Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
19,609 documents - page 1 of 500Result pages are truncated to 500.

Walton, Seymour and Finney, H.A. Mathematics of Accounting and Finance, 1921.

Collection Creator:
United Telegraph Workers.  Search this
Western Union Telegraph Company  Search this
Container:
Box 849
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements must be made to view some of the audio visual materials. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Western Union Telegraph Company Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
See more items in:
Western Union Telegraph Company Records
Western Union Telegraph Company Records / Series 27: Addenda / Addenda for Miscellaneous
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0205-ref11973

Ward F. Weakly photograph collection relating to pottery making in Sinoloa, Mexico

Creator:
Weakly, Ward F. (Ward Fredrick), 1938-1985  Search this
Names:
Griffith, James S.  Search this
Extent:
14 Mounted prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Mexicans  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Mounted prints
Place:
Sinaloa (Mexico : State)
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs depicting Sinaloa scenery, women working in various stages of pottery making, and examples of finished pots. Photographs were mounted as part of a University of Missouri Museum of Anthropology photographic exhibition of fieldwork, which was financed by a University of Tulsa Faculty Research Grant. The collection includes an exhibit pamphlet written by Weakly and James S. Griffith.
Biographical/Historical note:
Ward F. Weakly (1938-1985) was an archeologist and anthropologist in the Plains and Southwest. He earned his BA (1960) and MA (1961) in anthropology from the University of Nebraska and a PhD (1968) in anthropology from the University of Arizona. He was an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Tulsa from 1967 to 1971. He became the first Preservation Officer for the Bureau of Reclamation in 1974.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 86-47
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives holds Ward Weakly's papers.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Exhibitions  Search this
Pottery craft  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 86-47, Ward F. Weakly photograph collection relating to pottery making in Sinoloa, Mexico, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.86-47
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-86-47

Portrait of Beth Levine (Lady with Red Bow)

Artist:
Philip Pearlstein, born 24 May 1924  Search this
Sitter:
Beth Levine, 1914 - 2006  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
Stretcher: 76.2 × 62.9cm (30 × 24 3/4")
Frame: 79.4 × 66.7 × 4.1cm (31 1/4 × 26 1/4 × 1 5/8")
Type:
Painting
Date:
1985
Topic:
Costume\Jewelry\Earring  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Bow  Search this
Beth Levine: Female  Search this
Beth Levine: Visual Arts\Designer\Fashion Designer  Search this
Beth Levine: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Merchant\Shoe merchant  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Ellen Pearlstein
Object number:
NPG.2014.99
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© 1985, Phillip Pearlstein
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4f84b08e4-5d8a-431e-8c19-ecc59f9ccffe
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2014.99

E. Palmer typed letter signed. Cairo, 22 December 1891, concerning Robert Henry Nelson's application for employment in the Egyptian Service

Author:
Palmer, E. active 1891  Search this
Author:
Nelson, Robert Henry 1853-1892  Search this
Russell E. Train Africana Collection (Smithsonian Libraries) DSI  Search this
Physical description:
1 item (2 pages) 4.5 x 7 in. (document), 4.5 x 3.75 in. (envelope)
Type:
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Place:
Egypt
Great Britain
Date:
1891
Topic:
Diplomatic relations  Search this
Foreign relations  Search this
Call number:
NelM019
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1044923

BLACK EXPRESSIVE CULTURE NARRATIVE STG: Groove Phi Groove

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (sound tape reel, 7 inch reel, 1/4 inch tape)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1984 July 4
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1984 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1984, Item FP-1984-7RR-0241
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1984 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1984 Festival of American Folklife / Series 3: Black Urban Expressive Culture from Philadelphia / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1984-ref1210
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View BLACK EXPRESSIVE CULTURE NARRATIVE STG: Groove Phi Groove digital asset number 1

BLACK EXPRESSIVE CULTURE NARRATIVE STG: Arlene Mills Ultrasound; Groove Phi Groove

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (sound tape reel, 7 inch reel, 1/4 inch tape)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1984 July 5
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1984 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1984, Item FP-1984-7RR-0246
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1984 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1984 Festival of American Folklife / Series 3: Black Urban Expressive Culture from Philadelphia / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1984-ref1215
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View BLACK EXPRESSIVE CULTURE NARRATIVE STG: Arlene Mills Ultrasound; Groove Phi Groove digital asset number 1

Charles D. Walcott Collection

Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Extent:
108.59 cu. ft. (16 record storage boxes) (84 document boxes) (1 half document box) (1 12x17 box) (2 16x20 boxes) (8 5x8 boxes) (oversized materials and framed panoramas)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scientific illustrations
Diaries
Field notes
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Glass negatives
Nitrate materials
Date:
1851-1940 and undated
Introduction:
The Charles D. Walcott Collection Papers (Record Unit 7004) were given to the Smithsonian Institution by his wife, Mary Vaux Walcott, with certain more recent additions.

The Archives would like to thank Dr. Ellis L. Yochelson, United States Geological Survey, and Frederick J. Collier, Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, for their assistance in transferring items from the Walcott family and the Department for inclusion in this collection.
Descriptive Entry:
The Charles D. Walcott Collection documents his personal, professional, and official life as well as activities of his family. Included are papers from his scientific and educational activities at the local and national levels, his career as a paleontologist, his administrative career with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and to a lesser extent with the Smithsonian, and material on one of his sons' participation in World War I. Some of the collection postdates Walcott's life, including condolences to his family, an unpublished biography, correspondence between the biographer and Mrs. Walcott, and paleontological field notes by some of his colleagues.

For records relating to Walcott's family there are diaries; photographs; and correspondence with his children, his last two wives, and other family members. There is a considerable amount of material consisting of correspondence, photographs, memorabilia, publications, and official documents from the French and German governments concerning Benjamin Stuart Walcott's involvement with the Lafayette Flying Corps in France during World War I and efforts to establish a memorial in France for the Corps. Other personal records include legal documents; personal financial records; and family correspondence concerning financial investments in power companies, the prolonged illness and death of his son Charles, the death of his wife, Helena, and his daughter's travels through Europe.

Walcott's professional life is divided between his service with the USGS and the Smithsonian. Documenting his USGS years are photographs; speeches; scrapbooks; reports and correspondence from his work on forest reserves, the investigation of scientific work conducted by the federal government, and land reclamation; and annual reports. Walcott's Smithsonian career is documented primarily by correspondence written while serving as honorary curator of paleontology and Acting Assistant Secretary in charge of the United States National Museum. One scrapbook includes extensive correspondence from scientists, government officials, and friends upon the occasion of Walcott's appointment as Secretary of the Smithsonian. For a more complete record of Walcott's association with the Smithsonian, the records of the Office of the Secretary (Record Units 45 and 46), records of the Assistant Secretary, Acting (Record Unit 56), and two special series relating to the budget (Record Unit 49) and to the Research Corporation (Record Unit 51) should be consulted.

For Walcott's career as a paleontologist, there is documentation in his field notes; publications of his as well as those of others in related areas; manuscripts; diaries; and photographs, including panoramic views of the Rockies in Alberta, British Columbia, and Montana. In addition, there are paleontological field notes by Ray T. Bassler, Charles Elmer Resser, and Edward Oscar Ulrich.

Walcott's role in promoting and developing national science policy is partially covered in the records relating to his involvement in the National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council, Washington Academy of Sciences, and the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Included are legal documents, correspondence, committee minutes, reports, proceedings, financial statements, membership lists, and related materials. Additional material on the Washington Academy of Sciences can be found in Record Unit 7099. Records documenting Walcott's involvement in the administration and development of the other organizations exist at those institutions. His affiliation with the George Washington Memorial Association is documented with correspondence, trustees' minutes, histories of the Association, and drawings and plans for a building. For other national developments there is correspondence covering Walcott's participation on the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

Other types of materials in this collection include certificates, diplomas, awards, and occasionally correspondence concerning his election to honorary and professional societies and the receipt of honorary degrees, and scrapbooks and diaries which touch on events throughout his life.

See also the online exhibition "Beauty in Service to Science: The Panoramas of Charles D. Walcott."
Historical Note:
Charles D. Walcott (1850-1927) was born in New York Mills, New York, and attended the Utica public schools and Utica Academy, but never graduated. He demonstrated an early interest in natural history by collecting birds' eggs and minerals; and, while employed as a farm hand, he began collecting trilobites. These he later sold to Louis Agassiz at Harvard's Museum of Comparative Zoology. Walcott began his professional scientific career in November 1876 when he was appointed as an assistant to James Hall, New York's state geologist. On July 21, 1879, Walcott joined the United States Geological Survey (USGS) as an assistant geologist. Shortly after arriving in Washington, D. C., he was sent to southwestern Utah to make stratigraphic sections. His later field work with the Survey included expeditions to the Appalachians, New England, New York, eastern Canada, and several Middle Atlantic states, as well as other parts of southwestern and western United States. From 1882 to 1893 he worked with the Survey's invertebrate Paleozoic paleontological collections, and in 1893 he was appointed Geologist in charge of Geology and Paleontology. He also served as an honorary curator of invertebrate Paleozoic fossils at the United States National Museum (USNM) from 1892 to 1907, and as Acting Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution in charge of the USNM from 1897 to 1898. His fieldwork from this period resulted in several major publications, including The Paleontology of the Eureka District (1884), a study of fossils in Nevada; The Fauna of the Olenellus Zone (1888) concerning early North American Cambrian fossils; Correlation Papers on the Cambrian (1890); and Fossil Medusae (1898). In 1894 Walcott was appointed Director of the USGS. Serving until 1907, he greatly expanded the functions of the agency and was successful in increasing federal appropriations. In 1891 Congress had given the President the authority to establish public forests, but it was not until 1897 that the administration of the forest reserves was placed under the USGS. Walcott was instrumental in having legislation passed to enforce the preservation of forest reserves and to add additional land to the reserve program. His predecessor at the USGS initiated an arid land reclamation program in 1888 which Walcott continued as part of his forest reserve program. In 1902 he established the Hydrographic Branch to administer the program; but four years later the Branch, since renamed the Reclamation Service, became a separate federal agency. He also created the Division of Mineral Resources to experiment with coal combustion. In 1907 it was renamed the Bureau of Mines. At the request of President Theodore Roosevelt in 1903, Walcott served as chairman of a committee to study the scientific work being conducted by the federal government.

Walcott was appointed Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution on January 31, 1907, and resigned from the USGS in April 1907. His administration at the Smithsonian was marked by numerous accomplishments, including the completion of the National Museum Building (now the National Museum of Natural History) in 1911. He was also successful in convincing Detroit industrialist Charles Lang Freer to donate his extensive Oriental art collection and money for a building during his lifetime rather than after Freer's death, as was originally intended. Walcott also set up the National Gallery of Art (predecessor to the National Museum of American Art) as a separate administrative entity in 1920. To administer Frederick G. Cottrell's gift of patent rights to his electrical precipitator, the Research Corporation was formed in 1912, with revenue from this patent, as well as future ones, to be used to advance scientific research at the Smithsonian and other educational institutions. Walcott served on the Corporation's Board of Directors for several years. To further increase the Smithsonian's endowment, Walcott was planning a major fundraising effort; but this was not pursued following his death an February 9, 1927. In 1922, he and his wife established a fund in their names at the Smithsonian to support paleontological research.

Despite his many administrative responsibilities as Secretary, Walcott was able to find time to continue his research and collecting of fossils from the Cambrian and Ordovician periods, with primary focus on the Canadian Rockies. In 1909 he located Cambrian fossils near Burgess Pass above Field, British Columbia. The following season he discovered the Burgess shale fauna, which proved to be his greatest paleontological discovery. Most of this research was published in various volumes of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections from 1908-1931. His one major publication during this period was Cambrian Brachiopoda, published in 1912. Walcott continued to return to the Canadian Rockies for most seasons through 1925, when he made his last field expedition. As one of the foremost scientific figures in Washington, Walcott helped to establish several organizations with international renown and restructure existing national organizations. In 1902, Walcott, along with several other prominent individuals, met with Andrew Carnegie to establish the Carnegie Institution of Washington as a center for advanced research and training in the sciences. Walcott served the Institution in several administrative capacities. He was also instrumental in convincing Carnegie that the Institution should have laboratories built for scientists rather than use his gift solely for research grants.

Elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1896, Walcott played a role in having the Academy become more actively involved in national science policy by serving in many official capacities. In addition to serving on innumerable committees, he held the offices of treasurer, vice president, president, and council member. He was also appointed to two presidential committees--Timber Utilization and Outdoor Recreation--in 1924 and was reappointed to both in 1926. He was the Academy's first recipient of the Mary Clark Thompson Medal. Following his death, his wife established the Charles Doolittle Walcott Fund for achievements in Cambrian research.

In 1916 the Academy, at the request of President Woodrow Wilson, created the National Research Council within the Academy to assist the federal government in the interest of national preparedness. Walcott, as one who met with Wilson, became actively involved in the organization of the Council by sitting on many of its committees, including one which planned for the present headquarters of the Council and the Academy. Walcott contributed significantly to the development of American aviation. He pressed for the establishment of the National Advisory Committee for Aviation, which was a predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He was instrumental in establishing air mail service, organizing the Committee on Aerial Photographic Surveying and Mapping, and writing the Air Commerce Act of 1926. Besides his scientific activities, Walcott lent his influence to other groups, such as the George Washington Memorial Association. That group attempted to create a memorial to Washington by forming an institution to promote science, literature, and the arts, just as Washington had proposed should be done.

Walcott was married three times - to Lura Ann Rust (d. 1876), to Helena Breese Stevens (d. 1911), and to Mary Morris Vaux (d. 1940). By his second wife he had four children: Charles Doolittle, Sidney Stevens, Helen Breese, and Benjamin Stuart. Charles died while a student at Yale, and Benjamin was killed in action in France while flying for the Lafayette Flying Corps. In 1914 Walcott married Mary Morris Vaux, who, while accompanying him on his field trips, studied and painted North American wildflowers. Her work was published in five volumes by the Smithsonian in 1925.

Although Walcott never received an academic degree, he was the recipient of numerous honorary degrees from colleges and universities in the United States and Europe. His colleagues recognized his contribution to paleontology by awarding him the Bigsby and Wollaston Medals from the Geological Society of London; the Gaudry Medal of the Geological Society of France; and the Hayden Medal from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. He also served as a founder and president, 1899-1910, of the Washington Academy of Sciences; president of the Cosmos Club, 1898; president, 1915-1917, of the Washington Branch of the Archeological Institute of America; and president, 1925-1927, of the American Philosophical Society.
Chronology:
March 31, 1850 -- Born in New York Mills, New York

1858-1868 -- Attended public schools in Utica, New York, and Utica Academy

1863 -- Began collecting natural history specimens

1871 -- Moved to Trenton Falls, New York, to work on William P. Rust's farm and began collecting trilobites

January 9, 1872 -- Married Lura Am Rust

1873 -- Sold collection of fossils to Louis Agassiz at Harvard's Museum of Comparative Zoology

January 23,1876 -- Lura Ann Walcott died

November 1876 -- Appointed assistant to Janes Hall, state geologist of New York

1876 -- Joined American Association for the Advancement of Science

July 21, 1879 -- Appointed Assistant Geologist, United States Geological Survey (USGS)

1879 -- Assisted Clarence Edward Dutton in Grand Canyon region in south-central Utah and the Eureka district in Nevada

July 1, 1882 -- Placed in charge of Division of Invertebrate Paleozoic Paleontology at USGS

1882 -- Elected Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science

-- Field work in Nevada and Grand Canyon

1883 -- Promoted to Paleontologist, USGS

-- Field work in Grand Canyon and Cambrian studies in Adirondacks and northwestern Vermont

1884 -- Field work in Cambrian fossils in western Vermont; coal deposits in central Arizona; and Lower Paleozoic of Texas' central mineral region; Published first major paper The Paleontology of the Eureka District (USGS Monograph 8)

1885 -- Field work on Cambrians in Highland Range of central Nevada; Permian fossils of southwestern Utah; and Cambrian fossils in Wasatch Mountains near Salt Lake City

1886 -- Published "Classification of the Cambrian System in North America"

-- Cambrian field work in northern New York and western Vermont

1887 -- Cambrian field work in New York, western Massachusetts, and southwestern Vermont

1888 -- Married Helena Breese Stevens; Attended International Geological Congress in London; Placed in charge of all invertebrate paleontology at USGS; Published The Fauna of the Olenellus Zone which discusses Cambrian fossils in North America; Field work in Wales and on Canadian-Vermont border

May 17, 1889 -- Son Charles Doolittle born

1889 -- Cambrian field work in North Carolina, Tennessee, Mohawk Valley of New York, Vermont, and Quebec

1890 -- Published Correlation Papers on the Cambrian; Cambrian strata field work in New York and Vermont and Ordovician strata field work in Colorado Springs, Colorado

1891 -- Field work in New York, Colorado, and Appalachians from Virginia to Alabama

October 2, 1892 -- Son Sidney Stevens born

1892 -- Placed in charge of all paleontological work at USGS; Field work in southern Pennsylvania and western Maryland

1892-1907 -- Honorary curator of invertebrate Paleozoic fossils at United States National Museum (USNM)

January 1, 1893 -- Appointed Geologist in charge of Geology and Paleontology, USGS

1893 -- Vice President, Section E (Geology and Geography), American Association for the Advancement of Science; Examined Lower Paleozoic rocks in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee; Prepared paleontological exhibition for Chicago's Columbian Exposition

August 20, 1894 -- Daughter Helen Breese born

1894 -- Placed in charge of all paleontological collections at USNM; Appointed Director, USGS; Field work in central Colorado and White Mountain Range in California and Nevada

1895 -- Cambrian field work in Montana, Idaho, and Massachusetts

July 8, 1896 -- Son Benjamin Stuart born

1896 -- Joined National Academy of Sciences (NAS); Field work in eastern California and western Nevada and Franklin Mountains near El Paso, Texas

January 27, 1897 -- Appointed Acting Secretary in Charge of the USNM

1897 -- Conducted examination of forest reserves and national parks in Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains, and Inyo Mountains

June 30, 1898 -- Resigned as Acting Assistant Secretary in Charge of the USNM

1898 -- Field work in Lexington, Virginia; Teton Forest Reserve, Wyoming; Belt Mountains near Helena, Montana; and Idaho; President of the Cosmos Club, Washington, D.C.; Published Fossil Medusae (USGS Monograph 30)

1899 -- Field work in Newfoundland, New Brunswick, and Quebec; One of the founders of the Washington Academy of Sciences

1899-1911 -- President of the Washington Academy of Sciences

1900 -- Field work in Montana and Rhode Island

1901 -- Field work in Pennsylvania

January 4, 1902 -- One of the founders of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (CIW) and Secretary of the Board of Incorporators

1902 -- Member of the Advisory Committee on Geology and Advisory Committee on Geophysics of CIW

1902-1905 -- Secretary of Board of Trustees and of Executive Committee of CIW

1902-1922 -- Member, Executive Committee of Board of Trustees of CTW

1902-1923 -- Member of Council of NAS

1902-1927 -- Member, Board of Trustees, CIW

1903 -- Head of Board of Scientific Surveys, CIW; Field work in Uinta Mountains, Utah; House Range of western Utah; Snake River Range of eastern Nevada; Chairman of committee to study scientific work conducted by federal government

1904-1913 -- Honorary Curator, Department of Mineral Technology, USNM

1905 -- Field work in Montana's Rocky Mountains and Cambrian fossils of Utah's House Range

January 31, 1907 -- Appointed Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution

April 1907 -- Resigned as Director of the USGS

1907 -- Field work at Mount Stephen, Castle Mountains, Lake Louise, and Mount Bosworth in British Columbia

1907-1917 -- Vice President of NAS

1908 -- Field work in Montana, British Columbia, and Alberta

1909 -- Found Cambrian fossils near Burgess Pass above Field, British Columbia

1910 -- Found Burgess shale fauna

June 20, 1911 -- National Museum Building (now the National Museum of Natural History) completed

July 11, 1911 -- Wife Helena died in train accident in Bridgeport, Connecticut

1911 -- Field work in British Columbia

1912 -- Field work in Alberta and British Columbia; Published Cambrian Brachiopoda (USGS Monograph 51)

April 7, 1913 -- Son Charles Doolittle died

1913 -- Burgess shale work in Robson Park district, British Columbia, and in Jasper Park, Alberta

June 30, 1914 -- Married Mary Morris Vaux

1914 -- Field work in Glacier, British Columbia, and White Sulphur Springs and Deep Creek Canyon, Montana

1914-1927 -- Vice Chairman, Board of Trustees, CIW

1915 -- Living algae field work in Yellowstone National Park and West Gallatin River; fossil field work in Arizona 1915-1917; President, Washington Branch of the Archeological Institute of America

1915-1919 -- Chairman, Executive Committee of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

June 30, 1916 -- Elected member of National Research Council (NRC)

October 1916 -- Freer Gallery of Art building construction begun

1916 -- Field work in British Columbia and Alberta

1916-1923 -- First Vice Chairman, NRC

December 12, 1917 -- Son Benjamin Stuart died in military action in France

1917 -- Appointed member of NRC's Executive Committee, Aeronautics Committee, and Geology and Paleontology Committee; Chairman, NRC's Military Committee; Burgess shale field work around Lake MacArthur and in Vermilion River Valley

1917-1922 -- Chairman, Executive Committee, CIW

1917-1923 -- President, NAS

June 1918 -- Helped organize National Parks Educational Committee (became National Parks Association in 1919)

1918 -- Field work in Alberta; Member, NRC's Interim Committee; Chairman, NRC's Military Division and Section on Aeronautics

1918-1919 -- Chairman, National Parks Educational Committee

1919 -- Field work in Alberta; Chairman, NRC's Committee on Scientific Men as Reserve officers in Reorganized Army; Chairman, NRC's Committee on Removal of Offices of National Research Council; Chairman, NRC's Committee on Representation of United States at International Meetings to be held at Brussels

1919-1920 -- Member, NRC's Committee on General Policy and Solicitation of Funds; Chairman, NRC's Government Division

1919-1922 -- Member, NRC's Committee on Federal Grants for Research; Chairman, NRC's Committee on Publication of "The Inquiry" Results

1919-1924 -- Member, NRC's Research Information Service

1919-1925 -- Member, NRC's Executive Board

1919-1926 -- Member, National Parks Association's Executive Committee

1919-1927 -- Chairman, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

-- Chairman, NRC's Division of Federal Relations; Member, NRC's Executive Committee of Division of Federal Relations

1920 -- Field work in Alberta

1920-1921 -- Member, NAS's Federal Relations Committee

1920-1922 -- Chairman, Committee on Budget (jointly with NAS and NRC); Member, NRC's Committee on Building Stone and Committee on Building Plans

1921 -- Field work in Alberta

1921 -- Freer Gallery of Art building completed; Received first Mary Clark Thompson Medal from NAS

1921-1924 -- President, National Parks Association

1921-1927 -- Chairman, NRC's Executive Committee of Division of Federal Regulations

1922 -- Field work in Alberta and British Columbia; Established Charles D. and Mary Vaux Walcott Fund at Smithsonian

1922-1923 -- Member, NRC's Committee on Stabilization of Permanent Foundations; Chairman, Committee on Finance (jointly with NAS and NRC)

1922-1925 -- Member, NRC's Committee on Building; Member, NRC's Committee on Policies

1923 -- Field work in Alberta and British Columbia; President, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Freer Gallery of Art opened

1923-1924 -- Chairman, Committee on Dedication of the New Building (jointly with NAS and NRC)

1923-1925 -- Member, NRC's Interim Committee; Member, Executive Committee, Committee on Exhibits in the New Building (jointly with NAS and NRC)

1923-1927 -- Second Vice Chairman, NRC

1924 -- Field work in Alberta and British Columbia

1924-1925 -- Member, Committee on Exhibits (jointly with NAS and NRC)

1925 -- Field work in Alberta; Life Member, American Association for the Advancement of Science

1925-1927 -- President, American Philosophical Society

1926 -- Helped draft Air Commerce Act of 1926

1926-1927 -- Board of Trustees, National Parks Association

February 9, 1927 -- Died in Washington, D.C.
Topic:
Geology  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scientific illustrations
Diaries
Field notes
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Glass negatives
Nitrate materials
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 7004
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7004

Folder 10 Minutes of Finance Committee, 1921.

Collection Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Container:
Box 43 of 117
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Charles D. Walcott Collection / Series 17: GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION CORRESPONDENCE AND RELATED MATERIALS, 1898-1924 AND UNDATED. / Box 43
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7004-refidd1e7028

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1,948 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Audiocassettes
Slides (photographs)
Digital images
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Notes
Business records
Memorandums
Contracts
Negatives
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Plans (drawings)
Videotapes
Date:
1967-2016
Summary:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the annual Smithsonian Folklife Festival. These Festival records include administrative papers and the audiovisual documentation of annual Festivals (1967-ongoing). Finding aids are available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the annual Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. In earlier years these materials were all created as paper records or analog media; ongoing retrospective digitization efforts aim to preserve those and make them more widely accessible. Increasingly, the Festival records are now born as digital media or electronic documents.

Staff and contractors of the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage collaborate with Smithsonian staff photographers to document the Festival in images. The Center's videographer, contract crews, volunteers, and interns video-record Festival performances and demonstrations. Volunteers trained by the Center's archivists record and log audiotapes at every Festival stage and discussion area. In recent years, the average documentation of a Festival may consist of some 10,000 images, several hundred audio recordings, and 5+ terabytes of video; this audiovisual documentation is complemented by thousands of pages of administrative and planning documents. In addition to the documentation of the Festival on the National Mall, the collection includes field research conducted by Smithsonian researchers or, increasingly, by researchers drawn from the community, state, or nation featured.

Festival papers

The Smithsonian Folklife Festival papers include the correspondence, memoranda, notes, planning documents, and various other records associated with the Festival as a whole or with one or more of its years or programs. This includes, among others, administrative records such as planning documents, contracts, agreements, and memoranda of understanding, correspondence, meeting materials, etc.; programmatic records pertaining to the development and curation of the Festival or one of its programs such as correspondence, reports, proposals, concepts, notes, other planning documents, etc.; participant records such as participant handbooks, participant invitation and contract letters, release/voucher forms, participant questionnaires, staffing and payment schedules, and related materials; and artwork and graphic design files used in publications, signage, and other media as well as associated release forms. It does not such categories of papers as finance and administration records, personnel records, development records, publicity files, or technical project files.

For any given Festival, materials within the collection typically include:

Program books, publications, and ephemera

Program books were published from 1968 through 2011 and again in 2013, and typically included introductory essays and keynote essays on each program, as well as a list of Festival participants, schedule of activities, site map, and staff list. Occasionally, the schedule and lists were published separately from the essays. Beginning in 2012, a shorter guide provided an overview of each program, its participants, and schedule. Beginning in 2014, an annual review reported on the activities of the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, including the Festival. Digital versions of these materials, as well as site maps for each Festival except the first, are found as the first series within each annual collection. In addition, the Rinzler Archives houses one or more copies of the original printed versions of each publication. In later years, web resources were often published to enhance the Festival experience. Digitally archived copies of these resources are accessible through this finding aid.

For many Festivals, one or more posters were published. Cookbooks were occasionally published in connection with a Festival program, particularly in the case of a foreign country's participation. Materials aimed toward children or families, typically suggesting activities they could engage in during the Festival or before and after their visit, were published for many Festivals or programs. Original printed copies of such publications and ephemera are housed within the Rinzler Archives; as these are digitized over time they will be made available through this finding aid.

Fieldwork

Fieldwork may take the form of photographs, audio or video recordings, notes, transcripts, reports, correspondence, and other documents. Where these are clearly associated with a single Festival program, they are identified as such, housed discretely within the Rinzler Archive, and inventoried as part of that program. In some cases, fieldwork notes and reports may also be found among the Smithsonian Folklife Festival Papers, so the inventories within each program here may not always be comprehensive. As materials are processed over time, these inventories will be updated and enhanced.

Photographs

Photographs may include digital photographs, photographic prints, negatives, and slides, both black-and-white and color. These depict events and activities on the National Mall during the Festival, as well as informal activities of Festival participants at the hotel or while visiting Washington. Ongoing digitization efforts aim to preserve earlier analog photographs and make them more readily accessible. The Smithsonian's Digital Asset Management System (DAMS) stores all of the digital images, whether born digital (19XX-present) or digitized from analog originals. The present finding aid seeks to provide direct access to a sample of such photographs, although in most cases numerous other photographs also exist in the Rinzler Archives.

Audio

Throughout its history, the Festival has endeavored to create a comprehensive audio record of the performances, discussions, and other activities on all of its stages and performance venues, typically by taking a feed from that stage's sound reinforcement system. Occasionally, audio recordings also included interviews with craftspeople or Festival visitors who were not on stage, as well as evening rehearsals and informal interactions at the Festival hotel. Given the nature of the Festival as an outdoor event and the inevitable interference of airplanes flying overhead and traffic noises from adjacent streets, and given that the requirements of live sound reinforcement are not identical with those of audio recording, the resulting recordings are sometimes subject to interruption and technical shortcomings. In certain years, special arrangements were made for high-quality, multi-track recording, even if the vast majority of recordings are done at lower quality. At the time of recording, volunteers create logs or track sheets describing the content of each recording; in some cases these have been revised and corrected and in other cases the simultaneous logs have not been verified or revised. Retrospective digitization efforts aim to preserve older recordings and make them more widely accessible.

Video

Motion picture films and video recordings of Festival activities were created beginning in 1968 (for film) and 1973 (for video). In contrast with the audio recordings that sought to document primarily the activities on stage, the film and video efforts were typically both more inclusive (by covering crafts, occupational demonstrations, foodways, rehearsals, and non-stage events) and more selective (focusing on a sampling of each day's activities or on a single program, rather than beginning-to-end coverage of the entire Festival). As with the audio recordings, simultaneous written logs note what was recorded. Digital video is stored on the Smithsonian DAMS, with ongoing efforts to digitize older analog materials, whether born as motion picture film or as video.
Arrangement note:
The Smithsonian Folklife Festival records include one collection of papers and administrative documents and annual collections of the audiovisual documentation associated with each year's Festival.

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. It is produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and by its predecessors: the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Office of Folklife Programs (1979-1991), Folklife Program of the Office of American and Folklife Studies (1977-1979), and Division of Performing Arts (1967-1976). Beginning with the 1973 Festival, the National Park Service of the U.S. Department of the Interior became cosponsor of the Festival.

The Festival is organized to increase and diffuse knowledge about grassroots culture. It is a research-based, curated event, drawing on the efforts of Smithsonian staff, academic and lay scholars from the featured cultures, and people who know a great deal about their own cultures. The most distinctive feature of the Festival is its attempt to foreground the voices of tradition bearers as they demonstrate, discuss, and present their folklife and cultural heritage. Since its founding the Festival has always navigated between the various axes of art (as entertainment), cultural rights (as advocacy), education (as public service), and knowledge (as scholarship).

Since its founding, the Festival has featured exemplary tradition bearers from more than 50 nations, every region of the United States, scores of ethnic communities, more than 100 American Indian groups, and some 50 occupations. Each year's Festival typically includes several programs, each focusing on a state or region of the United States, a foreign country, an occupation, or a theme.

The Festival was born in 1967 during the tenure of Smithsonian Secretary S. Dillon Ripley, part of a larger effort to make the National Mall more accessible to the American public and to make the Smithsonian's programs more exciting and engaging. James Morris, director of Museum Services and then of the Division of Performing Arts, proposed that the Smithsonian host a folk festival as the centerpiece of the outdoors activities on the National Mall. Ralph C. Rinzler, then-director of field programs for the Newport Folk Festival, was engaged to help plan the 1967 Festival, serving as Festival Director from 1968-1982.

The Festival's growth and evolution over subsequent decades can be traced through introductory notes for each annual Festival. Those notes seek to provide an overview of that year's Festival and of each of its programs, as they were conceived by their organizers at the time. In certain cases, geographic names or other terms are retained that may not reflect current usage. Those notes also include detailed information on the institutional arrangements, key personnel, and major donors and partners for each annual Festival.
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 for additional information.

Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for information.

Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives; please submit this form. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
Publications  Search this
Language and languages  Search this
Folklore  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk music  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Audiocassettes
Slides (photographs)
Digital images
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Notes
Business records
Memorandums
Contracts
Negatives
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Plans (drawings)
Videotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff

Dorr Bothwell papers

Creator:
Bothwell, Dorr  Search this
Names:
Pollock-Krasner Foundation  Search this
Adams, Ansel, 1902-1984  Search this
Adams, Virginia Best  Search this
Adnan, Etel  Search this
Chinn, Benjamen, 1921-2009  Search this
Falkenstein, Claire, 1908-1997  Search this
Howard, Charles, 1899-1978  Search this
Jackson, Martha Kellogg  Search this
Packard, Emmy Lou, 1914-1998  Search this
Extent:
10.6 Linear feet
1.72 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Visitors' books
Interviews
Travel diaries
Scrapbooks
Collages
Sketches
Contracts
Awards
Diaries
Lecture notes
Date:
1900-2006
Summary:
The papers of California painter, printmaker, and art instructor Dorr Bothwell date from 1900-2006, and measure 10.6 linear feet and 1.72 GB. Found within the papers are biographical material, correspondence, personal business records, notes and writings, five diaries, art work and 19 sketchbooks, three scrapbooks, printed material, and print and digital photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of California painter, printmaker, and art instructor Dorr Bothwell date from 1900-2006, and measure 10.6 linear feet and 1.72 GB. Found within the papers are biographical material, correspondence, personal business records, notes and writings, five diaries, art work and 19 sketchbooks, three scrapbooks, printed material, and print and digital photographs.

Biographical material consists of biographical sketches, resumés, identity cards, award certificates, typescripts of autobiographical interviews, address books, and a file concerning UFOs, spirituality, and philosophy.

Correspondence consists of letters exchanged between Bothwell and her colleagues and friends discussing their art-related activities, travel, and birthday greetings. There are scattered letters from Ansel and Virginia Adams, Etel Adnan, Benjamin Chinn, Claire Falkenstein, and Emmy Lou Packard.

Personal business records include teaching contracts, contracts and royalty statements for the publication of Bothwell's book Notan, insurance records, income tax records, records concerning a grant from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, estate records, card files, lists of art work, price lists, exhibition entry cards, receipts for the sale of art work, travel receipts, medical receipts, and consignment/sales records.

Notes and writings include three diaries, two travel journals, guest books, miscellaneous lists, schedules of classes for various organizations and art schools including the Ansel Adams Yosemite Workshop, typescripts of lecture notes, and miscellaneous notes. There are also scattered writings by Bothwell and others.

Seventeen sketchbooks, including several completed during Bothwell's travels, and one dated 1942 illustrated with daily drawings of her activities while preparing for World War II, are found within the papers. There are also miscellaneous drawings, collages, a serigraph It's Time for a Change, an etching by Martha Jackson, and a drawing by Charles Howard.

Three scrapbooks contain clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, programs, and photographs of art work. Scrapbook 3 contains materials concerning spiritualism and mysticism. Additional printed material consists of clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, press releases, brochures for art classes, the sale of art work, travel, and camera equipment, reproductions of art work, picture postcards, programs, books, and miscellaneous commercial business cards.

Photographs are of Bothwell, her mother and brother, her studio/residences, miscellaneous friends and colleagues including her former husband, sculptor Donal Hord, miscellaneous events, and art classes conducted by Bothwell. There are also photographs of art work by Bothwell and others, as well as numerous photographs and slides of travel various forms in nature that Bothwell would incorporate into her art work.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1939-2001 (Box 1, 11, 13, 15; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1942-2002 (Box 1-3, 13; 2.3 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1925-2006 (Box 3-4; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Notes and Writings, 1949-1998 (Box 4, 11, 14, 15; 0.8 linear feet.)

Series 5: Art Work, 1920-1994 (Box 4-5, 11, 13, 16, 17; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, 1926-1979 (Box 5, 11, 12; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1923-2000 (Box 5-7, 12, 13; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, 1900-2001 (Box 7-9, 10; 2.4 linear feet, ER01-ER04; 1.72 GB)
Biographical Note:
Dorr Bothwell (1902-2000) worked primarily in California as a painter, printmaker, and art instructor.

Doris Bothwell was born on May 3, 1902 in San Francisco, and later changed her first name to Dorr in order to more easily enter the art business. Bothwell began her art studies in 1916 with her parents' friend Anna Valentien, a student of Rodin. Between 1921 and 1922, she studied at the California School of Fine Art, and continued her studies at the University of Oregon at Eugene. After attending the Rudolph Schaeffer School of Design in 1924, she established her own studio in San Francisco from 1924 to 1927. Also during this time Bothwell, with eight other artists opened the Modern Gallery on Montgomery Street, mounting her first solo exhibition there in 1927.

Between 1928 and 1929, Bothwell traveled to American Samoa, where she created paintings and drawings, and documented tapa (barkcloth) drawings for the Bishop Museum of Honolulu. She then spent a year of study in Europe, returning to San Diego, California in 1931 and marrying sculptor Donal Hord. Four years later, they divorced and she moved to Los Angeles where she worked for the pottery manufacturer Gladding McBean, joined the post-surrealist group around Lorser Feitelson and Helen Lundeberg and opened the Bothwell-Cooke Gallery.

Between 1936 and 1939, Bothwell worked in the mural division of the Federal Arts Project of Los Angeles, and learned the art of serigraph printing. She designed dioramas and mechanized exhibitions for the Los Angeles County Museum. In 1940 she also created murals in the Manning Coffee Restaurant in San Francisco.

After teaching color and design at the California School of Fine Art in San Francisco from 1944 to 1948, Bothwell was awarded the Abraham Rosenberg Traveling Scholarship that financed study in Paris from 1949 to the fall of 1951. In 1952 she taught textile design for mass production at the Parsons School of Design in New York City.

Returning to San Francisco, Bothwell taught again at the California School of Fine Art from 1953 to 1958, and at the San Francisco Art Institute from 1959 to 1960. From 1960 to 1961 she took a sabbatical in England and France, creating paintings for an exhibition. In 1962 she was asked to teach at the new Mendocino Art Center and she taught there until 1983. She was also asked by Ansel Adams to teach design and composition for photographers at his Yosemite Workshop summer sessions, which she did from 1964 to 1977.

From 1966 to 1967, Bothwell documented indigo dying techniques, strip weaving, and pottery in Western Nigeria and Tunisia. In 1968, she published her book, co-authored with Marlys Frey, NOTAN The Principle of Dark-Light Design. The book was reissued in 1991. Bothwell continued her travels from 1970 to 1971, when she studied 12th century enamels in England, France, and Holland, and conducted a symposium, "Notan Design," for the London Educational Authority. In 1974, she traveled to Bali, Java, and Sumatra, making a slide documentary on batik, woodcarving, and folk design.

In 1977 Bothwell moved to Joshua Tree, California, from Mendocino in Northern California, but moved back and forth between the two studio/residences until 1992 when she moved to her last residence on the desert at Apache Junction, Arizona. From 1979 to 1980, she taught composition at the Victor School of Photography in Colorado and a design course at the Women's Art Guild in Kauai, Hawaii. Following a tour of China with a watercolor artists' group in 1982, Bothwell conducted workshops at the Mendocino Art Center. In 1985, she traveled to Japan.

Dorr Bothwell died on September 24, 2000 in Fort Bragg, California.
Provenance:
The Dorr Bothwell papers were donated in 1978 by the artist, and in 2002, 2009, and 2012 by the Dorr Bothwell Trust.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Dorr Bothwell papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- California  Search this
Painters -- California  Search this
Topic:
Women artists -- California  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Surrealism  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Visitors' books
Interviews
Travel diaries
Scrapbooks
Collages
Sketches
Contracts
Awards
Diaries
Lecture notes
Citation:
Dorr Bothwell papers, 1900-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bothdorr
See more items in:
Dorr Bothwell papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bothdorr

Al Gore

Artist:
Chuck Close, born 5 Jul 1940  Search this
Sitter:
Al Gore, born 31 Mar 1948  Search this
Medium:
Jacquard tapestry
Dimensions:
212.1 × 184.5 × 1 cm (83 1/2 × 72 5/8 × 3/8")
Type:
Textile
Date:
2009
Topic:
Costume\Dress Accessory\Tie  Search this
Tapestry  Search this
Al Gore: Male  Search this
Al Gore: Politics and Government\Presidential Candidate  Search this
Al Gore: Politics and Government\Vice-President of US  Search this
Al Gore: Politics and Government\US Senator\Tennessee  Search this
Al Gore: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Environmentalist  Search this
Al Gore: Business and Finance\Land developer  Search this
Al Gore: Politics and Government\US Congressman\Tennessee  Search this
Al Gore: Nobel Prize  Search this
Al Gore: Oscar  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Ian M. and Annette P. Cumming
Object number:
NPG.2020.136
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Chuck Close
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm43df02c44-271e-4c44-9ce6-2d4b501e0d17
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2020.136

John Ashhurst

Artist:
Unidentified Artist  Search this
Sitter:
John Ashhurst, 1809 - 1892  Search this
Medium:
Watercolor on ivory
Dimensions:
Sight: 7.2 × 5.9cm (2 13/16 × 2 5/16")
Type:
Painting
Date:
c. 1839
Topic:
Miniature  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Stock  Search this
John Ashhurst: Male  Search this
John Ashhurst: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Banker  Search this
John Ashhurst: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Merchant  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Private collection
Object number:
MO990021
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm40cdf574e-8165-4d32-babb-3c9523979daa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_MO990021

Robert Brown Jamesson (Possibly)

Artist:
James Peale, 1749 - 24 May 1831  Search this
Possibly:
Robert Brown Jamesson, 1770 - 1820  Search this
Medium:
Watercolor on ivory
Dimensions:
Ivory (estimate): 6.4 × 4.9cm (2 1/2 × 1 15/16")
Type:
Painting
Date:
c. 1790-1791
Topic:
Costume\Jewelry  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Pendant  Search this
Miniature  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Stock  Search this
Robert Brown Jamesson: Male  Search this
Robert Brown Jamesson: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Merchant  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Private collection
Object number:
MO990022
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm46591a86f-f1f8-47f9-b14c-df9f33c8cf17
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_MO990022

James Breckenridge (Probably)

Artist:
Unidentified Artist  Search this
Probably:
James Breckenridge, 10 Dec 1802 - 26 Jan 1860  Search this
Medium:
Watercolor on ivory
Dimensions:
Sight (estimate): 7.2 × 5.9cm (2 13/16 × 2 5/16")
Type:
Painting
Date:
c. 1830
Topic:
Miniature  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Stock  Search this
James Breckenridge: Male  Search this
James Breckenridge: Natural Resources\Miner  Search this
James Breckenridge: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Dealer\Cattle dealer  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Private collection
Object number:
MO990024
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4d2cb9870-10ab-4d4a-bcfd-39f9837138ba
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_MO990024

Francis Xavier Lamotte

Artist:
Filippo Tignani, active c. 1868-1883  Search this
Sitter:
Francis Xavier Lamotte, c.1843 - 30 Jan 1868  Search this
Medium:
Shell cameo on gold enamel frame
Dimensions:
Frame: 5.1 × 2.6cm (2 × 1")
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
after 1868
Topic:
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Beard  Search this
Miniature  Search this
Cameo  Search this
Francis Xavier Lamotte: Male  Search this
Francis Xavier Lamotte: Business and Finance\Broker\Real Estate Broker  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Private collection
Object number:
MO990029
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm472e22cb7-3427-4f3a-bce6-50900e164f3f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_MO990029

Milo Hatch

Artist:
Unidentified Artist  Search this
Sitter:
Milo Hatch, 1815 - 1885  Search this
Type:
Painting
Topic:
Milo Hatch: Male  Search this
Milo Hatch: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Banker  Search this
Milo Hatch: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Banker\Bank Cashier  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in The State of Georgia
Object number:
SSSA1149
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4ffc6b706-7b5e-4854-95dd-f60480cd1e5d
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_SSSA1149

James Habersham

Attribution:
Richard West Habersham, 1812 - 1889  Search this
Copy after:
Jeremiah Theus, 5 Apr 1716 - 17 May 1774  Search this
Sitter:
James Habersham, 1712? - 1775  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
191.7cm x 91.5cm (75 1/2" x 36"), Estimate
Type:
Painting
Date:
c.1851
Topic:
James Habersham: Male  Search this
James Habersham: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Merchant  Search this
James Habersham: Politics and Government\Governor\Georgia  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Georgia Historical Society
Object number:
SSSA1596
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4ca1b9559-1c6f-4c76-83b5-69c139b32d3e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_SSSA1596

Thomas Wayland Vaughan Papers

Creator::
Vaughan, Thomas Wayland, 1870-1952  Search this
Extent:
9.5 cu. ft. (9 record storage boxes) (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Architectural drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1908-1947 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
These papers consist of Vaughan's professional correspondence with American and foreign scientists concerning descriptions of fossil localities; the identification, description and exchange of specimens; research in coral foraminifera and oceanography; research conditions in Europe around the time of World War II; and the activities of scientific committees on which Vaughan served. Correspondence with detailed locality information has been flagged. Also included are writings, reports, correspondence, and notes by Vaughan and other scientists concerning specimen collections, analyses of core bottom samples, descriptions and lists of new species, activities of the Committee of Sedimentation of the National Research Council, and field notebooks, including photographs, of corals of the Bahamas and the Pacific Ocean. Additional field notebooks on corals are located in the Department of Invertebrate Zoology.
Historical Note:
T. Wayland Vaughan (1870-1952), geologist and oceanographer, was educated at Tulane University, B.S., 1889; and Harvard University, A.B., 1893, A.M., 1894, and Ph.D., 1903. He began collecting fossils when he was an Instructor at Mount Lebanon College, Tennessee, from 1889 to 1892. From 1894 to 1903, he was an Assistant Geologist with the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Between 1901 and 1923, Vaughan participated in several geological investigations of the West Indies and Puerto Rico which were sponsored by the USGS, the Smithsonian Institution, the Carnegie Institution of Washington, and the United States Navy. The USGS and the Carnegie Institution also helped to finance his investigations of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast states in cooperation with several state geological surveys and his investigations of the corals and coral reefs of the Bahamas. In 1924, Vaughan became Director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, a position which he held until his retirement in 1936. In addition, he was an Associate in Marine Sediments, 1924-1942, and Associate in Paleontology, 1942-1952, at the United States National Museum.

Vaughan's research focused on three areas of science: the study of corals and coral reefs; the investigation of larger foraminifera; and oceanography. He was an authority on the corals of the United States, eastern Mexico, the West Indies, and Panama. As an oceanographer, Vaughan was interested in sedimentology and physical and chemical oceanography. With his work on oceanography, Vaughan served as Chairman, 1919 to 1923, of the Committee on Sedimentation of the National Research Council's Division of Geology and Geography; Chairman, 1926 to 1935, of the Pacific Science Association's International Committee on the Oceanography of the Pacific; and member of the National Academy of Science's Committee on Oceanography. This last committee was largely responsible for the founding of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Vaughan held membership in numerous scientific and professional societies. In 1897 he was a delegate to the International Geological Congress in Russia, and between 1920 and 1936 he served as a delegate from the United States to six Pan-Pacific Science Congresses.
Topic:
Paleontology  Search this
Corals  Search this
Coral reefs and islands  Search this
Foraminifera  Search this
Oceanography  Search this
Research  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Architectural drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 99-124, Thomas Wayland Vaughan Papers
Identifier:
Accession 99-124
See more items in:
Thomas Wayland Vaughan Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa99-124

Underrepresentation and Invisibility

Creator:
Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-11-30T19:11:32.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
LemelsonCenter
Data Source:
Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
LemelsonCenter
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_qZYG0wlzQkc

The Man Who Changed Global Finance Forever

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-07-17T04:00:00.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_UB1XE-biLMI

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By