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Charlene Hodges Byrd collection

Creator:
Byrd, Charlene Hodges, 1929-2009  Search this
Names:
Morgan State College  Search this
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988  Search this
Cummings, Ida R. (Ida Rebecca), 1868-1958  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Grimké, Francis J. (Francis James), 1850-1937  Search this
Hodges, Joyce Ethel Cummings, 1903-1971  Search this
Shimm, Erminie F. (Erminie Florence), 1867-1936  Search this
Shimm, Sarah A., 1843-1885  Search this
Thomas, Elizabeth N. (Elizabeth Nelson), d. 1932  Search this
Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915  Search this
Extent:
43 Linear feet (35 document boxes and 39 oversize boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
circa 1750-2009
bulk 1880-1960
Summary:
The Charlene Hodges Byrd collection measures 43 linear feet, and dates from circa 1750-2009, with the bulk of the material dating from 1880-1960. The collection documents the personal life and professional career of Charlene Hodges Byrd, an African American teacher from Washington, D.C., along with material for several related families from Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. Family members prominently represented include Sarah A. Shimm, teacher and essayist under the name Faith Lichen; her daughters Erminie F. Shimm and Grace E. Shimm Cummings, both teachers; and Byrd's mother, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges, also a teacher. Correspondence and writings chiefly discuss family life, religion, race, education, and the relationship with Frederick Douglass and his family. The collection is arranged in 10 series: Biographical Material, Correspondence, Writings, Subject Files, Financial and Legal Records, Printed Material, Volumes, Memorabilia, Textiles, and Photographs.
Scope and Contents:
Series 1. Papers related to biographical and family histories of the Byrd, Cummings, Davage, Dews, Hodges, Shimm, Spruill, and Thomas families. Material includes family trees; school diplomas and certificates; programs; awards; marriage and divorce papers; funeral documents; and obituaries.

Series 2: Chiefly letters from family and friends regarding family news, financial matters, school, work, neighborhood affairs, church events, travel and the weather. The majority of the letters are addressed to Charlene Hodges Byrd, Grace E. Shimm Cummings, Ida R. Cummings, Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges, Erminie F. Shimm, Sarah A. Shimm, and Elizabeth N. Thomas. Other correspondence includes letters from Booker T. Washington, Bessye Beardon, Charlotte Davage, Amelia Douglass, and Harrell S. Spruill. There are also a number of greeting cards, postcards, and empty envelopes.

Series 3. Writings include essays, speeches, papers written for school, teacher's notebooks, and a diary of Erminie F. Shimm, 1903. Topics include education, Frederick Douglass, religion, race, Africa, and the temperance movement.

Series 4. Subject files on Charlene Hodges Byrd's involvement with Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority; Book Lovers of Charleston, West Virginia, a women's book club organized in 1923; Church Women United radio program; and The Links, Inc., a volunteer service organization. The papers on Liberia relate to missionary work, and were probably gathered by Erminie F. Shimm; and the Shimm-Thomas Collection are papers related to the deposit and later return of family items housed as a collection at Morgan State College.

Series 5. The financial and legal records include invoices and receipts, bank books, real estate tax assessments, deeds, and wills. There is also material related to the estate of Erminie F. Shimm.

Series 6. Printed materials includes books, pamphlets, newspapers, newsletters, clippings, invitations and programs. The books and pamphlets are chiefly school yearbooks and newspapers and other texts related to religion, politics, music, and poetry. Also included is a copy of Frederick Douglass's autobiography and a printed copy of his speech "The Race Problem." The clippings include obituaries, articles about Charlene Hodges Byrd and her husband Charles R. Byrd, essays by Sarah A. Shimm under the name Faith Lichen, and articles on the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. The invitations and programs are primarily for school graduations, weddings, social events, and funerals. Other printed material includes newsletters; business cards; calling cards; postage stamps, chiefly from Liberia; and blank postcards. The binder on Frederick Douglass was prepared by Byrd and her goddaughter for the West Virginia School Studies Fair, and includes copies of Byrd family artifacts.

Series 7. Autograph books, guest books, and scrapbooks. The autograph book of Grace E. Shimm Cummings includes autographs from Amelia Douglass, Lewis B. Douglass, Charles R. Douglass, W. H. Clair, and Francis J. Grimke. The scrapbook of Grace E. Shimm Cummings and Erminie F. Shimm consists primarily of clippings, and was assembled from an old teacher's book with a student registration and punishment pages still intact at the back.

Series 8. Miscellaneous items in the collection including artwork, a coin purse, a piece of handwoven cloth belonging to Catherine Nelson's great grandmother, and leather hair curlers.

Series 9: The textiles are chiefly christening gowns, children's garments, and an apron. Several garments belonged to Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges, Charlene Hodges Byrd, and Elizabeth N. Thomas. There is also a doll that belonged to Amelia Douglass's niece, Kitty Cromwell.

Series 10. Photographs include pictures of Charlene Hodges Byrd, Joyce Ethel Hodges Cummings, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Charles Gilmor Cummings, Grace E. Shimm Cummings, Erminie F. Shimm, and other friends and relatives of the Byrd, Hodges, Cummings, Douglass, and Shimm families. Subjects are primarily portraits and candids, along with some wedding, baby, and school pictures. While some of the photographs are annotated, many of the individuals are unidentified. Included are vintage photographs, cabinet cards, cartes-de-visites, tintypes, daguerreotypes, and negatives.
Biographical / Historical:
The Shimm, Thomas, Cummings, Hodges, Davage, and related African American families chiefly lived in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. Numerous family members worked as teachers, barbers, or in the service industry. They were active in local churches and service organizations, and had established friendships with local church leaders as well as with Frederick Douglass and his family.

The Shimm and Thomas families were located in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. The Thomas family can be traced back to Philip Nelson, who owned property in Leesburg, Virginia and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Family genealogical papers list Nelson as a descendent of British Admiral Horatio Nelson. This lineage, however, is not supported in publically available family histories of Horatio Nelson. Philip Nelson and his wife Araminta had five children: Catherine (b. 1805?), William, Levi (b. 1820?), Henrietta, and Grayson.

Catherine Nelson married Elias E. Thomas (b. 1816?) of Virginia in 1840. They wed in Philadelphia and had five children: Levi Nelson (b. 1841), Sarah (1843-1885), Edward (b. 1844), Elizabeth (1848-1932), and Charles (b. 1851).

Sarah Thomas married William Y. Shimm (b. 1841), a barber in Reading, Pennsylvania, on July 26, 1863. They had 2 daughters, Erminie (1867-1936) and Grace (1865-1910). The Shimms lived in Pennsylvania and Ohio, but had moved to Washington, D.C., around 1871. Sarah was a teacher and a writer who published under the name "Faith Lichen." Her writings, primarily essays and commentaries about race and politics, were printed in several newspapers including The National Republican, The Celtic Weekly, The People's Advocate, and The Sunday Morning Gazette.

Sarah's sister Elizabeth was also a teacher in Maryland. Her brother Charles was a lawyer in Washington, D.C., and a graduate of the first class at Howard University's law school.

Erminie and Grace Shimm became teachers in the Washington, D.C., public school system. Erminie was active in her church and supportive of missionary work in Liberia. Grace married Charles Gilmor Cummings, a pastor in Alexandria, Virginia, on July 9, 1902. They had one daughter, Joyce Ethel (1903-1971), and second child in 1905 who died in infancy. Grace died in 1910 of heart failure. After her death, Grace's sister Erminie and Charles's family helped raise Joyce Ethel in Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland.

Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges graduated from Morgan College in 1924, and received her master's degree from Howard University in 1931. She taught at Douglass High School in Baltimore from 1924-1964. Joyce Ethel married Charles E. Hodges (1900--975) in 1927 and they divorced in 1953. The couple had one daughter, Charlene (1929-2009).

Charlene Hodges Byrd grew up in Washington, D.C., but attended the Northfield School for Girls in East Northfield, Massachusetts, for high school, graduating in 1946. She received her bachelor's degree from Connecticut College in 1950, and her master's degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Chicago in 1951. She married Charles R. Byrd (1919-2004) in 1952. They had one son in 1954, but he died four days after birth. Byrd soon began a career as a teacher and education administrator, eventually working for Kanawha County Schools in Charleston, West Virginia. She was also active in her local community as a member of the Book Lovers of Charleston, West Virginia; Church Women United; and The Links, Inc.

Charles E. Hodges was born Bridgewater, Virginia, where his father was a minister. He graduated from Morgan College in 1923 and received his master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1943. He was a teacher and served as principal of the North Street School in Hagerstown, Maryland. After he and Joyce Ethel divorced in 1953, he married Elizabeth Dews (1913-1999) in 1955.

Elizabeth Dews Hodges, born Elizabeth Virginia Waumbeeka, was adopted by James Edward (1889-1954) and Sarah Virginia Dews (1888?-1964) in Washington, D.C., in 1920. She graduated from Miner Teachers College in 1939, and worked as a teacher in Annapolis, Maryland, at Wiley H. Bates High School for 34 years. She was awarded a medal for her work there by the Freedom Foundation of Valley Forge in 1959. Elizabeth was active in local organizations in Maryland and Washington, D.C., including the SE/NE Friends of the Capitol View Branch Library; Eastern Star Chapter 4; Mount Ephraim Baptist Church; National Museum of Women in the Arts; National Association for the Advancement of Colored Peoples; and the Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind.

The Davage family is descended from Sidney Hall (b. 1818?) and Charles Davage (b. 1815?). Sidney was a former slave at the Perry Hall mansion in Baltimore, and was manumitted by 1840. She married Charles, a coachman, on April 12, 1842. They had five children: Eliza Jane (1843-1913), Sophia (b. 1847), Charlotte (b. 1849), Charles (b. 1854), and Hester (b. 1845). Their daughter Eliza Jane married Henry Cummings (b. 1830?). They had seven children: Harry Sythe (1866-1917), Charles Gilmor (1870-1924), William (b. 1882), Ida R. (1868-1958), Estelle (1874-1944), Carroll (b. 1875), Francis (b. 1872), and Aaron (1864?-1932).

Harry Sythe Cummings, a lawyer in Baltimore, became the city's first African American City Council member. He was first elected in 1890 and served intermittently until his death in 1917, often working on issues related to education. Cummings also delivered a speech at the Republican National Convention in 1904 seconding the presidential nomination of Theodore Roosevelt. He married Blanche Conklin in 1899, and they had three children: Harry S. Jr. (b. 1905), Lucille (d. 1906), and Louise.

Charles Gilmor Cummings graduated from Drew Theological Seminary in 1898, and was a pastor in Alexandria, Virginia and elsewhere. After the death of his wife Grace in 1910, he married Rosa Catherine Bearden, grandmother of artist Romare Bearden, in 1912.

Ida R. Cummings graduated from Morgan College in 1922, and was the first African American kindergarten teacher in Baltimore. She was also active in local organizations, and was president of the Colored Fresh Air and Empty Stocking Circle; chairman of the Woman's Section Council of Defense in Baltimore during the World War, 1914-1918; and president of the Woman's Campaign Bureau of the Colored Republican Voters' League of Maryland.
Provenance:
The Charlene Hodges Byrd collection was donated to the National Museum of African American History and Culture by Herbert S. Garten, co-personal representative of the Estate of Charlene H. Byrd, in 2010.
Restrictions:
Access to collection requires appointment.
Rights:
This collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
African Americans -- Maryland  Search this
African Americans -- Photographs  Search this
African American families  Search this
African Americans -- Pennsylvania  Search this
African American newspapers  Search this
African American -- Social life and customs  Search this
African American women journalists  Search this
African Americans -- Education  Search this
African American churches  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Citation:
Charlene Hodges Byrd collection, circa 1750-2009. National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.2010.26
See more items in:
Charlene Hodges Byrd collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-2010-26
Online Media:

The Magic Door with Louise Hutchinson

Creator:
WMAL-TV (Television station : Washington, D.C.)  Search this
WJLA-TV (Television station : Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Television programs
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1973
Scope and Contents:
On the educational children's television program The Magic Door, Louise Hutchinson discusses the history of Anacostia from the Nacochtank Indians to Frederick Douglass. Discussion directed toward children and accompanied by illustrations, maps, photographs, and a short film of the Frederick Douglass home.
Television program from 000655 to 002517 (preceded by News Reports: John Kinard on the Selection of D.C. Superintendent and followed by Children Singing in Outdoor Concert). Part of Broadcast Programs. Dated 19731005.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
Children  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Television programs
Citation:
The Magic Door with Louise Hutchinson, Record Group 09-037, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-037, Item ACMA AV003222
See more items in:
Broadcast Programs
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-037-ref9

John Wilson papers

Creator:
Wilson, John, 1922-2015  Search this
Names:
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968 -- Monuments  Search this
Interviewer:
Trachtenberg, Alan  Search this
Extent:
5 microfilm reels
1 Cassette (Sound recording, analog)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Cassettes
Drawings
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Date:
[ca.1939]-1993
Scope and Contents:
Biographical material, such as autobiographical notes, school records, personal documents, and a bibliography, 1981; personal and business correspondence, undated and 1938-1993 including the Albany Institute of History and Art, Atlanta University, Carnegie Institute, "Ebony", David Porter of the G Place Gallery, Institute of Modern Art, Alain Locke, Gloria May, Museum of Modern Art, Frederick G. Rice, Hale Woodruff and others; files on the New York City Board of Education, 1959-1965, regarding his teaching art; and project files, including Wilson's submission for the competion for a Frederick Douglass statue, "Eternal Presence," "Father and Child Reading," and Wilson's monuments and bust of Martin Luther King, Jr..
Also found are files on exhibitions; notebooks, 1958-1960; lesson plans, 1959, 1963; notes, writings, and lectures, ca. 1945-1993; transcripts of interviews of Wilson and related correspondence, 1978-1987; legal material, 1978; a notebook of sales and expenses, 1945-1950 and other financial records, 1944-1991; photographs, 1940-1990, of Wilson, his work, sculpture, and exhibition installations, 1944-1984; a scrapbook, 1939-1967; art work, including sketchbooks, 1970-1992, life studies done as a student, 1939-1947, and miscellaneous art work, 1939-1992; and printed material, 1939-1993, including exhibition catalogs, illustrated books and book jackets, and ephemera. Received with collection is a sound recording of an interview of Wilson conducted by Alan Trachtenberg, ca. 1979 (untranscribed).
Biographical / Historical:
African American painter, sculptor, illustrator, printmaker, educator; Boston, Mass. Full name John Woodrow Wilson. Studied with Ture Bengtz and Karl Zerbe at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and with Fernand Leger at his school in Paris, 1949; won competitions to execute statues of Martin Luther King, Jr. for the city of Buffalo, N.Y., 1982 and for the U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C., 1985. Taught art for the New York City schools, at Boston University, 1985-1986; Professor Emeritus, 1986-
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1993 by John W. Wilson, except for the 1979 sound recording which he lent for copying.
Restrictions:
Microfilm portion must be consulted on microfilm. Use of untranscribed interview requires an appointment.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Sculptors -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
African American artists -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
African American artists as teachers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.wilsjohn
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wilsjohn

Student Oratorical Contest on Frederick Douglass and Award Presentation

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
4 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Speeches
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1975
Scope and Contents:
Through their speeches for Black History Week in 1975, African American students from schools across Washington, D.C. interpret what they think Frederick Douglass said in his speeches. Oratorical contest and award presentation took place at the Ft. Dupont Activity Center in southeast Washington, D.C.
Speeches. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. AV000796: 19750214. AV000815 and AV003578: undated. AV000836: tape 1, dated 19750214. AV003578: award presentation until 001725 (followed by African Welcoming of Nana Oparebea to the United States).
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000815

ACMA AV003578

ACMA AV000836
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American students  Search this
Students  Search this
Blacks -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Speeches
Citation:
Student Oratorical Contest on Frederick Douglass and Award Presentation, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV000796
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref538

To Achieve These Rights Exhibition Display 2: Frederick Douglass narration

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 sound recordings (cartridge, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1992
Scope and Contents:
Narration that weaves together excerpts from a speech by Frederick Douglass from April 1883 on the anniversary of Emancipation in Washington, D.C. Douglass speaks about Emancipation, status and future of the negro, and prejudice despite freedom. He also states that negroes should be American citizens to the fullest extent, including the right to a fair trial, vote, serve on a jury, and attend public schools.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003340
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slave trade  Search this
Antislavery movements  Search this
Slavery -- Law and legislation  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
Activists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Collection Citation:
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-033, Item ACMA AV003339
See more items in:
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records / Series 2: AudioVisual Materials
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-033-ref506

To Achieve These Rights Exhibition Display 4: Clip of Mary Church Terrell on Americans All radio program

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Whitehead, Henry P., 1917-2002  Search this
Institute on Race Relations (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Todd, Tomlinson  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 sound recordings (cartridge, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1992
Scope and Contents:
A clip from "Americans All" radio program broadcasted on February 12, 1950 in celebration of Frederick Douglass' birthday. Tomlinson Todd, leader of Institute on Race Relations, interviewed Mary Church Terrell, civil rights activist and friend of Douglass. Terrell spoke of her friendship with Douglass - how they met and visiting World's Fair in Chicago with Douglass. She proposed February 14 as Frederick Douglass day. Narration and radio program provides brief description of Todd, Terrell, Institute on Race Relations, and "Americans All."
Narration and radio broadcast clip for one of four displays used in exhibition: To Achieve These Rights: The Struggle for Equality and Self-Determination in the District of Columbia, 1791-1978. Part of To Achieve These Rights: The Struggle for Equality and Self-Determination in the District of Columbia, 1791-1978 Audiovisual Records. Dated 19920101.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003342
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
Activists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Collection Citation:
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-033, Item ACMA AV003341
See more items in:
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records / Series 2: AudioVisual Materials
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-033-ref508

Warren M. Robbins Papers, 1945-2015

Creator:
Robbins, Warren M  Search this
Uniform title:
Man for All Reasons: Letters of a Visionary (Monograph : 2014)  Search this
Subject:
Robbins, Warren M  Search this
Douglass, Frederick 1817?-1895  Search this
Robbins Center for Cross Cultural Communication  Search this
Center for Cross Cultural Communication  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Museum of African Art (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of African Art (U.S.)  Search this
United States Foreign Service  Search this
Physical description:
1.69 cu. ft. (1 record storage box) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Books
Brochures
Clippings
Picture postcards
Scrapbooks
Serials (publications)
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Art objects
Date:
1945
1945-2015
Topic:
Museums--Management  Search this
Museum directors  Search this
Museums--Educational aspects  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Art, African  Search this
Cultural relations  Search this
Communication  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 20-144
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_400123

Broadcast about Frederick Douglass

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
Mention of Frederick Douglass as "father of Civil Rights." A man talks about his experience teaching and states "there are no labels, that's what I've been talking about in schools . . . I'm tired of the people who did go to these children, who have destroyed their minds, who have said they love them, who have charged them to tell them how to hate."
Clip of broadcast recording. Part of Broadcast Programs. Broadcast from 002022-002122 [also on recording: Benjamin Banneker Park Dedication]. Dated 19711124.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
Education  Search this
Students  Search this
Children  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Broadcast about Frederick Douglass, Record Group 09-037, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-037, Item ACMA AV002690
See more items in:
Broadcast Programs
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-037-ref27

Frederick Douglass Home

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home  Search this
United States.. Army. Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, 54th (1863-1865)  Search this
Brown, John, 1800-1859  Search this
Bruce, Blanche Kelso, 1841-1898  Search this
Cardozo, Francis Lewis, 1837-1903  Search this
Douglass, Anna Murray, -1882  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Douglass, Helen, 1838-1903  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897  Search this
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865  Search this
Sewall, May Wright, 1844-1920  Search this
Twain, Mark, 1835-1910  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (cartridge, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865
Talbot County (Md.)
New Bedford (Mass.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Rochester (N.Y.)
United States
England
Date:
1973
Scope and Contents:
Narrator provides an overview of abolitionist Frederick Douglass' life, work, and spirit from his birth as a slave in Talbot County, Maryland to his death in Washington, D.C. Douglass' experiences with racial prejudice and segregation as well as his involvement in the Underground Railroad and civil rights movements, including women's rights, are explored. Douglass lived in New Bedford (Mass.), Rochester (N.Y.), the neighborhood of Anacostia in Washington, D.C., and England, where he fled for two years after writing "The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" in 1845. Douglass and his son Frederick Jr. recruited black men for the Civil War while his sons Lewis and Charles joined the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. While championing many reform causes, Douglass worked alongside William Lloyd Garrison, John Brown, Blanche Kelso Bruce, John Mercer Langston, Francis Cardozo, and May Wright Sewall.
Narration. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. AV002692-1 and AV002692-2: same content. AV002692-1: sound beeps throughout recording. Dated 19731201.
Biographical / Historical:
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home was built between 1855 and 1859 for John Welsh Van Hook, an architect from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Uniontown (also known as Anacostia). In 1877, Frederick Douglass purchased the home and 9 3/4 acres of land, which he named Cedar Hill. Over several years, Douglass purchased additional land and converted the home into a 21 room mansion. In 1900, Douglass' second wife, Helen Pitts Douglass, urged U.S. Congress to charter the Frederick Douglass Memorial and Historical Association, which received the property in 1903 upon Helen's death. On September 5, 1962, the Frederick Douglass estate became a part of the National Park Service. Groundbreaking ceremonies for a visitor center were held in September 1980. The visitor center opened to the public in February 1982. Douglass' home and estate became a National Historic Site in 1988 and underwent several restorations between 1922 and 2007.;Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was born into slavery on Maryland's Eastern Shore but fled north in 1838 to settle in Massachussetts. He soon became an abolitionist in the antislavery movement, and by the mid-1840s his commanding eloquence in offering firsthand testimony to the oppressions of slavery had transformed him into one of the movement's most persuasive spokesmen. Douglass' reforming zeal remained strong all his life. After the Civil War put an end to slavery, he continued to be a leading defender of the rights of African Americans during Reconstruction.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002692-2
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
Antislavery movements  Search this
Civil rights movements  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Underground Railroad  Search this
Racism  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Slaves -- Emancipation  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Historic sites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Collection Citation:
Anacostia Community Museum Programs and Projects, 1967-1989, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV002692-1
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref514

The Ballad of the Black Dragon Rehearsal

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Drama
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents:
Dramatic performance of The Ballad of the Black Dragon, a play based on the life and work of Frederick Douglass. Includes excerpts of speeches delivered by Douglass. Recording does not contain entire play.
Performance. Poor sound quality. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Undated.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Slaves -- Emancipation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Drama
Citation:
The Ballad of the Black Dragon Rehearsal, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV003500-2
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref648

Curatorial Records

Topic:
On stage: 200 years of great theatrical personalities (Monograph)
Creator::
National Portrait Gallery. Department of Painting and Sculpture  Search this
Extent:
2.5 cu. ft. (2 record storage boxes) (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Books
Brochures
Clippings
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1966-1995
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records that were transferred from the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the National Portrait Gallery (NPG). They were mostly created by Robert G. Stewart, Associate Curator, 1964, Curator, 1965, Curator of Painting and Sculpture, 1979-1994, and Senior Curator of Painting and Sculpture, 1994. A small volume of records was also created by Monroe Fabian, Assistant Curator, 1969-1971, Associate Curator, 1972-1978, and Associate Curator of Painting and Sculpture, 1979-1986. Fabian died in July 1988.

The records consist mostly of files created by Stewart, Fabian, and others for exhibits that were proposed by museum staff for internal development, or external traveling exhibits that were considered for mounting at NPG. The files include staff evaluations and comments on proposed exhibits, exhibit scripts, documentation of brochure and catalog development, and memoranda between NPG staff as well as correspondence with potential exhibit donors. Some files also document NPG contributions to special traveling exhibits, and staff participation in symposia and seminars.

The records include a small amount of administrative material, plus correspondence files of secretarial staff which consist mostly of replies to public inquiries. The records also include documentation of the book On Stage written by Monroe Fabian, and published in the spring of 1980. These files consist of correspondence regarding the use of quotations and images for On Stage, photographs, a manuscript, and an unbound copy of the published volume.
Topic:
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895 -- Exhibitions  Search this
War correspondents  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
World's Columbian Exposition (1893: Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Art museum curators  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Congresses and conventions  Search this
Museums -- Public relations  Search this
Traveling exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Brochures
Clippings
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 97-046, National Portrait Gallery. Department of Painting and Sculpture, Curatorial Records
Identifier:
Accession 97-046
See more items in:
Curatorial Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa97-046

A.I.O. of Moses at home of / Frederick Douglass Sept 16 '31 [panoramic acetate film photonegative,]

Photographer:
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Names:
A.I.O of Moses  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Container:
Box 13, Folder 9
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Banquet camera photographs
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- 1930-1940 -- Photographs
Date:
1931 September 16
Scope and Contents:
Scan Number: 618ns0177565pg.tif
Mixed group of men and women, posed in three rows in front of columns of Douglass's house. Ink on negative : "A.I.O. of Moses at Home of Fredrick Douglass, / Sept. 16 '31 / Scurlock / Photo". No manufacturer's mark on film edge.
General:
From original negative Box 5692016M.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Series 8: Business Records, Subseries 8.1: Studio Session Registers are restricted. Digital copies available for research. See repository for details.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Architecture, Domestic  Search this
Organizations -- 1930-1940  Search this
Portraits, Group -- 1930-1940 -- Washington (D.C.).  Search this
Portraits, Group -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Banquet camera photographs -- 1930-1940
Photographs -- 1930-1940 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.12: Banquet Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.12: Banquet Negatives / 4.12: Banquet Negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-12-ref566

Condition and Treatment Records

Creator::
National Portrait Gallery. Conservation Laboratory  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1980-1999
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records that document the assessment of condition and proposed treatment for objects slated for exhibition. Objects represented in the collection come from within the National Portrait Galley (NPG) collection and outside loans.

Materials include condition and treatment reports, memoranda, checklists, photographs, notes and related materials.
Topic:
Museums -- Collection management  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Art museums  Search this
Museum loans  Search this
Conservation and restoration  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895 -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 01-086, National Portrait Gallery. Conservation Laboratory, Condition and Treatment Records
Identifier:
Accession 01-086
See more items in:
Condition and Treatment Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa01-086

Half-Portrait of Fred[e]rick Douglass [copy] [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Container:
Box 72
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Portraits
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
No ink on negative. A copy negative of a half-portrait of Frederick Douglas. Portrait appears to be in an oval matte. "KODAK-SAFETY 74" edge imprint.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Genre/Form:
Portraits -- African American men
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives / 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-01-ref2320
Online Media:

Original Frederick Douglas [Douglass] House in Anacostia [black-and-white photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Container:
Box 77
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Scope and Contents:
No ink on negative. Frederick Douglass house in Anacostia. Ink on sleeve: "Copyright: Scurlock Studio. Original Negative Valuation/ {dollar}2,500." "Agfa Safety Film" edge imprint. Unnumbered.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Dwellings -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Houses  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives / 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-01-ref2618
Online Media:

Dr. Anna Cooper in parlor of 201 T Street, N.W., then the Registrar's Office of Frelinghuysen University [from group of negatives entitled "Dr. Anna J. Cooper in her garden, home & patio" : photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Names:
Frelinghuysen University (Washington, D.C.).  Search this
Cooper, Anna J., Dr., 1858-1964  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Container:
Box 27
Type:
Archival materials
Retouching
Photographs
Date:
[ca. 1930]
Scope and Contents:
Job Number: 26806
In this image, Dr. Cooper stands near a desk with a phone and what appears to be a bust of Frederick Douglass. No accompanying contact print.
General:
From negative Box A. No edge marking on film edge. "26806 Dr. Anna J. Cooper / 2 8 x 10" in ink on film edge.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American women  Search this
Portraits -- African American women  Search this
Education -- Washington, (D.C.)  Search this
Le Droit Park, Washington, D.C.  Search this
Genre/Form:
Retouching -- Pencil
Photographs -- 1930-1940 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives / 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-01-ref523

19th century African-American Literature Collection

Names:
African Methodist Episcopal Church  Search this
First African Baptist Church (Savannah, Ga.)  Search this
Knights of Pythias  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Extent:
3.4 Linear feet ((30 books))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Books
Date:
circa 1800 - circa 1898
Summary:
This collection, which dates from the 19th century, contains 30 books written by or concerning African-Americans. The books are largely non-fiction and include material relating to African-American churches and evangelists, fraternal organizations, prominent members of the African-American Community, former slaves, education and self-improvement. Also present are several volumes of poetry, a tax ledger and a volume concerning patents.
Formatted Contents note:
Life and times of Frederick Douglass, written by himself -- Duplicate copy of the souvenir from the Afro-American league of Tennessee to Hon. James M. Ashley of Ohio... -- Myrtilla Miner, a memoir -- A narrative of the life and travels of Mrs. Nancy Prince -- A list of patents granted by the United States from April 10, 1790... -- Comly's spelling and reading book -- Poems written during the progress of the abolition question in the United States... -- The Black phalanx -- Progress of a race; or, the remarkable advancement of the Afro-American Negro from the bondage of slavery... -- Africa and America; addresses and discourses -- A discourse, delivered on the death of Capt. Paul Cuffe -- An apology for African Methodism -- History of the Knights of Pythias -- The college of life; or, practical self-educator, a manual of self-improvement for the colored race... -- The Rev. J.W. Loguen, as a slave and as a freeman -- Behind the scenes -- The story of Archer Alexander from slavery to freedom, March 30, 1863 -- From slave cabin to pulpit: the autobiography of Rev. Peter Randolph -- Uncle Tom's story of his life from 1789-1877 -- Poems on various subjects, religious and moral -- Men of mark: eminent, progressive and rising -- [Tax ledger] -- A memorial discourse by Rev. Henry Highland Grant -- My recollections of African M.E. Ministers -- William Lloyd Garrison: the abolitionist -- Annals of the First African church in the United States of America... -- How to get and keep churches out of debt... -- Code and the discipline of the African Methodist Episcopalian Zion Church -- History of the First African Baptist Church -- An autobiography: the story of the Lord's dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith, the colored evangelist.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Social conditions  Search this
African American religious leaders  Search this
Slavery -- United States  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
Slaves  Search this
American poetry -- African American authors  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Citation:
19th century African-American literature collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-107
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-107

Collection of Frederick Douglass' Monthly's, booklets, and other materials

Names:
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Extent:
1.63 Linear feet ((2 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Visiting cards
Speeches
Newspapers
Booklets
Photographs
Pamphlets
Date:
circa 1859 - 1894
Summary:
This collection, which dates from circa 1859-1894, contains materials relating to abolitionist Frederick Douglass. It includes several of his speeches reproduced in booklets and pamphlets, a visiting card, a portrait bearing his autograph, and 28 issues of Douglass'Monthly, which ran from 1858 to 1863.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 3 series. Series 1:Douglass' Monthly newspaper 2:Booklets 3: Other Materials.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was born into slavery on Maryland's Eastern Shore but fled north in 1838 to settle in Massachussetts. He soon joined the antislavery movement, and by the mid-1840s his commanding eloquence in offering firsthand testimony to the oppressions of slavery had transformed him into one of the movement's most persuasive spokesmen. Douglass' reforming zeal remained strong all his life. After the Civil War put an end to slavery, he continued to be a leading defender of the rights of African Americans during Reconstruction.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Antislavery movements -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Visiting cards
Speeches
Newspapers
Booklets
Photographs
Pamphlets
Newspapers -- 19th century
Citation:
Collection of Frederick Douglass materials, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-112
See more items in:
Collection of Frederick Douglass' Monthly's, booklets, and other materials
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-112
Online Media:

19th Century Pamphlet Collection

Names:
United States. Army -- Civil War, 1861-1865  Search this
United States. Army -- Recruiting, enlistment, etc.  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Linear feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Proceedings
Speeches
Pamphlets
Booklets
Reports
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- Politics and government
Date:
1838 - 1898
Summary:
This collection, which dates from 1838-1898, contains nine pamphlets and one booklet. The materials cover various subjects relating to African-Americans, including civil rights, education, the Civil War draft and services for freedmen. Several of the pamphlets contain speeches by Frederick Douglass.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Draft -- United States  Search this
Civil rights -- United States  Search this
School integration  Search this
African Americans -- Social conditions  Search this
Segregation in education  Search this
Genre/Form:
Proceedings
Speeches
Pamphlets
Booklets
Reports
Citation:
19th century pamphlet collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-119
See more items in:
19th Century Pamphlet Collection
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-119
Online Media:

Collection on Frederick Douglass materials

Names:
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Extent:
1.27 Linear feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Clippings
Cartes-de-visite
Portraits
Books
Photographic prints
Lithographs
Albumen prints
Date:
circa 1850 - 1871
Summary:
This collection, which dates from circa 1850-1971, contains materials relating to abolitionist Frederick Douglass. It includes 3 books (Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, LIfe and Times of Frederick Douglass, and My Bondage and My Freedom), a carte-de-visite, various portraits of Douglass, including an etching and lithograph, clippings from Harper's Weekly and the Evening Star, and photographs of Douglass in various settings, including one of Douglass in Key West with members of the Santo Domingo mission.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Douglass (1818--895) was born into slavery on Maryland's Eastern Shore but fled north in 1838 to settle in Massachussetts. He soon joined the antislavery movement, and by the mid-1840s his commanding eloquence in offering firsthand testimony to the oppressions of slavery had transformed him into one of the movement's most persuasive spokesmen. Douglass' reforming zeal remained strong all his life. After the Civil War put an end to slavery, he continued to be a leading defender of the rights of African Americans during Reconstruction. In 1871, President Grant appointed Douglass secretary to a diplomatic mission charged with investigating the desirability of annexing the Caribbean nation of Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic) as a United States territory.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Cartes-de-visite
Portraits
Books
Photographic prints
Lithographs
Albumen prints
Citation:
Collection on Frederick Douglass, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-046
See more items in:
Collection on Frederick Douglass materials
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-046
Online Media:

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