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Charles Lang Freer's letters to Frank Hecker during foreign travels

Creator:
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Collection Creator:
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Extent:
283 Pages
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Letters (correspondence)
Place:
Sri Lanka
Singapore
Indonesia
Egypt
Syria
Japan
Paris (France)
London (England)
Date:
1904-1908
Scope and Contents:
Letters written by Charles Lang Freer to his friend and business associate Frank Hecker (1846-1927) during multiple trips to Europe and Asia between 1904 and July of 1908. After a decade absence, Freer travelled again to Asia, taking extended tours of Egypt, Syria, Sri Lanka, Southeast Asia and Japan. Also included are letters written from Detroit that describe the status of Freer's offer of his collection to the Smithsonian.
Arrangement:
Organized chronologically.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.01 02.1Hecker.travel4
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Travel  Search this
Genre/Form:
Letters (correspondence)
Collection Citation:
Charles Lang Freer Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of the estate of Charles Lang Freer.
Identifier:
FSA.A.01, File FSA A.01 02.1Hecker.travel4
See more items in:
Charles Lang Freer Papers
Charles Lang Freer Papers / Series 2: Correspondence / 2.1: Charles Lang Freer Correspondence / Hecker, Frank J., Col., 1892-1917
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc31be8c988-7719-4a23-854e-4c80efae4722
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-01-ref3172
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  • View Charles Lang Freer's letters to Frank Hecker during foreign travels digital asset number 1

Rev. William Carroll; Jesse Fuller; mono dub of 69.101.09

Creator:
Festival of American Folklife  Search this
Artist:
Fuller, Jesse  Search this
Jackson, John, 1924-2002  Search this
Balfa Brothers  Search this
Ardoin Family Orchestra  Search this
Performer:
Fuller, Jesse  Search this
Jackson, John, 1924-2002  Search this
Balfa, Dewey  Search this
Balfa, Will  Search this
Balfa, Rodney  Search this
Fontenot, Canray  Search this
Balfa Brothers  Search this
Ardoin Family Orchestra  Search this
Bois-sec  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (7 inch reel, 1/4 inch tape)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
African American  Search this
Cajuns  Search this
Creoles -- Louisiana  Search this
Louisianans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Georgia
California
Virginia
Louisiana
Date:
1969 July 5
Contents:
Opening remarks; William Carroll- Leaning on the everlasting arms--Highway to heaven--Something got a hold of me; Jesse Fuller- Intro--Take this hammer--San Francisco Bay blues--Bye and bye--Stealin'--Let the light shine on me--Runnin' wild
Track Information:
101 One Man Band / Jesse Fuller. Guitar,Kazoo,Washboard band music,Fotdella. English language.

102 Blues Songster / John Jackson. Guitar. English language.

103 Cajun Music / Balfa Brothers, Dewey Balfa, Will Balfa, Rodney Balfa. Guitar,Fiddle. French language.

104 Zydeco Music / Ardoin Family Orchestra., Bois-sec, Canray Fontenot. Fiddle,Accordion. French language.
General note:
DPA number 69.101.57
Local Numbers:
FP-1969-7RR-0057
General:
CDR copy
69.101.57
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 5, 1969.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
One man bands  Search this
Songsters  Search this
Blues (Music)  Search this
Cajun music  Search this
Zydeco music  Search this
La-La music  Search this
Guitar  Search this
Kazoo  Search this
Washboard band music  Search this
Fotdella  Search this
Violin  Search this
Accordion  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1969 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1969, Item FP-1969-7RR-0057
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1969 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1969 Festival of American Folklife / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk56c34d3ec-0dc1-4fbe-95a7-0066d3655a68
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1969-ref236

Window Boxes

Collection Creator:
Druse, Kenneth  Search this
Extent:
75 Photographs
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
General:
Series includes images of window boxes on houses windows, porches, patios, and shop fronts.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Brassica  Search this
Ornamental cabbages  Search this
Fuchsia  Search this
Helichrysum  Search this
Everlasting flowers  Search this
Impatiens  Search this
Pelargoniums  Search this
Geraniums  Search this
Petunias  Search this
Salvia  Search this
Viola  Search this
Violets  Search this
Sage  Search this
Window boxes  Search this
Plant containers  Search this
Container gardening  Search this
Container plants  Search this
Urban gardens  Search this
Porches  Search this
Patio gardening  Search this
Stairs, stone  Search this
Flower boxes  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Ken Druse garden photography collection
Identifier:
AAG.DRU, File DRU123
See more items in:
Ken Druse garden photography collection
Ken Druse garden photography collection / Series 2: Garden Images by Subject
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb652e7d55c-d0fc-472a-8457-524191cdaa23
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-dru-ref118

Helichrysum

Collection Creator:
Druse, Kenneth  Search this
Extent:
2 Photographs
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
General:
Series includes images of Helichrysum, commonly called Everlasting Flowers, detailing orange blossoms.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Helichrysum  Search this
Everlasting flowers  Search this
Flowers  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Ken Druse garden photography collection
Identifier:
AAG.DRU, Item DRU016038
See more items in:
Ken Druse garden photography collection
Ken Druse garden photography collection / Series 2: Garden Images by Subject / DRU016: Annuals and Tender Perennials
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6f567a5aa-35d8-44af-9030-70437c003cb4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-dru-ref1533

Plants 'H'

Collection Creator:
Druse, Kenneth  Search this
Extent:
55 Photographs
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Ivy  Search this
Helichrysum  Search this
Sunflowers  Search this
Everlasting flowers  Search this
Daylilies  Search this
Hesperis  Search this
Hibiscus  Search this
Hosta  Search this
Hydrangeas  Search this
Hypericum  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Ken Druse garden photography collection
Identifier:
AAG.DRU, Item DRU130009
See more items in:
Ken Druse garden photography collection
Ken Druse garden photography collection / Series 2: Garden Images by Subject / DRU130: Planthropology: The Myths, Mysteries, and Miracles of My Garden Favorites
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb69b7ea4fa-35be-4848-a7b1-dc3324822913
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-dru-ref2206

Silver Gardens and Gray Gardens

Collection Creator:
Druse, Kenneth  Search this
Extent:
54 Photographs
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
General:
Series includes images of Silver and Gray Gardens with planted with color specific foliage, flowers, shrubs, and trees planted in formal, flower, cottage, container and indoor gardens with garden seating, lily ponds, sundials, and edging.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Artemisia  Search this
Centaurea  Search this
Knapweeds  Search this
Coreopsis  Search this
Cynara  Search this
Elymus  Search this
Eryngium  Search this
Fennel  Search this
Helichrysum  Search this
Everlasting flowers  Search this
Helictotrichon  Search this
Lychnis  Search this
Papaver  Search this
Poppies  Search this
Petunias  Search this
Salvia  Search this
Sage  Search this
Sedum  Search this
Sempervivum  Search this
Stachys  Search this
Mulleins  Search this
Gray gardens  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Parterres  Search this
Knot gardens  Search this
Flower beds  Search this
Terraces (land forms)  Search this
Container gardening  Search this
Indoor gardens  Search this
Lily ponds  Search this
Outdoor furniture  Search this
Garden ornaments and furniture  Search this
Conservatories  Search this
Edging  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Ken Druse garden photography collection
Identifier:
AAG.DRU, File DRU099
See more items in:
Ken Druse garden photography collection
Ken Druse garden photography collection / Series 2: Garden Images by Subject
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6b202339b-6fee-4f37-8cba-c3b0a2927e12
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-dru-ref94

Giant shrubs, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 3 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 19.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 3 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26187
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo77d192abe-e852-4f70-96c6-a700db14cd45
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18556

Giant shrubs, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 3.1 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 20.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 3.1 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26188
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo74c004d56-1980-4170-86b2-5f1df02538cf
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18557

Giant shrubs, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 3.2 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 21.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 3.2 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26189
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo79cb13164-4e9e-4094-8834-27930c5f6f5d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18558

Grassy land, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 4 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 22.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 4 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26190
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7f63febb7-47ca-42ce-ade2-2fcb068efbb7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18559

Grassy land, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 4.1 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 23.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 4.1 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26191
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7f94b7283-15fd-45ef-b5ab-8af15743e3ff
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18560

Grassy land, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 4.3 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 25.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 4.3 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26193
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo760efb526-74fc-40dd-ae96-9e515045bbe9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18563

Grassy land, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 4.4 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 26.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 4.4 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26194
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7bb0e3209-6688-4486-80a9-b3b3cf2629cc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18564

Grassy land, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 4.5 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 27.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 4.5 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26195
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7fefcc6d0-ea5d-4ec4-898e-788a9ecc28c6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18565

Grassy land, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 4.7 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 29.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 4.7 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26197
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo70c6e443e-4ff4-4abd-8946-e4ad6354f15a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18567

Grassy land, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 4.9 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 31.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 4.9 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26199
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7bd801850-86b4-40c7-b0fd-8a43d5ca4b1e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18569

Grassy land, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 4.10 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 32.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 4.10 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26200
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo79e80f603-dbbd-4585-b980-5dd5c9c5de39
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18570

Grassy land, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 4.11 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 33.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 4.11 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26201
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7da9dde77-b65f-4b75-8a57-0717e9e600b5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18571

The moorland area occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 5 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 34.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 5 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26202
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7e90f4921-19ee-4ea1-b0db-d90e1b7534cd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18573

The moorland area occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias, Mount Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Tanzania
Date:
1966
Scope and Contents:
Plants near the top of the mountain tend to become less and less. Travelling slightly higher up the slopes of Kilimanjaro, one will come across the heath and moorland. Also known as the grassy land of giants, the heath is inhabited by enormous heathers growing taller than 9 feet in many instances. Scattered between the giant shrubs are resilient flowers such as the Kilimanjaro protea, and 'everlasting daisies'. Also lighting up the mountain are the well known succulents, Kniphofia thomsonii, otherwise known as red hot pokers. Intersecting the heath, the moorland area is occupied mostly by senecios and lobelias. One sub- type of the species, the Lobelia deckenii has protective leaves which close over the plant's tiny blue flowers at night, protecting them from the devastation of the evening frost. At approximately 4500 feet, the alpine desert is a cauldron of extreme temperatures. Scorched by the equatorial sun during the day and battered by sub zero winds at night, only the hardiest of plants can survive here. Tussock shoots sprout from within the confines of the plant's dead older strands and lichens cling directly to jagged lava rocks. Also managing to endure the harsh terrain is the resilient helichrysum. The final stretch of the mountain, the summit zone, is inhabited only by the hardiest of lichens. Due to the fact that all water at this altitude has been sucked into the absorbent Volcanic Rocks, ice and snow, even the lichens at this Altitude grow incredibly slowly. During his trip to Tanzania, Eliot Elisofon and his crew ascended Mount Kilimanjaro. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for American Broadcasting Company and traveled to Africa from June 1966 to August 1966.
Local Numbers:
W 4 TAN 5.1 EE 66
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
33
Frame value is 35.
Slide No. W 4 TAN 5.1 EE 66
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Botany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 26203
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Tanzania
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7756c0d0c-331a-40d7-a2ff-5ae5e5ef3c22
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref18574

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