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Nina Howell Starr papers

Creator:
Starr, Nina Howell  Search this
Names:
International Women's Art Festival  Search this
Museum of American Folk Art  Search this
Photographic Historical Society of New York  Search this
Professional Women's Photographers, Inc.  Search this
Sharon Arts Center  Search this
Southern Regional Council  Search this
Brandt, Helene, 1936-  Search this
Cohen, Stephenie  Search this
Coke, Van Deren, 1921-  Search this
Connor, Linda  Search this
Daitz, Evelyne Z.  Search this
DiSpirito, Henry, 1898-1995  Search this
Evans, Minnie, 1892-  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Ghent, Henri, 1926-  Search this
Kanaga, Consuelo, 1894-  Search this
Kernan, Margo, 1927-  Search this
Kruger, Louise, 1924-  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton, 1890-1973  Search this
Mainardi, Patricia  Search this
Morgan, Barbara Brooks, 1900-1992  Search this
Putnam, Wallace, 1899-1989  Search this
Ringgold, Faith  Search this
Rose, Ruth Starr, 1887-1965  Search this
Savage, Naomi, 1927-2005  Search this
Sherwood, Maggie, 1922-1984  Search this
Siskind, Aaron  Search this
Strand, Paul, 1890-1976  Search this
Szarwarski, John  Search this
Uelsmann, Jerry, 1934-  Search this
Extent:
21.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Interviews
Drawings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Prints
Date:
circa 1933-1996
Summary:
The papers of photographer and art historian Nina Howell Starr measure 21.2 linear feet and date from circa 1933 to 1996. The papers contain research files about various art historical topics, museums and galleries, photography, and artists. There are extensive files documenting Starr's relationship as researcher, dealer, and friend of folk painter Minnie Evans. Additionally, the papers include biographical materials, writings, speeches, project files, printed material collected or authored by Starr, and hundreds of artistic and documentary photographs and negatives created by Starr depicting her travels, Minnie Evans' paintings, roadside folk art, and other topics.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of photographer and art historian Nina Howell Starr measure 21.2 linear feet and date from circa 1933 to 1996. The papers contain research files about various art historical topics, museums and galleries, photography, and artists. There are extensive files documenting Starr's relationship as researcher, dealer, and friend of folk painter Minnie Evans. Additionally, the papers include biographical materials, writings, speeches, project files, printed material collected or authored by Starr, and hundreds of artistic and documentary photographs and negatives created by Starr depicting her travels, Minnie Evans' paintings, roadside folk art, and other topics.

Biographical materials are scattered and include grant and publication applications, curriculum vitae, lists of artwork, and miscellany.

Starr's lectures, writings, and project files are arranged into one series. They include Starr's student writings, a notebook about Civil Rights, files documenting her work on a Florida public housing project, the Southern Regional Council, and the League of Women Voters. A few files of general writings and lectures mostly concern folk artist Minnie Evans and the exhibition Women Photograph Men, held at the International Women's Arts Festival in 1976.

Subject files on artists, art history topics, photographers and photography (including Starr's work), and on folk artist and friend Minne Evans comprise the bulk of the collection. The files are a mix of collated materials and primary sources created by Starr and others and many contain correspondence, notes, photographs, and a few sketches and orginal prints. Also included are materials related to professional and organizational groups in which Starr was involved, including the Professional Women's Photographers, Inc., the Photographic Historical Society of New York, and the Museum of American Folk Art; files on several of Starr's exhibitions; and files on artists that contain printed materials, correspondence, and photographs. The file on Ruth Starr Rose contains prints and drawings. There are also photographs taken by Stephanie Cohen. Particularly rich files are found for Stephanie Cohen; Van Deren Coke, Director of the George Eastman Company; Evelyn Daitz, Director of the Witkin Gallery; Henry DiSpirito; Walker Evans; the Fotofolio printing company; curator Henri Ghent; photographer Consuelo Kanaga and husband Wallace Putnam; Margot Starr Kernan; Lucy Lippard; Stanton Mac-Donald Wright; Sharon Arts Center; photographer Paul Strand; curator John Szarwarski; and photographer Jerry Uelsman.

The collection also documents the friendship between painter Minnie Evans and Starr, and Starr's business dealings on Evans' behalf. There is correspondence about and with Evans, several sound recordings of interviews conducted by Starr and others with Evans, many with transcripts, financial documents, publications about Evans including exhibition catalogs, clippings, journal articles and monographs, two posters, a scrapbook, and one sketch by Evans.

Printed material includes published articles, exhibition catalogs and announcements, and clippings about Starr.

Photographic materials are extensive and include photographs and slides taken by Starr of friends, family, artwork by Minnie Evans, events, exhibition openings, world travels, and folk art, especially roadside. Prominent artists and art historians photographed include: photographers Maggie Sherwood, Naomi Savage, Barbara Morgan, Linda Connor, Aaron Siskind, Consuelo Kanaga, Faith Ringgold, and Walker Evans; sculptors Louise Kruger and Helene Brandt; feminist and art historian Pat Mainardi; and curators Henri Ghent and John Szarkowski. Starr's artistic photographic work is also represented, and includes two silver gelatin prints of Minnie Evans, and subject studies on hands, people, and nature, among others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series.

Series 1: Biographical material, 1954-circa 1990 (8 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Writings, Speeches and Projects, 1933-1995 (1.1 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 3: Subject Files, circa 1939-1996 (8.3 linear feet; Boxes 2-10)

Series 4: Minnie Evans, 1962-1996 (3.7 linear feet; Boxes 10-13, 23, OV 24)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1936-1995 (2.7 linear feet; Boxes 13-16, 23)

Series 6: Photographic Material, circa 1939-1993 (5.4 linear feet; Boxes 16-23, OV 24)
Biographical / Historical:
Nina Howell Starr (1903-2000) was a photographer, art dealer, and art historian who worked primarily in New York City. Born in Newark, New Jersey in 1903 as Cornelia Margaret Howell, Starr attended Wellesley College and graduated from Barnard in 1926. Also in 1926, she married Nathan Comfort Starr, an English professor, and, over the years the couple lived in Massachusetts, Maryland, Florida, and New York City.

In 1963, at the age of 60, Starr received the first M.F.A. in photography granted by the University of Florida. Starr exhibited widely in both solo and group exhibitions, including Magic Lantern (Photographer's Gallery, London, 1976), and the Strength of Women (Witken Gallery, 1991), and numerous shows featuring photographs of outsider art. Her "New Yorker" project became an exhibition in 2016. Her work is owned by several prominent museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography.

As art historian, self-proclaimed critic, and civil rights and feminist advocate, Starr lectured widely, wrote articles and letters to editors, and corresponded with many notable art world figures. She became especially interested in outsider and folk art. Starr met outsider artist Minnie Evans in 1962 and became Evans' lifelong friend, advocate, and representative dealer. She wrote about Evans and introduced Evans' works to galleries and other exhibition spaces in New York, including the Whitney Museum, where she guest-curated an exhibition of Evans' work in 1975.

Starr was an active member of professional organizations including the Photographic Historical Society of New York, Professional Women's Photographers, Inc., and the Museum of American Folk Art where she served on the Advisory Committee.

Nina Howell Starr died in 2000 in Connecticut at the age of 97.
Provenance:
The Nina Howell Starr papers were donated by Nina Howell Starr in 1996.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Nina Howell Starr papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Folk art -- United States  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
African American art  Search this
Folk art -- Photographs  Search this
Women photographers  Search this
Photography  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Interviews
Drawings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Prints
Citation:
Nina Howell Starr papers, circa 1933-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.starnina
See more items in:
Nina Howell Starr papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-starnina
Online Media:

Lucy R. Lippard papers

Creator:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Names:
Addison Gallery of American Art  Search this
Alliance for Cultural Democracy  Search this
Art Workers Coalition  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Political Art Documentation/Distribution (Organization)  Search this
Printed Matter, Inc.  Search this
Studio International (Firm)  Search this
University of Colorado -- Faculty  Search this
Women's Caucus for Art  Search this
Andre, Carl, 1935-  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Darboven, Hanne  Search this
Edelson, Mary Beth  Search this
Hammond, Harmony  Search this
Henes, Donna  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-  Search this
LeWitt, Sol, 1928-2007  Search this
Pearson, Henry, 1914-2006  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Extent:
56.5 Linear feet
0.454 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1930s-2007
bulk 1960-1990
Summary:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 56.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 56.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.

A small amount of biographical material comprises resumes and an address book.

Correspondence files document all aspects of Lippard's professional life including her relationships with artists such as Carl Andre, Judy Chicago, Hanne Darboven, Ray Johnson, Sol LeWitt, and Henry Pearson; feminist artists including Mary Beth Edelson, Harmony Hammond, Donna Henes, and May Stevens; political and art-related activist groups such as Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Art Workers Coalition, Political Art Documentation/Distribution, Printed Matter, and Women's Caucus for Art; galleries and museums including Addison Gallery of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art, and publishers including Art International and Art Forum. The series also traces the development of Lippard's involvement in activist causes including censorship and the rights of artists, Central America and the impact of U.S. policy on the region, and equality and reproductive rights for women, as well as her interest in conceptual and minimalist art. The series includes scattered artwork and photographs of artists.

Writings are primarily by Lippard and include correspondence, manuscript drafts, extensive notes, and publication records for some of her best-known books such as The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood (1966), Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973), Eva Hesse (1976), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990), as well as essays for publications such as Art Forum and Studio International and contributions to exhibition catalogs. Also found are edited transcripts from conferences, symposia and interviews conducted by and of Lippard, some audio recordings of interviews and symposia, including an interview with Donald Judd, and notes and typescripts for lectures and speeches.

A small number of files document Lippard's teaching work during the 1970s and 1980s, primarily at the University of Colorado, Boulder where she taught several courses and seminars.

Exhibition files document Lippard's involvement with exhibitions she helped to organize or curate such as A Different War: Vietnam in Art (1989-1991) 557,087 and 955,000 (1969, 1970), 2,972, 453 (1971) c.7,500 (1973-1974) and those for which she wrote catalog contributions.

Printed material includes a collection of articles written by Lippard and a small amount of material concerning events, such as speaking engagements, in which Lippard was involved. Other printed material reflects Lippard's wide range of artistic, political and activist interests and documents exhibitions and performances and the activities of art-related and political groups. Material includes many exhibition catalogs, announcements, invitations, printed posters, news clippings, journal articles, brochures, pamphlets and other publications.

Artwork includes sixteen items by unidentified artists, including two by children. Photographs consist primarily of photographs of works of art in addition to a small number of photos of exhibition installations.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as eight series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1960s-circa 1980s (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1950s-2006 (Boxes 1-28, 51, OVs 54-63; 28.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1930s-1990s (Boxes 28-41, 51-52, OVs 64-66; 13.24 linear feet, ER01; 0.454 GB)

Series 4: Teaching Files, 1966-1993 (Boxes 41, 52; 0.76 linear feet)

Series 5: Exhibitions, 1960s-1990s (Boxes 42-45, 52, OVs 67-68; 4.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1940s-2007 (Boxes 45-49, 52, OVs 69-77; 5.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork and Ephemera, circa 1960s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53; 4 folders)

Series 8: Photographs, 1950s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53, OV 71; 1.0 linear foot)
Biographical / Historical:
New York and New Mexico writer and art critic, Lucy R. Lippard, is the curator of numerous exhibitions and the author of over twenty-four books and other writings that trace the emergence of minimalist and conceptual art and document Lippard's commitment to feminism and political activism.

Born in New York City in 1937, Lippard earned a B.A. from Smith College in 1958 and an M.A. in 1962 from New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. In the 1960s she began writing art criticism for the journals Art International and Artforum. In 1966 she curated the landmark exhibition Eccentric Abstraction at the Fischbach Gallery in New York City. Lippard then curated the first of four defining conceptual art exhibitions that became known as her "numbers" shows, each titled after the populations of the cities in which they took place, with catalogs in the form of a set of 10 x 15 cm index cards. Opening at the Seattle Art Museum in 1969, 557,087 was followed by 955,000 in Vancouver, Canada, a few months later. 2,972,453 was held at the Centro de Arte y Comunicacíon in Buenos Aires in 1971 and c.7500 opened in Valencia, California, in 1973-1974 before traveling to several other venues in the United States and Europe.

Lippard's first book, The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood was published in 1966, followed by Pop Art the same year, and a collection of her early essays, Changing, in 1971. Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973) and From the Center: Feminist Essays on Women's Art (1976) documented the emergence of conceptual art and the early years of feminist art respectively. In 1976 Lippard published her seminal book on the life and work of Eva Hesse.

Between 1977 and 1978 Lippard lived on a farm in Devon, England, and worked on a novel, The First Stone, about the role of politics in the lives of three generations of women. During her walks across the English countryside she became interested in landscape art and conceived of her book Overlay: Contemporary Art and the Art of Prehistory which was subsequently published in 1983. Other books include Get the Message?: A Decade Of Art For Social Change (1984), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990). Lippard has also written regular columns on art and politics for the Village Voice, In These Times and Z Magazine, and has been a contributing editor of Art in America.

Lippard was radicalized during a trip to Argentina in 1968 when she was invited to be a juror at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires. On her return to the United States she became heavily involved in anti-war activities and the Art Workers Coalition. She is a co-founder of several feminist and artist organizations including the feminist collective Heresies, which produced Heresies: A Feminist Journal on Art and Politics from 1977-1992, Ad Hoc Women Artists, Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Artists Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America, Women's Action Coalition, and Women's Art Registry. In 1976 she was a founder of Printed Matter, a New York nonprofit dedicated to producing artists' publications. She also worked closely with Franklin Furnace, an artist-run space devoted to the promotion of artists' books, installation art, and video and performance art, and served on the organization's International Committee.

Lippard has been a visiting professor at the School of Visual Arts, the University of Colorado, Boulder, and the University of Queensland, Australia, and was Eminent Artist in Residence at the University of Wyoming Department of Art in 2015. She has received honorary doctorates in fine arts from Maine College of Art, the Massachusetts College of Art, Moore College of Art, San Francisco Art Institute, and others, and awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Arts grants in criticism, the Smith College Medal, the ArtTable Award for Distinguished Service to the Visual Arts, and the Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies Award for Excellence.

Lippard has lived in New Mexico since 1992 and works as a freelance writer and speaker.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Lucy Lippard conducted in 2011 March 15, by Sue Heinemann, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, funded by a grant from the A G Foundation.
Provenance:
Lucy R. Lippard donated her papers in several increments between 1972-1995, and 2006.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Lucy R. Lippard papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Artists -- Political activity  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Conceptual art  Search this
Art criticism -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Feminism  Search this
Art critics  Search this
Minimal art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Lucy R. Lippard papers, 1930s-2007, bulk 1960s-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lipplucy
See more items in:
Lucy R. Lippard papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lipplucy
Online Media:

CURATING UNDER PRESSURE international perspectives on negotiating conflict

Physical description:
1 online resource
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2020
Call number:
N72.S6 C87 2021 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
1-user.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145703

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974

Creator:
Jacques Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Subject:
Hauke, Cesar M. de (Cesar Mange)  Search this
Glaenzer, Eugene  Search this
Haardt, Georges  Search this
Seligman, Germain  Search this
Seligmann, Arnold  Search this
Parker, Theresa D.  Search this
Waegen, Rolf Hans  Search this
Trevor, Clyfford  Search this
Seligmann, René  Search this
Seligmann, Jacques  Search this
De Hauke & Co., Inc.  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Eugene Glaenzer & Co.  Search this
Germain Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Gersel  Search this
Type:
Gallery records
Topic:
Mackay, Clarence Hungerford, 1874-1938 -- Art collections  Search this
Schiff, Mortimer L. -- Art collections  Search this
Arenberg, duc d' -- Art collections  Search this
Liechtenstein, House of -- Art collections  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- France -- Paris  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Art dealers -- France -- Paris  Search this
La Fresnaye, Roger de, 1885-1925  Search this
Art, Renaissance  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Art treasures in war  Search this
Art, European  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- France -- Paris  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9936
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212486
AAA_collcode_jacqself
Theme:
The Art Market
Art Gallery Records
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_212486
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974 digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Crip Theory Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability

Author:
McRuer, Robert http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/aut http://viaf.org/viaf/115629154  Search this
Author:
Bérubé, Michael F  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (299 pages)
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2006
Topic:
Culture  Search this
Heterosexuality--Social aspects  Search this
Homosexuality--Social aspects  Search this
Marginality, Social  Search this
Queer theory  Search this
Sociology of disability  Search this
Call number:
HV1568 .M37 2006 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
1-user
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145575

From head shops to Whole Foods the rise and fall of activist entrepreneurs Joshua Clark Davis

Author:
Davis, Joshua Clark http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/aut http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2017010326 http://viaf.org/viaf/2291148814294345330001  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xiv, 314 pages) illustrations
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
History
Place:
United States
Date:
2017
Topic:
Business enterprises--Political aspects--History  Search this
Small business--Political aspects--History  Search this
Entrepreneurship--Political aspects--History  Search this
Social movements--Economic aspects--History  Search this
Business and politics--History  Search this
HISTORY--20th Century  Search this
Business and politics  Search this
Business enterprises--Political aspects  Search this
Call number:
HD2785 .D33 2017 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
Non-linear
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145603

Agent of change Adela Sloss-Vento, Mexican American civil rights activist and Texas feminist Cynthia E. Orozco

Author:
Orozco, Cynthia E http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/aut http://viaf.org/viaf/103839099  Search this
Subject:
Sloss-Vento, Adela http://viaf.org/viaf/16022741  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (267 pages)
Type:
Biography
Electronic books
Biographies
History
Place:
Texas
Date:
2020
20th century
Topic:
Women political activists  Search this
Mexican American women authors  Search this
Mexican Americans--Civil rights--History  Search this
Women civil rights workers  Search this
Mexican Americans--Civil rights  Search this
Call number:
F391.4.S56 O76 2020 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
1-user
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145670

The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Fisk University  Search this
Howard University  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Virginia Theological Seminary and College (Lynchburg, Va.)  Search this
Brown, Sterling A., 1901-1989  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Egypt, Ophelia Settle  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
2 sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Lynchburg (Va.)
United States
Southern States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Sterling A. Brown talks about his experiences and teachers, including Anna J. Cooper, at M Street High School (later known as Dunbar High School); and education and segregation, which was fought by Cooper and Mary Church Terrell. He provides a short history and legacy of Cooper, who he considers a role model; and reads prose by Anna J. Cooper which highlights her educational philosophy and her views regarding education and the roles of teachers. Brown talks about his education and academic career; reminiscences his teaching experiences particularly at Virginia Theological Seminary and College, and living in Lynchburg, Virginia; and reads a few of his own poems, which focus on black life experiences in the Southern United States. Ophelia Settle Egypt, a friend of Sterling Brown, reminiscences about her experiences attending Howard University and adventures with Brown and his wife, Daisy: their resentment of Jim Crow and riding on a segregated bus. Mr. Muhammad reads his poems in tribute of Sterling Brown and "for everyone in the struggle of identifying what is what and who is who and what we need to do about it." Zora Martin-Felton introduces the speakers throughout the lecture series.
Lecture, and poetry and prose reading. AV003057 and AV003051: video. AV001053 and AV001353: audio only. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV003057, AV003051, and AV001053: undated. AV001353: dated 19810426.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.;Professor, poet, and literary critic Dr. Sterling A. Brown (1901-1989) was born and raised in the Washington, D.C area. He grew up on a farm in Howard County, Maryland; and attended Waterford Oaks Elementary, Dunbar High School, Williams College in Massachusetts, and Harvard University. He married Daisy Turnbull in 1927. Brown taught at Howard University, Fisk University, Vassar College, New York University, Atlanta University, Yale University, and Virginia Theological Seminary and College in Lynchburg, Virginia. His studies and poetry focused on black history and culture of the Southern United States.;Originally named Preparatory High School for Colored Youth and later known as M Street High School, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, located in Washington, D.C., was the first black public high school in the United States. During the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school with many of its teachers holding master and doctorate degrees. By the 1950s, the school was sending 80 percent of its students to college. During the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century, Dunbar struggled to keep its prestigious reputation and high standards. As with many troubled urban public schools, Dunbar standards fell and some students struggle with basic reading and math. The Dunbar Legacy Lecture Series, which was held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in the early 1980s, consisted of lectures by and about people associated with Dunbar High School.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003051

ACMA AV001053_A

ACMA AV001053_B

ACMA AV001353_A

ACMA AV001353_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Education  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
Social history  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003057
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref906

The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke Lecture

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frelinghuysen University (Washington, D.C.).  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Miner Teachers College  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
St. Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Wilberforce University  Search this
Cooke, Paul P.  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Cooper, George A. C., Reverend  Search this
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963  Search this
Grimké, Francis J. (Francis James), 1850-1937  Search this
Hunt, Ida Gibbs, 1862-1957  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
1 sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Raleigh (N.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1981
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke speaks on the subject of Anna J. Cooper: Teacher and Human Being. He talks about Cooper's life and the time in which she lived; and her human and religious influences. Cooke, who assisted with the Cooper exhibition at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, provides an overview of Cooper's history and addresses questions from the lecture audience. Cooke also provides an overview of the history of educational institutions and schools, and the education system in Washington, D.C. He discusses civil rights, legislation changes in D.C., and how civil rights legislation affected Cooper, W. E. DuBois, and Booker T. Washington. Zora Martin-Felton introduces Cooke providing a short history of his Anacostian roots.
Lecture. AV003264: Part 1. AV003220: Part 2. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV003264 and AV003220: undated. AV001346: dated 19830925, audio only, contains part of (copy of) AV003220 recording.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.;Educator, author, statesman, and former president of the District of Columbia Teacher's College Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke (1917-2010) was born in New York City and raised in Washington, D.C. He attended Dunbar High School, Miner Teachers College, New York University, Catholic University of America, and Columbia University, where he received his doctorate. Cooke was married to Rose Cooke for 63 years.;Originally named Preparatory High School for Colored Youth and later known as M Street High School, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, located in Washington, D.C., was the first black public high school in the United States. During the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school with many of its teachers holding master and doctorate degrees. By the 1950s, the school was sending 80 percent of its students to college. During the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century, Dunbar struggled to keep its prestigious reputation and high standards. As with many troubled urban public schools, Dunbar standards fell and some students struggle with basic reading and math. The Dunbar Legacy Lecture Series, which was held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in the early 1980s, consisted of lectures by and about people associated with Dunbar High School.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003220

ACMA AV001346_B
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Education  Search this
Religion  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Social history  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003264
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref907

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Puppet Show

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum Black Heritage Puppet Theatre  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frelinghuysen University (Washington, D.C.).  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Music
Puppet plays
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
A puppet show, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum Black Heritage Puppet Theatre, provides school children with an introduction to the exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The main character in the puppet show is a student who needs to present a report on a black woman who lived in Washington, D.C. and who made an outstanding contribution to the lives of black people. The puppet show highlights Cooper's teaching career; her advocacy for education, black students, and civil rights; and the period of time in which she lived. Music played prior to puppet show, and children in the audience sing a rhyme about Cooper's live after puppet show.
Puppet show. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19810415.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Education  Search this
Educators  Search this
Students  Search this
Children  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Music
Puppet plays
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Puppet Show, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003070
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref909

Pinpoint Production: Anna Julia Cooper

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Drama
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents:
Pinpoint, an educational theater group, presents a dramatic program about Anna Julia Cooper.
Dramatic performance. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Poor audio. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
African American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Drama
Citation:
Pinpoint Production: Anna Julia Cooper, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV000814
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref913

Nation Mourns Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Who Broke Barriers and Became a Feminist Icon

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Sat, 19 Sep 2020 16:39:49 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_63f0a0862c0f4476bc105428957d2a14

Margaret Fuller

Artist:
John Plumbe, Jr., 13 Jul 1809 - 28 May 1857  Search this
Sitter:
Margaret Fuller, 23 May 1810 - 19 Jul 1850  Search this
Medium:
Sixth-plate daguerreotype
Dimensions:
Image/Sight: 7 × 8.3 cm (2 3/4 × 3 1/4")
Case open: 9.3 × 16.9 × 0.5 cm (3 11/16 × 6 5/8 × 3/16")
Case closed: 9.5 × 8.1 × 1.5 cm (3 3/4 × 3 3/16 × 9/16")
Type:
Photograph
Place:
United States\New York\Kings\New York
Date:
1846
Topic:
Costume\Jewelry  Search this
Interior  Search this
Home Furnishings\Furniture  Search this
Home Furnishings\Furniture\Seating\Chair  Search this
Printed Material\Book  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Ring  Search this
Home Furnishings\Furniture\Table  Search this
Costume\Outerwear\Shawl  Search this
Cased object  Search this
Margaret Fuller: Female  Search this
Margaret Fuller: Communications\Journalist\Editor\Newspaper  Search this
Margaret Fuller: Education\Educator\Teacher  Search this
Margaret Fuller: Communications\Translator  Search this
Margaret Fuller: Literature\Writer\Essayist  Search this
Margaret Fuller: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Feminist  Search this
Margaret Fuller: Rulers and Nobility\Aristocrat\Marchioness  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2018.3
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
Women of Progress: Early Camera Portraits
On View:
NPG, East Gallery 134
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm412e02b98-67cc-4d5b-bc5f-349e755f43a5
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2018.3
Online Media:

Lucretia Coffin Mott

Artist:
Marcus Aurelius Root, 1808 - 1888  Search this
Sitter:
Lucretia Coffin Mott, 3 Jan 1793 - 11 Nov 1880  Search this
Medium:
Half-plate daguerreotype
Dimensions:
Image: 11.6 x 8.9 cm (4 9/16 x 3 1/2")
Plate: 14 x 10.7 cm (5 1/2 x 4 3/16")
Case Open: 15 x 23.2 x 1 cm (5 7/8 x 9 1/8 x 3/8")
Case Closed: 15 x 11.8 x 2.3 cm (5 7/8 x 4 5/8 x 7/8")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
1851
Topic:
Costume\Headgear\Hat  Search this
Cased object  Search this
Lucretia Coffin Mott: Female  Search this
Lucretia Coffin Mott: Education\Educator\Lecturer  Search this
Lucretia Coffin Mott: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Social Reformer  Search this
Lucretia Coffin Mott: Education\Educator\Teacher  Search this
Lucretia Coffin Mott: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Abolitionist  Search this
Lucretia Coffin Mott: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Suffragist  Search this
Lucretia Coffin Mott: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Feminist  Search this
Lucretia Coffin Mott: Religion and Spirituality\Clergy\Minister  Search this
Lucretia Coffin Mott: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Women's rights advocate  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution Conservation made possible by a grant from the Smithsonian's Collections Care and Preservation Fund
Object number:
NPG.2009.32
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
Women of Progress: Early Camera Portraits
On View:
NPG, East Gallery 134
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4225a35a9-9bd6-46e3-bb06-5ffeac9d961f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2009.32

Betty Friedan

Artist:
Garry Winogrand, 14 Jan 1928 - 19 Mar 1984  Search this
Sitter:
Betty Friedan, 4 Feb 1921 - 4 Feb 2006  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
31.2cm x 46.5 cm (12 5/16" x 18 5/16"), Image
Type:
Photograph
Place:
United States\New York\Kings\New York
Date:
1969 (printed 1983)
Topic:
Interior  Search this
Home Furnishings\Drinking vessel\Glass  Search this
Baggage & Luggage\Bag\Purse  Search this
Betty Friedan: Female  Search this
Betty Friedan: Literature\Writer  Search this
Betty Friedan: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Social Reformer  Search this
Betty Friedan: Communications\Journalist\Editor  Search this
Betty Friedan: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Feminist  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.84.29
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Garry Winogrand, courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4cc754dd1-79c1-46f2-a9b1-5b6195db22fb
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.84.29

Guatemaltecas the women's movement, 1986-2003 Susan A. Berger

Author:
Berger, Susan A http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/aut http://viaf.org/viaf/76643123  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (157 pages)
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic book
Electronic books
Place:
Guatemala
Date:
2006
Topic:
Women's rights  Search this
Women--Social conditions  Search this
Women--Economic conditions  Search this
Femmes--Droits  Search this
Femmes--Conditions sociales  Search this
Femmes--Conditions économiques  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE--Feminism & Feminist Theory  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE--Anthropology--Cultural  Search this
Frauenbewegung  Search this
Women--Guatemala--Economic conditions  Search this
Women--Guatemala--Social conditions  Search this
Women's rights--Guatemala  Search this
Call number:
HQ1236.5.G9 B47 2006 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
Use copy Restrictions unspecified
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145564

New perspectives on environmental justice gender, sexuality, and activism edited by Rachel Stein

Editor:
Stein, Rachel http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n97018595 http://viaf.org/viaf/5112959  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (304 pages)
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2004
Topic:
Environmental justice  Search this
Women environmentalists  Search this
Women in politics  Search this
POLITICAL SCIENCE--Public Policy--Environmental Policy  Search this
SCIENCE--Environmental Science  Search this
Women--Political activity  Search this
Feminismus  Search this
Umweltethik  Search this
Ökologische Bewegung  Search this
Earth & Environmental Sciences  Search this
Environmental Sciences  Search this
Call number:
GE220 .N48 2004 (Internet)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145577

Disability studies and the environmental humanities toward an eco-crip theory edited and with an introduction by Sarah Jaquette Ray and Jay Sibara ; foreword by Stacy Alaimo

Writer of introduction:
Ray, Sarah Jaquette http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2012066601 http://viaf.org/viaf/271992500  Search this
Sibara, Jay http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/nb2017011225 http://viaf.org/viaf/2149659922006832335  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xvi, 667 pages) illustrations
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2017
Topic:
Disability studies  Search this
Environmentalism  Search this
Environmentalism--Social aspects  Search this
Environmentalism in literature  Search this
POLITICAL SCIENCE--Public Policy--Social Security  Search this
POLITICAL SCIENCE--Public Policy--Social Services & Welfare  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE--People with Disabilities  Search this
Call number:
HV1568.2 .D5944 2017 (Internet)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145606

Design history beyond the canon edited by Jennifer Kaufmann-Buhler ; Victoria Rose Pass ; Christopher S. Wilson

Editor:
Kaufmann-Buhler, Jennifer http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://viaf.org/viaf/3155707083822412650  Search this
Pass, Victoria Rose http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://viaf.org/viaf/7721148209317300460009  Search this
Wilson, Christopher S http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://viaf.org/viaf/108098780  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
History
Date:
2019
20th century
Topic:
Design--History  Search this
Aesthetics  Search this
ART--Folk & Outsider Art  Search this
CRAFTS & HOBBIES--Folkcrafts  Search this
Design  Search this
Call number:
NK1390 .D47 2019 (Internet)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145631

Women, periodicals, and print culture in Britain, 1830s-1900s the Victorian period edited by Alexis Easley, Clare Gill, and Beth Rodgers

Editor:
Easley, Alexis 1963- http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2003037847 http://viaf.org/viaf/71644417  Search this
Gill, Clare http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/nb2016008971 http://viaf.org/viaf/78146331904818691945  Search this
Rodgers, Beth http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/edt http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2014017421 http://viaf.org/viaf/307461137  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xi, 580 pages) illustrations
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
History
Place:
Großbritannien
Date:
2019
19th century
Topic:
Women's periodicals, English--History  Search this
LITERARY CRITICISM--Reference  Search this
Women's periodicals, English  Search this
Buchmarkt  Search this
Frau  Search this
Frauenzeitschrift  Search this
Leseverhalten  Search this
Presse  Search this
Call number:
PN5124.W6 W66 2019 (Internet)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145655

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