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Agustín Lira and Alma - “Quihubo, Raza” [Behind the Scenes Documentary]

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-05-13T18:52:06.000Z
YouTube Category:
Music  Search this
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianfolkways
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianfolkways
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_u5x_5t_ercQ

Artist Carlee Fernandez in "Staging the Self" - National Portrait Gallery

Creator:
National Portrait Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2014-12-18T15:29:27.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Portraits  Search this
See more by:
NatlPortraitGallery
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
YouTube Channel:
NatlPortraitGallery
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_7tZah-bIxpk

Strong Women/Strong Nations 8: Maylei Blackwell

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-03-28T17:38:48.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_cWwibTk2MnM

Oral history interview with Carmen Lomas Garza, 1997 Apr. 10-May 27

Interviewee:
Garza, Carmen Lomas, 1948-  Search this
Garza, Carmen Lomas, 1948-  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J  Search this
Subject:
Galería de la Raza (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Chicano artists  Search this
Chicano art movement  Search this
Chicano movement  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Theme:
Latino and Latin American  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13540
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216257
AAA_collcode_garza97
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_216257
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, 2014 May 1- 2015 May 25

Interviewee:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cardenas, Gilberto  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Chicano movement  Search this
Chicano artists  Search this
Theme:
Latino and Latin American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16309
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)379312
AAA_collcode_ybarra14
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_379312

Oral history interview with Barbara Carrasco, 1999 April 13-26

Interviewee:
Carrasco, Barbara, 1955-  Search this
Carrasco, Barbara, 1955-  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Subject:
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Chavez, Cesar  Search this
Gamboa, Harry  Search this
Garza, Carmen Lomas  Search this
Valadez, John  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles  Search this
University of California, San Francisco. School of Fine Arts  Search this
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Chicano art movement  Search this
Chicano movement  Search this
Chicano artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Theme:
Latino and Latin American  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5447
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216606
AAA_collcode_carras99
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_216606
Online Media:

Poster with "Chicano Power" and "Viva La Raza" over a Mexican flag

Published by:
Platt Poster Company, American, founded 1969  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W: 21 5/8 × 34 1/16 in. (55 × 86.5 cm)
Type:
posters
Place printed:
Los Angeles, California, United States, North and Central America
Cultural Place:
Mexico, Latin America, North and Central America
Date:
1970s
Topic:
African American  Search this
Activism  Search this
Civil Rights  Search this
Communities  Search this
Identity  Search this
Politics  Search this
Resistance  Search this
Social reform  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2014.252
Restrictions & Rights:
© Platt Poster Company. Permission required for use.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera-Political and Activist Ephemera
Movement:
Chicano Movement / El Movimiento
Exhibition:
A Changing America: 1968 and Beyond
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 1, C1 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd58db98515-cffb-4d3d-b857-570524fbc515
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2014.252

Oral history interview with Carmen Lomas Garza

Interviewee:
Garza, Carmen Lomas  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Names:
Galería de la Raza (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Extent:
5 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (4 hrs.), analog)
122 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 Apr. 10-May 27
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Carmen Lomas Garza conducted 1997 Apr. 10-May 27, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
Lomas Garza discusses her working environment at Hunter Point Shipyard, a former naval facility on San Francisco Bay, near Candlestick Park, occupied by artists and small businesses; growing up in Kingsville, Tex., near Corpus Christi; her education at Texas A and I University (now Texas A and M) and graduating from the University of Texas at Austin with a B.S. in art education (1969); her activism in the Chicano movement during her college years; joining the farm workers march in Kingsville in 1965; installing an art show for MAYO (Mexican Workers Youth Organization) conference in 1969; the impact upon her of MAYO's walkout at Robstown High School, Tex., while she was a student teacher there, in protest of the lack of Mexican American teachers and curriculum; joining Galeria de La Raza in San Francisco, 1976, while a graduate student at Washington State University and the effect it had on the development of her career as an artist; the inspiration of her mother, who painted "lotteria tablas" (figures on boards; game cards); her interest in children's art; using family experiences for her "monitos" or "little figures" (cards painted with sets of fifteen numbers); and preserving her Mexican-American traditions as a basis for her identity.
Biographical / Historical:
Carmen Lomas Garza (1948-) is a painter from California.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview received from a donation to AAA from the Los Angeles women's art organization Double X.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Painters -- California  Search this
Topic:
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Chicano artists  Search this
Chicano art movement  Search this
Chicano movement  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.garza97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-garza97
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Barbara Carrasco

Interviewee:
Carrasco, Barbara, 1955-  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Faculty  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Students  Search this
University of California, San Francisco. School of Fine Arts -- Students  Search this
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Chavez, Cesar, 1927-  Search this
Gamboa, Harry  Search this
Garza, Carmen Lomas  Search this
Valadez, John, 1951-  Search this
Extent:
87 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1999 April 13-26
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Barbara Carrasco conducted 1999 April 13 and 26, by Jeffrey Rangel, in two sessions, for the Archives of American Art.
Carrasco speaks of the roles played by her parents in her career as an artist, her experiences as a light-skinned Chicana, and the marginalization of women artists within the Chicano art movement; her relationship and marriage to fellow artist, Harry Gamboa, Jr., who has supported women artists; and her perception of Asco ("nausea" in Spanish), a group of artists and performers who joined together during the Chicano civil rights movement. She also discusses the influence of the art professors at UCLA and the quality of the training she received there; working with Carlos Almaraz and John Valadez on the "Zoot Suit" mural in Hollywood; meeting César Chávez and how he in part shaped her identity as a cultural worker; attending California School of Fine Arts, Valencia, California, and receiving her MFA there; other Chicana artists such as Carmen Lomas Garza; and the changes in her most recent work.
Biographical / Historical:
Barbara Carrasco (1955-) is a painter and muralist from Los Angeles, California. Carrasco was born in El Paso, Texas, and a resident of the Los Angeles area since 1956. She is best known for her work inspired by the United Farm Workers Union, by her experiences as a Chicana, by historical events, and by personal issues.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 41 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview and transcription provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Initiatives Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Muralists -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Chicano art movement  Search this
Chicano movement  Search this
Chicano artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.carras99
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carras99
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Tomás Ybarra-Frausto

Interviewee:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cardenas, Gilberto  Search this
Extent:
32 Items (sound files (11 hrs., 26 min.), digital, wav)
175 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2014 May 1- 2015 May 25
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, conducted 2014 May 1-2015 May 25, by Gilberto Cardenas for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Tomás Ybarra-Frausto (1938- ) is an art historian in San Antonio, Texas, who specializes in Latin American and U.S. Latino culture. Interviewer Gilberto Cardenas is the Executive Director of the Notre Dame Center for Arts and Culture, South Bend, Indiana. Ybarra-Frausto is an authority on Chicano art and a bibliographer.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Art historians -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Chicano movement  Search this
Chicano artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.ybarra14
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ybarra14
Online Media:

Oral history interview with César Martínez

Interviewee:
Martínez, César Augusto, 1944-  Search this
Interviewer:
Quirarte, Jacinto, 1931-2012  Search this
Extent:
107 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 Aug. 21-28
Scope and Contents:
An interview of César Martínez conducted 1997 Aug. 21-28, by Jacinto Quirarte, in Martínez's studios, San Antonio, Tex., for the Archives of American Art. Martinez discusses his family; schooling; experience in Korea and returning to San Antonio; meeting other artists; joining artists' groups; artists who have influenced him; the themes, forms, meaning, development, processes of his work; and specific works.
Biographical / Historical:
César Martínez (1944- ) is a painter and printmaker from San Antonio, Tex.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 31 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1959 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Texas -- San Antonio  Search this
Chicano artists  Search this
Chicano movement  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.martin97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-martin97
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Harry Gamboa, Jr

Interviewee:
Gamboa, Harry  Search this
Gronk, 1954-  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
Extent:
5 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (270 min.), analog)
90 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1999 Apr. 1-16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Harry Gamboa, Jr. conducted 1999 Apr. 1-16, at various cafes in Los Angeles, Calif., by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art. The artist, Gronk, joined the interview for the second session.
Photographer, painter, video artist, and writer, Harry Gamboa, Jr. (b. 1951), has been involved in creating visual and performance works that interpret the contemporary urban Chicano culture. A native of Los Angeles, Gamboa began the interview by reflecting on his book Urban Exile (University of Minnesota Press, 1998), which he considers only a fragment of his creative work, feeling photography his primary medium. He expressed a need to maintain his identity as a Chicano artist while at the same time trying to balance financial survival, family maintenance, and creative spontaneity. He described growing up in East Los Angeles, a period that tested his personality and developed his quick wit and humor as a means of survival and his sense of being the "participant viewer." He remembers his educational experiences as "highly damaging," due to the physical violence from a few teachers and the stereotyping of Chicanos. His views about the Vietnam War and his disillusionment of the political process which led to a discussion about the Civil Rights Movement and the African-American culture's influence on his work. He emphasized the lack of an awareness by the art community of black and Chicano artists that was underscored in the Armand Hammer Museum's LA and Noir [Sunshine and Noir: Los Angeles Art, 1960-1990, at the UCLA/Armand Hammer Art Center] exhibition, 1998.
The second session began and ended with Gamboa reflecting on his relationship with his wife and fellow artist, Barbara Carrasco. In the interim, he and Gronk, who joined the interview, discussed the dynamics that brought the artists together in Asco; the differences and competitiveness within the Chicano Arts Movement; and the vulnerabilities of an artist's surviving while trying to maintain an artistic vision. Despite these challenges and an opressive dominant culture that has not embrased Chicano art, Carrasco have continued as artists because they feel a need to create and to present their work as a means of expanding a perception of reality.
Biographical / Historical:
Harry Gamboa, Jr. (1951-) is a painter, writer, photographer, and video artist from Los Angeles, Calif.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview and transcription provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Initiatives Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Chicano artists  Search this
Chicano movement  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Photography  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.gamboa99
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gamboa99
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Enrique Chagoya

Interviewee:
Chagoya, Enrique  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Extent:
95 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2001 July 25-August 6
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Enrique Chagoya conducted July 25-August 6, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
The interview takes place at Chagoya's home in South San Francisco (sessions 1,2) and at Karlstrom's San Francisco office (session 3). Chagoya's wife, Kara Maria, joins in for the final portion of the interview. Chagoya discusses activities in Mexico and the U.S.; his involvement with the Galeria de la Raza and the Chicano Movement; his work, including books that are based on Pre-Columbian codices; his application of "reverse anthropology," the history of the Americas and Europe, as if Mexico conquered Europe; Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera; the legacy of Mexican muralism and the union of art and ideology; the nature of his own interest in Pre-Columbian imagery; his sabbatical year in Paris; collaborations with his wife Kara Maria, including issues of self-projection into works of art; artistic responsibility; creation of hybrid cultures; the separation of his art from other Chicano art; and identity as a Mexican. Chagoya's wife, painter Kara Maria, discusses her training at UC Berkeley, meeting Chagoya; their evolving relationship as artists; his role as mentor; and her separate artistic identity.
Biographical / Historical:
Enrique Chagoya (1953-) is a Mexican born American painter, graphic artist, and educator in San Francisco, California. Kara Maria (1968-) is Chagoya's wife.
General:
Originally recorded on 7 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 13 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hr., 43 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Printmakers -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Indian art -- Central America  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Chicano artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.chagoy01
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chagoy01
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Carlos Almaraz

Interviewee:
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Interviewer:
Nieto, Margarita  Search this
Names:
Flores, Elsa  Search this
Extent:
154 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1986 February 6-1987 January 29
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Mexican born American artist Carlos Almaraz conducted 1986 February 6-1987 January 29, by Margarita Nieto, for the Archives of American Art.
Almaraz discusses his childhood and education; the development of his interest in art; his experiences living in New York City from 1965 to 1970; and his return to Southern California in the early 1970s. He speaks of his participation in the muralism movement in Los Angeles in the 1970s; his political involvement in the United Farm Workers movement; his personal art work (as opposed to collective work with the muralists); his trip to China in 1974; people he met in New York and southern California; and recent developments in the Los Angeles art world. The interview is concluded with Almaraz speaking of his wife Elsa Flores and their daughter Maya.
Biographical / Historical:
Carlos Almaraz (1941-1989) was a Mexican born American mural painter from Los Angeles, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 8 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 14 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hrs., 56 minutes.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Mexican American art  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Street art  Search this
Chicano movement  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.almara86
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-almara86
Online Media:

Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Ranching Crafts: Murals & Lowriders: Border Stories

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Borderlands Program 1993 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Performer:
Rodríguez, Adolfo O., 1971-  Search this
Rodriguez Puentes, Baltasar, 1942-  Search this
Mendietta, Joe O., 1961-  Search this
Herrera, Alonso Encina  Search this
Callejo, Carlos, 1951-  Search this
Frías, Romulo  Search this
Strong, Arturo Carrillo, 1930-  Search this
Rogues, Maria G. Moroyoqui'd de  Search this
Hernandez, Reynaldo B.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Mexicans  Search this
Americans  Search this
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Texas
Mexico
Kingsville (Tex.)
Lajitas (Mexico)
Durango
Ciudad Juar̀ez (Durango, Mexico)
El Paso (Tex.)
Arizona
Nogales (Nogales, Mexico)
Tucson (Ariz.)
Date:
1993 July 4
Track Information:
101 Ranching Crafts / Adolfo O. Rodríguez, Baltasar Rodriguez Puentes, Joe O. Mendietta.

102 Murals and Lowriders / Alonso Encina Herrera, Carlos Callejo, Romulo Frías.

103 Border Stories / Arturo Carrillo Strong, Maria G. Moroyoqui'd de Rogues, Reynaldo B. Hernandez.
Local Numbers:
FP-1993-CT-0092
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 4, 1993.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Ranching  Search this
Horsehair braiding  Search this
Saddlery  Search this
Rope  Search this
Cowboys  Search this
Automobiles  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Lowriders  Search this
Border patrols  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Smuggling  Search this
Drugs  Search this
Border  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Item FP-1993-CT-0092
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: U.S.-Mexico Borderlands / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref714
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Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material

Creator:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Names:
Mexican Museum  Search this
Royal Chicano Air Force  Search this
Studio 24 (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Garza, Carmen Lomas  Search this
Goldman, Shifra M., 1926-2011  Search this
Mesa-Bains, Amalia  Search this
Extent:
33.1 Linear feet
1.27 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Interviews
Place:
Mexico -- Religious life and customs
Date:
1965-2004
Summary:
The research material of Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, measures 33.1 linear feet and 1.27 GB and dates from 1965-2004. The collection, amassed throughout Ybarra-Frausto's long and distinguished career as a scholar of the arts and humanities, documents the development of Chicano art in the United States and chronicles Ybarra-Frausto's role as a community leader and scholar in the political and artistic Chicano movement from its inception in the 1960s to the present day.
Scope and Content Note:
The research material of Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, amassed throughout his long and distinguished career as a scholar of the arts and humanities, documents the development of Chicano art in the United States. As community leader and scholar, Ybarra-Frausto played dual roles of active participant and historian in the Chicano movement, chronicling this unique political and artistic movement from its inception in the 1960s to the present day.

Deeply rooted in American history, "El Movimiento," the Chicano movement, evolved from Mexican-Americans' struggle for self-determination during the civil rights era of the 1960s. It began as a grassroots community effort that enlisted the arts in the creation of a united political and cultural constituency. Chicano artists, intellectuals, and political activists were instrumental in mobilizing the Mexican-American community for the cause of social justice, and the movement was shaped by the affirmation of a cultural identity that embraced a shared heritage with Mexico and the United States.

Just as "El Movimiento" aimed to instruct and inspire through the recollection and conservation of culture, Ybarra-Frausto's own career as scholar and historian helped to shape the intellectual discourse of the Chicano art. As a leading historian and theoretician in the field of Chicano Studies, he has written extensively on the subject, and has been instrumental in defining the canons of Chicano art. His papers are accordingly rich and varied, and they will be of great use to future scholars.

His research material, dating from 1965 to 1996, are arranged in subject files containing original writings, notes, bibliographies compiled by Ybarra-Frausto and others, exhibition catalogues, announcements, newspaper clippings and other printed material, as well as slides and photographs. Many of these files also include interview transcripts and correspondence with prominent figures in the movement. While this research collection contextualizes Chicano art within the larger framework of Latino and Latin-American culture, the bulk of the files relates specifically to Chicano visual culture. The collection also contains pertinent documentation of the Chicano civil rights movement, material on Chicano poets and writers, and research files on the wider Hispanic community, but these also appear within the context of Chicano culture in general.

Prominent among the bibliographies are the many notes and drafts related to the publication of A Comprehensive Annotated Bibliography of Chicano Art, 1965-1981 (University of California, Berkeley, 1985), which Ybarra-Frausto co-authored with Shifra Goldman. Ybarra-Frausto's files on Goldman, like other files in the collection, document his close associations and collaborations with scholars.

Art historians have traditionally found the categorization of Chicano art a difficult task. Unsure whether to classify the work as "American" or "Latin American," critics often ignored the work altogether. An outgrowth of this dilemma was the proliferation of artists, curators, and critics within the Chicano community, and the papers contain many original writings by Chicano artists about Chicano art, found in extensive files on artists that will be of particular significance to researchers. These often contain exhibition essays, dissertation proposals, and course outlines authored by the artists, along with the standard biographies, exhibition records, and reviews. Some of the files contain rare interviews conducted and transcribed by Ybarra-Frausto. Highlights include conversations with Carmen Lomas Garza, Amalia Mesa-Bains, and members of the Royal Chicano Air Force artist cooperative.

As a member of several Chicano art organizations and institutions, Ybarra-Frausto kept active records of their operation. The extensive files on the Mexican Museum and Galerie de la Raza/Studio 24, both in San Francisco, not only chronicle the history of Chicano art through the records of exhibitions and programming, but also offer case studies on the development of non-profit art institutions. The files on artist cooperatives, organizations, and exhibition spaces cover several regions of the United States, but focus on California, Texas and New York.

Two notable events in the development of Chicano art were the 1982 Califas: Chicano Art and Culture in California seminar at the University of California at Santa Cruz, and the 1990 traveling exhibition Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation, 1965-1985 (CARA), of which Ybarra-Frausto served as organizer and catalogue essayist. His records document the planning and development of these seminal events. Ybarra-Frausto's files on folk art, altars, posters, murals, performance art, border art, Chicana feminist art, and Southwestern and Mexican imagery (both urban and rural expressions) mirror the diverse forms and subject matter of Chicano art.

Spanning almost four decades of American culture from a Chicano perspective, these files have a unique historical value. The legacy of Chicano art and its contribution to the cultural landscape of this country, kept alive in Ybarra-Frausto's files, attests to the richness and diversity of American art.

Henry C. Estrada

Research Fellow, 1997.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as a single series of subject files. The general contents of each folder have been listed. The subject files are arranged in alphabetical order. While no two files are alike, they may contain résumés, printed and digital material, letters, draft writings, and photographs. Unless otherwise noted, each listing represents one file folder. The abbreviation TYF was used to refer to the name Tomá Ybarra-Frausto throughtout the Series Description.
Autobiographical Note:
Papelitos (little bits of paper), whether rent receipts, paid bills, or piles of personal letters, can become layered bundles of personal history. I have always been a pepenador (a scavenger) and saver of paper scraps. Diary notes, scribbled annotations, and first drafts are often useful indicators of ideas and gestation. Papelitos are the fragments of every-day life that gain expanded meaning integrated into the larger historical events of a period.

In the decade of the 1960s, I started saving ephemeral material--exhibition announcements, clippings of individual artists and of organizations fomenting a Chicano art movement. The social scenarios of the period such as marches, strikes, sit-ins, and mobilizations for social justice all spawned manifestos, posters, leaflets, and other forms of printed material. I somehow managed to assemble and protect the evanescent printed information that recorded the birth and development of Chicano art.

As I started to research and write about Chicano art and artists of the period, I continued to clip, photocopy, and preserve material given me by Mexican-American artists from throughout the nation. My idea was to form an archive that would be comprehensive rather than selective. I knew that it was the offbeat, singular piece of paper with a missing link of information that would attract the scholar.

Today, several decades after the flowering of Chicano art, there is still a lamentable paucity of research and information about this significant component of American art.

It is my fervent hope that this compendium of information will function as a resonant print and image bank for investigators of Chicano culture. Perhaps contained within the archive are the facts that will inspire new visions or revisions of Chicano art and culture--this is my fondest dream.

Dr. Tomás Ybarra-Frausto

New York City, 1998
Related Materials:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto Papers are located at University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the Archives of American Art by Tomás Ybarra-Frausto in 1997, and in 2004.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Santos (Art)  Search this
Household shrines -- Mexico  Search this
Chicano art  Search this
Chicano artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Interviews
Citation:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material, 1965-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.ybartoma
See more items in:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ybartoma
Online Media:

General (see also: Santos, Margaret; White, Sid)

Collection Creator:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Container:
Box 23, Folder 18
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1984-1993, undated
Scope and Contents note:
(clippings; catalogs; typescript of "Hablamos/We speak: Contempory Chicano Posters"; letter to TYF from Margaret T. Santos, 09/01/1993; exhibition announcement; letter to TYF from Lydia [?], 01/15/1987; letter to TYF from Sid White, 01/13/1987; letter to TYF from Michael Rossman, 12/28/1986; TYF's notes on chicano posters, "Juan Fuentes", "Grafica Chicana", "The Chicano Movement: Context for Chicano Posters"; handwritten draft of letter to Sid [White] from TYF, undated; Art Journal issue on "The Poster", Spring 1984)
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material, 1965-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material / Series 1: Subject Files / Posters (see also: Santos, Margaret)
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-ybartoma-ref1390

Velasquez, Willie, Chicano Movement Organizer, Community Leader (1944-1988)

Collection Creator:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Extent:
(memorial booklet)
Container:
Box 28, Folder 32
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1988
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material, 1965-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material / Series 1: Subject Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-ybartoma-ref1762

Chicano Movement

Collection Creator:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 23
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
( The Chicano Movement: Some Not Too Objective Observations By Abelardo B. Delgado , Denver: Colorado Migrant Council; distributed by Totinem Publications, 1971; essays by TYF, Richard A. Garcia, Tomás Almaguer "The Chicano Movement and the Emergence of a Chicano Poetic Consciousness"; "The Chicano Movement and the Mexican American Community, 1972-1978: An Interpretive Essay"; "Chicano Politics in the Present Period: Comment on Garcia")
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material, 1965-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material / Series 1: Subject Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-ybartoma-ref482

Artists and the Chicano Movement, Kellie Jones (see also: Gómez-Peña, Guillermo; Mesa-Bains, Amalia),

Collection Creator:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 67
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
(essay, excerpt from a longer, as yet unpublished, paper entitled Amalia Mesa-Bains and Guillermo Gómez-Peña: Artists's Histories and the Chicano Movement)
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material, 1965-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material / Series 1: Subject Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-ybartoma-ref112

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