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Concert - The Blues: Roots, Branches and Beyond Part 1

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Podcast
MIME Type:
video/mp4
Uploaded:
Tue, 16 Aug 2011 13:39:00 GMT
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
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Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Live Events
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:podcasts_0894f322fae7cabe229721738b462edc

Ozomatli Concert - Indian Summer Showcase Concert

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Podcast
MIME Type:
video/mp4
Uploaded:
Thu, 20 JUL 2013 15:30:00 GMT
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
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Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Live Events
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:podcasts_28afb551762a4d05fb317a4506c3807d

Indian Summer Showcase Concert: She King

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Podcast
MIME Type:
video/mp4
Uploaded:
Thu, 20 JUL 2013 15:30:00 GMT
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
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Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Live Events
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:podcasts_321499aa22606060dcd99c078bd8abea

Concert - The Blues: Roots, Branches and Beyond Part 2

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Podcast
MIME Type:
video/mp4
Uploaded:
Tue, 16 Aug 2011 14:39:00 GMT
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
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Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Live Events
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:podcasts_56f0d549621ccd4fd12dbeb7fa59ef27

Living Earth Festival: Halau Ho'omau I Ka Wai Ola O Hawai'i

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Podcast
MIME Type:
video/mp4
Uploaded:
Thu, 20 JUL 2013 15:30:00 GMT
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
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Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Live Events
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:podcasts_7b5cff1f9c9dd851acb6cc913e68556a

Living Earth Festival: Quetzal Guerrero

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Podcast
MIME Type:
video/mp4
Uploaded:
Thu, 20 JUL 2013 15:30:00 GMT
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
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Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Live Events
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:podcasts_ddd745e5271116c8aff8317afb751259

Living Earth Festival: Pokagon Drum and Dance Troupe

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Podcast
MIME Type:
video/mp4
Uploaded:
Thu, 20 JUL 2013 15:30:00 GMT
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
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Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Live Events
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:podcasts_e0f81e5c7cfd332f8b9def13ed715e57

Program in African American Culture Collection

Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Extent:
100 Cubic feet (309 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Photographs
Date:
1850-2004, undated
Summary:
The collection primarily documents the activities of the National Museum of American History's Program in African American Culture (PAAC) dating from 1979 through 2004. The Program in African American Culture (PAAC) created public programs documenting the black experience in the United States, as well as, other countries. Archival materials include photographs, programs, administrative files, magnetic tape, audiocassettes, U-matic and VHS video cassettes.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists primarily of administrative files, audio, video, and photographic documentation of the programs presented by the Program in African American Culture (PAAC) from 1979 through 2004. There is a substantial amount of material documenting research conducted by the Program in African American Culture (PAAC) for its programming. In addition, administrative paperwork relating to the day-to-day activities of the Program in African American Culture (PAAC) are also included in the materials.

The collection is divided into four series. Series one consists of the material created for each program and is arranged in chronological order. Series two contains background materials and publications relating to subjects of program interest and is arranged in alphabetical order. Series three includes correspondence, contracts, resumes of presenters and performers and other forms of administrative files. Series four are materials relating to Smithsonian Institution or outside programs and performances.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into four series.

Series 1, Programs Files, 1979-2004, undated

Series 2, Research Files, 1850-1995, undated

Series 3, Administrative Files, 1850-1995, undated

Series 4, Interviews, Speaking Engagements and Performances, 1964-2000, undated
Biographical / Historical:
The Program in African American Culture (PAAC) is a Smithsonian Institution research and programming office located in the National Museum of American History that was created as an outgrowth of the African Diaspora component of the 1975 and 1976 Festival of American Folklife. Founding director, Bernice Johnson Reagon, developed the Program in Black Culture, as the PAAC was originally, as a center for researching and presenting topics of interest to the study of African American history and culture. Reagon is a song leader, composer, scholar, and social activist, who was a founding member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Freedom Singers in the Albany Movement in Georgia. The Program, which was transferred to the National Museum of American History in 1983, provided, and continues to provide, a forum for the presentation of traditional and historical forms of African American cultural expression. To accomplish this, Program in African American Culture (PAAC) staff conducted thorough research, which resulted in public programs including conferences, concerts, colloquia, and seminars on a wide range of topics.
Related Materials:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History

Duke Ellington Collection (NMAH.AC0301)

Ruth Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (NMAH.AC0415)

Eugene D. Smallwood Gospel Music Collection (NMAH.AC0456)

Wade in the Water Radio Series Collection (NMAH.AC0516)

Moses Moon Civil Rights Movement Audio Collection (NMAH.AC0556)

Bernice Reagon Johnson Collection of African American Sacred Music (NMAH.AC0653)

Edward and Gaye Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (NMAH.AC0704)

Ruth Koenig Mississippi Summer Collection (NMAH.AC0558)

Ed King Collection of Civil Rights Material (NMAH.AC0559)

Smithsonian Institution

Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1969 Festival of American Folklife (CFCH.SFF.1969)

Smithsonian Institution Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, June 25-July 6, 1997 (CFCH.SFF.1997)

Diana Davies Photographs (CFCH.DAVIE)

Smithsonian Institution Archivesemph>

Oral History Interview with Bernice Reagon Johnson, 1986 (Accession 009612)

National Museum of American History, Program in African American Culture, 1982-2002 (Accession 05-116)

National Museum of American History, Program in African American Culture, 1983-2004 (Accession 06-002)

National Museum of American History, Program in African American Culture, 1972-1999 (Accession 08-107)

National Museum of American History, Program in African American Culture, 1975-2000 (Accession 12-102)

National Museum of American History, Program in African American Culture, 1976-1999 (Accession 12-358)

National Museum of American History, Program in African American Culture, 1980-1992, 1961 (Accession 96-147)

Duke Ellington Collection Records, circa 1985-1993 (Accession 98-129)

National Museum of American History, Program in Black American Culture, circa 1976-1987 (Accession 98-136)

Smithsonian Institution. Division of Performing Arts (Accession 84-012)
Provenance:
Collection created by the Program in African Amerian Culture at the Smithsonian Institution from 1979-1986.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Civil rights  Search this
African American history  Search this
African American religion  Search this
Gospel music  Search this
African Americans -- Music  Search this
Civil rights movements  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Photographs -- 1980-2000
Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0408
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0408
Online Media:

Black American Gospel Music Series, Richard Smallwood and Myrna Summers

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1980 February 3
Scope and Contents:
Myrna Summers and Richard Smallwood are two of Washington's most notable gospel composers and performers, both having achieved national and international recognition as concert and recording artists of originality and significant influence in the gospel world. Myrna Summers excels as both a gospel soloist and a composer. Her music is a combination of syncopated rhythmic vibrations of the Pentecostal church, scriptural lyrics, and a poignant harmonic quality. Richard Smallwood, composer, pianist, lecturer, and director, grew up learning the gospel music tradition of the Black church. His gospel stylings were rooted in hymns, traditional spirituals, jubilees, and Holiness church music. The Division of Performing Arts presented the concert as part of the Black American Gospel Music Series. The Black American Gospel Music Series and this program were organized by Bernice Reagon Johnson. Program number AC408.6.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1066

Black American Gospel Music Series, United House of Prayer

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 4
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1980 April 13
Scope and Contents:
Concert held in the Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, on Sunday, April 13, 1980, at 3:00 p.m. It featured the Kings of Harmony Jubilee Brass Band, the Sons of Grace Quartet, and the McCullough Youth Choir, whose repertoire spanned an exciting range of traditional gospel styles. The concert was presented as part of the Black American Gospel Music Series by the Division of Performing Arts. The Black American Gospel Music Series and this program were organized by Bernice Reagon Johnson. Program number AC408.7.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1067

Black American Gospel Music Series, Marion Williams

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1980 October 12
Scope and Contents:
Concert paid tribute to Marion Williams, a leading gospel music performer. Her singing career began at age three in her mother's church in Miami, Florida, where she performed her first a cappella song, "Yes, Jesus Love Me." Other early influences included the street sounds of blues, calypso, and West Indian rhythms, and the great traveling quartets such as the Kings of Harmony and Professor Smith's Jubilee Singers. By her mid-teens, Williams, a soaring soprano, was a premier local gospel singer. In 1947, at the age of 18, she joined the Ward Singers. She was a leading member of that group until 1958. In 1961, Alex Bradford and she starred in Langston Hughes's gospel musical, "Black Nativity," which played off Broadway and throughout Europe. Marion Williams performed at major European music festivals in Antibes, France; Montreux, Switzerland; and Bergamo, Italy; toured the Far East and Africa; and, with Duke Ellington, represented the United States at the First World Festival of Negro Arts in Dakar, Senegal. Since 1967, Williams has performed as a solo artist. From Notes on the Artist in Program Notes by Pearl Williams-Jones. See Program Notes for additional information about Marion Williams and the Black American Gospel Music Series. Program number AC408.8.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1069

Black American Gospel Music Series, The Dynamics, Norvus Miller and Company

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 7
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1980 November 9
Scope and Contents:
Concert by Norvus Miller and Company, a band organized in 1976, and The Dynamics, a Black gospel group formed in 1968, held November 9, 1980, in the Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Norvus Miller and Company extended the concept of Black sacred instrumental and vocal music, using singers for both lead and back-up vocals and allowing a harmonica to carry the lead and back-up responsibility on various songs. The Dynamics represented a modern approach to Black gospel music, paying homage to the tradition of classic bass gospel singers. The members present for the performance included Jerry Caesar, piano and lead singer; Douglas Howell, tenor and lead singer; Melvin "Chip" Lowrey, first tenor and lead singer; Sherman "Blake" Clayborne, bass-baritone; and Len Baldwin, second tenor and lead singer. The concert was presented as part of the Black American Gospel Music Series by the Division of Performing Arts. The program and concert were organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.9.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1070

Black American Gospel Music Series, Roberta Martin and The Roberta Martin Singers: The Legacy of Music

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 8
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981 February 6-9
Scope and Contents:
Program held February 6-8, 1981, at Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. It explored the richness of black gospel music as one of this country's most powerful contemporary urban music forms. More importantly, the program highlighted Roberta Martin as one of the most significant pioneers and innovators of Black American gospel music in the 1930s. Roberta Martin, inspired by Thomas A. Dorsey and Sallie Martin, became a composer and arranger of gospel music. Martin's first church position was as a pianist for the Young Peoples' Choir of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Chicago. There she worked with Thomas A. Dorsey and Theodore Frye, both of whom helped guide her early career. In 1933, with the help of Dorsey and Frye, Roberta Martin organized the Martin Frye Quartet with Eugene Smith, James Lawrence, Robert Anderson, Willie Webb, and Norsalus McKissick. This group became the Roberta Martin Singers in 1936. In the mid-1940s, the group expanded with the addition of two females, Bessie Folk and Delois Barrett Campbell. The Roberta Martin Singers documented here are Delois Barrett Campbell, Lucy Smith Collier, Archie Dennis, Bessie Folk, Gloria Griffin, Louise McCord, Norsalus McKissick, Eugene Smith, Romance Watson. From Roberta Martin and the Roberta Martin Singers: Program Notes. See Program Notes for additional information on Roberta Martin and the Roberta Martin Singers. The Division of Performing Arts presented the concert as part of the Black American Gospel Music Series. The Black American Gospel Music Series and the Roberta Martin program were organized by Bernice Johnson Reagon, director of the Program in African American Culture (formerly known as the Program in Black Culture). Program number AC408.10.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1071

Black American Gospel Music Series, Roberta Martin Singers Reconstruction Concerts and Conferences

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981-02
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1074

Black American Gospel Music Series, The Harmonizing Four

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981 April 12
Scope and Contents:
Concert held Sunday April 12, 1981 at Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. It paid tribute to the Harmonizing Four, an all-male gospel group from Richmond, Virginia, who have been singing together for more than fifty years. The group began singing together on October 27, 1927. The original quartet members were Joseph Williams, Thomas Johnson, Jr., Lawrence Hatchett, and Lawrence Longhorn (the latter two now deceased). The Harmonizing Four began as an informal a cappella group who sang spirituals, hymns, and classic gospel songs. Every member is a leader and soloist and they do all of their own arranging. The present group includes two original members. The Harmonizing Four documented here are Joseph Williams (lead, baritone, manager, and spokesman) Thomas Johnson, Jr. (lead, second tenor) Lonnie Smith Sr. (lead, first tenor) Thomas Ellis Johnson (bass) Rick Monroe (guitarist) From notes on the artists, program nNotes by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon. See program notes for additional information about the Harmonizing Four and the Black American Gospel Music Series. The Division of Performing Arts presented the concert as part of the Black American Gospel Music Series. The series and program were organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black American Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.11.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1112

Black American Gospel Music Series, Scott A. White Family Singers

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 11
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981 May 17
Scope and Contents:
Program in African American Culture Collection highlighted the exceptional talent of one of the nation's largest gospel singing family. The Scott A. White Family Singers consists of father and mother, fifteen children, fifty grandchildren and at least eight great-grandchildren. There are many other talents in the family. Nine family members are ministers, seven are missionaries, seven are piano players, one is a minister of music, one is an evangelist, seven are songwriters, and three are playwrights. The Scott A. White Family has been singing for more than twenty-five years, presided over by their father, elder Scott A. White, pastor of the New Hope Primitive Baptist Church in Steelton, Pennsylvania. (From unpublished program notes by Pearl Williams Jones. See notes for additional information about the Scott A. White Family). The concert by the Scott A. White Family was held on Sunday, May 17, 1981 at Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. The concert was presented as part of the Black Gospel Music Series by the Division of Performing Arts. The series and program were organized by Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.12.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1113

Black American Gospel Song Series, The Quartet Tradition

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 12
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981 November 20-21
Scope and Contents:
Concert and colloquium held Friday and Saturday, November 20 and 21, 1981, at Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Program was created to explore examples of quartet styles. Panelists included Bernice Reagon Johnson, Doug Seroff, Thermon Ruth, Portia K. Maultsby, and Reverend Isaac Ravizee. The Sterling Jubilees and Four Eagles, two of the groups featured in this program, are community-based quartets from Jefferson County, Alabama, whose unaccompanied singing style dates to the 1930s. The program also features the Fairfield Four, a quartet from Nashville, Tennessee, and the Sensational Nightingales. From notes in the Program guide. See program guide for additional information on the Black American Gospel Song: The Quartet Tradition. The concert and colloquium were presented by the Division of Performing Arts. The program was organized by Bernice Johnson Reagon. Program number 408.13.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1114

Black American Blues Song: A Study in Poetic Literature

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 13-14
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1982 February 5-7
Scope and Contents:
Concert and colloquium held February 5-7, 1982, at Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. The program was designed to explore blues as a form of literature. Blues music has been described as a feeling, a state of being, a condition, originating from everyday experiences like partialities, pain, struggle, hard times, and personal love. Blues music is a statement about these conditions. From its African American roots in the rural South to worldwide popularity, blues is a sound and a literature voicing the unique experiences that have forged African-American culture. From program guide. The program was organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black American Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). It featured songwriters and performers demonstrating and discussing their composition process, performance style, and philosophy. Scholars who discuss blues lyrics as Black American literature joined them. Performances by Chicago-based musicians Willie Dixon, Koko Taylor and Taja Mahal are also included among the materials. Program number AC408.14.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1115

The Song Ministry of Reverend Charles Albert Tindley: A Musical Tribute

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 15
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1982 May 7-9
Scope and Contents:
The concert and colloquium held May 7-9, 1982, at Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution was created to pay tribute to Reverend Charles Albert Tindley, a pioneer in gospel music. Tindley's compositions formed a base upon which the new Black urban sacred gospel music was developed. Tindley's style influenced all of the early gospel music composers including Thomas A. Dorsey, Lucie Elizabeth Campbell, Roberta Martin, and Reverend William Herbert Brewster. The gospel songs composed by Tindley include "Stand By Me", "The Storm Is Passing Over", "We'll Understand It Better By and By", "Nothing Between", and "Leave It There". Tindley's songs moved quickly into the Black oral tradition and today, many of his songs are part of the pool of Black music by unknown composers.

This musical tribute was an original production conceived of and directed by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). The script was created by Eleanor Traylor and featured Reverend Tindley's songs as they were developed within the performancve tradition of Tindley Temple. The colloquium included Black music scholars, theologians, and others who knew and worked under the tutelage of Reverend Tindley. Participates included Reverend Marion Ballard, Dr. Horace C. Boyer, Kenneth Goodman, Dr. William C. Jason, Jr., Ralph H. Jones, Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, Wayne Shirley and Pearl Williams-Jones.

The program was presented again on April 28 and 29, 1984 at the Tindley Temple United Methodist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by the Tribute to Tindley Committee. Program number AC408.15.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1116

Song Journey: A Retrospective of Gospel Music Composer Reverend William Herbert Brewster

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 11, Folder 4-5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1982 February 17-19
Scope and Contents:
One in a series of programs including a concert and colloquium highlighting and honoring the work of gospel music composers. Brewster, pastor of the East Trigg Baptist Church in Memphis, Tennessee was considered one of the most gifted orators in the country. Born and raised in Tennessee, he became one of the mid-South's first radio ministers on radio station WDIA. Brewster wroteitten over two hundred 200 gospel songs including "Jesus Is All," "Peace Be Still," and ALeaning and Depending On the Lord. Many of his songs are gospel standards and considered treasures in the church. He was head of the Education Department of the National Baptist Convention and established the Brewster Clinic of Theology in Memphis. This series documents the concert and colloquium "Reverend William Herbert Brewster: Song Journey," held December 17-19, 1982 at the Smithsonian Institution. The concert and colloquium were sponsored by the Division of Performing Arts and organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director of the Program in Black Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Audio cassette tapes OTC 408.17.1 - 3 are missing. Program number AC408.17.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1120

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