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Persons with Disabilities in Aviation and Space Science

Collection Creator:
National Air and Space Museum. Archives Division.  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
The majority of the Archives Department's public reference requests can be answered using material in these files, which may be accessed through the Reading Room at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. More specific information can be requested by contacting the Archives Research Request.
See more items in:
National Air & Space Museum Technical Reference Files: Biographies
National Air & Space Museum Technical Reference Files: Biographies / Series C2: Biographies: Groups
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2e373dedc-d33e-4f9d-8617-e61d3c8628e5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-1183-c-ref76462

Persons with Disabilities in Aviation and Space Science

Collection Creator:
National Air and Space Museum. Archives Division.  Search this
Container:
Drawer C2, Folder 070000-01
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Documents
Collection Restrictions:
The majority of the Archives Department's public reference requests can be answered using material in these files, which may be accessed through the Reading Room at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. More specific information can be requested by contacting the Archives Research Request.
See more items in:
National Air & Space Museum Technical Reference Files: Biographies
National Air & Space Museum Technical Reference Files: Biographies / Series C2: Biographies: Groups / Persons with Disabilities in Aviation and Space Science
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg25a328dd5-f3f7-47ec-87df-41878ba9149e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-1183-c-ref76463

ANTA Theatre, "Othello"

Collection Collector:
Whitehead, Henry P. (Prenton), 1917-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 59, Folder 14
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1965
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
The Henry P. Whitehead collection is the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Collection Citation:
Henry P. Whitehead collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Michael A. Watkins.
See more items in:
Henry P. Whitehead collection
Henry P. Whitehead collection / Series 1: Henry P. Whitehead Papers / 1.5: Printed Material / Programs, Theater
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa75b2f9008-dc24-4726-b0ea-f80dd8ea0af7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-042-ref575
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View ANTA Theatre,

Lake Geneva -- House in the Woods

Former owner:
Bartlett, Adolphus Clay  Search this
Bartlett, Adolphus Clay, Mrs.  Search this
Spencer, William Marvin, Colonel, Mr.  Search this
Spencer, William Marvin, Colonel, Mrs.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Olmsted, John Charles, 1852-1920  Search this
Mariani Landscape  Search this
Architect:
Shaw, Howard Van Doren  Search this
Provenance:
Lake Geneva Garden Club  Search this
Arborist:
Bartlett Tree Experts  Search this
Creator:
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Place:
House in the Woods (Lake Geneva, Wisconsin)
United States of America -- Wisconsin -- Walworth -- Lake Geneva
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and articles about the house.
General:
Beauty without boundaries is the guiding principle for the more than 50 acre vacation estate. Since it was identified as one of the most beautiful country houses by Ladies Home Journal in 1912 and had gardens landscaped by John Charles Olmsted in 1905, the owners chose to restore rather than renovate when they purchased the property in 1971. The wooded shore of Lake Geneva with rockwork retaining walls transitions into an ornamentally landscaped estate. Drifts of hydrangea, hosta and buckeye at the gated entrance are succeeded by the original concrete driveway through woodland gardens with sugar maple, red oak, white oak, linden, boxwood, ground covers and perennial flowers that include daylilies, bleeding heart, phlox, and rugose roses. The formal drive circle at the house has a fountain in the center and a perimeter of flowering shrubs and variegated ivy topiaries. A grass terrace facing the lake features a rustic planted stone staircase. White roses and hydrangea are accented by a bell placed on an old tree stump. The children's garden has containers of vegetables, fruits, flowers and herbs with rustic wattle arches and furniture.
An enclosed courtyard for the swimming pool between the main house and guest house has clipped yew hedges, ground covers and perennials, trumpet, clematis and wisteria vines, and potted citrus trees. Near stands of mature trees planted more than 100 years ago there is a grotto, a mound of soil and stones topped by a statue with a stone bench nearby. One lawn is kept sculpted into a labyrinth. There is a mineral spring on the property, which is said to be restorative, that flows into a fieldstone basin surrounded by a planted rockwork wall. The other formal gardens include a rose garden planted in parterres and enclosed by espaliered apple trees and an organic potager with vegetable, herb and cutting flower beds laid out geometrically on either side of a wide path of stabilized degenerate granite with more espaliered fruit trees on the surrounding wire fence and covering a pergola.
Renovations were required for a disabled family member, including widened and level walkways with very gradual inclines, smooth stone patios and terraces with narrow joints, benches placed where there are good views of the lake, access to the house and swimming pool, and an elevator to the second floor inside the house. Trees in the woodland gardens were replaced as needed and tagged for future reference.
Persons associated with the garden include: Mr. and Mrs. Adolphus Clay Bartlett (former owners, 1905-1930); Colonel and Mrs. William Marvin Spencer (former owners, 1930-1971); John Charles Olmsted (landscape architect, 1905); Howard Van Doren Shaw (architect, 1905); Bartlett Tree Experts (arborists, 2011); Mariani Landscape (landscape architect, 1980- ).
The property was featured in "Ladies Home Journal" in 1909 when it was selected as one of the the twelve most beautiful homes in America.
Related Materials:
House in the Woods related holdings consist of 1 folder (3 35mm slides (photographs); and 21 digital images)
Records related to this site can be found at the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, Olmsted Job Number 03038, A. C. Bartlett.
See others in:
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection, circa 1900s-1970s, bulk 1920-1940s.

Eleanor Weller collection, circa 1978-2006.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Wisconsin -- Lake Geneva  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WI027
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Wisconsin
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb65ecad488-b154-45ec-85d7-31c2ef917cc4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11667

[Flaherty]: a mosaic tile rounded from a Jordanian workshop for the disabled echos the pruned shape of a Japanese maple.

Photographer:
Lapham, Emilie S.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Digital image (JPEG file, color.)
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Place:
Flaherty (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia -- Philadelphia
Date:
2015 Apr.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Houses  Search this
Japanese maple  Search this
Mosaics  Search this
Flowering trees  Search this
Vines  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item PA824016
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania / PA824: Philadelphia -- Flaherty
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6eb6bf50f-cf95-4599-88e3-d9e5d952fe43
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref17169

Morris -- George Griswold Frelinghuysen Arboretum

Former owner:
Frelinghuysen, George Griswold  Search this
Frelinghuysen, Matilda E.  Search this
Owner:
Morris County Park Commission  Search this
Landscape architect:
Sauer, Leslie  Search this
French and Perillo  Search this
Zion & Breen Associates  Search this
Architect:
Parker Group  Search this
Schemata Architectural  Search this
Pellet, Glen W.  Search this
Rotch and Tilden  Search this
Creator:
Whippany Farm  Search this
Master planners:
Andropogon Associates  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
George Griswold Frelinghuysen Arboretum, (Morris Township, N.J.)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Morris County -- Morris
Scope and Contents:
George Griswold Frelinghuysen Arboretum holdings consist of 1 folder including plans, information sheet, garden description and slide descriptions and (10) 35 mm. slides)The folder .
General:
"Whippany Farm was owned by George Griswold Frelinghuysen and his descendants from 1891 until the Morris County Parks Commission acquired the property in 1969. Today, the Arboretum includes 127 acres of park and gardens, and constitutes a wonderful example of adaptive re-use of a historic property."
"By the early 1990's, the increasing number of visitors resulted in the need for additional parking facilities, enhanced drainage systems, improved lighting and safety provisions, revised layout of roads and trails, ADA (Americans with Disablities Act) compliance and improved signage."
"Sixteen garden or display areas have been defined, each with a distinctive theme and treatment. As of April, 1997, the conceptual plan existed for the major areas, and detailed planting plans and actual implementation have commenced. The Arboretum's target is to implement the entire plan by 1999."
Persons associated with the property include: George Griswold Frelinghuysen (former owner from 1891 to 1936); Matilda E. Frelinhuysen (former owner from 1936 to 1969); Morris County Parks Commission (owner from 1969 to present); Rotch & Tilden (architects for house in 1891); Andropogon Associates (master planning in 1981); Zion & Breen (landscape architects in 1982); Leslie Sauer (landscape architect for entrance in 1982); Parker Group (architect for Haggerty Education Center in 1987); French & Perillo (landscape architects, engineers for Expanded Visitor Service area); Schemata Architectural (designers for Observation Deck; Glen W. Pellet (from Schemata Architectural Designers).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Morris Township  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ121
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d82df6c9-8fe6-471f-a283-1b6653fa4a2c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20151

Members minutes, taken by Acting Secretary, H.E. Burke

Collection Creator:
Bladensburg Union Burial Association  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 11
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
5 February 1923-4 April 1938
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Bladensburg Union Burial Association records are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Collection Citation:
Bladensburg Union Burial Association records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Reverend L. Jerome Fowler.
See more items in:
Bladensburg Union Burial Association records
Bladensburg Union Burial Association records / Series 1: Administration
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7911844ad-1059-48e0-99a5-2fa82d7974fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-025-ref22
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Members minutes, taken by Acting Secretary, H.E. Burke digital asset number 1

MS 2372 Garrick Mallery Collection on Sign Language and Pictography

Creator:
Mallery, Garrick, 1831-1894  Search this
Extent:
41.29 Linear feet (22 boxes, 29 folders, 3 mounted drawings, and 3 rolled items)
Note:
Some materials, especially in series 3, are stored in the NAA artwork collection.
Culture:
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pictographs
Place:
Oceania
Date:
1849-1902
bulk 1870-1895
Summary:
Garrick Mallery (1831-1894) was an ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology who focused primarily on Native American sign language and pictography. This collection reflects Mallery's research interests and methods. Much of the collection is comprised of correspondence and notes relating to sign language and pictography and is organized chiefly by either the cultural or geographic region to which the material belongs. Bound volumes of several of his publications are included, along with annotated draft copies from collaborators. In the case of Mallery's work on pictography, the collection includes several oversize items including original works and reproductions.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains Garrick Mallery's research and writings as a BAE ethnologist and is largely comprised of correspondence and preparatory materials for publications on Native American sign language and pictography. The geographic scope of the material is chiefly the present-day United States and Canada, though other areas of the world are represented less comprehensively. Correspondence and research notes include verbal descriptions of signs, sometimes with illustrations included. Bound volumes of Mallery's publications are included, along with annotations from collaborators. In addition, this collection includes notecards, drawings, illustrations, photographs, articles, and art objects. Art objects (mostly oversize) deal chiefly with Dakota winter counts and other artifacts.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into 3 series: 1) Research Notes, undated; 2) Materials on Sign Language, 1843-1849, 1873-1894; 3) Materials on Pictographs and Petroglyphs, 1849-1902, undated
Biographical Note:
Garrick Mallery (1831-1894) was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania and practiced law in Philadelphia from 1853 until the outbreak of the American Civil War. While serving in the army, he became interested in Native American sign language and pictography, perhaps while performing his duties in frontier areas. After retiring from the military in 1879, Mallery was appointed to the newly created Bureau of American Ethnology as one of its first ethnologists. In his work with the Bureau, Mallery pioneered the study of sign language and pictographs, examining them as a universal human phenomenon with a direct link to spoken language.

In his work, Mallery collected and examined sign language vocabulary from Native American groups throughout the U.S. and Canada and regularly solicited contributions from collaborators. He also related his findings to examples from the wider world, comparing the formation of Native American signs to those in other areas by hearing individuals and by the deaf. Mallery completed several publications on the topic throughout the 1880s, notably Introduction to the Study of Sign language Among the North American Indians (1880), A Collection of Gesture- Signs and Signals of the North American Indians (1880), and "Sign-language among North American Indians Compared with that Among other People and Deaf-mutes," which appeared in the BAE 1st Annual Report (1881).

While most widely known for his work with sign language, Mallery also undertook extensive research into Native American pictography. Like his work with sign language, he both conducted original research and solicited assistance from collaborators. He was especially interested in the representational images in Dakota winter counts and petroglyphs in the United States and throughout the world.

Sources Consulted

Fletcher, Robert. "Garrick Mallery, President of the Philosophical Society of Washington, in 1888." In Brief Memoirs of Colonel Garrick Mallery, U.S.A., Who Died October 24, 1894, 3-8. Washington: Judd & Detweiler, 1895.

Fletcher, Robert. "Colonel Garrick Mallery, U.S.A." American Anthropologist 8, no. 2 (1895): 79-80.

Chronology

1831 -- Born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, on April 25

1850 -- Graduates Yale College

1853 -- Earns LL. B. from the University of Pennsylvania Admitted to the Pennsylvania bar

1853-1861 -- Practices law in Philadelphia

1861 -- Enters the volunteer army of the United States

1862 -- Severely wounded in the battle of Peach Orchard, Virginia Captured and held prisoner at Libby prison in Richmond, Virginia

1866 -- Completes service with volunteer army of the United States Accepts commission in regular army of the United States

1870 -- Marries Helen W. Wyckoff

1879 -- Retires from the United States army due to disability Appointed to the Bureau of American Ethnology

1880 -- Publishes Introduction to the Study of Sign-Language Among the North American Indians as Illustrating the Gesture-Speech of Mankind and A Collection of Gesture-Signs and Signals of the North American Indians With Some Comparisons

1881 -- Publishes "Sign Language Among North American Indians, Compared with that Among Other Peoples and Deaf-Mutes"

1894 -- Dies after a short illness in Washington, D.C., on October 24
Related Materials:
See MS 2322 A collection of gesture-signs and signals of the North American Indians for more of Garrick Mallery's work on sign language.
Provenance:
MS 2372 was transferred from the Bureau of Ethnology Archives to the Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives with the merger of the BAE and the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History in 1965. The Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives was renamed the National Anthropological Archives in 1968.
Restrictions:
Manuscript 2372 is open for research.

Access to Manuscript 2372 requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Sign language  Search this
Picture-writing  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Pictographs
Citation:
Manuscript 2372, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2372
See more items in:
MS 2372 Garrick Mallery Collection on Sign Language and Pictography
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw367638eb8-dce6-4d4e-bea5-2204e49134ef
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2372
Online Media:

Insurance - Folkways - 01

Collection Creator:
Asch, Moses  Search this
Distler, Marian, 1919-1964  Search this
Folkways Records  Search this
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1973, 1975-1977
Scope and Contents note:
File consists mainly of insurance documents and disability forms.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at rinzlerarchives@si.edu or (202) 633-7322 for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection
Moses and Frances Asch Collection / Series 3: Business Records / Tax and Insurance Materials
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5710d405a-336b-479e-a982-42afa0b996d1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-asch-ref13934

African elephants in Kenya's dense Bush

Creator:
Neesgaard, Ole, photographer  Search this
Plurigraf (Italy)  Search this
Extent:
1 Postcard (halftone., col., 14.5 x 21 cm.)
Container:
Volume 1
Type:
Archival materials
Postcards
Postcards
Picture postcards
Place:
Africa
Kenya
Date:
circa 1988
Scope and Contents:
Printed caption on verso reads: "African elephants in Kenya's dense Bush."
Additional printed text on verso reads: "Photo: Ole Neesgaard, Wildlife Photographer. / Plurigraf - Narni - Terni / Important Notice: When buying this postcard, YOU are supporting the disabled of Kenya."
Postmarked postage stamp, manuscript message, and address on verso.
Local Numbers:
EEPA KE-02-02
General:
Title source: Postcard caption.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Elephants  Search this
Genre/Form:
Picture postcards
Collection Citation:
African Postcard collection, EEPA 1985-014, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.1985-014, Item EEPA KE 1997-010-0001
See more items in:
African Postcard Collection
African Postcard Collection / Series 23: Kenya (KE)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo769b6ba39-7059-441a-8386-3f32d4086249
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1985-014-ref5262

Bristow McIntosh [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Georgia
United States
Date:
circa 1931-1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and of her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Bristow McIntosh appears in the 1870 census as a 14-year old working as a farm laborer and living in the household of Martha Woodruff. According to the interview he gave to Dr. Turner in 1933, beginning in 1866, he had attended school for a few months each year and had been able to learn how to read and write.

By 1880 Bristow McIntosh was married to Nancy King Mctinosh (also known as Annie and Nannie), and they had two children and owned 20 acres of land valued at fifty dollars. The previous year his farm had produced corn, peas, and beans. Bristow also owned milk cows and chickens. The value of his production in 1879 had been $100.

During his life, Bristow worked his land, which was valued at $200 in 1930. He also, at some point, ran a store and kept a mail route. By 1930 he was already in his seventies but still working as a family servant.

Bristow and Nancy would have eleven children, and only three survived childhood. Nancy passed away in 1922 after a long illness, and two of her surviving children followed her within a few years. Leonard passed away in 1926 and James in 1928.

Bristow McIntosh was one of Dr. Turner's principal informants when he came to Harris Neck in 1933. He passed away four years later, on November 25, 1937. Thus, Bristow McIntosh was not alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Bristow (also Brister or Bristol); Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.310
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa750b90d0f-507b-42c6-8d17-5f76dc14a942
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1390

Lizzie Grant [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Georgia
United States
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Lizzie McIntosh married Sandy Grant on January 21, 1902. They had at least one son named Harry and later in life raised several nephews and nieces.

Sandy Grant owned his farm at Harris Neck, which was worth $200.00 in 1930. Both Sandy and Lizzie had been able to attend two years of school when they were children.

We have no information about Lizzie's passing. Sandy died in 1961 in his 80s. Thus he was alive and most likely witnessed when Harris Neck was destroyed to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.314
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa79fee1832-dcde-4aed-b39e-3df8d6ac9208
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1393

John (Johnnie) Campbell [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Georgia
United States
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
John Campbell was born about 1877, the son of Isaac Campbell and Rose Bacon Campbell. On December 27, 1900, John married Georgia Stevens.

The couple had at least five children but by 1910 had lost one of them. The surviving children were Ophelia, James, Agnes, and Johnnie. John was working as a boatman for the oyster industry. Georgia worked as a cook for a private family. They owned their house. After appearing in the 1910 population census, both John and Georgia disappear from the record. However, we know that Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed John Campbell at Harris Neck in the summer of 1933.

It is possible that both John and Georgia Campbell were living when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933 Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.319
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7751b039b-58b7-4afd-8ccb-ec0fd1f9bcf3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1397

James (Napoleon) Rogers and Adeline (Annie) Rogers [Gullah informants]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Georgia
United States
United States of America -- Georgia -- Harris Neck
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
James (Napoleon) Rogers was born in Liberty County, Georgia, around 1859. He was never able to attend school, and thus when Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed him in the Summer of 1933 in Harris Neck, Georgia, he informed him that he could neither read nor write. Dr. Turner considered him one of his principal informants in Harris Neck.

By 1880 Rogers had moved to Harris Neck and was working as a laborer living in the household of John J. Curry. On September 30, 1905, Rogers married Adeline (also spelled as Adline) Houston. Adeline was much younger than Rogers. She was 30, being born at Ways Station, Bryan County, on March 15, 1875. Rogers was at least 46 years old. They had two children Anna Lee (also spelled as Analee and Analie) and James.

James Rogers owned his farm, which was worth $500.00 in 1930. He informed Dr. Turner that he had always been a farmer, but around 1910 he was working as a carpenter. Adeline Rogers mainly took care of the family, but around 1910 she was working as a seamstress.

James Rogers passed away between 1933 when he was interviewed by Dr. Turner and 1940 when he disappeared from the record. Adeline Rogers appears in the 1940 census as a widow living with her niece Emma Tate, the cook at the local school. Adeline must have been already sick on April 12, 1940, when the census was taken. A little bit over a month later, on May 25, she passed away from heart failure due to renal and cardiovascular disease. She had gone back to live where she had been born in 1875, Ways Station (today Richmond Hill), Bryan County, Georgia. Her daughter, Anna Lee, was married and living in New York City with the married surname of Callaway and was the person who informed on her mother data for the death certificate.

Thus, neither James nor Adaline Rogers were alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African American women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.337
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7397b947e-7fac-4319-8bf6-192b8034cc85
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1399

Sandy Grant [Gullah Informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1932 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Sandy Grant was born at Harris Neck around 1876, the son of Alexander (Sandy) and Frances (Fannie) Grant. Alexander was an early settler of Harris Neck. Sandy Grant married Lizzie McIntosh on January 21, 1902. They had at least one son named Harry and later in life raised several nephews and nieces.

Sandy Grant owned his farm at Harris Neck, which was worth $200.00 in 1930. Both Sandy and Lizzie had been able to attend two years of school when they were children.

We have no information about Lizzie's passing. Sandy died in 1961 in his 80s. Thus he was alive and most likely witnessed when Harris Neck was destroyed to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.326
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7da161f74-1c75-4845-b114-7e66130c45c5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1405

Bristow McIntosh [Gullah Informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
circa 1931-1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and of her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Bristow McIntosh appears in the 1870 census as a 14-year old working as a farm laborer and living in the household of Martha Woodruff. According to the interview he gave to Dr. Turner in 1933, beginning in 1866, he had attended school for a few months each year and had been able to learn how to read and write.

By 1880 Bristow McIntosh was married to Nancy King Mctinosh (also known as Annie and Nannie), and they had two children and owned 20 acres of land valued at fifty dollars. The previous year his farm had produced corn, peas, and beans. Bristow also owned milk cows and chickens. The value of his production in 1879 had been $100.

During his life, Bristow worked his land, which was valued at $200 in 1930. He also, at some point, ran a store and kept a mail route. By 1930 he was already in his seventies but still working as a family servant.

Bristow and Nancy would have eleven children, and only three survived childhood. Nancy passed away in 1922 after a long illness, and two of her surviving children followed her within a few years. Leonard passed away in 1926 and James in 1928.

Bristow McIntosh was one of Dr. Turner's principal informants when he came to Harris Neck in 1933. He passed away four years later, on November 25, 1937. Thus, Bristow McIntosh was not alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Bristow (also Brister or Bristol); Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.330
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7390c90a8-2e29-42af-95ba-b0fcafd80763
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1409

David (Davey) Grant [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
David (Davey) Grant was born around 1874, the son of Alexander (Sandy) Grant and Frances (Fannie) Grant and the older brother of Sandy Grant, another of Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner's informants, by two years.

Around 1901 David married a woman named Amanda (Manda). They had one child, a boy named Roan.

Sometime before 1910, the family moved from Harris Neck to Brunswick, a coastal town in Glynn County, Georgia, where David went to work as a dockhand and Amanda as a washerwoman.

By 1920 the family was back at Harris Neck, living on South Harris Neck Road at a locality named Warboo. David was renting the place where they lived and was not working. Amanda was working at a farm.

We do not know what happened to Amanda, but David Grant lived until 1947. He died on April 11, 1947. Thus, he was alive and most likely witnessed when Harris Neck was destroyed to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.336
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa75dbe1147-698d-49e9-94aa-f0b4313ebdf8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1415

James (Napoleon) Rogers [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
James (Napoleon) Rogers was born in Liberty County, Georgia, around 1859. He was never able to attend school, and thus when Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed him in the Summer of 1933 in Harris Neck, Georgia, he informed him that he could neither read nor write. Dr. Turner considered him one of his principal informants in Harris Neck.

By 1880 Rogers had moved to Harris Neck and was working as a laborer living in the household of John J. Curry. On September 30, 1905, Rogers married Adeline (also spelled as Adline) Houston. Adeline was much younger than Rogers. She was 30, being born at Ways Station, Bryan County, on March 15, 1875. Rogers was at least 46 years old. They had two children Anna Lee (also spelled as Analee and Analie) and James.

James Rogers owned his farm, which was worth $500.00 in 1930. He informed Dr. Turner that he had always been a farmer, but around 1910 he was working as a carpenter. Adeline Rogers mainly took care of the family, but around 1910 she was working as a seamstress.

James Rogers passed away between 1933 when he was interviewed by Dr. Turner and 1940 when he disappeared from the record. Adeline Rogers appears in the 1940 census as a widow living with her niece Emma Tate, the cook at the local school. Adeline must have been already sick on April 12, 1940, when the census was taken. A little bit over a month later, on May 25, she passed away from heart failure due to renal and cardiovascular disease. She had gone back to live where she had been born in 1875, Ways Station (today Richmond Hill), Bryan County, Georgia. Her daughter, Anna Lee, was married and living in New York City with the married surname of Callaway and was the person who informed on her mother data for the death certificate.

Thus, neither James nor Adaline Rogers were alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.342
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa77c70db42-73d8-42c7-bc78-b081e8cdc382
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1420

Mitch Rogers (Rodgers) [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Mitchell Rogers was born on August 15, 1880. On August 22, 1906, he married Nancy Holmes, with whom he had three children but only one daughter, Ella, survived. By 1910 the family lived on Harris Neck Road with Jonesville Road, and Mitchell was working at odd jobs while Nancy worked as a cook for a private family.

By 1920 Mitchell and Nancy lived at South Harris Neck Road at Warbo, a locality at Harris Neck. He owned the farm in which he worked. Nancy was housekeeping. Ella was no longer living with them.

Ten years later, things had turned to worst in Mitchell's life. He was divorced from Nancy and no longer owned his farm. He was renting a home for $2 a month and working at odd jobs to survive. After that, he disappears from the record, except that we know he was interviewed and photographed by Dr. Turner in the summer of 1933.

Mitchell Rogers might not have survived to see the destruction of Harris Neck to build a military airport in 1942. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.344
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa78a95f4a9-4f1e-4157-b69f-7ba7d9c30b14
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1422

Mitch Rogers (Rodgers) [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Mitchell Rogers was born on August 15, 1880. On August 22, 1906, he married Nancy Holmes, with whom he had three children but only one daughter, Ella, survived. By 1910 the family lived on Harris Neck Road with Jonesville Road, and Mitchell was working at odd jobs while Nancy worked as a cook for a private family.

By 1920 Mitchell and Nancy lived at South Harris Neck Road at Warbo, a locality at Harris Neck. He owned the farm in which he worked. Nancy was housekeeping. Ella was no longer living with them.

Ten years later, things had turned to worst in Mitchell's life. He was divorced from Nancy and no longer owned his farm. He was renting a home for $2 a month and working at odd jobs to survive. After that, he disappears from the record, except that we know he was interviewed and photographed by Dr. Turner in the summer of 1933.

Mitchell Rogers might not have survived to see the destruction of Harris Neck to build a military airport in 1942. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.345
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa722606647-c68d-4a3c-9e66-c0585cf88be6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1423

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