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Cleveland -- Forest Hill

Former owner:
Rockefeller, John D.  Search this
Rockefeller, John D., Jr  Search this
Landscape architect:
Taylor, A. D.  Search this
Collection Collector:
Marchand, Richard  Search this
Extent:
4 slides (photographs)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Postcards
Place:
United States of America -- Ohio -- Cuyahoga County -- Cleveland
Forest Hill (Cleveland, Ohio)
General:
001: J.D. Rockefeller's Residence, Cleveland, 10673. Postcard circa 1901-1915.

002: Forest Hill, John D. Rockefeller's Residence, Cleveland, Ohio. Postcard circa 1901-1915.

003: 2158 John D. Rockefeller's Residence, "Forest Hill," Cleveland, Ohio. Copyright 1908 by Detroit Publishing Co.

004: Entrance to John D. Rockefeller's Residence, Cleveland, Ohio. Postcard circa 1901-1915.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Ohio -- Cleveland  Search this
Gatehouses  Search this
Fences -- wrought iron  Search this
Driveways  Search this
Mansions  Search this
Flower beds  Search this
Hillside planting  Search this
Parks  Search this
Woodlands  Search this
Lawns  Search this
Shrubs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postcards
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Richard Marchand historical postcard collection.
Identifier:
AAG.MAR, File OH199
See more items in:
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection (35mm slides)
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection (35mm slides) / Ohio
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-mar-ref1697

Forest Service, 1925-1944

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary  Search this
Container:
Box 57 of 156
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 46, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 1: General Correspondence, 1925-1949 / Box 57
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0046-refidd1e17590

Folder 11 Forest Service, 1907-1924

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary  Search this
Container:
Box 91 of 112
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 45, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 3: RECORDS RELATED TO CABINET DEPARTMENTS AND OTHER GOVERNMENT OFFICES, 1902-1926. / Box 91
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0045-refidd1e12910

Folder 8 de Forest, Henry W., 1907-1915. Deals with various philanthropic subjects, such as a "plan to rescue the poor whites of the South".

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary  Search this
Container:
Box 19 of 112
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 45, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 1: CORRESPONDENCE, 1890-1929. Arranged alphabetically and chronologically. / Box 19
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0045-refidd1e3868

Folder 9 de Forest, Robert W., 1907-1923. Relates chiefly to a 1916-1917 campaign to ensure that provisions for a tax deduction for charitable gifts would be included in the new income tax law passed pursuant to the XVI amendment to the Constitution.

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary  Search this
Container:
Box 19 of 112
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 45, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 1: CORRESPONDENCE, 1890-1929. Arranged alphabetically and chronologically. / Box 19
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0045-refidd1e3879

Folders 8-9 Forest Reserve Law, correspondence, 1890-1905, 1916-1917

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary  Search this
Container:
Box 23 of 112
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 45, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 1: CORRESPONDENCE, 1890-1929. Arranged alphabetically and chronologically. / Box 23
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0045-refidd1e4563

Folder 4 Nelson, E. W. - New Hampshire Forests, Society for

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of the Secretary  Search this
Container:
Box 41 of 112
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 45, Smithsonian Institution, Office of the Secretary, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 1: CORRESPONDENCE, 1890-1929. Arranged alphabetically and chronologically. / Box 41
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0045-refidd1e7334

Goose Creek -- Medway Plantation

Architect:
van der Gracht, Ides  Search this
Landscape architect:
Shipman, Ellen  Search this
Creator:
Little Garden Club of Rye--provenance.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Medway Plantation,(Goose Creek, South Carolina)
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Berkeley County -- Goose Creek
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, plant lists, and photocopies of articles.
General:
Medway Plantation comprises 6700 acres of longleaf and loblolly pine, live oaks, tupelo, swampland and lakes as well as the oldest masonry house in South Carolina. An ornamental garden with irregularly-shaped beds and serpentine paths, known as Miss Lou's garden, was redesigned in the 1930s by Ellen Biddle Shipman. The earlier garden was described as a bird sanctuary and nursery growing anise and Chinese bay trees, azaleas, fringe trees, roses, flowering almond, lilacs, spireas, myrtle, and yellow Jessamine, with wisteria growing up into deciduous trees. The surplus from Miss Lou's garden was planted in long borders alongside three shallow brick terraces, and along paths that led to a schoolhouse on the property. The current drive to the house has double borders of live oak trees hung with Spanish moss that were first planted after the Civil War. In the 1930s architect Ides van der Gracht designed a greenhouse with stepped gables, echoing that feature from the house, and added serpentine brick walls surrounding a garden of flowers and vegetables, on the site of the historic kitchen garden. Prior to the Civil War rice was cultivated at Medway Plantation, followed by cotton and the current crop, timber.
Medway Plantation was first organized as a land grant to Johan (or Jan) van Aerssen in the last quarter of the 17th century. He started the original house which during its long history was burned and rebuilt, nearly abandoned and used only as a hunting lodge, and finally renovated. The house has unusual stepped gables in the Dutch style, reflecting the van Aerssen heritage. After van Aerssen's death circa 1867 and the remarriage of his widow, Sabina de Vignon to Thomas Smith in 1689, the property came into the prominent South Carolina Smith family.
In the early days land parcels routinely were acquired and sold and the dimensions of Medway Plantation changed frequently, finally ending up at 6700 acres under the ownership of Sidney J. and Gertrude S. Legendre in the 20th century, who had purchased and annexed neighboring plantations. Before her death in 2000 Gertrude Legendre put the property in a non-profit foundation with a conservation easement to preserve the pine forests, wetlands, and wildlife. It is recognized as a breeding site for endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers, bald eagles, wood ducks and wintering ring-necked ducks, and provides habitat for deer, turkey and quail.
Persons associated with the garden include Johan van Aerssen (former owner and builder of original house, 1686-circa 1688); Sabina de Vignon, (former owner, 1688-1689); Thomas Smith and members of the Smith family (former owners, 1689-1701); Edward Hyrne (former owner, 1701-1711); Peter Gaillard Stoney and family (former owners, 1833-1930); Sidney J. and Gertrude Sanford Legendre (former owners, 1930-1993; Ides van Waterschoot van der Gracht (architect, 1930s); Ellen Biddle Shipman (landscape architect, 1930s).
Related Materials:
Medway Plantation related holdings consist of 2 folders (2 35mm slides (photographs), 34 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Goose Creek  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File SC082
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / South Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12480

Moncks Corner -- Mulberry Plantation

Landscape architect:
Briggs, Loutrel W.  Search this
Owner:
Chapman, Clarence  Search this
Provenance:
Little Garden Club of Rye  Search this
Creator:
Broughton, Thomas Col  Search this
Collection, John, Sir  Search this
Barker, Theodore G., Major  Search this
Chapman, Clarence  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Mulberry Plantation (Moncks Corner, South Carolina)
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Berkeley County -- Moncks Corner
Mulberry Plantation (Moncks Corner, South Carolina)
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Berkeley County -- Moncks Corner
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, and photocopies of book excerpts and articles.
General:
The brick house at Mulberry Plantation was built on a bluff by the first owner, Thomas Broughton in 1714, the date inscribed in iron on the four weathervanes atop the four pavilions at the corners of the house. Situated along the Cooper River the current property comprises 805 acres and includes gardens on three levels: a formal boxwood parterre garden next to the house, a descending camellia walk, and a formal circle garden, all designed by Loutrel W. Briggs (b.1893-d.1977) circa 1930. Other features include a parterre kitchen garden, a Live oak allée, lagoon, rolling lawns and the oldest mulberry tree in the country. The plantation grew rice at various times in its history, as well as indigo and forest products. Another 19th century commercial project that did not succeed was breeding silk worms to produce domestic silk, with mulberry trees planted to house the worms. By the early 20th century the property was in decline and was sold out of the Broughton family to Mr. and Mrs. Clarence E. Chapman as a winter retreat. The Chapmans restored the house and brought in Briggs, known for developing the Charleston style for the many small gardens he designed in the city and at other Cooper River plantations.
Mulberry Plantation was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1966. The style of the house has been described as Jacobean and French, with a mansard roof, rather than a typical low-country wooden structure. The brick house may have been used as a fortress against attacks during the Yamesse War in 1715, between settlers and Native Americans. At one time there were many slave cabins on the property but now only one remains that has been used as a hunting lodge.
Persons associated with the garden include Thomas Broughton and descendents (former owners, 1714-1914); Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Chapman (former owners, 1915-1981); Historic Charleston Foundation (former owners, 1981-1987); Loutrel Winslow Briggs (December 12, 1893-May, 1977) (landscape designer, circa 1930)
Related Materials:
Mulberry Plantation related holdings consist of 2 folders (2 35mm slides (photographs) + 27 digital images)
Mulberry Plantation related holdings consist of 1 slide (photograph) (col., 35mm.)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Moncks Corner  Search this
Plantations  Search this
Spring  Search this
Box  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Sundials  Search this
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Moncks Corner  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File SC061
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / South Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12489

Pittsburgh -- Garden Dreams Urban Farm and Nursery

Former owner:
Schwartz, Mindy J.  Search this
Nicholas, Barbara K.  Search this
Allegheny City vacant property program  Search this
Production manager:
Reiff, Hannah  Search this
Outreach manager:
Madden, Robert  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Allegheny County  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Garden Dreams Urban Farm and Nursery (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Allegheny -- Pittsburgh
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of articles.
General:
Three previously vacant city lots comprise this one-third acre urban farm and nursery garden focused on growing organically, providing a community gathering place, and teaching about sustainable land use. Ecologically sound practices are their main feature. The farm keeps bees for pollination and chickens for their eggs and to provide manure for the compost. Garden structures are fabricated from found or re-used objects and discarded building materials, such as PVC pipes that are too old to be used for their intended purpose but can serve as hoops for floating row covers. The business is recognized for its ingenuity, craftiness and thrift, as well as for creating a green space in a struggling neighborhood. They grow 100 varieties of tomatoes including heirlooms, dozens of sweet and hot peppers, many kinds of eggplants, greens and herbs. Flowers that are grown may be edible or are attractive to pollinating bees and other beneficial insects, including sunflowers, alyssum, coneflowers and native asters.
Since the urban lots contained detritus from demolished buildings and other debris, they had to be excavated, leaving craters that were filled with leaf mulch courtesy of the local public works agency. The organic matter decomposed into the degraded soil creating an excellent growing medium. Subsequent testing showed that the produce grown there was not contaminated and safe.
Persons associated with the garden include: Allegheny City vacant property program (former owners, 1996); Mindy J. Schwartz and Barbara K. Nicholas (former owners, 1996); Hannah Reiff (production manager, 2010- ); Robert Madden (outreach manager, 2008- ).
Related Materials:
Garden Dreams Urban Farm and Nursery related holdings consist of 1 folder (8 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA740
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16554

Slippery Rock -- Longbow

Former owner:
Boyd, Walter  Search this
Fowler, Walter  Search this
Architect:
Ligo, Bret  Search this
Garden designer:
Kemenyffy, Susan Hale.  Search this
Artist:
Miller, Doug  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Place:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Slippery Rock
Longbow (Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Butler County -- Slippery Rock
Scope and Contents:
119 digital images (2007-2017), 50 prints and 1 file folder.
General:
An undeveloped approximately five-acre parcel in second growth forest was chosen for a home with noteworthy hardscape, plantings to enhance the site, and no-maintenance gardens without lawns or pink flowers. The contemporary house was finished in 2005; the gardens were designed and built over four years from 2008 to 2012. The site had a grove of more than 75 mature beech that descends downward to a ravine with a stream that outlines the property boundaries on two sides. The stream was cleared of fallen trees and other debris, widened in places and augmented with boulders and cut slabs of stone to created waterfalls that could be seen from the house. A design feature alongside the stream as well as around the house site were irregular sandstone offcuts from a local quarry. Other styles and shapes of sandstone included large irregular uprights used for retaining walls on terraces and stairways, smooth cut slabs for benches, steps and tables with the edges left rough, and rough-edged thick cut slabs laid and grouted over a concrete base used for the front walk and upper patio. Areas that were not under concrete and aggregate were filled with pea gravel with pockets of soil for plants. A water wall was created from two discarded slabs that had been used under other stones as they were precisely cut into the geometric shapes sold by the quarry; these slabs, scored with cross cuts over which water would flow, were set into custom armatures. Three stone stairways, each in a different style, were built.
The front garden in the middle of an elongated circular driveway had pre-existing trees that were augmented with understory ferns, Japanese stewartia and annuals. Near the house there is a low stone wall planted with rows of serviceberry and winterberry along with Harry Lauder walking sticks, kousa dogwood, seasonal flowers and ornamental grasses. Bergenia was planted as a ground cover under the beech next to the outbuilding potting shed and carport. Behind the house there is a porch, stone patio and a stone stairway that descends to a pea gravel terrace and a lower stone terrace. Features next to and behind the house on the patio and terraces include stone benches, a grilling zone, fire pit, bird feeders and bath, an extensive container garden and beds for herbs and annuals. Other plantings along the terraces include dwarf bamboo, Japanese maples and ajuga; thyme planted between stepping stones, climbing hydrangea on stone walls, roses near the water wall, and a stand of river birch on the far side of the stream.
Walter Boyd (former owner, -1990); Walter Fowler (former owner, 1990-2001); Bret Ligo (architect, 2003, 2005); Susan Kemenyffy (garden designer, 2008); Doug Miller (artisan, 2008-2011).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA838
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref32357

West Chester -- Fox Hollow

Provenance:
The Weeders  Search this
The Weeders  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Chester County -- West Chester
Fox Hollow (West Chester, Pennsylvania)
Scope and Contents:
40 digital images (2014, 2016) and 1 file folder.
General:
The three acre property, the last to sell in a development in 1978, was densely wooded and sloping with heavy clay soil and an overgrown stream. The owners put up a brick colonial revival house and planted juniper on the slope circumscribed by the driveway but it did not thrive in the shade. Next they planted hydrangeas, upright Japanese barberry, spirea, hosta, Japanese forest grass and other perennials, creating a woodland garden. That sparked an interest in gardening that gradually led to almost 2-1/2 acres being planted and tended. Rocks and boulders that were dug up in every expansion were used as edging or focal points except for the bed at the front of the house that has a low brick wall. The first garden beds were around a perimeter that could be seen from the house with excavated soil dumped further away in the forest. The owner emphasized foliage texture and color combinations over flowers, influenced by her study of Englishwoman Beth Chatto. Closer to the house there are free-form beds connected by meandering grass paths rather than defined garden rooms. One island bed is a rock garden; a densely planted courtyard garden off the brick patio has a pergola and koi pond. The owner's welded art pieces dot the garden beds and line the driveway.

Year by year the gardens were expanded into the woodland of oak, poplar, shagbark hickory, beech, bramble and skunk cabbage. In the forest they found a creek bed and a berm, loamy soil and clay. Drainage channels were dug, the berm was enlarged, and a 20 by 10 foot, 18-inch deep pond was dug. Outbuildings include a garden shed/welding workshop and an old potting shed further out that functions as a folly. Varying height of the plants, including repeated use of the vertical Japanese barberry and the vertical Japanese holly "Sky Pencil", deep purple foliage as an accent, and many shapes and textures of chartreuse foliage are unifying features in all the garden areas.

Persons associated with the garden include: Dr. Charles M. Thomas and family (former owners, circa 1912-1930s); William H. Taylor and the Taylor Land Company (former owners, -1973); General Development Corporation (former owner, 1973-1978).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- West Chester  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA841
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref32841

Portland -- Josselyn Garden

Architect:
Graham, Rod  Search this
Landscape architect:
Kiest, Craig  Search this
Provenance:
The Portland Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Josselyn Garden (Portland, Oregon)
United States of America -- Oregon -- Multnomah County -- Portland
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets.
General:
A 1922 Tudor-style house with three acres, listed on the National Historic Register, required extensive renovation by the current owners to preserve the original craftsmanship. The grounds were in need of reconditioning as well, including an original Japanese garden whose pond had to be re-dug, rocks repositioned, and plantings restored with more than 40 different Japanese maple trees. Landscape architect Craig Kiest's (ASLA) plan includes garden rooms, paths and hardscape, described by the owner as a classic design that features their plant collections. A circular driveway in front of the house surrounds a boxwood knot garden punctuated with container plantings. The uphill walk to the garden runs along a wall with espaliered camellias and is overlooked by a balcony for viewing the knot garden that has a wrought iron railing assembled from old gates found on the property. A serpentine rose border with more than one hundred plants is a colorful connector along the back driveway between the house and garage. An orchard, perennial bed, soccer field and upper lawn are arrayed between the house and the streets that border this corner lot.
Several bluestone terraces with stone steps and balustrades accommodate the terrain behind the house and lead to a formal garden that is on an axis with the dining room. A pergola planted with wisteria japonica crosses the entrance to the formal garden. In this garden surrounded by a hedge of holly there are boxwood parterres centered by a circular patch of lawn with an enormous restored stone planter with white Iceland roses and white alyssum in the summer. Large cast iron planters on bluestone platforms contain Japanese maples. The formal garden terminates in a seating area backed by a semi-circle of four columns and an old planting of English holly. Other features include a grotto with granite semi-circular steps and a grindstone, a wall fountain with a bronze frog, and an Italianate cobblestone patio with beds of hydrangea. Frogs and dragonflies are recurring motifs in the iron hardware on the buildings and in garden ornaments. Flowering vines and container gardens, climbing roses, and a rose and wild geranium parterre add color to the vigorous greenery that grows in this favorable climate.
The Japanese garden features the colorful Japanese maple tree collection and a pond stocked with koi. Additional trees from the earlier garden include copper beech, gingko, and Japanese umbrella pine. There is a raised vegetable garden for berries, grapes, pumpkins and artichokes with a custom made wooden fence, and wooded areas underplanted with hosta and other shade-tolerant perennials. A large lawn bisecting these forests leads to a rectangular reflecting pool with a colonnade that was found buried in an old laurel hedge on the property and restored.
Persons associated with the garden include Percy Smith family (former owners, 1922-1994); Craig Kiest, ASLA (landscape architect, 1997-1999); Dave Sexton (gardener, 1999-present)
Related Materials:
Josselyn Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (26 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Oregon -- Portland  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File OR050
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Oregon
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10146

South Euclid -- Cropthorn

Provenance:
Shaker Lakes Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Cropthorn (South Euclid, Ohio)
United States of America -- Ohio -- Cuyahoga County -- South Euclid
Scope and Contents:
Cropthorn related holdings consist of 2 folders, 2 35 mm. slides (c.1987-1992) and 25 35mm slides (1984).
General:
The main feature of the garden was its arc of perennial and rose gardens, sloping to catch the sun and the visitor's eye. The Tudor house, lawns, and gardens became an organic part of the property, which had been second or third growth forest, part of long-abandoned farmland. Well-grown trees were preserved, along with sections of the woods. The south area was kept unchanged except for a flagstone-paved picnic area with brick seating and a large brick fireplace. The woods to the east were somewhat tamed by lining the stream with sandstone; putting in primroses, ferns and other shade-loving plants; and adding two small stone bridges. The flower beds were terraced with low sandstone walls lining broad grass paths. Dense plantings of iris and roses bloomed through the summer. Cutting gardens, two greenhouses, a cold-frame, tool shed, vegetable garden; and field completed the property.
Person(s) associated with the property and garden include: Richard Preston and Helen Millikin Nash, II (former owners, ca. 1923-1990).
Related Materials:
Additional records may be available at the Shaker Lakes Garden Club and also the Western Reserve Historical Society.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Ohio -- South Euclid  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File OH049
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Ohio
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref15561

Berwyn -- Toad Hall

Landscape designer:
Wood, Sally  Search this
Gardener-horticulturist:
Stasen, Wendy  Search this
Former owner:
Willcox, James M.  Search this
Architect:
Hall, Arthur W.  Search this
Provenance:
The Weeders  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Toad Hall (Berwyn, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Chester County -- Berwyn
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, additional images of the house (including one of it under construction in 1930-31), and other information.
General:
Located on an 11.5 acre site, this garden surrounds Toad Hall, the house which sits at the crest of a hill. The current owners acquired the property in 1961 and have been developing the site and the gardens ever since. One owner grew up on an English estate, an experience that is reflected in her grasp of site planning, views and vistas, understanding of plants, love of roses, and the use of garden accents such as ornamental iron gateways, treillage, containers, brightly painted obelisks, fountains, and numerous metal and wood sculptures. Various established gardens are organized by axes and cross axes and include a woodland garden, a pergola and reflecting pool, a secret garden, and a vegetable garden with raised beds for tender tropicals. From the bottom of these gardens a long vista leads the eye to a fountain set in a small side terrace next to the house. At the rear of the house a flagstone terrace has a dramatic view down a sweep of meadow to the woodland edge below. Many of the mature trees are original to the property, while other plants, like native rhododendron, were added by the original owner. Along the entrance driveway and beneath the house large stone boulders and carpets of spring bulbs, native ferns, and wildflowers enliven the forest floor, accessible by woodland paths. Deer are kept at bay by high iron fencing and a cattle guard at the gate.
Persons associated with the property and garden include Sally Wood (landscape designer, 1979); Wendy Stasen (gardener-horticulturist); James M. Willcox (former owner, 1930-1961); and Arthur W. Hall (architect, 1930).
Related Materials:
Toad Hall related holdings consist of 1 folder (19 35 mm. slides (photographs))
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Berwyn  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA670
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16441

Erie -- Raku Place

Artist:
Kemenyffy, Susan Hale.  Search this
Landscape designer:
Kemenyffy, Susan Hale.  Search this
Sculptor:
Kemenyffy, Steven, 1943-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Raku Place (McKean, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- McKean -- Erie
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, a copy of a book of Susan Hale Kemenyffy's drawings dedicated to Carrie T. Watson Garden Club member Lynn Perry Alstadt, and a copy of "Drawing: The Purpose," edited by Leo Duff and Phil Sawdon. The latter includes a chapter by Susan Hale Kemenyffy titled, "Landscape - Drawing - Drawiing - Landscape' (2008).
General:
The 47 acre property in western Pennsylvania had been logged, stripped of topsoil and used as a dump for garbage and burned out cars when the land and 1950's house were obtained in 1974 by two artists. Mature trees, weeds and enormous mud puddles comprised the landscape. The site has been developed with 18 named gardens, channeled water courses with a string of pools and two ponds to ameliorate the property's tendency to flood every spring, numerous hand-built bridges, and intersecting paths totaling about one mile of walkways. Outbuildings include a chicken house, a Hungarian Tea House cantilevered on a cliff in a conifer forest that overlooks one of the pools, and two artists' studios. Garden structures and outdoor furniture are painted in blues and greens that contrast with and stand out from the lushly planted grounds while sculptures created by the owners have been nestled into the landscape. Hundreds of rocks, slabs and boulders have been dug up and re-positioned to form or edge paths and ponds. Positions have been found for objects including discarded aluminum playground horses that rear up among the trees. Ceramic tiles and sculptures made by the artists contribute to the unique landscape.
An early entrance garden included climbing hydrangea, bergenia lining the walkway, pachysandra and ferns to obscure the front of the house. Later a wider walkway was dug and laid with slabs of Pennsylvania bluestone over gravel, decking and brick walls were built, and 100 feet of climbing hydrangea have been trained around the house and deck. The owners describe their highly personal gardens as naturalized Arts and Crafts designed to suit the topography. They have given fanciful names to their gardens, such as giraffe's place, polka dot garden, alpine forest, great meadow, sky garden, primrose-less path, and Steven's mountain with an elevated metal sculpture "Sirius Dog House" to mark the juncture of earth and sky and the conclusion of the garden.
Raku Place has been shared with many groups for events and has participated in Garden Conservancy Open Days.
Persons associated with the garden include Donald and Sharon Williams (former owners, 1966-1974); Steven Kemenyffy (sculptor, 1974- ); Susan Kemenyffy (artist and landscape designer, 1974- ).
Related Materials:
Raku Place related holdings consist of 1 folder (85 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- McKean  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA825
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16460

Rye -- Rye Nature Center

Urban farming installation:
Nurick, Jacob  Search this
Director and conservation:
Letaka, Taro  Search this
Horticulturist:
Hein, Annette  Search this
Former owner:
Parsons family  Search this
Owner:
City of Rye  Search this
Rain garden design and installation:
Nature's Cradle  Search this
Provenance:
Little Garden Club of Rye  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Rye Nature Center (Rye, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Westchester -- Rye
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, a photocopy of an article and other materials.
Varying Form:
Parsons Garden, formerly known as.
General:
The mission of the Rye Nature Center is to promote conservation and environmental education within an urban forest and preserve. The 47 acre site, once a private estate, is comprised of three distinct gardens: a 300 square foot educational garden inside a deer fence, a rain garden, and a native plant garden, an educational center with two classrooms in the former carriage house of the estate, woodlands with natural water features and an outcropping of volcanic gneiss, more than two miles of hiking trails, a seasonal butterfly house, and two children's playgrounds and a sunflower maze. Classes are given for pre-school and school age children, summer campers, and adults on water conservation and storm water management, plant lifecycles including decomposition, and gardening techniques that are beneficial to the environment and wildlife. The teaching methods are hands on, encouraging participants to sample organically grown produce while planting or hand-picking insects that will be fed to the bearded dragons housed in the educational center. Rain water is collected and channeled to the rain garden's ferns, Joe Pye weed, milkweed, blue flag iris, cardinal flower and shrubs. A roof garden with self-watering containers also demonstrates how rain water can be captured and used.
Food grown in the gardens is used for cooking demonstrations and leftover food from the campers is turned into compost for the vegetable garden. Logs from the woodlands, straw and wood chips are inoculated with several varieties of mushroom spawn, also demonstrating how decomposition aids food production. Tomatoes and squash are planted in straw bales that were used for autumn decorations and an old wash basin is repurposed as a bog garden containing Venus flytraps, pitcher plants, cranberries and sphagnum moss. The native plant garden, established by the Little Garden Club of Rye in 1988, includes an edible forest garden shaded by sweet gum trees growing native perennials, trees, shrubs and ground covers that provide food for wildlife and humans. Also a bee-friendly garden is being planned by the nature center staff.
The Friends of Rye Nature Center was first founded as the Rye Conservation Society in 1964 and has been managed by the non-profit Friends since 2006. It has been certified as an urban wildlife sanctuary by the National Institute for Urban Wildlife.
Persons associated with the garden include: Parsons family (former owners 1902-1942); City of Rye (owner, 1959- ); Nature's Cradle (rain garden design and installation, 2011); Jacob Nurick (urban farming installation, 2013); Taro Letaka (director of conservation, 2013- ); Annette Hein (horticulturist, 2014- ).
Related Materials:
Rye Nature Center related holdings consist of 2 folders (1 lantern slide and 26 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Rye  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY135
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref27063

Old Brookville -- Cedars, The

Provenance:
North Country Garden Club of Long Island  Search this
North Country Garden Club of Long Island  Search this
Former owner:
Blackwell, Charles Addison, Esq.  Search this
Tanner, Frederick Chauncey  Search this
Thomas, Joseph A.  Search this
Architect:
Polhemus & Coffin  Search this
Kella, Cicognani  Search this
Landscape architect:
Brinkerhoff, Arthur F.  Search this
Innocenti & Webel  Search this
Woltz, Nelson Byrd  Search this
Gardener:
Molitor, Nicholas  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The Cedars (Old Brookville, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Nassau -- Old Brookville
Scope and Contents:
61 digital images and 1 folder.
General:
The gardens for this 23 acre property were reconceived by Nelson Byrd Woltz into zones for the body, mind and spirit, with each section divided longitudinally. The park section contains many native trees; the garden section includes the entrance court, seven distinct rooms and a formal vegetable garden with a greenhouse; the forest has a pine and fern grove; water encompasses the swimming pool and a large pond with a pagoda on an island; the field has the tennis court, cutting garden and a golf green with sand traps. Repeated features in the formal gardens include allées, sheared hedges, brick and bluestone hardscapes, oversize urns and pots planted with either seasonal flowers or vines, and flowering trees, shrubs, annuals and perennials with white blooms predominating. There are brick pillars at the entrance gate that are repeated at the end of the driveway. A field of daffodils and redbuds has a path mowed through for strolling in the spring. Layers of shrubs that surround the rectangular lawns at the arrival court include white hydrangea, lilac, boxwood, and viburnum, with Russian sage and pachysandra as the lower story and three large magnolias above. Behind the house a blue stone path and steps lead to a bluestone terrace garden with arborvitae in the corners, white rhododendron, white Japanese anemone, and shaped boxwood all surrounding a circle of grass. A rectangular white garden with benches at either end contains tree peony, white bleeding heart, hydrangea, Japanese anemone and ferns. The secret garden enclosed by a brick wall has a gravel center court with a large urn that is replanted each season, a cement bench under a kousa dogwood, white tulips and bleeding heart, rhododendron and hydrangea. Outside the wall there is a bed planted with two rows of Japanese stewartia.

A formal lawn has a reflecting pool in the center, allées of pollarded sycamore on two sides, and shaped boxwood at the far end. Another allée of yoshino cherry and large planted pots along the long walk leads to a walled formal vegetable and flower garden with a greenhouse. Teak tuteurs are planted with peas in spring followed by tomatoes. Apple and pear trees are espaliered on serpentine brick walls. Teak lattice gates attached to one wall can swing out to support climbing roses or other vines. Nearby a pine and fern grove lost many trees during Hurricane Sandy but has an understory planted with dogwood, rhododendron, hay scented fern, Virginia bluebells, beech, redbud and mayapple. Grass steps with stone risers lead to the swimming pool with low stone walls. A hot tub set in stone is flanked by beds of perennials. Next to the pool there is a playing field with blue painted benches that look towards the fish-stocked pond. Japanese style bridges lead to two islands in the pond, one of which has the Chinese style pagoda and a weeping cherry. The other island is planted with river birch. Along the boundary of the property there is an allée of silver maple that leads to a circle of clipped hornbeam and the tennis court. There is a cutting garden next to a shed, and beyond that lies the golf green complete with sand traps.

Persons associated with the property include: Charles Addison Blackwell, Esq. (former owner, 1929-1937); Frederick Chauncey Tanner (former owner, 1937-c.1950); Joseph A. Thomas (former owner, c. 1950-1977); estate of Joseph A. Thomas (former owner, 1977-2002); Polhemus & Coffin (architects, c. 1926); Arthur F. Brinkerhoff (1880-1959) (landscape architect, 1929); Nicholas Molitor (gardener, 1946-2004); Cicognani Kella (architects, 2002); Innocenti & Webel (landscape architects, 2004-2005); Nelson Byrd Woltz (landscape architects, 2005- ); Sam Brush, Foxgloves Horticultural Services (landscape management (2015- ).
Related Materials:
See also the Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Eleanor Weller Collection.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Old Brookville  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY1066
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref32849

Princeton -- New Jersey Woodland Property

Former owner:
Stanley, Thomas Mr.  Search this
Stanley, Thomas Mrs.  Search this
Heins, Katharine P.  Search this
Heins, John J.  Search this
Architect:
Bauhan, Rolf William, 1892-1966  Search this
Bennett, Robert S.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Lenker, David M.  Search this
Bencze, S. Lawrence  Search this
Olejnik, Barbara J. CLA  Search this
Doerler Landscapes  Search this
Sculptor:
Mallory, Ann  Search this
Ditarando, Roger  Search this
Stokes, Charlotte C.  Search this
Provenance:
Stony Brook Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
New Jersey Woodland Property (Princeton, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Mercer County -- Princeton
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and write-ups of the property's planting scheme.
Varying Form:
Frog Pond
General:
The New Jersey Woodland Property comprises 3.5 acres, a Colonial Revival house designed by architect Rolf W. Bauhan (1892-1966) in 1959, and ten distinct garden areas that the owner has been developing since 1981. Among the first area encountered is wooded lot bordered by preserved open space, a spring-fed pond, a swimming pool, and a graceful curving entry with bluestone steps and mature rhododendron and mountain laurel. Problems to overcome included a huge native deer population, undeveloped areas where invasive plants thrived, heavy clay soil, a cinder block retaining wall near the swimming pool, and the competing roots and canopies of mature trees that had to be accommodated in the landscape designs. The owner undertook a three-year course of study at the Barnes Arboretum, installed a six-foot tall deer fence around the property, and found the right plant for the right place, taking into account light, soil conditions and terrain. The style of the gardens is naturalized, with different species intermingling, rather than formally planted garden beds.
The entry courtyard was improved by replacing black asphalt with stone pavers, installing a brick retaining wall and piers, and planting bulb, perennial and shrub gardens under existing trees. The front path to the main entrance of the house is a bluestone walkway bordered by rhododendron and mountain laurel under planted with hosta, tiarella, euonymous and other ground covers. The pool terrace is in full sun, and features a 50-year-old wisteria that wraps around the house, Chippendale style gates lead to the pool, and vistas of the other gardens, pond and woodlands due to its higher elevation. Dwarf conifers are planted under the overhanging roof.
A perennial garden that replaced grass on the south side of the house was the owner's first project, with stone retaining walls defining the space. The eastern border of the property features unusual rhododendron. `The cryptomeria garden is a small woodland screen that features naturalized plantings. The woodland garden was designed with a meandering stone path and beds of naturalized perennials and shrubs but the soil was poor and needed yearly additions of leaf compost. A tennis court and outdoor room were installed in 1987 near Stony Brook and the designated open space. The banks of the pond created from a spring by the previous owners are accessible for bass fishing, with the outer perimeter planted in trees and shrubs that screen the property from the street.
Persons associated with the garden include Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Stanley (former owners, 1959-1981); Rolf W. Bauhan (architect, 1959); Robert S. Bennett (architect, 1997, 2008); David M. Lenker (landscape architect, 1959); Doerler Landscapes (landscape architect, 1973, 1975); S. Lawrence Bencze (landscape architect, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995); Barbara J. Olejnik, CLA (landscape architect, 2000-2002); Ann Mallory (sculptor of "Forest Pool"); Roger Ditarando (sculptor of "Bird's Nest"); Charlotte Calwell Stokes (sculptor of "Francis of Assisi")
Related Materials:
New Jersey Woodland Property related holdings consist of 1 folder (25 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Princeton  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ519
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20203

Dover Plains -- Copperheads

Provenance:
Millbrook Garden Club  Search this
Former owner:
Losee, William  Search this
De Forest, Isaac N.  Search this
De Forest, Augusta A.  Search this
Barrow, Lawrence  Search this
Johnson, Robert F.  Search this
Johnson, Caroline  Search this
Fuller, Rufus  Search this
Buckley, John  Search this
Buckley, Daniel  Search this
Anderson, Edgar V.  Search this
Middleton, Margaret  Search this
Colwell, Laurence J.  Search this
Rizzolo, Alfred F.  Search this
Rizzolo, Rose  Search this
Gelman, Irving  Search this
Goodstein, Robert  Search this
Goodwin, Jeanne  Search this
Stone mason:
Corsi, Daryl  Search this
Creator:
Horst, Werner  Search this
Horticulturist:
Pelletier, Amy  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
17 Digital images (color, JPEG file.)
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Place:
Copperheads (Dover Plains, New York)
United States -- New York -- Dutchess County -- Dover Plains
Scope and Contents:
17 digital images and 1 file folder.
General:
Copperheads sits on a 40 acre property in the town of Washington located in Duchess County, New York. The only evidence of a pre-existing garden was a lone Spirea atop the stone driveway wall and mauve peonies scattered throughout the site. The present owners adapted the old cow paths, building, and barn foundation into their garden.

The present garden began in 2001 when the Greek revival house was moved twelve feet during a major restoration project. The owners adapted sites utilized by the previous farmer owners, prompted by the 150-year old time capsule discovered inside a porch column during the renovation. On the foundation of what was once a storage barn, formal double perennial borders were constructed and enclosed by arborvitae hedges roughly following the outline of the barn. Stone steps lead down into the lower half of the garden, flanked by bronze mastiffs. In the center of the perennial garden is a lily pond. A secondary growth of trees was removed to open the view over the foothills of the Berkshires. To the north of the perennial garden, a pool backed by a Doric column pergola replaces the burnt remnants of an old cow barn. A fountain rests under the pergola smothered in Dutchman's pipe, a reference to the Dutch De Forest family that placed the time capsule in the house column. A cutting garden is located beyond the pool. To the west of the pergola on a steep slope, rubble from another building was uncovered. One side of the stone foundation remains functioning as a wall separating an upper path from a small pinery developed on the slope.

While constructing the house, a deep outhouse pit was uncovered revealing shards of Dutch clay pipes, clay storage jars, animal femurs, flower pots, and hand painted pottery. A boxwood parterre was planted on the outhouse site to be used as a vegetable garden. Before the gate is an iron arch topped with a copperhead snake to support a pair of weeping larch. Beside the carriage house is an apple orchard and fruit cage for growing blueberries. A stone pathway winds through a woods garden, complete with a wooden bench. The allee terminates at an urn and behind it grows a large Hydrangea.

In 2012, a teacup garden, called the "Pan Garden," was installed adjacent to the Daffodil Meadow to the right of the driveway. Boursault rhododendrons form a circle around a single Laburnum tree.

Persons associated with the garden include: William Losee (former owner, pre-1841); Isaac N. and Augusta A. De Forest (former owners, 1841-1856); Lawrence Barrow (former owner, 1856-1859); Robert F. and Caroline Johnson (former owners, 1859-1861); Rufus Fuller (former owner, 1861-1878); John Buckley (former owner, 1878-1917); Daniel Buckley (former owner, 1817-1923); Edgar V. Anderson (former owner, 1923-1945); Margaret Middleton (former owner, 1945-1948); Laurence J. Colwell (former owner, 1948-1959); Alfred F. and Rose Rizzolo (former owners, 1959-1972); Irving Gelman (former owner, 1972-1976); Robert Goodstein and Jeanne Goodwin (former owners, 1976-present); Daryl Corsi (stonemason, 2001-2008); Werner Horst (metal artist, 2008-2012); Amy Pelletier Clark (Horticulturalist, 2010-present).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Dover Plains  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY1188
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref32894

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