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Alanson Buck Skinner photograph collection

Photographer:
Van Schaick, C.J.  Search this
Smith, Huron H. (Huron Herbert), 1883-1933  Search this
Creator:
Skinner, Alanson, 1886-1925  Search this
Extent:
454 Negatives (photographic)
99 Photographic prints (black and white)
5 Lantern slides
Culture:
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Iowa  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Odawa (Ottawa)  Search this
Plains Cree (Prairie Cree)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Bribri  Search this
Plains Ojibwa (Bungi)  Search this
Cayuga  Search this
Minnesota Chippewa  Search this
Saulteaux  Search this
Shinnecock  Search this
Wahpetonwan Dakota (Wahpeton Sioux)  Search this
James Bay Cree  Search this
Seneca [Cattaraugus]  Search this
Potawatomi [Forest County, Wisconsin]  Search this
Kesagami (Kesagmi) Cree  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Lantern slides
Negatives
Place:
Minnesota
Wisconsin
Costa Rica
Oklahoma
Mexico
Canada
Florida
New York
New Mexico
Wyoming
Date:
circa 1870 to before 1926
Summary:
Tribes covered in the photographs are: Arapaho, Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Chippewa, Iowa, Iroquois, Mahican, Menomini, Ojibwa, Oto, Plains Cree, Potawatomi, Seminole, Seri, Shinnecock, Sioux, Winnebago, Zuni Pueblo. The majority of photographs (552) have Skinner listed as the photographer and presumably are photographs he took on his expeditions. However, 104 photos are of the Seminole in Florida. According to Dennis P. Carey's biography of Skinner (Unpublished? 1980) Julian Q. Dimock, a well-known photographer, accompanied him on his expedition to the Seminole in Florida; how many of the photos were taken by Dimock is unknown, but he is listed as the photographer for 23 of them. Skinner's other photographs are of the Seneca Iroquois in New York; the Zuni Pueblo and Hawikku site; several tribes in Wisconsin; the Chippewa in Minnesota; and miscellaneous shots taken in Canada, Costa Rica, Florida and New York. Two photographs of the Mahican were taken by Huron H. Smith (1923) and two of the Winnebago were taken by C.J. Van Schaick (c. 1870). The remaining photographs have no photographer listed but were in Skinner's collection of photographs and are of varying tribes with dates ranging from 1909 to 1923.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Alanson Buck Skinner was born in Buffalo, New York, on September 7, 1886. His parents moved to Staten Island, New York, when Alanson was still very young. There Alanson met W.T. Davis who taught him to find arrowheads and other traces of ancient Indian life. When he was older he consulted with Prof. F.W. Putnam and George H. Pepper at the American Museum of Natural History about his interest. In the summer of 1902 Skinner went on his first fieldwork expedition near Shinnecock Hills, Long Island, for the American Museum of Natural History with Arthur C. Parker and Mark R. Harrington. Two years later Skinner and Harrington went on another archeological expedition in western New York State for the Peabody Museum and while there he attended his first Native ceremony on the Cattaraugus reservation. After high school Skinner joined the staff of the AMNH as an assistant in anthropology. In 1908 he led an expedition to Hudson Bay to study the Cree Indians. In 1910 he went to Wisconsin where he met John V. Satterlee, part Menomini, and Judge Sabatis Perote, a full-blooded Menomini, who adopted him into the tribe under the Thunder clan name of Sekosa or "Little Weasel." He later went on expeditions to collect from the Seminoles in the Florida Everglades, and other tribes in Wisconsin, Oklahoma, and other states. During these years he was also studying anthropology at Columbia under Boas, Farrand, Saville, and Bandelier, and at Harvard under Dixon, Tozzer, and Farrabee. In 1916 Skinner joined the Museum of the American Indian and remained there until 1920, when he took a position as curator of anthropology at the Public Museum of Milwaukee. He returned to the MAI in 1924 where he remained until his untimely death on August 17, 1925 in a car accident in North Dakota. He was a member of the American Anthropological Association, the Wisconsin Archeological Society, the Explorer's Club, a York Rite Mason and a Shriner. A more detailed biography by Dennis P. Carey (1980) can be found in the vertical file. A complete bibliography of Skinner's writings can be found in Indian Notes, Vol. II, No. 4 (October 1925).
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Topic:
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of North America -- Wisconsin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Lakes Region  Search this
Indians of North America -- New York (State)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern states  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Mexico  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Lantern slides
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.036
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-036

Homer Garner Barnett Papers

Creator:
Barnett, H. G. (Homer Garner), 1906-1985  Search this
Names:
University of California, Berkeley. Far Eastern Language and Area Training Program  Search this
Extent:
7.5 Linear feet
Culture:
Palauans  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Ponape  Search this
Yurok Indians  Search this
Coast Salish  Search this
Yapese (Micronesian people)  Search this
Hupa Indians  Search this
Yakama Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Hawaii
Irian Jaya (Dutch New Guinea)
Date:
1934-1973
Summary:
The Homer Garner Barnett papers, 1934-1973, consist of papers, photographs, slides, maps, and periodicals primarily documenting his ethnological work among American Indians, Palauans, and the people of Netherlands New Guinea (Irian Jaya).
Scope and Contents:
The Homer Garner Barnett papers, 1934-1973, contain papers, photographs, slides, maps, periodicals, field notes and copies of studies done by others. Dr. Barnett, an ethnologist, anthropologist, author and teacher spent his early professional years, 1934-1943, studying Northwest Coast Indians. After the second World War, her focused on Micronesia, especially Palau, and later Netherlands New Guinea, now known as West Irian. It was during this time that he observed at close hand and became an expert in cultural change.

Between 1947 and 1970, years of drastic change for natives of Oceania, Dr. Barnett made three long stays and many shorter ones in the islands. He used his research in writing, teaching, and consulting.

His early study of Yurok, Hupa, Karok, Nuqually, Oakville and Skopomish Indians is contained in research notebooks, field notebooks and photographs. There is an interesting section on Indian Shakerism (not related to the Shaker Movement of the East). One notebook records his experience while conducting a class at Berkeley in 1943 on inter-cultural exchange of information. The later field notebooks record his observations while on Palau and New Guinea. There are also approximately 900 slides that he used in class lectures.

Dr. Barnett amassed a large collection of scholarly papers and periodicals dealing with the South Pacific area, especially during the years 1952-1960. There are a few publications in Japanese reflecting the interests of the prior trustees of Palau. There are significant numbers of scientific papers in Dutch on natives of New Guinea. He also preserved interesting examples of literature in Palauan, pidgin English and Papuan.

There is no personal correspondence other than that pertaining to setting up a study of displaced communities in the South Pacific. This study was funded over a 5-year period by the National Science Foundation. The resulting papers are on deposit at the University of Oregon.

Dr. Barnett spent 2 years (1944-1946) as Senior Fellow in ethnogeography at the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). There are no papers in this collection dating from those years, but the BAE Correspondence files contain letters to and from Barnett during this period.
Arrangement note:
The Homer Garner Barnett papers are arranged in the following series: (1) Material relating to the "Displaced Communities" Study, 1963-1970; (2) Writings, 1938-1959; (3) Field notebooks, 1934-circa 1955; (4) Dissertation notebooks, undated; (5) Linguistic material, 1941-1965; (6) Scholarly serials and periodicals, 1950-1971; (7) Processed and printed items, 1942-1974; (8) Photographs, 1895-1955; (9) Micronesian Monthly/Reporter, 1951-1963; (10) Quarterly Bulletin of the South Pacific Commission, 1953-1963; (11) Photographic slides, 1947-1953; (12) Maps, 1887-1959
Biographical/Historical note:
Homer G. Barnett trained at the University of California at Berkeley and practiced as an ethnologist and archeologist. He specialized in culture change and applied anthropology.

Barnett's earliest field work was among American Indians of Oregon, Washington, and northwestern California--particularly the Yurok, Hupa, Yakima, and several small groups of the Oregon coast. Some of his research concerned diverse ethnological matters but much of it focused primarily on the Indian Shaker religion and the potlatch, the latter being the subject of his doctoral dissertation.

In 1939, while he was on the faculty of the University of New Mexico, Barnett served as field director of the Jemez Archeological Field School and was in charge of a project in the Santa Fe National Forest in New Mexico. Later in the same year, he joined the faculty of the University of Oregon and has been chiefly identified with that institution since then. In the summer of 1943, however, he participated in a World War II Far Eastern Language and Area Training Program of the University of California at Berkeley. There he helped train voluteer service men in techniques of eliciting cultural information from native informants.

In the following year, he joined the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology and became a researcher associated with the Ethnogeographic Board, the World War II agency formed to provide scientific information about human and natural resources of the world. He served as the executive secretary of the Board's Pacific Survey Project and, later, undertook a War Document Survey concerning the Pacific to determine and advise on the disposition of documents that had been accumulated by the government.

Returning to the University of Oregon after the war, Barnett continued to work with Pacific cultures. He carried out field work in the Palau Islands under the sponsorship of the National Research Council, served as staff anthropologist for the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, and was a consultant for the government of Netherlands New Guinea. In the 1960s, he directed a program of research among communities of the Pacific displaced because of natural disasters and atomic bomb tests.
Related Materials:
In 1939, Dr. Barnett was the director of an archeological excavation in the Santa Fe National Forest in New Mexico. The report of this dig is NAA MS 4070. Another paper Barnett wrote, Yakima Indians in 1942 is NAA MS 4867.
Provenance:
Dr. Homer G. Barnett donated this collection to the National Anthropological Archives in 1975.
Restrictions:
The Homer Garner Barnett papers are open for research.

Access to the Homer Garner Barnett papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Religion  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Potlatch  Search this
Shakers (American Indian)  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Citation:
Homer Garner Barnett Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1975-17
See more items in:
Homer Garner Barnett Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1975-17

Nelson and Henry C. White research material

Creator:
White, Henry Cooke, 1861-1952  Search this
White, Nelson C.  Search this
Names:
Tryon Art Gallery  Search this
Barnard, George Grey, 1863-1938  Search this
Benson, Frank Weston, 1862-1951  Search this
Brush, George de Forest, 1855-1941  Search this
Churchill, Alfred Vance, 1864-1949  Search this
Cortissoz, Royal, 1869-1948  Search this
Currier, Elizabeth  Search this
Currier, J. Frank (Joseph Frank), 1843-1909  Search this
Dewing, M. O. (Maria Oakey), 1855-1927  Search this
Dewing, Thomas Wilmer, 1851-1938  Search this
Fantin-Latour, Henri, 1836-1904  Search this
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Fuertes, Louis Agassiz, 1874-1927  Search this
James McNeill Whistler, 1834-1903  Search this
Kaup, Elizabeth Dewing, b. 1885  Search this
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945  Search this
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919  Search this
Saint-Gaudens, Augustus, 1848-1907  Search this
Sargent, John Singer, 1856-1925  Search this
Taber, E. M.  Search this
Thayer, Abbott Handerson, 1849-1921  Search this
Thayer, Emma B., 1850-1924  Search this
Thayer, Gladys, 1886 or 7-1945  Search this
Thayer, Kate Bloede  Search this
Thayer, Wm. Henry (William Henry), 1822-1897  Search this
Tryon, Dwight William, 1849-1925  Search this
Williams, George Alfred, 1875-  Search this
Extent:
4.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Photographs
Sketches
Date:
circa 1851-1961
Summary:
The research material of Connecticut artists and authors Nelson and Henry C. White, measures 4.5 linear feet and dates from circa 1851-1961. The bulk of the collection consists of Nelson C. White's correspondence, writings, and research, primarily related to J. Frank Currier and Abbott Handerson Thayer, and referencing Thomas Wilmer Dewing. Also found are the correspondence, writings, and research files of Nelson's father, Henry C. White, primarily relating to Dwight W. Tryon. Research files include artist correspondence, writings and notes, printed material, photographs of the artists, and photographs of artwork and exhibition installations.
Scope and Contents:
The research material of Connecticut artists and authors Nelson and Henry C. White, measures 4.5 linear feet and dates from circa 1851-1961. The bulk of the collection consists of Nelson C. White's correspondence, writings, and research, primarily related to J. Frank Currier and Abbott Handerson Thayer, and referencing Thomas Wilmer Dewing. Also found are the correspondence, writings, and research files of Nelson's father, Henry C. White, primarily relating to Dwight W. Tryon. Research files include artist correspondence, writings and notes, printed material, photographs of the artists, and photographs of artwork and exhibition installations.

Nelson C. White's correspondence is with Elizabeth Currier, gallery owners, and other individuals in possession of artwork by Currier, conducted during his research on J. Frank Currier, as well as with Elizabeth Dewing Kaup and others concerning his research on Thomas Wilmer Dewing. Miscellaneous material includes reviews of White's autobiography on Abbott Handerson Thayer, and White's ink sketches for a holiday card.

Nelson C. White's writings and notes consist of annotated drafts of Abbott H. Thayer: Painter and Naturalist, The Life and Art of J. Frank Currier, and articles including "Cremona," and "The Art of Thomas W. Dewing."

White's research files form the bulk of the collection. 9 folders of research material on J. Frank Currier consist primarily of photos of artwork and of an installation at Lyman Allyn Museum, but also include a transcript of Currier's 1870 diary, and 3 photographs (copy prints) of Currier. White's research material on Abbott Handerson Thayer is substantial and includes: biographical material on Thayer, such as family reminiscences by Thayer's daughter, Gladys Thayer, and his father, William Henry Thayer; copies and originals of Thayer's letters to his first wife, Kate Thayer, and his second wife, Emma Beach Thayer, and correspondence with William Henry Thayer; typescript copies and originals of Thayer's correspondence with artists, politicians, naturalists and others including George Grey Barnard, Frank Weston Benson, George de Forest Brush, Royal Cortissoz, Maria Oakey Dewing, Thomas Wilmer Dewing , Charles Lang Freer, Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, John Singer Sargent, Edward Martin Taber, and George Alfred Williams; annotated drafts of Thayer's writings and notes on art, philosophy, and nature including his theories on concealing coloration and wildlife preservation; printed material including 2 Thayer exhibition catalogs and news clippings of Thayer's letters to editors; and photographs of Thayer, his family and friends, his home and studio, and his artwork.

Henry C. White's papers include a folder of White's correspondence relating to the publication of his book, The Life and Art of Dwight William Tryon and including a letter from Elizabeth Currier; drafts of his biography of Tryon, including revisions by Mrs. Bender, Alfred Vance Churchill, and Mr. Rossiter; research material on Tryon including transcripts of letters from Tryon to George Alfred Williams, from Charles Lang Freer to Tryon, and from James McNeill Whistler to Henri Fantin-Latour; a typescript of autobiographical "notes and recollections" by Tryon; and photographs of Tryon, his home and studio, his artwork, and the Tryon Art Gallery at Smith College.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 4 series.

Series 1: Nelson C. White Correspondence and Miscellaneous Material, 1921-1953 (Box 1; 0.25 linear feet)

Series 2: Nelson C. White's Writings and Notes, circa 1929-circa 1951 (Box 1, OV 6; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 3: Nelson C. White's Research Files, circa 1851-1961 (Boxes 1-4, OV 6; 2.65 linear feet)

Series 4: Henry C. White Papers, circa 1860-1954 (Boxes 4-5; 1.1 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Connecticut painter, art historian, and collector, Nelson C. White (1900-1989) was born in Waterford, Connecticut, to artist Henry C. White. He studied at the National Academy of Design and Yale University and established himself as a landscape painter whilst also pursuing a literary career. He was the author of two biographies: The Life and Art of J. Frank Currier (1936), and Abbott H. Thayer: Painter and Naturalist (1951). White also penned an article on his friend, Thomas Wilmer Dewing ("The Art of Thomas Wilmer Dewing"), which was published in 1929.

White's father, Henry C. White (1861-1952), was an artist known primarily for his landscapes and seascapes of his native Connecticut. Born in Hartford, White began his career in 1875, studying with Dwight W. Tryon. In the 1880s he enrolled in the Art Students League in New York, while continuing to study with Tryon and other artists, including Kenyon Cox and George de Forest Brush. In the 1890s he traveled in Europe and then returned to Hartford where he taught drawing at the Hartford Public School, and co-founded the Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts in 1910. Like his son, White had literary aspirations, and in 1930 published a biography of his life-long friend and teacher entitled The Life and Art of Dwight W. Tryon. Two years after his death in 1952, the Lyman Allyn Museum held a memorial exhibition for White, curated primarily by Nelson C. White.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art holds several collections related to the Nelson and Henry C. White research material on Abbott Handerson Thayer and Dwight William Tryon. These include research material on Abbott Handerson Thayer and other artists, 1895-1990, donated by Thomas B. Brumbaugh; the Abbott Handerson Thayer letter and drawings to Caroline Peddle Ball, circa 1890-1893; and the Dwight William Tryon papers, 1872-1930.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reels 1330 and 2807) including autobiographical notes by Tryon, letters to Nelson C. White and Henry C. white, photographs of artwork, and an article. Lent materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The Archives of American Art purchased two linear feet of material from Nelson C. White in 1956. White also lent material and donated papers in 1978 and 1983.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Nelson and Henry C. White research material is owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Art historians -- Connecticut  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Connecticut  Search this
Painters -- Connecticut  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Protective coloration (Biology)  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Wildlife conservation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Nelson and Henry C. White research material, circa 1851-1961. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.whitnels
See more items in:
Nelson and Henry C. White research material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-whitnels
Online Media:

H. E. Hoopes photograph album of Arizona and New Mexico

Creator:
Hoopes, H. E. (Homer E.)  Search this
Extent:
77 Prints (Album :, platinum)
Culture:
Navajo Indians  Search this
Laguna Indians  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Isleta Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Place:
Petrified Forest National Park (Ariz.)
Date:
1902
Scope and Contents note:
The collection consists of an album of photographs made by H. E. Hoopes made in Arizona and New Mexico in August 1902. The photographs document people, domestic activities, and ceremonies at Acoma, Hano, Isleta, Laguna, and the Hopi towns of Mishongnovi, Oraibi, Sishomove, including the Flute Dance at Mishongnovi and the Snake Dance at Oraibi. There are also a few photographs of Navajo Indians and scenic views of the Petrified Forest.
Biographical/Historical note:
Homer Eachus Hoopes was born in Lima, Pennsylvania in 1848. He was a pharmacist in Media, Pennsylvania and member of a camera club that included A. C. Vroman. These photographs were likely made on one of the camera club's excursions and, as such, some of his photographs are similar to those of other club members.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 16, USNM ACC 40432
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional Hoopes photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 24.
See others in:
H. E. Hoopes photograph album of Arizona and New Mexico 1902
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Pottery  Search this
Snake dance  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 16, H. E. Hoopes photograph album of Arizona and New Mexico, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.16
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-16

Josephine Sloan Armstrong family photographs

Collector:
Armstrong, Josephine Sloan  Search this
Extent:
4 Photographic prints
Container:
Photo-folder 1
Culture:
Minnesota Chippewa [White Earth, Minnesota]  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Date:
circa 1908-1920
Summary:
This collection contains 4 photographs that depict Josephine Sloan Armstrong (Minnesota Chippewa [White Earth, Minnesota]) and her family circa 1908-1920.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 4 photographs that depict Josephine Sloan Armstrong (Minnesota Chippewa [White Earth, Minnesota]) and her family circa 1908-1920. The photographs were shot at Lake Winnibigoshish and include depictions of Josephine, Josephine's father William (Bill) Sloan, her mother Charlotte Brunette, her sister Annie Sloan, and her son Thomas Walter (Danny Boy Armstrong). One photograph depicts a group at Leech Lake in Minnesota.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into 1 folder.
Biographical / Historical:
Josephine Sloan Armstrong (White Earth Band of Minnesota Ojibwe) was born on November 27th, 1888 to William Sloan and Charlotte Brunette. She married Benjamin Henry Armstrong in 1906 and they had eleven children George (born 1907), Anne (born 1908), Thomas Walter (born 1913), Mildred (born 1915), Everett (born 1918), Benjamin (born 1919), Lucille (born 1921), Dorothy (born 1922), and James (born 1927). Two of her eleven children died in early childhood; Earl died in 1910 and Joseph in 1921.

Around the time of her birth, Josephine's father William Sloan owned a land allotment in Wisconsin. The Sloan family later relocated to Northern Minnesota. There, Josephine and her two sisters Anne and Georgette opened a dry goods store and taught local children to read and write. The family eventually sold a portion of their land to the U.S. Government to establish the Chippewa National Forest. Josephine made dresses, which were passed down through her family and worn to many Pow-wows. NMAI now holds the dress in its collection (object 26/6690). Josephine died January 5, 1939 at Cass Lake, Minnesota.
Separated Materials:
The photographs in this collection were donated along with a Jingle dress made by Josephine Sloan Armstrong (NMAI object # 26/6690).
Provenance:
Gift of Theresa L. Connor in Memory of Rose Marie Armstrong in 2008.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Minnesota  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Josephine Sloan Armstrong family photographs, NMAI.AC.278; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.278
See more items in:
Josephine Sloan Armstrong family photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-278
Online Media:

Charles G. Schoewe collection of Potawatomi tintypes

Collector:
Schoewe, Charles G.  Search this
Extent:
2 Tintypes (prints)
Culture:
Potawatomi [Forest County, Wisconsin]  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Tintypes (prints)
Place:
Wisconsin
Date:
circa 1875-1895
Summary:
This collection consists of 2 tintypes collected by Charles G. Schoewe that depict Potawatomi men from Wisconsin.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 2 tintypes collected by Charles G. Schoewe that depict Potawatomi men from Wisconsin. One tintype depicts Bill Shopodock (1845-1925) circa 1875-1885. The other tintype depicts two men possibly Jim Anishinaba and John Sanko circa 1880-1895. The photographers for these images are unknown.
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number. The tintypes are stored in 2 archival phase boxes.
Biographical / Historical:
Charles Gustav Schoewe was born on September 13, 1887 in Milwaukee, Wisconson. He worked for Middleton Manufacturing Company where he served as a salesman and later a manager. His family included his wife Blanche and his children Jean and William. Schoewe died on November 14, 1970.
Provenance:
Gift of Charles Schoewe to the Museum of the American Indian in 1933.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Tintypes (prints)
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Charles G. Schoewe collection of Potawatomi tintypes, image #, NMAI.AC.406; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.406
See more items in:
Charles G. Schoewe collection of Potawatomi tintypes
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-406
Online Media:

Tintype of Bill Shopodock (Potawatomi)

Collection Collector:
Schoewe, Charles G.  Search this
Extent:
1 Tintypes (prints)
Culture:
Potawatomi [Forest County, Wisconsin]  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Tintypes (prints)
Date:
circa 1875-1885
Scope and Contents:
This tintype shot circa 1875-1885 depicts Bill Shopodock (Potawatomi) sitting for his portrait wearing a jacket with fur trim and a bowler hat with two feathers. The 1910 census for Wabeno, Forest, Wisconsin lists Shopodock's birth date as circa 1840 and his occupation as a foreman on a farm. It also notes that he was married for 45 years. According to the 1926 Indian Census Rolls for Potawatomi at the Laona Agency, William Shopodock was born in 1845 and died on August 22, 1925. The 1880 census for Waupaca, Wisconsin, the family name is spelled Chabodoc. The original museum catalog records for the tintype listed his last name as Schobedock, which may be another alternate spelling.

According to the publication The Shopodocks: a Potawatomi Indian story by Delores Zillmer Miller, Bill Shopodock also went by the name Soc-qua. His father was Che-pau-dack (Sam Wapuka or Chief Waupaca) and his siblings were Kik-a-pa, Che-wan, Joseph and John. They lived in Dupont Township, Waupaca County, Wisconsin in the 1870s, where this tintype may have been shot.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Charles G. Schoewe collection of Potawatomi tintypes, image #, NMAI.AC.406; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.406, Item P10527
See more items in:
Charles G. Schoewe collection of Potawatomi tintypes
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-406-ref2

Huron H. Smith photograph collection

Creator:
Smith, Huron H. (Huron Herbert), 1883-1933  Search this
Names:
Milwaukee Public Museum  Search this
Satterlee, John V.  Search this
Extent:
26 Photographic prints
11 Copy negatives
Culture:
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Minnesota Chippewa [Leech Lake, Minnesota]  Search this
Minnesota Chippewa [Mille Lacs, Minnesota]  Search this
Lake Superior Chippewa [Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin]  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Place:
Minnesota
Wisconsin
Iowa
Date:
1921-1924
Summary:
This collection includes photographs made by Huron H. Smith during his ethnobotanical studies among Native communities in Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota between 1921 and 1924. These include photographs made among the Menominee (Menomini), Minnesota Chippewa [Mille Lacs and Leech Lake], Lake Superior Chippewa [Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin], Ho-Chunk (Winnebago), Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox) on the Mesquakie Indian Settlement in Tama, Iowa.
Scope and Contents:
This collection includes 26 photographic prints (11 copy negatives) made by ethnobotanist Huron H. Smith during field work for the Milwaukee Public Museum in 1921-1924. Many of the photographs are portraits of Native community members wearing traditional outifts or demonstrating local plant use, such as mat making.

Six photographs are from Smith's 1921-1922 trip to the Menominee (Menomini) reservation in Wisconsin. These include portraits of John Valentine Satterlee, Smith's guide and interpreter, and the Satterlee family. There are also as well as several restricted photographs of a Menominee cemetery and of the Menomini Spirit Rock. Seven photographs are from Smith's 1923 trip to the Meskwaki (Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)) Reservation in Tama, Iowa. These include portraits of William Davenport, Charles Keosatok and wife Qua-tau-che, White Breast and his family, and doctor John McIntosh (Kepeosatok). There are also several restricted images of Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox) cemeteries.

Eleven photographs are from Smith's 1923-1924 trips to the Lac du Flambeau Reservation in Wisconsin, working among the Lake Superior Chippewa, and to the Leech Lake and Mille Lacs Reservations in Minnesota, working among the Minnesota Chippewa. Images made in Lac de Flambeau include portraits of Big George Skye, John White Feather (We-bu-ju-o-no-kwe) and wife Na-Wa-Que Go-Kwe, We hre-gu-o-no-kwe, Chief A-mi-kons and wife Pa-ma-ju-o-no-kwe, and Maxiwika [Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)]. Also included are scenic views of a Lac De Flambeau village and a view shot during a Lake Superior Chippewa community dance. Images made in Minnesota include portraits of John Smith, Young Duck and Ajoybenais. There is also a photograph of the balsam Wigwam used by Huron Smith in Leech Lake and a restricted image of a Minnesota Chippewa cemetery. There is also a portrait of Stockbridge Mahican woman Harriet Quinney also taken in 1923.

Some of these photographs were included as illustrations in Smith's articles "Ethnobotany of the Menominee Indians," "Ethnobotany of the Meskwaki Indians," and "Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians" in the Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee.

The copy negatives were created by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (NMAI's predecessor museum) during a photo conservation project in the 1960s.
Photographic prints: P10326-P10351. Copy Negatives: N20758, N36526-N36532, N38018-N38020
Arrangement:
Physcially arranged by catalog number. Intellectually arranged chronologically by community and then catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
Huron Herbert Smith was born in Danville, Indiana in 1883. After receiving degrees from De Pauw and Cornell Universities he served as assistant curator of Botany at the Field Museum of Natural History from 1907 and 1917. In 1917, Smith began working at the Milwaukee Public Museum as head of the Botany Department. Throughout the 1920s and 1930s Smith conducted studies on the use of plant by Native American communities in Wisconsin and surrounding states. This research was supported by then-Museum director Samuel Barrett and anthropologist Alanson Skinner. Smith's ethnobotanical studies began on the Menominee Reservation in Wisconsin (1921-1923), and were followed by trips to the Meskwaki (Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)) Reservation in Tama, Iowa (1923), the Lac du Flambeau Reservation in Vilas County, Wisconsin and the Leech Lake Reservation in Minnesota (1923-1924), the Potawatomi bands in Forest County, Wisconsin (1925), the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) south of Wisconsin Rapids (1928), and the Oneida Reservation in Wisconsin (1929).

Smith's work came to a sudden end with his death in 1933 as the result of an automobile accident. At the time of his death, four manuscripts had been published (Smith 1923, 1928, 1932, 1933), one was in process and published in 1998 by Kindscher & Hurlburt, and field notes remained for a sixth on the Oneida.

For more information on Huron Smith see the Milwaukee Public Museum's website on their Ethnobotany collections: http://archive.mpm.edu/research-collections/botany/online-collections-research/ethnobotany.
Related Materials:
A large collection of Huron H. Smith photographs and field notes can be found in the Milwaukee Public Museum Archives.
Provenance:
Gift of Charles Schoewe in 1932.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu). Several photographs have been restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Ethnobotany  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Huron H. Smith photograph collection, image #, NMAI.AC.145; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.145
See more items in:
Huron H. Smith photograph collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-145
Online Media:

Frazer (sic) Reach, British Columbia

Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Collection Collector:
Rumsey, Mary Harriman, 1881-1934.  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
1 Lantern slide
Container:
Photo-folder 4
Box 10
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Slides
Photographic prints
Lantern slides
Date:
1899 June
Scope and Contents:
View of the Fraser Reach from the water, with forested and snow-covered mountains rising out of the sound in British Columbia.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Mary Harriman Rumsey Collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition Photographs, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.053, Item P10894, L00717
See more items in:
Mary Harriman Rumsey collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs
Mary Harriman Rumsey collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs / Series 1: Harriman Alaska Expedition / 1.4: Coast of British Columbia
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-053-ref617

Scrub pine and bog near Wrangell. Alaska

Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Collection Collector:
Rumsey, Mary Harriman, 1881-1934.  Search this
Extent:
1 Lantern slide
Container:
Box 10
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Lantern slides
Date:
1899 June 5
Scope and Contents:
View of forest in background, with bog and large tree to the right in foreground near Wrangell, Alaska.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Mary Harriman Rumsey Collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition Photographs, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.053, Item L00755
See more items in:
Mary Harriman Rumsey collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs
Mary Harriman Rumsey collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs / Series 1: Harriman Alaska Expedition / 1.6: Wrangell
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-053-ref631

Resurrected forest, near Muir glacier

Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Collection Collector:
Rumsey, Mary Harriman, 1881-1934.  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
1 Lantern slide
Container:
Photo-folder 10
Box 11
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Slides
Photographic prints
Lantern slides
Date:
1899 June 9-14
Scope and Contents:
View of the remains of partially submerged trunks of trees, part of an old forest near Muir Glacier, along the banks of a stream leading down to Muir Inlet, with rocky bluffs on either side in Alaska.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Mary Harriman Rumsey Collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition Photographs, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.053, Item P10915, L00827
See more items in:
Mary Harriman Rumsey collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs
Mary Harriman Rumsey collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs / Series 1: Harriman Alaska Expedition / 1.9: Glacier Bay
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-053-ref678

Field photographs from Seneca Nation Reservations in Pennsylvania and New York

Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Photographer:
Stiles, William F., 1912-1980  Search this
Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956  Search this
Sinclair, David  Search this
Names:
Bailey, Nicodemus  Search this
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Extent:
22 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Seneca  Search this
Seneca [Tonawanda]  Search this
Seneca [Cattaraugus]  Search this
Seneca [Allegany]  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Date:
1939 October
Summary:
Photography taken by George Heye, Joseph Keppler, David Sinclair and William Stiles during a trip to the Cornplanter Reservation in Pennsylvania and Onondaga, Allegheny, Cattaraugus, Tuscarora, and Tonawanda Reservations in New York October 1939.
Scope and Contents:
This collection includes 22 photographic negatives (acetate) made by David Sinclair, William Stiles and Joseph Keppler in October 1939 during a trip in New York and Pennsylvania. The negatives were shot on the Tonawanda Reservation, Cattaraugus Reservation and Allegany Reservation in Erie County, New York as well as the Cornplanter Reservation in Warren County, Pennsylvania. Many of the photographs include images of the log Seneca cabin donated to the Museum of the American Indian by Nicodemus Bailey (Seneca [Tonawanda]), NMAI object number 20/2211. Some of these photograph also feature images of Nicodemus Bailey and his wife Edna Bailey. There are also images of an elm bark tipi made in 1936, NMAI object number 02/6026, views of a monument to Chief Red Jacket in the Forest Lawn Cemetery and views of the Cornplanter Monument on the Cornplanter Reservation. Joseph Keppler is also photographed with Alice White (Seneca) and Mrs. George.
N21785-N21806.
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
In October 1939, George Gustav Heye, director of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation took a trip with Joseph Keppler, William Stiles and David Sincair to several Iroquois Nation (Seneca) reservations in Pennsylvania and New York. This included the Tonawanda Reservation, Cattaraugus Reservation and Allegany Reservation in Erie County, New York as well as the Cornplanter Reservation in Warren County, Pennsylvania. During this trip many Seneca ethnographic items were obtained, most notably the gift of a log cabin from Nicodemus Bailey (Seneca [Townawanda]). The cabin (NMAI 20/2211) was reconstructed on the grounds of the MAI Research Branch in the Bronx, New York and Nicodemus Bailey was elected a Life Member of the Museum. See the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, Annual Report (April 1, 1939 to April 1, 1940).
Related Materials:
Ethnographic materials obtained during this trip can be found in NMAI's ethnographic collections.
Provenance:
Field collections obtained by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in 1939.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Genre/Form:
Negatives (photographic)
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Field photographs from Seneca Nation Reservations in Pennsylvania and New York, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.055
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-055

Kluskap's Cave, Waycobah (Whycocomagh), Nova Scotia

Collection Creator:
Johnson, Frederick, 1904-1994  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Date:
1930
Scope and Contents:
View of low forested mountains with Kluskap's Cave on the shores of the Bras d'Or Lake, Waycobah (Whycocomagh), Nova Scotia. Kluskap (Gluskap) is a mystical figure who appears in many Mi'kmaq legends-stories passed down from generation to generation.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.

Some images restricted: Cultural Sensitivity
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Frederick Johnson photograph collection, Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.038, Item N19801
See more items in:
Frederick Johnson photograph collection
Frederick Johnson photograph collection / Series 3: Canada: Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, Mi'kmaq (Micmac) / 3.1: Membertou and Waycobah (Whycocomagh) Reserves, Nova Scotia
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-038-ref567

Wi'sik', Waycobah (Whycocomagh), Nova Scotia

Collection Creator:
Johnson, Frederick, 1904-1994  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Date:
1930
Scope and Contents:
View of low forested mountains with bay or body of water in foreground, Waycobah (Whycocomagh), Nova Scotia. Johnson recorded the mountain as "Wi'sik," a lookout for Kluskap (Gluskap), a mystical figure who appears in many Mi'kmaq legends-stories passed down from generation to generation. The name "Wi'sik" didn't carry significance for Mi'kmaq people from Waycobah or Eskasoni when interviewed in 2001.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.

Some images restricted: Cultural Sensitivity
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Frederick Johnson photograph collection, Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.038, Item N19802
See more items in:
Frederick Johnson photograph collection
Frederick Johnson photograph collection / Series 3: Canada: Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, Mi'kmaq (Micmac) / 3.1: Membertou and Waycobah (Whycocomagh) Reserves, Nova Scotia
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-038-ref568

Where Kluskap Struck the Rock, Waycobah (Whycocomagh), Nova Scotia

Collection Creator:
Johnson, Frederick, 1904-1994  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Date:
1930
Scope and Contents:
View of low forested mountains with Kluskap's Cave on the shores of the Bras d'Or Lake, Waycobah (Whycocomagh), Nova Scotia. Where "Kluskap struck the rock" in a story where Kluskap chases a beaver throughout Nova Scotia. Kluskap (Gluskap) is a mystical figure who appears in many Mi'kmaq legends-stories. A version of this story by Benjamin Brooks was published in 1990, translated from the original in Mi'kmaq.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.

Some images restricted: Cultural Sensitivity
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Frederick Johnson photograph collection, Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.038, Item N19803
See more items in:
Frederick Johnson photograph collection
Frederick Johnson photograph collection / Series 3: Canada: Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, Mi'kmaq (Micmac) / 3.1: Membertou and Waycobah (Whycocomagh) Reserves, Nova Scotia
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-038-ref569

Pine forest on the Catawba Reservation

Collection Creator:
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Collection Source:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Catawba  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Date:
1922
Scope and Contents:
View of a hilly pine forest on the Catawba Reservation in South Carolina.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Frank Speck photograph collection, Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.032, Item N12415
See more items in:
Frank Gouldsmith Speck photograph collection
Frank Gouldsmith Speck photograph collection / Series 10: North Carolina and South Carolina: Catawba, Eastern Band of Cherokee
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-032-ref1069

Pine forest on the Catawba Reservation

Collection Creator:
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Collection Source:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Catawba  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Date:
1922
Scope and Contents:
View of a clearing in a pine forest on the Catawba Reservation in South Carolina.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Frank Speck photograph collection, Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.032, Item N12417
See more items in:
Frank Gouldsmith Speck photograph collection
Frank Gouldsmith Speck photograph collection / Series 10: North Carolina and South Carolina: Catawba, Eastern Band of Cherokee
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-032-ref1071

Sally V. Cooke photograph collection of Southwest Indians and scenery

Collector:
Cooke, Sally V.  Search this
Names:
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
Stevenson, Matilda Coxe, 1850-1915  Search this
Photographer:
Steinberg, G.  Search this
Wittick, Ben, 1845-1903  Search this
Extent:
24 Copy prints
Culture:
Navajo Indians  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Copy prints
Place:
New Mexico -- Antiquities
Hopi Indian Reservation (Ariz.)
Petrified Forest National Park (Ariz.)
Fort Apache (Ariz.)
Zuni (N.M.)
Acoma (N.M.)
Date:
circa 1875-1900
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs depicting pueblos, dances, cliff dwellings, pottery, weaving, rock art, Matilda Coxe Stevenson, and other scenes in and around the pueblos in New Mexico and Arizona. Locations depicted include Moqui Pueblo, Acoma Pueblo, Zuni Pueblo, Fort Apache, and the Wood Yard in Arizona's Petrified Forest. The collection also includes one image of inscriptions on Pawnee Rock in Kansas, 1878. Most photographs in the collection were made by George Ben Wittick, with some by G. Steinberg of Juarez, Mexico.
Biographical/Historical note:
G. Ben Wittick (1845-1903) was official photographer for the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad and operated studios in Santa Fe, Albuquerque, Gallup, and Fort Wingate. The first to photograph the Hopi Snake Dance, his photographs mostly documented Southwest scenery and Navajo, Hopi and Zuni Indians.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 89-19
Reproduction Note:
Copy prints made by Smithsonian Institution, 1989.
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional Wittick photographs can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 4638, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 37, Photo Lot 59, Photo Lot 87-2P, Photo Lot 90-1, Herbert William Krieger's papers, and the BAE historical negatives.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pottery  Search this
Dances  Search this
Pueblos  Search this
Cliff-dwellings  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 89-19, Sally V. Cooke photograph collection of Southwest Indians and scenery, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.89-19
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-89-19

Joseph C. Farber photographs of American Indian life

Creator:
Farber, Joseph C., 1903-  Search this
Names:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) -- Exhibitions.  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Gorman, R. C. (Rudolph Carl), 1932-  Search this
Extent:
6,000 Contact prints (circa 6000 contact prints (proof sheets))
6,000 Acetate negatives (circa)
8 Color transparencies
1,000 Items (circa 1000 enlarged prints: silver gelatin (some mounted for exhibition))
Culture:
Arctic peoples  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Onondaga Indians  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Quinault Indians  Search this
Tlingit Indians  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tewa Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Dakota Indians  Search this
Lummi Indians  Search this
Haida Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Kootenai Indians  Search this
Kiowa Indians  Search this
Mohave Indians  Search this
Mikasuki Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Chehalis  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Contact prints
Acetate negatives
Color transparencies
Photographs
Place:
North Carolina
New York
New Mexico
Montana
South Dakota
Oklahoma
Arizona
California
Florida
Minnesota
Alaska
Alberta
Washington (State)
Barrow, Point (Alaska)
Yuma County (Ariz.)
Taos (N.M.)
Date:
circa 1970-1975
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made as part of Joseph C. Farber's project to document modern American Indian everyday life. Represented tribes include the Acoma, Apache, Blackfoot, Chehalis, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chippewa, Cocopa, Dakota, Eskimo, Haida, Kiowa, Kutenai, Lummi, Mohave, Mohawk, Navaho, Northern Athabascan, Onandaga, Pima, Pueblo, Quinalt, Seminole, Taos, Tlingit, and Zuni. Subject coverage is broad and varies from tribe to tribe. Included are portraits, as well as totem poles, carving, weaving, pottery, painitng, landscapes, boats and canoes, ceremonial regalia, camps, classes and vocational training, homes and traditional dwellings, construction projects, rodeos and powwows, dances, industries (including lumber), herding and ranching, agriculture, stores and storefronts, cliff dwellings, parades, crab cleaning, fishing, games, health care, legal processes, music, office work, sewing, vending, and a funeral. There are also photographs of R. C. Gorman (and a letter from Gorman to Farber) and Fritz Shoulder (some in color).

Farber's travels included Alaska (Point Barrow, Dead Horse, Glacier Bay, Haines, Hoona, Hydaberg, Ketchikan, Mount McKinley, Prudhoe Bay, Saxman, and Sitka); Alberta (Blackfeet Reservation); Arizona (Canyon de Chelly, Cocopa Reservation, Flagstaff, Kayenta, Monument Valley, Pima Reservation, Quechan Reservation, Mojave Reservation, and Yuma); California (Alcatraz, Oakland, and San Francisco); Florida (Big Cypress Reservation; Miccosukee Reservation); Minnesota (Minneapolis and Nett Lake); Montana (Northern Cheyenne Reservation); New Mexico (Acoma, Gallup, Navajo Forest, Picuris, Puye, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, Santa Fe, Taos, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, and Tesuque); New York (New York City and Onandaga Reservation); North Carolina (Cherokee Reservation); Oklahoma (Anadarko, Apache, Lawton, Stilwell, and Tahlequah); South Dakota (Rosebud and Wounded Knee); and Washington (Lummi Reservation, Nisqually River, Puyallup River, and Quinalt Reservation).
Biographical/Historical note:
Joseph C. Farber (1903-1994) was a successful New York businessman and professional photographer. He studied with Edward Steichen at the New York Camera Club in the 1920s. The prints in this collection resulted from a five-year project that involved travelling to Indian communities throughout the United States to document modern American Indian life. The project resulted in a book, Native Americans: 500 Years After (1975), as well as exhibits, including one in the National Museum of Natural History in 1976-1977.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 78-1, NAA ACC 95-3
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Farber's photographs, previously located in Photo Lot 95-3 have been relocated and merged with Photo Lot 78-1. These photographs were also made by Joseph C. Farber and form part of this collection.
The National Museum of American History Archives Center holds the Joseph Farber Papers and Photographs, circa 1962-1990.
See others in:
Joseph C. Farber photographs of American Indian life, circa 1970-1974
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Photographs published in Farber's books still under copyright. Reproduction permission from artist's estate.
Topic:
Dwellings  Search this
Vocational education  Search this
Canoes and canoeing  Search this
Boats and boating  Search this
Dance  Search this
Powwows  Search this
Rodeos  Search this
Building  Search this
handicrafts  Search this
Totem poles  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Livestock  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 78-1, Joseph C. Farber photographs of American Indian life, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.78-1
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-78-1

MS 416 Draft of letter to O. H. Marshall signed by M. B. Pierce, containing notes on Red Jacket, White Chief, Big Kettle, Little Billy

Creator:
Pierce, M. B. (Maris Bryant), 1811-1874  Search this
Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Addressee:
Marshall, O. H. (Orsamus Holmes), 1813-1884  Search this
Names:
Big Kettle  Search this
Farmer's Brother, approximately 1730-1841  Search this
Little Billy  Search this
Pollard  Search this
Red Jacket, Seneca chief, approximately 1756-1830  Search this
White Chief  Search this
Young King, Seneca chief, 1760-1835  Search this
Extent:
2 Pages
Culture:
Iroquois  Search this
Iroquois -- Seneca  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Seneca Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
February 7, 1874
Scope and Contents:
Reply to inquiry about burial places of certain Iroquois men: Red Jacket, Farmer's Brother. Pollard, Young King, Big Kettle, Little Billy, White Chief. Gives Indian name but no information re burial site except for Red Jacket. "...will write...again"
Biographical / Historical:
This was probably preliminary to the reburial of Red Jacket and other chiefs (mentioned in Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30, II, 363 and Buffalo Historical Society Publications, Volume III, 1885) in Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo. October 9, 1884.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 416
Local Note:
O. H. Marshall was the author of "The Niagara Frontier", Buffalo, 1865; and "The First Visit of De La Salle to the Senecas made in 1669." Buffalo, 1874. -MCB 10-57
Topic:
Nahuatl language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 416, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS416
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms416

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