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Oral history interview with Rockne Krebs

Interviewee:
Krebs, Rockne, 1938-2011  Search this
Interviewer:
Forgey, Benjamin  Search this
Names:
Caro, Anthony, 1924-  Search this
Noland, Kenneth, 1924-2010  Search this
Olitski, Jules, 1922-2007  Search this
Extent:
164 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1990 Jan. 27-Feb. 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Rockne Krebs conducted 1990 Jan. 27-Feb.3, by Benjamin Forgey, for the Archives of American Art.
Krebs discusses growing up in Kansas City; his early interest in art; childhood art classes at Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art; his family and their home; studying sculpture at the University of Kansas; influential teachers; attending Naval Officer's Training School; his U.S. Navy service and art education while in the Navy; working in Washington, D.C. as the Public Affairs Officer for Vice-Admiral Frost in the 1960s; his wife Denise and their daughter Heather; meeting Anthony Caro, Kenneth Noland, and Jules Olitski; his "Chevron" series; his interest in planes, light, space, and "dematerializing" sculpture; the influence of Walter Hopps; working with laser specialists and Hewlett Packard equipment; his outdoor city-scale laser sculpture; and his early principal patrons Mr. and Mrs. Philip M. Stern and works created for them. Krebs also describes in detail his laser sculptures for the New Orleans Museum of Art (1971) and St. Petersburg (1975-1976) and comments on economic, political and social aspects of the art world.
Biographical / Historical:
Rockne Krebs (1938-2011) was a sculptor from Washington, D.C.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 14 digital wav files. Duration is 7 hrs., 27 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others. Funding for these interviews provided by the Lannan Foundation.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Sculpture -- Technique  Search this
Sculptors -- Washington (D.C.) -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.krebs90
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-krebs90
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Sam Gilliam

Interviewee:
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
Interviewer:
Forgey, Benjamin  Search this
Names:
Coalition of Washington Artists  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
District of Columbia Arts Center, Inc.  Search this
Jefferson Place Gallery  Search this
Washington Gallery of Modern Art (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Washington Project for the Arts (D.C.)  Search this
Downing, Thomas, 1928-1985  Search this
Hopps, Walter  Search this
Krebs, Rockne, 1938-2011  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (Sound recording, sound cassettes)
54 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1989 Nov. 4-11
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Sam Gilliam conducted 1989 Nov. 4-11, by Ben Forgey for the Archives of American Art. Gilliam speaks of his decision to come to Washington, D.C., from Louisville, Ky.; his shift from figurative painting to abstract painting; meeting Washington painters Robert Gates and Tom Downing; the "stature" of Tom Downing in the Washington art scene in the 1960s and Walter Hopps' role; influential exhibitions at the Jefferson Place Gallery and the Washington Gallery of Modern Art; being a Washington artist and a black artist; artist/teachers at American University; the Johnson Avenue Workshop grant; his relationship with Rockne Krebs; the history of the Washington Coalition of Artists; the Corcoran Gallery and the Washington Project for the Arts' relationship to Washington artists; his involvement with the District of Columbia Art Center; teaching; and his working methods. Gilliam also discusses various paintings, processes, materials, ideas and experiments at length. He recalls Gene Davis, Howard Mehring, Ken Noland, Morris Louis, Nesta Dorrance, Alma Thomas, Lou Stovall, Al Nodal, Jock Reynolds, Michael Botwinick, Willem de Looper, Paul Reed, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Sam Gilliam (1933- ) was a painter of Washington, D.C.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African American painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.gillia89
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gillia89
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Willem De Looper

Interviewee:
De Looper, Willem  Search this
Interviewer:
Forgey, Benjamin  Search this
Names:
American University (Washington, D.C.). Fine Arts Dept.  Search this
Phillips Collection  Search this
Extent:
134 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1992 January 26-February 29
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Willem De Looper conducted 1992 January 26 and February 29, by Benjamin Forgey, for the Archives of American Art. De Looper discusses growing up in the Hague, in Holland, during WWII; his family and educational background; moving to the United States in 1950; his U.S. Army service; his studies at American University and his teachers including Robert Gates, Ben Summerford, William Calfee, and Sarah Baker; his early experiments with abstraction; his first studio in Washington, D.C.; exhibiting at the Jefferson Place Gallery in the 1960s and later at the B.R. Kornblatt Gallery; working at the Phillips Collection for twenty-five years; and materials, techniques, and influences in his painting. He recalls Tom Downing, the Institute of Contemporary Art (Washington, D.C.), John Gernand, Sam Gilliam, Michael Clark, Duncan and Marjorie Phillips, Harold Giese, William Woodward, Jim McLaughlin, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Willem De Looper (1932-2009) was a painter from Washington, D.C.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hr., 23 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (D.C.) -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art students -- Washington (D.C.) -- Interviews  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.deloop92
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-deloop92
Online Media:

Benjamin Forgey papers

Creator:
Forgey, Benjamin  Search this
Extent:
28.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
circa 1964-2015
Scope and Contents:
A majority of the collection contains subject and research files documenting the writings of Benjamin Forgey and focuses on urban development, the art scene, and museum and monument building projects in Washington, D.C. Also included are administrative files, photographs, correspondence, and sound cassettes of lectures by Forgey on Washington architecture.
Biographical / Historical:
Benjamin Forgey (1938- ) is an architecture and art critic in Washington, D.C. Forgey wrote for the Washington Star from 1964 to 1981, and then for the Washington Post where he focused on architecture until his retirement in 2006.
Provenance:
Donated 2014 by Benjamin Forgey.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Occupation:
Art critics -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Architecture -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art, Municipal  Search this
City planning  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.forgbenj
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-forgbenj

Benjamin Forgey papers, circa 1964-2015

Creator:
Forgey, Benjamin F., 1938-  Search this
Forgey, Benjamin F., 1938-  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Topic:
Architecture -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art, Municipal  Search this
City planning  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16251
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)370603
AAA_collcode_forgbenj
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_370603

Oral history interview with Rockne Krebs, 1990 Jan. 27-Feb. 3

Interviewee:
Krebs, Rockne, 1938-2011  Search this
Krebs, Rockne, 1938-2011  Search this
Interviewer:
Forgey, Benjamin F., 1938-  Search this
Subject:
Caro, Anthony  Search this
Noland, Kenneth  Search this
Olitski, Jules  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Sculpture -- Technique  Search this
Sculptors -- Washington (D.C.) -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13035
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213466
AAA_collcode_krebs90
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213466

Oral history interview with Sam Gilliam, 1989 Nov. 4-11

Interviewee:
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
Interviewer:
Forgey, Benjamin F., 1938-  Search this
Subject:
Downing, Thomas  Search this
Hopps, Walter  Search this
Krebs, Rockne  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
District of Columbia Arts Center, Inc.  Search this
Jefferson Place Gallery  Search this
Coalition of Washington Artists  Search this
Washington Gallery of Modern Art (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Washington Project for the Arts (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African American painters  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11472
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213260
AAA_collcode_gillia89
Theme:
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213260
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Willem De Looper, 1992 January 26-February 29

Interviewee:
De Looper, Willem, 1932-2009  Search this
De Looper, Willem, 1932-2009  Search this
Interviewer:
Forgey, Benjamin F., 1938-  Search this
Subject:
Phillips Collection  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.). Fine Arts Dept.  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Art students -- Washington (D.C.) -- Interviews  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12592
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214744
AAA_collcode_deloop92
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_214744
Online Media:

How the West Was Wrong

Author:
Forgey, Benjamin  Search this
Subject:
National Museum of American Art (U.S.)  Search this
West as America: Reinterpreting Images of the Frontier, 1820-1920 (Exhibition) (1991: Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Place:
North America
United States
Date:
March 18, 1991
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Art objects  Search this
Art--History  Search this
Controversies  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Publisher:
Washington, D.C
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_2466

The Quadrangle: Reaching for Unseen Heights

Author:
Forgey, Benjamin  Search this
Subject:
Carlhian, Jean-Paul  Search this
Ripley, Sidney Dillon 1913-2001  Search this
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery (Smithsonian Institution)  Search this
National Museum of African Art (U.S.)  Search this
S. Dillon Ripley International Center  Search this
Place:
Enid A. Haupt Garden (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
September 27, 1987
Topic:
Smithsonian Institution Quadrangle Complex  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Buildings  Search this
Art objects  Search this
New Museums  Search this
Publisher:
Washington, D.C
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_2467

Ripley's Believe It & Build: Shaping Washington & the Smithsonian

Author:
Forgey, Benjamin  Search this
Subject:
Ripley, Sidney Dillon 1913-2001  Search this
Owings, Nat  Search this
Brown, J. Carter  Search this
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Physical description:
Cityscape
Date:
September 15, 1984
Topic:
Secretaries  Search this
Successful people  Search this
Retirement  Search this
SI Buildings  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_2534

Quadrangle's Coming Attractions -- Treasures from Asia and Africa

Author:
Forgey, Benjamin  Search this
Subject:
Carlhian, Jean-Paul  Search this
Ripley, Sidney Dillon 1913-2001  Search this
Freer, Charles Lang 1854-1919  Search this
Robbins, Warren M  Search this
Sackler, Arthur M  Search this
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery (Smithsonian Institution)  Search this
Museum of African Art (U.S.)  Search this
S. Dillon Ripley International Center  Search this
Freer Gallery of Art  Search this
Physical description:
pgs. 77-89
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Enid A. Haupt Garden (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
February 1983
Topic:
Smithsonian Institution Quadrangle Complex  Search this
Secretaries  Search this
Museum buildings  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Collectors and collecting  Search this
Publisher:
Washington, DC Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_3776

Washington -- Hirshhorn Sculpture Garden

Donor:
Hirshhorn, Joseph H.  Search this
Creator:
Forgey, Benjamin, art critic  Search this
Lerner, Abram, first director and curator  Search this
Owings, Nathaniel Alexander, 1903-1984, architect, original concept  Search this
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill  Search this
Landscape architect:
Collins, Lester, -1993  Search this
Urban, James  Search this
Architect:
Bunshaft, Gordon, 1909-1990  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
General:
The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, opened in October 1974. The grounds are west of 7th Street SW on the south side of the National Mall. The 2.7-acre museum and fountain plaza lie south of Jefferson Drive on the former site of the Army Medical Museum and Library (1887-1969). The 1.3-acre sculpture garden lies north of Jefferson Drive. The garden and plaza are two open-air galleries dedicated to showcasing modern sculptures, many of which had been collected and donated to the Smithsonian by the entrepreneur Joseph H. Hirshhorn (1899-1981).
The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden was first conceived in 1966, when Mr. Hirshhorn donated more than 5,500 works of art to the Smithsonian. In particular, the idea for the sculpture garden came from by Nathaniel Owings of the international architecture and engineering firm, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill of New York City. Firm partner Gordon Bunshaft carried out Owings' idea, proposing a two-acre sunken garden that would bisect the National Mall. The garden would be 7 feet below ground level with 3 foot high walls, creating a 10 foot deep enclave. A rectangular reflecting pool would dominate the space, surrounded by a pebble walkway. It was an austere Minimalist design with few plants.
The museum and sculpture garden's groundbreaking was in 1969, but Bunshaft's plan for the garden to extend across the Mall created much controversy, as it would interrupt the vista between the U.S. Capitol and the Washington Monument. Work on the sculpture garden was halted by Congress in January 1971. In February, Washington Star art critic Benjamin Fogey suggested turning the garden parallel to the Mall, and making the reflecting pool smaller. These suggestions were adopted, and construction resumed in July.
When the garden opened in 1974, it served as a neutral setting where the sculptures commanded much of the attention. It featured a center court 14 feet below ground level with a rectangular reflecting pool and two flanking terraces. Enclosed within high walls, it successfully reduced traffic noise. However, despite its sunken form, Bunshaft's Minimalist approach made for an uncomfortably exposed, bleak space. There was also no access for strollers or wheelchairs, and the pebble floor was difficult to walk on. In 1977, landscape architect, Lester Collins, of the member Smithsonian's Horticultural Advisory Committee and President of the Innisfree Foundation, redesigned the sunken garden to make it more user friendly. His goal was to provide ramps for easier access and to soften the area with extensive plantings. Construction began in 1979 and the garden reopened in 1981." Construction began in 1979 and the garden reopened in 1981. A pair of long ramps were installed, and the formerly harsh open area was now divided and bordered by lawns and plantings, and shaded by trees.
In 1991, landscape architect James Urban collaborated with Hirshhorn staff to renovate the museum's fountain plaza. Deteriorating concrete surfaces were replaced with granite, as had been called for in Bunshaft's original plan. A wheelchair entrance was added to provide access to the pathway that runs the perimeter of the plaza, and the adjacent Mary Livingston Ripley Garden. Sculptures were installed in new areas of lawn and flowering trees in the plaza's four corners, and also amid small groves of honey locust trees on the plaza's east and west sides. The plaza reopened in 1993.
In 2007, the artist Yoko Ono presented a Japanese dogwood tree to the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in conjunction with that year's Cherry Blossom Festival. This, along with nine other trees planted in Washington, D.C., made up part of her Wish Tree project. Visitors to these trees could write a wish on a paper tag and hang it on a branch. This is a custom associated with the Shinto temple gardens of Japan, where Ms. Ono grew up. While the nine other wishing trees were removed, the one in the sculpture garden remains as a permanent installation.
Plantings include weeping beech (Fagus sylvatica 'Pendula'), Japanese black pine (Pinus thunbergii), sugar maple (Acer saccharum), crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica), Boston ivy (Pathenocissus tricuspidata), climbing hydrangea (Hydrangea anomala), lily turf (Liriope muscari), southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), and crabapple (Malus).
Persons associated with the garden include: Joseph H. Hirshhorn (donor, 1966). Nathaniel Owings (architect, original concept, 1966). Gordon Bunshaft (architect, 1967-1974). Benjamin Forgey (art critic, 1971). Lester Collins (landscape architect, 1977-1981). Abram Lerner (first director and curator of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 1974-1984). James Urban (landscape architect, 1991-1993).
Related Materials:
Hirshhorn Sculpture Garden related holdings consist of (659 35mm slides (photographs), 6 photographic prints and digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG006
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref9

Are Years What? (for Marianne Moore)

Artist:
Mark di Suvero, American, b. Shanghai, China, 1933  Search this
Medium:
Steel, paint, and wire
Dimensions:
480 × 480 × 360 in., 18725 lb. (1219.2 × 1219.2 × 914.4 cm, 8493.6 kg)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
(1967)
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Joseph H. Hirshhorn Purchase Fund and Gift of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, by exchange, 1999
Accession Number:
99.19
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
On View:
Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden (Washington, DC), Garden
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py29932ac7e-4f61-4331-b925-585e1255ff10
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_99.19

Carmine Theater

Artist:
John Sloan, American, b. Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, 1871–1951  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
26 1/8 X 32 IN. (66.1 X 81.2 CM.)
Type:
Painting
Date:
1912
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of the Joseph H. Hirshhorn Foundation, 1966
Accession Number:
66.4616
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
School:
American Realism (Ashcan School)
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py23cde1a38-d73c-4602-ad2e-560863059c4e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_66.4616

2-2-1: To Dickie and Tina

Artist:
Richard Serra, American, b. San Francisco, California, 1938  Search this
Medium:
Steel
Dimensions:
51 3/8 × 120 1/4 × 99 3/8 in. (130.5 × 305.4 × 252.4 cm)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
(1969/fabricated in steel, 1986)
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Joseph H. Hirshhorn Purchase Fund, 1986
Accession Number:
86.5898
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
School:
Minimalism
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py2c385443c-a32b-4240-bee6-535bba6548d0
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_86.5898

Holy Mountain III

Artist:
Horace Pippin, American, b. West Chester, Pennsylvania, 1888–1946  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
25 1/4 × 30 1/4 in. (64.6 × 76.8 cm)
Type:
Painting
Date:
1945
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966
Accession Number:
66.4069
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
School:
Outsider Art
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py273cf3ed9-be85-4c98-871c-98c75fd64c85
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_66.4069

The Burghers of Calais

Artist:
Auguste Rodin, French, b. Paris, 1840–1917  Search this
Medium:
Bronze
Dimensions:
79 3/8 × 80 7/8 × 77 1/8 in., 6000 lb. (201.6 × 205.4 × 195.9 cm, 2721.6 kg)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
(1884-1889/cast 1953-1959)
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966
Accession Number:
66.4340
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
On View:
Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden (Washington, DC), Garden
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py2c0c4aa30-2cf5-4268-98f8-c83d9e63bc34
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_66.4340

Fossil for Bob Morris

Artist:
Robert Rauschenberg, American, b. Port Arthur, Texas, 1925–2008  Search this
Medium:
Paper, metal, plastic, rubber, and fabric on canvas
Dimensions:
84 × 60 × 9 in. (213.4 × 152.4 × 22.9 cm) [variable]
Type:
Collage
Date:
1965
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1972
Accession Number:
72.240
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
School:
Pop Precursors
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py240dd565e-c274-4ff2-bae9-a03595ffb013
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_72.240

Where

Artist:
Morris Louis, American, b. Baltimore, Maryland, 1912–1962  Search this
Medium:
Magna on canvas
Dimensions:
99 3/8 x 142 1/2 in. (252.3 x 361.9 cm)
Type:
Painting
Date:
1960
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966
Accession Number:
66.3112
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
School:
Washington Color School
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py21e6c0312-91a3-4a32-9f81-d426e178da4d
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_66.3112

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