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New York City at the Smithsonian

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
At first, it might seem like an oxymoron to talk about the "folklore" or "folklife" of one of the world's most modern cities, but daily life in New York would be impossible without this body of shared urban traditions, of collective community knowledge, customs, historical memories, and cultural understandings that constitutes the folklife of the city. lt provides the basic ground rules that shape how New Yorkers interact with their families, their colleagues, and their fellow New Yorkers. From subway etiquette to local street food to stickball games, these traditions give New York City its unique sense of place.

ln addition to a shared urban culture, most New Yorkers also have one or more reservoirs of specialized traditional knowledge, which they have acquired from their ethnic and/or religious upbringing, working in a particular occupation, or living in a specific area of the city. The innumerable, multifaceted ways in which these factors interact are what make New York and New Yorkers so fascinating. Of course, it was impossible to cover all aspects of New York's culture in a single event, but by approaching city culture thematically, and by carefully selecting examples that highlight different aspects of work, life, and leisure in New York, New York City at the Smithsonian sought to acquaint Festival visitors with both the ordinary and extraordinary aspects of life in Gotham.

What gives New York a sense of being different is not merely tbe myriad ethnic and interest groups that are found in the city, but the complex ways in which they overlap and interact. The physical landscape of New York - the lack of space, the reliance on mass transit by people of vastly differing backgrounds, neighborhoods which are home to both the very rich and the extremely poor - makes it impossible for New Yorkers to ignore the influence of "others." From kosher Chinese restaurants to lrish hip-hop groups to Mexican pizzas, cultures from all corners of the globe have influenced one another in New York, in part because of their physical proximity.

The 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated just a few of the innumerable manifestations of traditional culture in New York City. More importantly, fieldwork leading up to the Festival allowed the Smithsonian, working in close collaboration with city-based cultural organizations and ethnic and occupational communities, to document daily life in New York City at the turn of the millennium. Material collected during the course of this research, as well as information recorded during and after the Festival, will significantly enrich the Smithsonian's archival holdings about New York City. A century from now, when scholars and writers want to know what it was like to live in New York in 2001, to work on Broadway, to drive a taxi, to trade stocks on Wall Street, or teach English in a school filled with recent immigrants, they can turn to the documentation collected by this project. That body of documentation - and the recordings and photographs made during the Festival itself - took on increased importance with the events of September 11, 2001, barely three months after the Festival had closed, which emphasized to all observers how the cultural values of New Yorkers, vividly on display to Festival visitors, also provided them a reservoir of resiliency to surmount those tragic events.

Nancy Groce was Senior Curator for the program, supported by several Area Curators: Ray Allen, music; Marion Jacobson, urban fashion; Annie Hauck-Lawson, foodways; Cathy Ragland, music; Ethel Raim, music; Henry Sapoznik, media; Brian Thompson, Wall Street; Kay Turner, Wall Street; and Steve Zeitlin, neighborhood. Arlene Reiniger was Program Coordinator.

An Advisory Committee included: Ruth Abram, Director, Lower East Side Tenement Museum; Gladys Pena Acosta, Director, RAICES; Ray Allen, Director, American Studies Program, Brooklyn College/CUNY; Gage Averill, Chair, Music Department, New York University; Fatima Bercht, Chief Curator, El Museo del Barrio; Melody Capote, Executive Director, Caribbean Culture Center/African Diaspora Institute; Barbara Cohen-Stratyner, Curator, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts; Cara De Silva, Food Historian; Miriam De Uriarte, Director of Education, El Museo del Barrio; Howard Dodson, Director, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture/NYPL; Sharon E. Dunn, Senior Assistant for the Arts, New York City Board of Education; Juan Flores, Professor, Black and Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College/CUNY; Laura Hansen, Director, Place Matters, Municipal Art Society; John Haworth, Assistant Director, National Museum of the American Indian; Ellie Hisama, Director, Institute for Studies in American Music, Brooklyn College/CUNY; Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Professor, Performance Studies Department, NYU; Leah Krauss, Program Officer, The New York Community Trust; Susana Torruella Leva!, Executive Director, El Museo del Barrio; Robert MacDonald, Executive Director, Museum of the City of New York; Fay Chew Matsuda, Executive Director, Museum of Chinese in the Americas; Ethel Raim, Executive Director, Center for Traditional Music and Dance; Jan Seidler Ramirez, Vice President of Public Affairs, New York Historical Society; Frances A. Resheske, Vice President of Public Affairs, Consolidated Edison Company; Joseph Sciarra, Academic Programs, Calandra Italian American Institute, Queens College; Gabrielle Shubert, Director, New York Transit Museum; Pravina Shukla, Assistant Professor, Folklore Department, Indiana University; John Kuo Wei Tchen, Director, Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program & Institute, NYU; Brian Thompson, Director, Museum of American Financial History; Michael Wallace, Historian and Author, CUNY; Steve Wheeler, Archivist, New York Stock Exchange; Theodora Yoshikami, Multicultural Program, American Museum of Natural History; Steven Zeitlin, Executive Director, City Lore: The Center for Urban Culture.

The program was produced in collaboration with New York's Center for Traditional Music and Dance and City Lore, with major funding from the New York City Council, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Howard P. Milstein, and the New York Stock Exchange. The Leadership Committee was co-chaired by The Honorable Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Elizabeth Moynihan and corporate chairman Howard P. Milstein. Major support was provided by Amtrak, Con Edison, the Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds, Arthur Pacheco, and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Major contributors included The New York Community Trust, The Coca-Cola Company, The Durst Foundation, the May & Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Leonard Litwin, Bernard Mendik, and Stephen and Judy Gluckstern. Additional donors included Emigrant Savings Bank, Jeffrey Gural, Lester Morse, Richard Schwartz, Michael Bloomberg, Keyspan Energy, Martin Segal, and Earle Mack.
Researchers:
Jerald Albarelli, Ray Allen, Emily Botein, Lori Branston, Kathleen Condon, Martha Cooper, Amanda Dargan, Andrew Davis, Tony DeNonno, Sonia Estreich, Makale Faber, Kwali Farbes, Michael Greene, Laura Hansen, Annie Hauck-Lawson, Marion Jacobson, Denise Lynn, Elena Martinez, Cathy Ragland, Ethel Raim, Henry Sapoznik, Roberta Singer, Les Slater, Scott Spencer, Brian Thompson, Kay Turner, Tom Van Buren, Li Wangsheng, Bill Westerman, Lois Wilken, Steven Zeitlin
Presenters:
Judy Adamson, Ray Allen, Dwight Blocker Bowers, Kathleen Condon, Andrew Davis, James Early, Makale Faber, Juan Flores, Annie Hauck-Lawson, Marion Jacobson, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Wangsheng Li, Elena Martinez, Cathy Ragland, Ethel Raim, Kristin Richard, Henry Sapoznik, Les Slater, Brian Thompson, Kay Turner, Tom Van Buren, Meg Ventrudo, Cynthia Vidaurri, George Zavala, Steve Zeitlin
Participants:
Arts & Artists

Wilfreda "Bio" Feliciano, muralist, Tats Cru

Hector "Nicer" Nazario, muralist, Tats Cru

Sotero "BG 183" Ortiz, muralist, Tats Cru

Gaspar Ingui, neon sign maker

Robbie Ingui, neon sign maker

Theresa Ingui, neon sign maker

Backstage Broadway

Judy Adamson, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Jarred Aswegan, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Gary Brouwer, theatrical milliner

Kimberly Cea, actress

Edie Cowan, director, choreographer

Brian Healy, prop maker, armorer, Costume Armour

Bob Kelly, wig maker, make-up artist

Polly Kinney, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Janice Lorraine, actress

Terry Marone, Gypsy Robe, Actors' Equity

Barbara Matera, costume maker

Nino Novel lino, prop maker, Costume Armour

Peter Ray, prop maker, Costume Armour

Woody Regan, rehearsal pianist

Linda Rice, wig maker, Bob Kelly

Tom Rocco, actor

Tom Schneider, theatrical milliner

Scott Sliger, make-up artist, Bob Kelly

Josephine Spano, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Patricia Sullivan, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Brian Wolfe, prop maker, Costume Armour

Leslie Wolfe, prop maker, Costume Armour

Building Trades

George Andrucki, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Stan Bernstein, sheet metal worker, Local 28

William Bush, water tank builder

Adonis Cegisman, water tank builder

Ryszard Danielewski, water tank builder

John DeGeorge, water tank builder

Robin Delk, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Nicholas Maldarelli, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Leah Rambo, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Andrew Rosenwach, water tank builder

Thomas Schlitz, sheet metal worker, Local 28

George Treanor, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Arthur Tyburski, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Urban Fashion & Garment Industry

Britt Bowers, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Vanessa Burgos, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Lidia Carrera, needle trade worker, UNITE! Local 23-25

Esther Cheung, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Mary Costantini, mannequin sculptor

Linda Dworak, director, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Shiniji Horimura, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Elizabeth Jacobsen, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Anne Kong, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Anne Liu, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Nicole Mata, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Adrienne Muken, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Ana Perez, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Ramon Roman, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Isabel Toledo, fashion designer

Ruben Toledo, fashion designer

Monica Williamson, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

May Xian, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Foodways

Salvator Bartolomeo, Italian cook

Kam-Chung Chan, Chinese cook

Cara De Silva, food researcher, writer

Makale Faber, West African cook

Mark Federman, Jewish appetizing

Trevor Fraser, West Indian, Caribbean cook

Theresa lngui, Polish, German cook

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, food historian

Alana Grace Lawson, Polish cook

Vertamae Grosvenor, African-American cook

Molly O'Neill, food writer and chef

Ming Hua Qian, Chinese cook

Donald Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Esta Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Steve Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Community Media

Clay Berry, producer, African-American radio

Kathleen Biggins, host, Irish-American radio

Joe Franklin, host, entertainment community

Debi Jackson, producer, African-American radio

Hal Jackson, host, African-American radio

Bill Jaker, 1939-, radio historian

René Lopez, host, Latino radio

Henry Sapoznik, host, Yiddish radio

Music, Dance & Performance

Wrickford Dalgetty, Caribbean song

Julio Diaz, Latin dancer

Tony DeMarco, Irish fiddle

Linda Hickman, Irish flute

D.J. Angola, turntablist

D.J. Rehka, turntablist

ABDOULAYE DIABATE & SUPER MANDEN -- ABDOULAYE DIABATE & SUPER MANDENAbdoulaye Diabate, director, vocals, guitarChiek Barry, bassMoussa Cissoko, n'goni, guitarAboubakar Diabate, djembeMamadou Diabate, 1975-, koraTapani Sissoko, vocalsAbou Sylla, bala

APOLLO THEATRE, AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLO -- APOLLO THEATRE, AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLOVanessa Brown, Amateur Night assistantJoseph Gray, lead vocalsJane Harley, Kemet ProductionsMonteria Ivey, hostSteve Jones, production managerC.P. Lacey, The ExecutionerShirley Matthews, coordinating producerMoni-J, hostessDavid Rodriguez, executive director

RAY CHEW & THE CREW -- RAY CHEW & THE CREWRay Chew, musical directorMike Ciro, guitarBobby Douglas, keyboardArtie Reynolds, bassRalph Rolle, drums

CHERISH THE LADIES -- CHERISH THE LADIESSean Conner, step dancerDeirdre Connolly, tin whistle, vocalsMary Coogan, guitar, banjo, mandolinKatie Fox, step dancerDonna Long, piano, fiddleJoanie Madden, director, tin whistle, flute, vocalsPaul McKeown, sound engineerMary Rafferty, accordion, tin whistleMarie Reilly, fiddle

CHERES UKRAINIAN FOLK ENSEMBLE -- CHERES UKRAINIAN FOLK ENSEMBLEAndriy Milavsky, leader, woodwindsVictor Cebotari, accordionGeorge Cheremush, violinAlexander Fedoriouk, cymbaly (hammered dulcimer)Oleh Ivanyschuk, contrabass

DAVID DAVID -- DAVID DAVIDLauterio Polanco, director, lead vocals, accordionAdriel Espaillat, guieraAdelso Fernandez, bajoKenny Fernandez, tamboraMenecio Martinez, pianoHector Mota, saxophoneFernando Rodreguez, conga

FRISNER AUGUSTIN AND LA TROUPE MAKANDAL -- FRISNER AUGUSTIN AND LA TROUPE MAKANDALFrisner Augustin, 1948-2012, lead drums, vocalsRaymond Charles, third drumSteve Deats, second drumSmith Destin, dancerKethelyne Jean-Louis, dancerKesler Pierre, percussionSandy St. Cyr, dancer

HANGUK: SOUNDS OF KOREA (KOREAN TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ARTS ASSOCIATION) -- HANGUK: SOUNDS OF KOREA (KOREAN TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ARTS ASSOCIATION)Gee Soak Back, percussionHyung Joan Kim, percussionChii-Seung Kwon, percussionJi-Young Park, dancer, percussionSue Yeon Park, dancer, percussionKathy Soh, dancer, percussionMaggie Soh, percussion

LOS AFORTUNADOS -- LOS AFORTUNADOSFelix Sanabria, director, congas, bata, percussionFrancisco Cotto, bassPedro Domeich, dancer, vocalsAlbert Lusink, trumpetAbraham Rodriguez, vocals, percussionMichael Rodriguez, percussionBrandon Rosser, percussionSusan Richardson Sanabria, dancerAdam Tully, tres guitar

LOS MACONDOS -- LOS MACONDOSJorge L. Marquez, bajoEugenio R. Ortega, accordion, lead vocalsJuan A. Ortega, caja vallenata, vocalsDavid Pacheco, timbalesGuillermo E. Penate, guieroMario A. Rodriguez, congas

LOS PLENEROS DE LA 21 -- LOS PLENEROS DE LA 21Juan J. Gutierrez, leader, tamboreroAlberto Cepeda, güiro, tamboreroRoberto Cepeda, vocals, bailador de bomba, güiro, maraca, tamboreroJose Lantigua, keyboardHector Matos, vocals, tamboreroEdgardo Miranda, cuatroDonald Nicks, bassJose Rivera, vocals, tamboreroDomingo Tanco, vocalsNellie Tanco, vocals, bailadora de bomba, tamboreraVictor Velez, vocals, tamborero

MERITA HALILI & THE RAIF HYSENI ORCHESTRA -- MERITA HALILI & THE RAIF HYSENI ORCHESTRAGezim Halili, clarinet, saxophoneMerita Halili, vocalsRaif Hyseni, accordionArtan Kushi, dajreTome Lleshaj, bass guitarEdmond Xhani, laouta

MESAOUDA JUDEO-ARABIC ENSEMBLE -- MESAOUDA JUDEO-ARABIC ENSEMBLEMarc Hazan, vocalsJoshua Levitt, naiHaig Manoukian, oudTomer Tzur, percussion

MUKTHAMBAR FINE ARTS, INC. -- MUKTHAMBAR FINE ARTS, INC.A. Balaskandan, violinBala Ganesh, mrudangist (Asian Indian drum)Aarati Ramanand, dancerSaavitri Ramanand, vocals

MUSIC FROM CHINA -- MUSIC FROM CHINASusan Cheng, director, daruanChung Bun Chiu, percussionWai Wah Law, vocalsGao Renyang, dizi, xiaoGuowei Wang, erhu, zhong hu, daohuTienjou Wang, gou hu, zhong huHerman Wong, concert managerMin Xiaofen, pipaHelen Yee, yang qinYing Ying Zhu, vocals

SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA -- SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRAZoran Muncan, keyboardErnie Sau, button accordionMichael Sau, button accordionVinnie Sau, violin

SHASHMAQAM BUKHARAN JEWISH CULTURAL GROUP -- SHASHMAQAM BUKHARAN JEWISH CULTURAL GROUPAbokhay Aminov, vocals, doyra (drum)Tavriz Aronova, ensemble memberDavid Davidov, tarFiruza Junatan, dancerShumiel Kuyenov, doyra (drum)Boris Kuknariyev, accordionIzro Malakov, vocals

SIMON SHAHEEN & QANTARA -- SIMON SHAHEEN & QANTARASimon Shaheen, director, oud, violinOlga Chirino, keyboardsBilly Drewes, soprano saxJamie Haddad, world percussionFrancois Moutin, contrabassAdam Rogers, acoustic and electric guitarBassam Saba, flute, naiLuis Santiago, Latin percussionNajib Shaheen, oudSteve Sheehan, world percussionSoraya, vocalsMartin Zarzar, world percussion

SON MUNDANO -- SON MUNDANOBobby Allende, bongosJimmy Bosch, 1962-, tromboneNelson Gonzalez, Cuban tresNelson Gonzalez, Jr., lead vocalsOscar Hernandez, electric pianoRene Lopez, Jr., congasLuis Rosa, vocalsJoe Santiago, upright bass

VISION BAND

X-ECUTIONERS -- X-ECUTIONERSD.J. AngolaTotal EclipsePeter KangRoc RaiderMista SinistaRob Swift

YURI YUNAKOV ENSEMBLE -- YURI YUNAKOV ENSEMBLELauren Brody, keyboard, vocalsCatherine Foster, clarinetIvan Milev, accordionGeorge Petrov, drumsCarol Silverman, vocalsYuri Yunakov, 1958-, saxophone

Neighborhood & Community Life -- Neighborhood & Community LifeLori Brandston, urban sports and gamesSam Chwat, speech therapist, dialect coachMichael E. Clark, Citizens Committee for New York CitySonia Estreich, Citizens Committee for New York CityMichael Greene, urban sports and gamesLaura Hansen, Place Matters, Municipal Art SocietyRoberta Jones, storytellerJessica Katz, Citizens Committee for New York CityAnnie Lanzilloto, storyteller, performance artistMoe Maloney, community activist, "Mayor of Windsor Terrace"Rosalyn Perry, storytellerLiz Sevcenko, Memory Map, Lower East Side Tenement Museum

Street Life, Festival, Celebration

Mikey Enoch, steel pan tuner

Richie Richardson, Caribbean carnival costume maker

Les Slater, Caribbean carnival culture

Transit

Carissa Amash, New York Transit Museum

Bruce Alexander, subway engineer, MTA

Chris Creed, subway engineer, MTA

Sandra Lane, subway operator, MTA

Anthony Palombella, bus operator, MTA

Luz Montano, New York Transit Museum

Tarin Reid, subway operator, MTA

Charles Sachs, Sr., curator, New York Transit Museum

Gabrielle Shubert, director, New York Transit Museum

Mark Watson, New York Transit Museum

Wall Street

Richard Anderson, Jr., stock market investor, speaker

Richard Anderson, Sr., stock market investor, analyst

Richard Baratz, caricaturist, stock certificate engraver, American Bank Note Company

Madeline Boyd, trader, New York Stock Exchange

Victoria Chukwuka, New York Metro Coordinator, Stock Market Game

Joseph Cicchetti, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Anthony DeMarco, trader, New York Board of Trade

Joe Gabriel, engineer, plant manager, New York Stock Exchange

Michael Geoghan, clerk, New York Mercantile Exchange

John E. Herzog, founder, Museum of American Financial History

Scott Hess, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Myron Kandel, senior financial editor, CNN

Michael LaBranche, specialist, New York Stock Exchange

Gary Lapayover, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Michel Mark, New York Mercantile Exchange

Mark Tomasko, financial printer, engraving historian

Nancy Norton Tomasko, financial printer

Steve Wheeler, archivist, New York Stock Exchange

Jason Zweig, columnist, -- Money -- Magazine

Generations: a centennial tribute to Margaret Mead

THE FLOWERS FAMILY SINGERS -- THE FLOWERS FAMILY SINGERSRev. James N. Flowers, Jr., director, vocals, Ft. Washington, MarylandAnthony Flowers, vocals, keyboard, Seat Pleasant, MarylandYolanda Flowers, vocals, Capital Heights, MarylandMarie Hickson, vocals, Capital Heights, MarylandDorothy McDowell, vocals, Upper Marlboro, MarylandMargie Pickett, vocals, Landover, MarylandErma Reed, vocals, Landover, MarylandMildred Scruggs, vocals, Capital Heights, Maryland

WALKER CALHOUN AND THE RAVEN ROCK DANCERS -- WALKER CALHOUN AND THE RAVEN ROCK DANCERSWalker Calhoun, director, vocals, drum, rattle, Cherokee, North CarolinaAndrew Calhoun, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaJennifer Calhoun, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaChris Mahan, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaVelma Mahan, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaDelana Smith, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaPatrick Smith, dancer, vocals, Cherokee, North Carolina

THE SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA, RIDGEWOOD, QUEENS, NEW YORK -- THE SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA, RIDGEWOOD, QUEENS, NEW YORKZoran Muncan, keyboard, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkAksenti Sau, piano accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkErnie Sau, button accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkMichael Sau, button accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkNikica Sau, keyboard, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkVinnie Sau, violin, Ridgewood, Queens, New York
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5fa8116c3-ad1f-4df7-ae92-1bfaad7778fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref34

Deborah Skell - Fashion Designer

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2000 August 18
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Item FP-2001-CT-0344
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: New York City at the Smithsonian / 4.1: Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk574a56194-e3b4-4074-9092-08feea78225b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref887

The Will to Adorn: African American Diversity, Style, and Identity

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The creative traditions of dress and body arts among people of African descent in the United States reveal continuities of ideas, values, skills, and knowledge rooted in the African continent and in the American experience. They have been shaped by identities born of African heritage; legacies of bondage and resistance; and encounters and alliances between people of African descent, indigenous Americans, Europeans, and more recent African and Caribbean diasporas. They may reflect, for example, shared experiences of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements; group commitments to faith; and the politics of gender.

African Americans "belong" to many communities variously defined by ethnic, class, gender and gender orientation, regional, religious, political, cultural, and other affiliations that exist in complex interrelationship with each other. Accordingly, there is no single African American aesthetic of dress; there are many aesthetics that at times overlap, intertwine, and are juxtaposed in visual dialogues defining difference and belonging.

Style, the art of dress and personal adornment, is a powerful way to assert complex identities, announce solidarity with a cause, proclaim music and dance preferences, uphold cultural pride, and declare belief in a set of religious and moral principles. In all its glorious diversity, African American style is as local as the barbershop on the corner and as global as the influence of hip hop dress culture among young people from Japan to South Africa. The 2013 Festival celebrated the communities, artisans, and exemplars of style who contribute to this distinctive, expressive art form and their creative approaches, processes, and performances.

The Will to Adorn Festival program was part of a multi-year collaborative cultural research and community engagement project initiated by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. The project brought together faculty and students at historically (and predominantly) African American colleges and universities, museum and independent scholars, community and student researchers, educators, and cultural practitioners to document and present the wearable art traditions of African Americans from diverse regional, ethnic, occupational, faith, and ideology-based communities. This research focused on urban style centers - Atlanta, metropolitan Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Chicago, Detroit, New Orleans, New York, St. Croix and St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands, and most recently Oakland, California. The project identified and represented a range of traditions of dress and body arts of Americans of African descent across the United States. At the 2013 Festival, this work was highlighted at the Research Tent, where, as part of the Smithsonian's Will to Adorn Youth Access project, teen researchers worked with visitors to create their own sartorial (dress) autobiographies.

Diana Baird N'Diaye was Program Curator, with a Curatorial Team including Olivia Cadaval, Elaine Nichols, and Debora Mack; Sally A. Van de Water was Program Coordinator. Advisors included: Harold Anderson, Mary Jo Arnoldi, Jade D. Banks, Rachel Delgado-Simmons, Tina Dunkley, James Early, Jessica Harris, Monte Oyd Harris, Christine Kreamer, Marsha MacDowell, Maurita Poole, Mark Puryear, Deborah Richardson, Gwendolyn K. Robinson, Pamela Rogers, Nicole Shivers, Pravina Shukla, Deborah Smith-Pollard, Gabrielle Tayac, Patricia Turner, Mary Arnold Twining Baird, and Deborah Willis.

The program was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and supported by Smithsonian Institution funds from the Youth Access Grants Program, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and other Smithsonian fund sources. It was also supported by AARP. Major in-kind support came from the Smithsonian Office of Mobile Technology, the National Museum of the American Indian, the National Museum of African Art, the Center for Aesthetic Modernism, Spelman College, Clark Atlanta University, Bowie State University, Frank McClarin High School, University of the District of Columbia, University of Michigan, University of California-Los Angeles, Michigan State University, Pyramid Atlantic Art Center, and Mind-Builders Creative Arts Center. Research for the program was funded by the Craft Research Fund, Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, Smithsonian Scholarly Studies, Smithsonian Institution Consortium for Understanding the American Experience and Consortium for World Cultures, and the Virgin Islands Council on the Arts.
Researchers:
Maurita Poole and Spelman College students, Deborah Robinson and McClarin High School Video Production Program, Atlanta researchers; Althea Grey McKenzie, Baltimore researcher; Gwendolyn Robinson, Chicago researcher; Simone Forde, Deborah Smith Pollard, Detroit researchers; Diana Briggs, Malik Stevenson, New Orleans researchers; Jade D. Banks, Madaha Kinsey Lamb, and students of the Beverly Robinson Folk Arts Internship Program, Mind-Builders Creative Arts, New York City researchers; Shukuru Sanders, Oakland researcher; Harold Anderson and students at Bowie State University and Goucher College, Camila Bryce-LaPorte and students, Katherine Hockey, Mark Puryear, James Robinson, Washington, D.C., researchers; Sally A. Van de Water, Januwa Moja, Jade D. Banks, Betty Mahoney, U.S. Virgin Islands researchers; Camila Bryce LaPorte, Olivia Smith-Elnaggar, Deborah Smith Pollard, communities of faith researchers; Rachel Delgado-Simmons, Gabrielle Tayac, Native/African American communities researchers; Keisha Martin, on-line communities of style researcher
Presenters:
Kimberly Brown, Camila Bryce-LaPorte, James Early, Allison J. Hamilton, Elaine Nichols, Mark Puryear, Gwendolyn Robinson, Olivia Smith-Elnaggar, Gabrielle Tayac, Patricia Turner, Derrick Washington
Participants:
DESIGN STUDIO ARTISANS

Hadia Abul-Qasim, 1968-, henna artist, Washington, D.C.

Elena Crusoe Aiken, 1947-, jewelry maker, Silver Spring, Maryland

Kwasi Asare, 1963-, kente weaver, Washington, D.C., and Nwasam, Ghana

Akosua Bandele, 1951-, jewelry designer, Windsor, North Carolina

Vanilla Beane, milliner, Washington, D.C.

C. Alan Bennett (1968-) and the Bennett Career Institute, beauty school, Washington, D.C.

Lawrence Berry, 1942-, shoe designer and stylist, Upper Marlboro, Maryland

Andrea Bray, 1942-, milliner, Silver Spring, Maryland

Fana Chisolm, 1959-, hair braider and stylist, Silver Spring, Maryland

Malaika Tamu Cooper, 1967-, hairstylist and hair show organizer, Baltimore, Maryland

Jay F. Coleman, artist, tattoo artist, painter, lecturer, educator, Washington, D.C.

Evette Everett, jewelry designer and bead maker, College Park, Georgia

Dusan and Rachel Grante, cosmetologists, make-up artists, stylists, Vienna, Virginia

Alexis Gumbs, 1982-, dress artist and cultural activist, Durham, North Carolina

Diondra Hall, stylist, wig maker, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Fannie Hamilton, 1949-, master gardener and herbalist, Washington, D.C.

Al Haynes, 1959-, designer of Caribbean Carnival costumes, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

Paul Koko, 1955-, tailor, Riverdale, Maryland

Crystal Little, milliner, Washington, D.C.

Peterbug Mathews, 1949-, cobbler and educator, Washington, D.C.

Dennis "Denny Moe" Mitchell, barber, New York, New York

Habeebah Muhammad, 1954-, confectioner of scents and natural body care products, Washington, D.C.

Januwa Moja Nelson, dress artist, Washington, D.C.

Cynthia Sands, textile artist, Washington, D.C.

Marvin Sin, 1948-, leather accessories designer, Windsor, North Carolina

Situ Sofon, hair braider, Silver Spring, Maryland

Thomas Tate, shoe designer and stylist, Upper Marlboro, Maryland

Brenda Winstead, designer, New Windsor, Maryland

ROCK THE RUNWAY STAGE

Fatoukiné Ndiaye Abeille, style exemplar, Washington, D.C., and Paris, France

Christylez Bacon, musician, Washington, D.C.

Junious Brickhouse and Urban Artistry, dancers/voguers, Washington, D.C.

Juanita Britton, entrepreneur, Washington, D.C., and Ghana

Sharon Bullock, 1954-, designer, owner Metamorphosis Boutique, Silver Spring, Maryland

A'Lelia Bundles, family historian, writer, Washington, D.C.

Caribbean and Afro-Latino style exemplars, Washington, D.C.

Cristine Brooks Cropper, D.C. fashion commissioner, Washington, D.C.

Emory Douglas, 1943-, graphic arts designer, former minister of culture for the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, San Francisco, California

Earthen Vessels youth, style exemplars, Washington, D.C.

Kahil El'Zabar and the Ethnic Heritage Ensemble, musician, tailor, Chicago, Illinois

Gladys-Marie Fry, folklorist, University of Maryland professor emeritus, Maryland

In Process..., Washington, D.C.

Kimberly Kelley, regalia maker, Nottaway tribal member, Washington, D.C.

Rosemary Reed Miller, historian and entrepreneur, Washington, D.C.

Lubna Muhammad, 1955-, fashion designer, Pennsauken, New Jersey

Betty Keckley Stratford, family historian, Washington, D.C.

Takoma Park Baptist Church, style exemplars, Takoma Park, Maryland

RESEARCH TENT

Jade Banks, director, Dr. Beverly J. Robinson Community Folk Culture Program, Mind-Builders Creative Arts Center, New York, New York

Monte Oyd Harris, 1966-, Maryland, plastic surgeon, Chevy Chase, Maryland

Yemaya Jones, 1949-, resist dyer, Frederiksted, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands

James Pogue, 1993-, Frank McClarin High School student researcher, Atlanta Georgia

Darius Smith, 1993-, Frank McClarin High School student researcher, Atlanta Georgia

Geena Paige Mignon, genealogist, African ancestry

Edmund Asante, 1993-, Mind-Builders student researcher, Bronx, New York

Katherine Blanco, 1995-, Mind-Builders student researcher, Bronx, New York

Marlon Carter, Mind-Builders student researcher

Chennell Christopher, 1984-, Mind-Builders student researcher, Bronx, New York

Phylicia Martin, Mind-Builders student researcher

Debra Robinson, 1953-, videographer, educator, Frank McClarin High School, Atlanta, Georgia

Andrene M. Taylor, 1978-, health activist, CEO of Zuriworks for Women's Health, Washington, D.C.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2013, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk553d2190a-b510-4921-9eb2-07807ae02e2c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2013-ref39

On the Runway: Muslim Style

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2013 June 30
Scope and Contents:
Diane N'Diaye; Zarinah Shakir (African Historian / Professor) ; Models; Lubna Muhammad (Fashion Designer) Transylvanian sing along and dance
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2013, Item 130630_Will-To-Adorn_Rock-The-Runway_0026
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 5: The Will to Adorn: African American Diversity, Style, and Identity / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk586f3aa3c-ce86-4663-a045-f19463bc6048
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2013-ref576

Language of Headstyles

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2013 June 30
Scope and Contents:
Elaine Nichols; Fana Chisolm (Hair Stylist); Andrene Taylor (community curator / cancer research); Yemaya Jones (Wrap Stylist / fashion designer) Song and dance from Demesh, Transylvania
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2013, Item 130630_Will-To-Adorn_Rock-The-Runway_0029
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 5: The Will to Adorn: African American Diversity, Style, and Identity / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk527ca8d55-11b4-4c61-9a5e-a8aa59d36565
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2013-ref579

Cross Cultural Traditions: Weddings

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2013 July 06
Scope and Contents:
Neil, Sharon (jewelry designer); Davies, Marilyn (Urban Runway fashion designer) Weaving for different occasions; demonstration of tools used for weaving; Quechua phrases; alpaca wool
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2013, Item 130706_Will-To-Adorn_Rock-The-Runway_0061
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 5: The Will to Adorn: African American Diversity, Style, and Identity / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c6ab4439-9eee-40be-b851-0bc67c3486ec
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2013-ref608

Transition to Modernity: Omani Fashion Design

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2005 June 27
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2005, Item FP-2005-CT-0231
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 5: Oman: Desert, Oasis, and Sea / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5b7b9a0b4-8c6c-49a0-9041-0e03b285b488
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2005-ref964

Festival Recordings: Community Talk: Old Traditions in New Settings; Work Experience Stories

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. African Immigrant Program 1997 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Ruland, Marcella (recorder)  Search this
Ruland, Tim (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Osanyingbemi, Gabriel  Search this
Ajibade, Layo  Search this
Macharia, Kanuthia  Search this
Pereira, Aristide  Search this
Gihgi  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Nigeria
Senegal
Date:
1997 June 27
Track Information:
101 Old Traditions in New Settings: African Gospel in the U.S / Gabriel Osanyingbemi, Layo Ajibade.

102 Work Experience Stories: First Jobs in the U.S / Gihgi, Kanuthia Macharia, Aristide Pereira.
Local Numbers:
FP-1997-CT-0266-7
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 27, 1997.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. SI Permission.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Gospel music  Search this
Music  Search this
Religion  Search this
Work  Search this
language  Search this
Fashion designers  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1997, Item FP-1997-CT-0266
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: African Immigrant Folklife / 2.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5670f4e12-c9bb-4ab8-9499-dfb97ae41175
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1997-ref629

Mali: From Timbuktu to Washington

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The 2003 Mali program was an invitation to think about Mali and her important place in the wider world. Mali's influence in West Africa and beyond has been felt for centuries. But her regional, continental, and global connections are not just part of the past. The Festival program also demonstrated Malians' ongoing interest in actively forging new links worldwide.

From Timbuktu to Washington evolved over five years, from a wish and an idea to a fully developed and exciting program of musical performances and cultural activities. Planning was enhanced by the previous relationships, both personal and institutional, between the Smithsonian and Malian cultural institutions and was supported by the Malian government and U.S. agencies in Mali. Malian organizers thoughtfully deliberated about what to share with American visitors and determined how Malian culture in all its diversity should be represented.

Traditional music is a vibrant expression of Mali's cultural diversity and wealth. Each ethnic group and region is characterized by certain musical rhythms, instruments, and compositions - a tremendous diversity of which were reflected in the Festival program. Music is involved in all aspects of life, marking birth, work, marriage, religious ceremonies, and death. For the Malian people, music is fundamental and essential to life: it has a precise function and meaning, and it is inextricably linked to a set of doctrines, ideals, beliefs, and practices whose coherence constitutes the identity of each group. Since beliefs about music are often associated with beliefs about the origin of both music and the ethnic group that performs it, the perpetuation of music is a matter of considerable importance.

Malian crafts are a legacy from the past but also very much a part of the present - and the future. People generally think of crafts as the artistic expression of a civilization or culture, but they are much more. Crafts are an important economic resource for Malians, and in 1995 the government adopted a Craft Code to protect and develop craft activity, which the code defined as all basically manual extraction, transformation, or production of goods or services, in metalwork (such as tool-making and appliance repair), woodwork (from carpentry to paper-making), textile and leather work (such as tailoring and tanning), mining and building trades, food processing and preparation (from meat-cutting to milling grain), health and body care (from hairdressing to incense-making), as well as arts. Crafts encompass not only objects used in rituals and traditional ceremonies, but also objects used in daily life - all demonstrated for Festival visitors on the National Mall. Other presentations focused on Malian vernacular architecture, the building arts, and foodways.

Samuel Sidibé, Oumou Dembélé, Zakiyatou Halatine, Sina Maiga, Stephanie Diakité, Modibo Diarra, and Vanessa Adams constituted the Curatorial Board/General Festival Coordination in Mali; Mary Jo Arnoldi and John Franklin were the Curatorial Team; Aboubakar Sanogo was Program Coordinator; and Diana N'Diaye was Fashion Curator. Music and Dance Commission: Kardigué Laico Traoré and N'tji Bagayoko; Craft Commission: Oumou Maiga; Architecture Commission: Alpha Baba Cissé and Boubacar Mady Diallo; Gastronomy Commission: Ami Sow; Communication Commission: Yiriba Samaké; Tourism Commission: Korotimi Théra; Commercial Crafts Commission: Tidiane Hady Kane.

The Mali National Planning Commission included: Dabele Diassana, Chair; Moussa Konaté; Gaoussou Mariko; Abdoulaye Sow; Germaine Samaké Sylla; Demba Kone; Oumou Maiga; Illal; Fatim Kouyaté; Yriba Samaké; and Mamadou Soubounou. A National Advisory Board included: Mossadeck Shada Bally; Alpha Baba Cissé; Ousmane Daou; Idrissa Diakité; Zakiyatou Halatine; Doulaye Konaté; Adam Ba Konaré, co-chair; Fatim Kouyaté; Adama Samessekou; Bintou Sanankuoa; Klena Sanogo; Samuel Sidibé, co-chair; Bakary Soumanou; Ousmane Sow; Djibril Tabouré; Adam Thiam; Barthélémy Togo; and Ibrahim Ag Youssouf.

The program was made possible by a partnership with the Government of Mali (Office of the President; Office of the Prime Minister; Malian National Folklife Festival Commission; Ministry ofTourism and Crafts; Ministry of Culture; Ministry ofWomen, Family, and Youth Affairs; and Ministry of Education), the World Bank, and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Additional supporting organizations included the U.S. Department of State, Africa Society, Corporate Council on Africa, Friends of Mali, Association of Malians, the Peace Corps, Chemonics Inc., and John Snow Inc.
Participants:
PERFORMANCE TRADITIONS

Ali Farka Touré Group, Niafunke -- Ali Farka Touré Group, NiafunkeAli Farka Touré, electric guitar, vocalsOumar Touré, congas, chorus vocalsAli KontaSouleymane Kane, djembéHamadoun BocoumMamadou Kelly

Baba Larab, Gao -- Baba Larab, GaoGuilemikoye M'bara I., 1956-, dancerArawaidou Yacouba, 1959-, guitarSalif Maiga, 1950-, guitarZéinaba Assoutor, 1977-, dancer

Dogon Masked Dance Group, Bandiagara -- Dogon Masked Dance Group, BandiagaraInogo Dolo, 1928-, singerSomou Dolo, 1963-, dancerYanousssou Dolo, 1956-, dancerBassa Dolo, 1970-, dancerAmatigué Dolo, 1968-, drummerAtemelou Dolo, 1973-, dancerOgodana Dolo, 1950-, drummerBasso Dolo, 1963-, singerAly Dolo, singer

Donso N'goni -- Donso N'goniSékouba Traoré, 1965-, Koulikoro, singer and donso n'goniDramane Traoré, 1973-, Koulikoro, donso n'goniNianankoro Diarra, 1982-, Koulikoro, guiros

Ensemble Instrumental -- Ensemble InstrumentalMassambou Wèlè Diallo, artistic directorSouadou Soumano, 1958-, singerSaranfing Kouyaté, 1950-, singerNafissatou Maiga, 1954-, singerDjeneba Doumbia, 1962-, singerAdama Soumono Sacko, 1960-, singerBabily Kanouté, 1951-, koraSaranfing Kouyaté, 1950-, koraBinéfou Koita, 1960-, n'goniModibo Diabaté, 1961-, balafonMohamadoun Ag Sidi Cissé, djembe

Groupe So Fing, Markala -- Groupe So Fing, MarkalaMariam Thiero, 1956-, singer, dancerAichata Niono, 1971-, backup singerAlmamy Thiero, 1959-, percussionistOumar Traoré, 1959-, percussionistYaya Famenta, 1972-, percussionistMohamed Khalifa Thiero, 1959-, percussionist

Groupe Sogonikun, Wassoulou -- Groupe Sogonikun, WassoulouAmadou Diakité, 1941-, dancerBakary Diakité, 1979-, dancerKassoum Diakité, 1980-, dancerBrehima Diallo, 1973-, percussionistMamaourou Doumbia, 1979-, percussionistAlmamy Traoré, 1963-, percussionistKadiè Traoré, 1978-, singerDoussouba Traoré, singer

Kanaga de Mopti -- Kanaga de MoptiDjeliba Koné, 1953-, trumpetKaniba dit Demba Koné, 1965-, guitarIssa Koné, 1978-, guitarMaki Koné, 1958-, singerSada Traoré, 1978-, drummerSekou dit Tomi Koné, 1952-, saxophone, balafonBouraima Diabaté, 1961-, singerPapa Koné, 1966-, bass guitarMamadou Traoré, 1950-, band leaderSekou Diankoumba, 1948-, singer

Krin de Birgo, Kita -- Krin de Birgo, KitaDemba Sidibé, singer, calabashMooro Sidibé, djembeTenemba Diallo, 1988-, calabashBakary Sidibé, calabash, camale n'goni

Musical Storytellers -- Musical StorytellersMoctar Kone, 1945-, n'goni, MourdiahMamary Diabaté, 1943-, n'goni, Bamako

N'Goussoun, Koulikoro -- N'Goussoun, KoulikoroMariam Bagayoko, 1952-, singer, dancerDjéneba Bagayoko, 1978-, chorus singerDognan Coulibaly, 1975-, balafonAlou Diarra, 1975-, balafon

Néba Solo Group, Sikasso -- Néba Solo Group, SikassoSouleymane Traoré (Néba Solo), 1969-, balafonYacouba Traoré, 1963-, keregneSiaka Traoré, 1971-, balafonOumar Coulibaly, 1971-, percussionZantien Gonsogo, 1959-, percussionMahamadou Traoré, 1976-, percussionBocary Dembélé, dancerIbrahim Dembélé, 1974-, dancer

Oumou Sangaré, Wassoulou -- Oumou Sangaré, WassoulouOumou Sangaré, 1968-, lead vocalsSaya Kouyaté, 1973-, singer, dancerZoumana Tereta, 1963-, sokou (traditional violin)Abdoulaye Fofana, 1954-, fluteNabintou Diakité, 1972-, singer, dancerMouneissa Tandina, 1964-, drummerSalah Baba, 1974-, guitarHamane Touré, 1964-, bassOusmane Haidara, 1954-, managerBrehima Diakité, 1965-, camale n'goniCheikh Oumar Diabaté, 1968-, djembeAlama Diakite, yabara (percussion)

Salif Keita, Bamako -- Salif Keita, BamakoSalif Keita, 1949-, lead vocals, guitarDjely Moussa Kouyaté, electric guitarHarouna Samaké, camale n'goniDrissa Bagayoko, djembeMamadou Kone, calabashAdama Kouyaté, tamaSouleymane Doumbia, African congasSouleyman Kouyaté, n'goniAbdoulaye Diabaté, keyboardsAminata Doumbia, 1976-, background vocalsAssitan Diarra, background vocalsJean-Marie Avisse, technical crewIsabel Bonvalet, technical crewTimor Cardenas, technical crewJohnson Mensah, technical crewDavid Lunardelli, technical crew

Tabital Pulaku, Mopti -- Tabital Pulaku, MoptiBoureima Dicko, 1947-, fluteDinda Sarré, 1958-, n'goniGabdo Cissé, 1978-, dancerGoro Hamadoun, 1971-, calabashAminata Coulibaly, dancerHamadoun Biga Cissé, drumYehia Dicko, violinAlima Barry, dancerAminata Salmana Traoré, singer

Tartit, Kel Antessar -- Tartit, Kel AntessarMohamed Aly Ansar, leaderIssa Amanou, n'goniMohamed Issa Ag Oumar, n'goniIdwal Ag Mohamed, n'goniFatoumata Walett Mohomadoun, dancerTafa Walett Alhousseini, violinFatoumata HaidaraZeinabu Walett Oumar, tende

PUPPETRY

Yaya Coulibaly, 1957-, puppeteer, Bamako

CRAFT TRADITIONS

Fatoumata Maiga, 1961-, carding, Ségou

Aminata Keita, 1983-, spinning, Ségou

Ousmane Sarré, 1969-, cotton weaving, Badalabougou

Kola Kassé, 1944-, wool weaving, Mopti

Nakounté Diarra, -- bogolan -- , mudcloth, Kolokani

Founemousso Sakiliba, 1940-, -- bogolan -- , mudcloth, Bamako

Ousmane Ganame, 1942-, indigo-dyeing, Bandiagara

Tantou Sambaké, modern tie-dyeing, Bamako

Aminata Sacko, 1961-, modern tie-dyeing, Bamako

Sanounou Bathily, fabric finishing, Bamako

Ousmane Traoré, 1947-, hand embroidery, Djenne

Sekou Touré, machine embroidery, Bamako

Dikourou Diarrah Traoré, fashion design, Dou Couture, Bamako

Sambou Fané, fashion design, Bamako

Kasobane Design Group, Bamako -- Kasobane Design Group, BamakoKandioura Coulibaly, fashion designKlétigui Dembélé, fashion design

Style Movement Consultants Models -- Style Movement Consultants ModelsStephanie Alexander, Toya Brown, Terraria Chase, Maria Dennard, Tanisha Dodson, Alyssa Grannum, Torye Hurt, Viola Iso-Hola, Evan Jones, Sean Majors, Darlena Perry, Darletra Perry, Angela Tilghman, Latonya Tilghman, Nila Zachman

Malian Association Models -- Malian Association ModelsRokiatou Ba, Aminata Amy Cissé, Boubacar Cissé, Djeneba Djenny Diakité, Aichatou Keita, Hawa Keita, Kadiatou Koné, Djingareye M. Lawani, Adam A. Ouologuem, Assetou Traoré, Fanta Traoré

Alassane Ag Agaly, 1973-, Tuareg jewelry, Gao

Amadou Samasekou, 1955-, Tuareg jewelry, Mopti

Hady Koné, 1967-, modern jewelry, Bamako

Mamadou Gueye Thiam, modern jewelry, Kayes

Kassim Ballo, 1961-, blacksmithing, Bamako

Mohamed Ag Iknane, 1964-, blacksmithing, Gao

Kadidia Nienta, 1975-, pottery, Mopti

Almadane Traoré, 1939-, straw jewelry, Timbuktu

Fatoumata Gariko, 1958-, straw jewelry, Hombori, Mopti region

Halimatou Abouba, mat-weaving, Gao

Tago Walet Mémé, 1956-, leather work, Timbuktu

Fadiala Dembelé, 1953-, modern leather work, Bamako

Tairou Soumbounou, shoemaking, Bamako

Mody Cissoko, 1959-, wood sculpture, Bamako

ARTS OF ADORNMENT

Kadidia Ouologuem, 1963-, hairdressing, Bamako

Soumata Sidi, 1964-, hairdressing, Gao

Aminata Doumbia, 1976-, henna artistry. Bamako

Korotoumo Ouattara, 1948-, shea butter extraction, Sikasso

TRADITIONAL MEDICINE

Toumani Diakité, 1966-, Bamako

FOODWAYS TRADITIONS

Ami Sow

Kadiatou Sow Traoré, 1955-

Halimatou Touré

Kadia Souko

Fatoumata Sissoko Cissé

Koumba Kanté

Mariam Diarra

Aissa Touré Alhamafi, 1955-

Maimouna Coulibaly Camara

ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS

Baba Cissé, architect

Boubacar Mady Diallo, architect

Alassane Hasseye, 1942-, master mason

Boubacar Kouroumanse, master mason

Manhamane dit Berre Yanou, 1936-, master mason

Almoudou Baigna, master mason

Alhousseini Ag Tajoudine, 1963-, Tuareg tent

Sekou Tientao, mason

Mandedeou Tanapo, mason

Mamoudou Kontao, mason

Oumar Yonou, mason

Agaly Ousmane, mason

Baba Touré, mason

Ahamadou Hasseye, mason

Adoulahi Albaidja, mason
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2003, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk520988e38-6cbb-4109-9f2e-f9f1a9681176
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2003-ref26

Festival Recordings: Musical storytelling: Moctar Kane, Mamary Diabaté (Ibrahim N'Diaye); Malian Fashion Design: Kandioura Coulibaly, Kletigui Dembélé, Dikouou Diarrah Traoré (Janet Goldner); Growing Up in Mali: Inogo Dolo, Aly Dolo, Ousmane Ganame (Ib...

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2003 July 3
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2003, Item FP-2003-CT-0264
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 3: Mali: From Timbuktu to Washington / 3.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5a500b5ad-3205-42e4-896e-0813662e4dcf
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2003-ref843

Crafts of African Fashion

Type:
Archival materials
DESCRIPTION:
From Ghana to Niger and beyond, African Fashion is increasingly recognized as a significant component of the cultural, social, economic, and even political expression of contemporary life on the continent and in the diaspora. It is a performance art, a showcase for the work of traditional master artisans, and a spectator sport. The occupations and industries that support African fashion are typically grounded in the traditional knowledge, histories, artistry, and skills of local communities.

As a community-centered cultural heritage enterprise, fashion provides opportunities for people to identify and appreciate the handmade. Crafts of African Fashion is an initiative promoting the continuity of heritage arts by exploring the important role which cultural enterprises play in sustaining communities and connecting generations on the African continent and throughout the diaspora. The program showcases the skills of weavers, dyers, leather workers, designers and tailors in their presentations of African fashion trends and craft production.

Through discussions, demonstrations and workshops, participants explore with visitors the important role cultural enterprises play in sustaining communities and connecting generations of Africans. Following three underlying themes, the local marketplace, transnational and international fashion trends, and the relationships between consumers and producers within a community, artisans lead daily presentations and activities.

Interest in African fashion has come to international attention in the Hollywood blockbuster Black Panther. The film represented emerging global African identities by using Ghanaian adinkra, kente, and other textiles, as well as African clothing styles in their costuming throughout the film. Using this as a departure point, participants explore the role that heritage plays in both the identity and the artisanship of African fashion.

The panoply of African fashion is presented in a series of short films depicting haute couture design studios, pop culture fashion houses, as well as the streets of Soweto. Starting with the creativity and style influenced by the African continent, the program explores the current state and future of African fashion through panel discussions with local, national, and international designers. Visitors learn how textile and adornment artists—weavers, dyers, leather workers, designers—contribute their knowledge, values, skills, and local aesthetics to contemporary global fashion while sustaining time-honored traditions.

PRODUCTION

Curator: Diana Baird N'Diaye

Fashion Project Coordinator: Shay Stevens

Research Fellow: Rebecca Fenton

Katzenberger Art History Intern: Brianne Chapelle

PARTICIPANTS

• Brenda Winstead, Clothing designer

• Chapuchi Bobbo Ahiagble, Ewe weaver

• Cynthia Sands, Textile artisan

• Kibonen, Fashion designer

• Kwasi Asare, Kente cloth weaver

• Soumana Saley, Leather craftsman
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2018 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2018-ref5

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