Enid A. Haupt Garden related holdings consist of 3,124 35mm slides (photographs), 979 photographic prints, 15 contact sheets, 12 transparencies, and digital images
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref4

Washington -- Pollinator Garden

Donor:
Smithsonian Women's Committee  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Varying Form:
Butterfly Habitat Garden, formerly known as.
General:
On June 4, 1995, the Butterfly Habitat Garden opened on the East side of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). The development of the garden was a collaboration between NMNH and the Smithsonian's Horticulture Services Division (now Smithsonian Gardens), and was largely funded by a grant awarded by the Smithsonian Women's Committee. The original garden area was essentially a road verge, but a GCA Millennium Founder's Fund Award from the Garden Club of America in 2000 allowed for an expansion, tripling the size to 400 x 40 feet. The gift also provided for the installation of walks, an irrigation system, and an amphitheater seating area. The purpose of the garden at that time was to highlight butterfly behavior with native plants from four represented habitats: wetlands, wood's edge, meadow, and backyard.
The Butterfly Habitat Garden was re-dedicated as the Pollinator Garden on June 21, 2016 to showcase a wider diversity of pollinators. Along with this change, native plants that were beneficial to pollinators other than butterflies - such as bees and beetles - were introduced, and the four specific habitats were no longer explicitly distinguished. The revised focus of the garden is the interdependency between plants and pollinators as a whole. Illustrated signs displayed around the garden inform readers about the pollination process.
Plantings include common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis), pawpaw (Asimina triloba), purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), verbena (Verbena bonariensis), and other native plants, shrubs, and trees specifically selected for providing nourishment and shelter to the pollinators.
Persons associated with the garden include: Smithsonian Women's Committee (donor, 1995). Garden Club of America (donor, 2000).
Related Materials:
Pollinator Garden related holdings consist of 589 35mm slides (photographs), 84 photographic prints, negatives, and digital images
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG002
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref5

Washington -- Kathrine Dulin Folger Rose Garden

Landscape architect:
Lindell, Paul H.  Search this
Swanson, Karen  Search this
Donor:
Folger, Lee M.  Search this
Lead horticulturist:
Gaskins, Shelley.  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
General:
The Kathrine Dulin Folger Rose Garden is located immediately east of the Smithsonian Institution Building (commonly referred to as the Castle) and north of the Smithsonian's Arts and Industries Building, on Constitution Avenue. This area was previously home to a smaller fragrance garden dating from the 1970s. Landscape architects Paul Lindell and Karen Swanson of the Smithsonian's Horticulture Services Division (now Smithsonian Gardens) designed the Folger Rose Garden in 1997. Installation began that year, and the garden was dedicated on October 7, 1998. The garden was made possible by a donation from Mr. and Mrs. Lee Merritt Folger, in honor of Folger's mother, Kathrine Dulin Folger (1904-1997). Kathrine was an advocate of horticulture and the Smithsonian Institution. In 2016, the garden underwent a redesign which continued to follow the original vision - to create a four-season garden with year-round interest.
The Folger Rose Garden features modern rose varieties created after 1867, particularly those which are disease-resistant. Roses in this garden have won awards from the All-American Rose Selections and the Royal Horticultural Society. Different varieties bloom from spring through autumn, while conifers and evergreens stand out in the winter. Groundcovers and other perennials are present to attract pollinators and provide plant diversity.
The garden's three-tiered cast-iron fountain was manufactured in the 1880s by the J. W. Fiske Iron Works Company. In 1977, the Smithsonian purchased it from the estate of Nanette F. Dunlop. The fountain first stood in the Victorian Garden (now the Enid A. Haupt Garden) adjacent to the Castle. It was restored in 1998 through the donations of Narinder and Rajinder Keith, and moved to the Folger Rose Garden. The Keiths named the fountain the Gur-Karma-Rana Keith Fountain, using the first letters of several Keith family members' names.
Plantings in winter include holly (Ilex x 'Emily Bruner') and winterberry (Ilex verticillata). Roses include hybrid tea (Rosa 'Andeli' Double Delight), floribunda (Rosa Europeana'), shrub (Rosa 'Amiga Mia'), and polyantha (Rosa 'The Fairy').
Persons associated with the garden include: Lee M. Folger (donor, 1998). Paul Lindell (landscape architect, 1997-1998). Karen Swanson (landscape architect, 1997-1998). Narinder Keith (donor, 1998). Rajinder K. Keith (donor, 1998). Shelly Gaskins (lead horticulturist, 2003- ). J. W. Fiske Iron Works Company (fountain manufacturer, circa 1885).
Related Materials:
Kathrine Dulin Folger Rose Garden related holdings consist of 339 35mm slides (photographs), 1 photographic print, and digital images
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG003
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref6

Washington -- Courtyard at Freer Gallery of Art

Donor:
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Landscape architect:
Platt, Charles A. (Charles Adams), 1861-1933  Search this
Museum director:
Lodge, John Ellerton, 1876-1942  Search this
Landscape designer:
Watson, Phillip  Search this
Creator:
Sasaki Associates  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
General:
The Smithsonian Institution's first art museum, the Freer Gallery of Art, opened to the public on May 9, 1923. The building and its courtyard have an Italian Renaissance-style architecture focused on symmetry and simplicity. In the courtyard, loggias (covered open-air corridors) lie between the surrounding walls and an inner-perimeter of arches, which in turn have an inner-border of shade trees and lower plantings. Brick pavers and white marble paths lead to the courtyard's center - a granite fountain surrounded by a ring of Japanese boxwood.
In 1906, industrialist Charles L. Freer (1854-1919) donated to the Smithsonian Institution his collection of Asian and American art, including works by the American expatriate artist James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903). Freer's friend, the acclaimed architect and illustrator Charles A. Platt (1861-1933), designed the museum and courtyard to house Freer's collection. Builders broke ground in September 1916, but construction was then delayed due to World War I. Freer died in September 1919, and work on the gallery was finally completed later that year.
The courtyard's first walls were largely glass doors and windows, to allow air and light to enter. In 1928, the Freer Gallery's first curator, John E. Lodge, directed for some of the courtyard's brick and marble paving to be replaced with lawn, to diminish heat and glare in the galleries. Advances in indoor-climate technology and concern for artwork preservation later led to replacing many of the glass doors with white marble walls.
In 1988, Sasaki Associates, Inc. began an extensive renovation of the gallery, which included dismantling the courtyard and excavating two levels beneath it. This provided for more storage space and connected the Freer with the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, together forming a national museum of Asian art. When the courtyard was reinstalled, it was again paved with brick and white marble, with no lawn. Landscape designer Phillip Watson was in charge of the plantings. The gallery and courtyard reopened in 1993.
Peacocks were temporarily installed in the courtyard in the 1920s, and again when the gallery reopened in 1993. The birds were a living reference to the gallery's most famous work, Whistler's masterpiece of interior mural art, the Peacock Room (1876-77).
Plantings include Japanese maple (Acer palmatum 'Burgundy Lace'), Persian ironwoods (Parrotia persica), Japanese boxwoods (Buxus microphylla var. japonica 'Green Beauty'), cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus), and Hinoki cypress (Chamecyparis obtusa).
Persons associated with the garden include: Charles L. Freer (donor, 1906). Charles A. Platt (landscape architect, 1918). John E. Lodge (museum director, 1920-1942). Sasaki Associates, Inc. (landscape architecture firm, 1988-1993). Philip Watson (landscape designer, circa 1992).
Related Materials:
Courtyard at Freer Gallery of Art related holdings consist of 504 35mm slides (photographs), 6 photographic prints, negatives, and digital images
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG004
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref7

Washington -- Mary Livingston Ripley Garden

Advocate:
Ripley, Mary Livingston.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Jacobsen, Hugh Newell  Search this
Horticulturist:
Draper, Janet.  Search this
Donor:
Folger, Kathrine Dulin.  Search this
Smithsonian Women's Committee  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Varying Form:
East or Victorian Fragrance Garden, formerly known as.
General:
The Mary Livingston Ripley Garden is a half-acre ornamental garden with over one thousand different plantings. Located between the Smithsonian's Arts and Industries Building and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the garden is immediately south of the National Mall and lies partly over the roof of the 9th Street tunnel, which was completed in 1971. The garden's beginning stems from tragedy; in 1976, a fire destroyed the Litchfield, Connecticut home of Smithsonian Secretary S. Dillon Ripley. Winter creeper, trained as espaliers by Ripley's mother, were rescued and replanted on the west side of the Hirshhorn's perimeter wall, which had been constructed two years prior. Ripley's wife Mary, a scholar and avid gardener, saw potential in the space as an inclusive garden accessible even to visitors who were visually impaired or in wheelchairs - a garden filled with fragrant plantings on raised beds. For funding, Mrs. Ripley appealed to the Smithsonian Women's Committee (SWC) which she herself had founded in 1966, and of which she was a former president. The SWC agreed and awarded a contract to the architect Hugh Newell Jacobsen in July 1978 for the design and construction. Construction was completed in 1981.
In 1988, the SWC renamed the garden as the Mary Livingston Ripley Garden, in honor of Mrs. Ripley's vision for what would otherwise have likely become a parking lot. Kathrine Dulin Folger, a supporter of the Smithsonian Institute and proponent of horticulture, established an endowment fund for the continued care of the garden in 1994. Horticulturalist Janet Draper began tending the garden in 1997, with the goal to expose visitors to a wide variety of ornamental plants coexisting in harmony. In 2009, foot traffic from crowds during the January 20th presidential inauguration of Barack Obama seemingly destroyed the garden. However, spring that year brought unexpected regrowth, demonstrating that this garden's strengths lie not only in aesthetics, but also in physical resilience.
The Ripley Garden's geometry is unusual in that its paths are predominantly curvilinear. This layout is meant to encourage visitors to slow down and enjoy the plantings. The paths and raised beds are constructed of brick. Features include an antique cast iron fountain, benches placed in alcoves, small birdhouses, and a vertical living wall installed in 2013.
Plantings include daylilies (Hemerocallis 'Mango Thrills'), tulips (Tulipa 'Snow Parrot,' 'Zurel,' 'Violet Beauty,' and 'Negrita'), grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum), witch hazel (Hamamelis x intermedia 'Arnold Promise'), Lenten rose (Helleborus x hybridus), and columbine (Aquilegia sp.).
See also Arts and Industries Building -- East/Fragrance Garden for an additional 822 35mm slides (photographs).
Persons associated with the garden include: Mary Livingston Ripley (advocate, circa 1970s). Smithsonian Women's Committee (donor, 1978). Hugh Newell Jacobsen (landscape architect, 1978-1981). Kathrine Dulin Folger (donor, 1994). Janet Draper (horticulturist, 1997- ).
Related Materials:
Mary Livingston Ripley Garden related holdings consist of 1,236 35mm slides (photographs), 164 photographic prints, negatives, and digital images
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG005
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref8

Washington -- Hirshhorn Sculpture Garden

Donor:
Hirshhorn, Joseph H.  Search this
Creator:
Forgey, Benjamin, art critic  Search this
Lerner, Abram, first director and curator  Search this
Owings, Nathaniel Alexander, 1903-1984, architect, original concept  Search this
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill  Search this
Landscape architect:
Collins, Lester, -1993  Search this
Urban, James  Search this
Architect:
Bunshaft, Gordon, 1909-1990  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
General:
The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, opened in October 1974. The grounds are west of 7th Street SW on the south side of the National Mall. The 2.7-acre museum and fountain plaza lie south of Jefferson Drive on the former site of the Army Medical Museum and Library (1887-1969). The 1.3-acre sculpture garden lies north of Jefferson Drive. The garden and plaza are two open-air galleries dedicated to showcasing modern sculptures, many of which had been collected and donated to the Smithsonian by the entrepreneur Joseph H. Hirshhorn (1899-1981).
The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden was first conceived in 1966, when Mr. Hirshhorn donated more than 5,500 works of art to the Smithsonian. In particular, the idea for the sculpture garden came from by Nathaniel Owings of the international architecture and engineering firm, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill of New York City. Firm partner Gordon Bunshaft carried out Owings' idea, proposing a two-acre sunken garden that would bisect the National Mall. The garden would be 7 feet below ground level with 3 foot high walls, creating a 10 foot deep enclave. A rectangular reflecting pool would dominate the space, surrounded by a pebble walkway. It was an austere Minimalist design with few plants.
The museum and sculpture garden's groundbreaking was in 1969, but Bunshaft's plan for the garden to extend across the Mall created much controversy, as it would interrupt the vista between the U.S. Capitol and the Washington Monument. Work on the sculpture garden was halted by Congress in January 1971. In February, Washington Star art critic Benjamin Fogey suggested turning the garden parallel to the Mall, and making the reflecting pool smaller. These suggestions were adopted, and construction resumed in July.
When the garden opened in 1974, it served as a neutral setting where the sculptures commanded much of the attention. It featured a center court 14 feet below ground level with a rectangular reflecting pool and two flanking terraces. Enclosed within high walls, it successfully reduced traffic noise. However, despite its sunken form, Bunshaft's Minimalist approach made for an uncomfortably exposed, bleak space. There was also no access for strollers or wheelchairs, and the pebble floor was difficult to walk on. In 1977, landscape architect, Lester Collins, of the member Smithsonian's Horticultural Advisory Committee and President of the Innisfree Foundation, redesigned the sunken garden to make it more user friendly. His goal was to provide ramps for easier access and to soften the area with extensive plantings. Construction began in 1979 and the garden reopened in 1981." Construction began in 1979 and the garden reopened in 1981. A pair of long ramps were installed, and the formerly harsh open area was now divided and bordered by lawns and plantings, and shaded by trees.
In 1991, landscape architect James Urban collaborated with Hirshhorn staff to renovate the museum's fountain plaza. Deteriorating concrete surfaces were replaced with granite, as had been called for in Bunshaft's original plan. A wheelchair entrance was added to provide access to the pathway that runs the perimeter of the plaza, and the adjacent Mary Livingston Ripley Garden. Sculptures were installed in new areas of lawn and flowering trees in the plaza's four corners, and also amid small groves of honey locust trees on the plaza's east and west sides. The plaza reopened in 1993.
In 2007, the artist Yoko Ono presented a Japanese dogwood tree to the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in conjunction with that year's Cherry Blossom Festival. This, along with nine other trees planted in Washington, D.C., made up part of her Wish Tree project. Visitors to these trees could write a wish on a paper tag and hang it on a branch. This is a custom associated with the Shinto temple gardens of Japan, where Ms. Ono grew up. While the nine other wishing trees were removed, the one in the sculpture garden remains as a permanent installation.
Plantings include weeping beech (Fagus sylvatica 'Pendula'), Japanese black pine (Pinus thunbergii), sugar maple (Acer saccharum), crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica), Boston ivy (Pathenocissus tricuspidata), climbing hydrangea (Hydrangea anomala), lily turf (Liriope muscari), southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), and crabapple (Malus).
Persons associated with the garden include: Joseph H. Hirshhorn (donor, 1966). Nathaniel Owings (architect, original concept, 1966). Gordon Bunshaft (architect, 1967-1974). Benjamin Forgey (art critic, 1971). Lester Collins (landscape architect, 1977-1981). Abram Lerner (first director and curator of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 1974-1984). James Urban (landscape architect, 1991-1993).
Related Materials:
Hirshhorn Sculpture Garden related holdings consist of (659 35mm slides (photographs), 6 photographic prints and digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG006
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref9

Perry H. Wheeler collection

Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Names:
Arlington National Cemetery (Arlington, Va.)  Search this
National Arboretum (U.S.)  Search this
Washington National Cathedral (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Bonnet, Henri, Ambassador  Search this
Bonnet, Henri, Madam  Search this
Estes, Billie Sol  Search this
Harriman, Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward, 1920-1997  Search this
Johnson, Lady Bird, 1912-  Search this
Mellon, Paul  Search this
Mellon, Rachel Lambert  Search this
Mesta, Perle, 1889-1975  Search this
Onassis, Jacqueline Kennedy, 1929-1994  Search this
Palmer, Bertha Honoré, 1849-1918  Search this
Truman, Margaret  Search this
Extent:
25.75 Cubic feet
3,958 Photographic items
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lists
Awards
Certificates
Invoices
Negatives
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographs
Invitations
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Plans (drawings)
Place:
Canada
White House (Washington, D.C.)
Africa
Europe
Caribbean
South America
West (U.S.)
Georgetown (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1880-1984
bulk 1950-1965
Summary:
The Perry H. Wheeler Collection includes the design, client and business records of Perry H. Wheeler, a landscape architect best known for his work on numerous townhouse gardens in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C., during the 1960s as well as the redesign of the White House Rose Garden in collaboration with Rachel Lambert ('Bunny') Mellon during the Kennedy administration.
Scope and Contents note:
The Perry H. Wheeler Collection includes the design, client and business records of Perry H. Wheeler, a landscape architect best known for his work on numerous townhouse gardens in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. during the 1960s as well as the redesign of the White House Rose Garen in collaboration with Rachel ('Bunny') Lambert Mellon during the Kennedy adminstration. The collection includes photographic images, plans, drawings, client correspondence, plant lists, invoices, newspaper and magazine clippings, certificates, awards, and invitations. The bulk of the collection and most of the professional papers date from about 1950 to 1965 and relate to various garden design projects by Wheeler, many of them located in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Of particular note are documents for Wheeler's public design work including the White House grounds, Washington National Cathedral, U. S. National Arboretum, President John F. Kennedy's gravesite in Arlington National Cemetery, and the British and Cambodian Embassies in Washington, D.C. Noteworthy correspondents include President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy, Ladybird Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, and Margaret Truman.

There are also over 3,000 35mm slides dating from the 1950s and 1960s that document Wheeler's personal travels to Europe, Africa, South America, the Caribbean, Canada, and the American West.
Biographical/Historical note:
Perry Hunt Wheeler (1913-1989), a Georgia native, began his higher education at Emory University, going on to graduate from the University of Georgia with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1937. Immediately afterward Wheeler enrolled in Harvard University from which he earned a graduate degree in Landscape Architecture in 1938. After graduation, Wheeler collaborated on garden projects in Atlanta, Georgia with fellow landscape architect Helen Hawkins Clarke. During World War II, Wheeler moved to Washington, D.C. to serve under the Office of Civilian Defense and the Office of Strategic Services Camouflage Division. Following the war, Wheeler worked at Garden House a Georgetown shop where he advised homeowners on tasteful garden design, accessories, and furnishings. By 1948 Wheeler had established a landscape architecture practice in Washington, D.C. His practice grew via word of mouth through Washington's social circles and through a shared office with landscape architect Rose Ishbel Greely, and later with architect Gertrude Sawyer.

In 1947, he formed a 'bachelor household' in Georgetown with James Snitzler. Later, at the invitation of Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon, he and Snitzler created a second home outside of Washington called "Spring Hill" on property owned by Mellon. Shortly after Snitzler's death in 1968, Wheeler moved permanently to Middleburg, Virginia and continued to travel, lecture, and consult with clients. Wheeler semi-retired in 1981 to 'Budfield,' a property in Rectortown, Virginia where he passed away in 1989, leaving his estate to his partner, James M. Stengle.

Wheeler is best known for his work on private gardens in Washington's Georgetown neighborhood. He frequently employed the use of intricate brickwork, low-maintenance planting, and simple water features in creating his charming and functional designs. His most noteworthy commissions outside the private realm include collaboration with Bunny Mellon on the White House Rose Garden, designing a Garden Club of America-commissioned gazebo and its surroundings for the U.S. National Arboretum, and plantings for the National Cathedral and President John F. Kennedy's gravesite in Arlington National Cemetery.
Provenance:
Gift from the estate of James M. Stengle, 1993.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Presidents -- United States  Search this
Landscape architects  Search this
Presidents' spouses -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lists
Awards
Certificates
Invoices
Negatives
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographs
Invitations
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Plans (drawings)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-whe
Online Media:

Stroud Garden, Garden Images

Landscape architect:
Greely, Rose, 1887-1969  Search this
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Former owner:
Stroud, Franklin L. Dr., d. 2008  Search this
Magnuson, Laura T.  Search this
Magnuson, Paul B.  Search this
Shoemaker, Frances  Search this
Jones, Fred W.  Search this
Collection Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Collection Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Stroud Garden (Washington, D.C.)
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets, plans, financial documents, correspondence, plant lists, copies and photocopies of articles featuring the garden, and other information.
General:
Noted landscape architect Rose Greely did the original design for this garden, while Perry Wheeler undertook extensive remodeling beginning in the early 1950s. A typical small Georgetown garden only 48 feet wide, its privacy was assured by a wisteria-topped brick wall, shade trees, and shrubs around its borders. The plan divided the area into several distinct sections, including a shade terrace, living terrace, lawn, lawn terrace, and even a small circular formal vegetable and herb garden. A fountain adjacent to the living terrace provided white noise to mask the sounds of the urban setting. The Wheeler portion of the series includes not only visual images but plans, financial records, and other documentation. Greely's architectural drawings and papers are housed in Special Collections at the University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Virginia.
Persons associated with the garden include Rose Greely (landscape architect, circa 1920-1940); Perry H. Wheeler (landscape architect, circa 1951-1964); Dr. Franklin L. Stroud (former owner, 1976-2008); Paul B. and Laura T. Magnuson (former owners, 1946-1974); Frances Shoemaker (former owner); and Fred W. Jones (former owner).
Related Materials:
Stroud Garden related holdings consist of 3 folders (26 slides (photographs); 1 photographic print; 104 safety film negatives)
See others in:
Garden Club of America Collection, ca. 1920-[ongoing].
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE, File DC009
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Perry H. Wheeler collection / Project Files / District of Columbia / DC009: Washington -- Paul B. Magnuson Garden
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-whe-ref1004

Greely Garden, Garden Images

Landscape architect:
Greely, Rose, 1887-1969  Search this
Former owner:
Greely, Rose, 1887-1969  Search this
Collection Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Collection Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Greely Garden (Washington, D.C.)
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets.
General:
Noted landscape architect Rose Greely's Washington, D.C., home garden was photographed by Perry Wheeler in the late 1940s. It had been under development since at least the 1920s. The compact (20 feet wide by 65 feet long) Colonial Revival design was in keeping with the scale of Greely's Federal style Georgetown home. Seasonally rotational plantings in borders and beds included spring bulbs, boxwood edging, other evergreens, and gravel paths. A small terrace seating area with chairs was placed at the far end of the garden, while another seating area with a small fountain and pool was adjacent to the house. Garden ornaments included a strawberry pot and a hand-blown glass flagon. Greely's architectural drawings and papers, including those relating to her garden, are housed in Special Collections at the University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Virginia.
Persons associated with the garden include Rose Greely (landscape architect and former owner, ca. 1920-1969).
Related Materials:
Greely Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (6 slides (photographs))
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE, File DC019
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Perry H. Wheeler collection / Project Files / District of Columbia / DC019: Washington -- Rose Greely Garden
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-whe-ref1005

[Greely Garden]: looking out toward the garden from the terrace adjacent to the house.

Photographer:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Collection Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Extent:
1 Slides (photographs) (col., 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Place:
Greely Garden (Washington, D.C.)
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Date:
[between 1945 and 1949]
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Fences -- wooden  Search this
Hedges  Search this
Walkways, gravel  Search this
Tulips  Search this
Chairs  Search this
Strawberry jars  Search this
Edging, brick  Search this
Fountains  Search this
Stairs, brick  Search this
Plants, Potted  Search this
Boxwood  Search this
Outdoor furniture  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE, Item DC019004
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Perry H. Wheeler collection / Project Files / District of Columbia / DC019: Washington -- Rose Greely Garden / DC019: Greely Garden, Garden Images
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-whe-ref1006

[Greely Garden]: looking toward the house terrace from the garden.

Photographer:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Collection Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Extent:
1 Slides (photographs) (col., 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Place:
Greely Garden (Washington, D.C.)
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Date:
[between 1945 and 1949]
General:
Rose Greely is the woman on the far left.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Fences -- wooden  Search this
Hedges  Search this
Walkways, gravel  Search this
Tulips  Search this
Chairs  Search this
Strawberry jars  Search this
Edging, brick  Search this
Boxwood  Search this
Bulbs  Search this
Outdoor furniture  Search this
Terraces  Search this
Women  Search this
Dogs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE, Item DC019005
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Perry H. Wheeler collection / Project Files / District of Columbia / DC019: Washington -- Rose Greely Garden / DC019: Greely Garden, Garden Images
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-whe-ref1007

[Greely Garden]: flowerbeds edged in hedges, gravel walkways.

Photographer:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Collection Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Extent:
1 Slides (photographs) (col., 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Place:
Greely Garden (Washington, D.C.)
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Date:
[between 1945 and 1949]
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Fences -- wooden  Search this
Hedges  Search this
Walkways, gravel  Search this
Tulips  Search this
Chairs  Search this
Strawberry jars  Search this
Edging, brick  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE, Item DC019006
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Perry H. Wheeler collection / Project Files / District of Columbia / DC019: Washington -- Rose Greely Garden / DC019: Greely Garden, Garden Images
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-whe-ref1008

Herter Garden, Garden Images

Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Former owner:
Herter, Christian Archibald, 1895-1966  Search this
Herter, Mary Caroline Pratt, 1895-1980  Search this
Collection Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Collection Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Herter Garden (Washington, D.C.)
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets, copies of magazine and newspaper articles featuring the garden, orders and invoices, correspondence, and other information.
General:
The Georgetown garden of Christian A. Herter and Mary Caroline Pratt Herter involved Perry Wheeler for a period of about 10 years. Wheeler's association began in 1954, when he provided additions to an original plan (with plant names) by Cary Millholland Parker, and lasted until at least 1964, when he created a new design for the garden's pool. Typical of Georgetown gardens, the Herter Garden occupied a relatively small space behind its Federal period house, situated cheek by jowl with its neighbors. Privacy was provided by brick walls, a bamboo fence, and shrub and tree plantings. A wide brick walkway led to a small ornamental pool at the back of the garden, while smaller brick walkways provided additional circulation. Azaleas, magnolia, boxwood, spring bulbs, and other plantings amply filled the garden space, while seating was provided on a terrace area near the pool.
Persons associated with the garden include Perry H. Wheeler (landscape architect, 1954-1964) and Christian Archibald and Mary Caroline Pratt Herter (former owners, 1943-1980).
Related Materials:
Herter Garden related holdings consist of 3 folders (30 slides (photographs); 2 photographic prints; 1 safety film negative; 10 plans; 3 drawings; 1 blueprint)
See others in:
Garden Club of America Collection, ca. 1920-[ongoing].
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE, File DC020
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Perry H. Wheeler collection / Project Files / District of Columbia / DC020: Washington -- Christian A. Herter Garden
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-whe-ref1009

[Herter Garden]: view of garden in spring, showing lawn, walkways and flowering trees in containers.

Photographer:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Collection Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Extent:
1 Slides (photographs) (col., 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Place:
Herter Garden (Washington, D.C.)
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Date:
1959 Apr.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Patios, brick  Search this
Chairs -- Iron  Search this
Azaleas  Search this
Dogwoods  Search this
Outdoor furniture  Search this
Tulips  Search this
Barrels  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE, Item DC020001
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Perry H. Wheeler collection / Project Files / District of Columbia / DC020: Washington -- Christian A. Herter Garden / DC020: Herter Garden, Garden Images
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-whe-ref1010

[Herter Garden]: head-on view of pond and surrounding terrace.

Photographer:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Collection Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Extent:
1 Slides (photographs) (col., 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Place:
Herter Garden (Washington, D.C.)
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Date:
1959 Apr.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Azaleas  Search this
Boxwood  Search this
Walls, brick  Search this
Walkways, brick  Search this
Fountains  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE, Item DC020006
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Perry H. Wheeler collection / Project Files / District of Columbia / DC020: Washington -- Christian A. Herter Garden / DC020: Herter Garden, Garden Images
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-whe-ref1011

[Herter Garden]: corner of lawn and walkway leading to stairs.

Photographer:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Collection Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Extent:
1 Slides (photographs) (col., 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Place:
Herter Garden (Washington, D.C.)
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Date:
1959 Apr.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Azaleas  Search this
Walkways, brick  Search this
Chairs -- Iron  Search this
Magnolias  Search this
Rhododendrons  Search this
Stairs  Search this
Latticework  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE, Item DC020012
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Perry H. Wheeler collection / Project Files / District of Columbia / DC020: Washington -- Christian A. Herter Garden / DC020: Herter Garden, Garden Images
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-whe-ref1012

[Herter Garden]: view of azaleas and brick walkway.

Photographer:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Collection Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Extent:
1 Slides (photographs) (col., 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Place:
Herter Garden (Washington, D.C.)
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Date:
1959 Apr.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Azaleas  Search this
Walkways, brick  Search this
Tulips  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE, Item DC020019
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Perry H. Wheeler collection / Project Files / District of Columbia / DC020: Washington -- Christian A. Herter Garden / DC020: Herter Garden, Garden Images
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-whe-ref1013

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