Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
8841 documents - page 1 of 443

Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection

Topic:
Landscape architecture
Creator:
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Sears, Thomas Warren, 1880-1966  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Donor:
Tibbetts, Eleanor Sears  Search this
Tibbetts, Eleanor Sears  Search this
Extent:
44.5 Cubic feet (4,317 glass negatives. 363 film negatives. 182 glass lantern slides. 12 photograph albums. 56 plans and drawings. 3 monographs. )
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Blueprints
Albums
Plans (drawings)
Lantern slides
Date:
1899-1964
Summary:
The Thomas Warren Sears Photograph Collection documents examples of the design work of Thomas Warren Sears (1880-1966), a landscape architect and amateur photographer from Brookline, Massachusetts. Sears, who was based for most of his career in Philadelphia, designed a variety of different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments located primarily in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. In addition to some of Sears' design work, images in the collection document Sears' domestic and foreign travels, design inspirations, and family. The collection includes over 4,800 black and white negatives and glass lantern slides dated circa 1899 to 1930. While most images show private and public gardens, there are a significant number of unidentified views and views photographed in Europe during two trips he took there in 1906 and 1908. Few images are captioned or dated. In addition, there are over 50 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and 3 monographs by or about Sears.
Scope and Contents note:
The Thomas Warren Sears Photograph Collection documents examples of the design work of Thomas Warren Sears (1880-1966), a landscape architect and amateur photographer from Brookline, Massachusetts. Sears, who was based for most of his career in Philadelphia, designed a variety of different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments located primarily in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. In addition to some of Sears' design work, images in the collection document Sears' domestic and foreign travels, design inspirations, and family. The collection includes over 4,800 black and white negatives and glass lantern slides dated circa 1899 to 1930. While most images show private and public gardens, there are a significant number of unidentified views and views photographed in Europe during two trips he took there in 1906 and 1908. Few images are captioned or dated. In addition, there are over 50 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and monographs by or about Sears. Several of the glass lantern slides are duplicates of glass plate negatives in the collection. They apparently were chosen by Sears to illustrate some of his best design work, perhaps for lecture or client purposes.

In addition, there are 56 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. They range in date from 1917 to 1937 and from 1955 to 1964. Sears photographed some of his early plans; they are included in with the photographic images. Sears also photographed a handful of design plans by landscape architect Sibley Coslett Smith who practiced in Providence, Rhode Island; Sears and Smith shared the same business address there.

The Thomas Warren Sears Collection does not fully document the extent of Sears' design work. The use of glass plate negatives—which make up the bulk of the Thomas Warren Sears Collection—as a photography medium waned sometime during the first quarter of the twentieth century. As a result, the images in the Sears Collection capture examples of Sears' early to mid-career design work but they do not include jobs designed by Sears during the latter half of his design career.
Arrangement note:
The glass plate negatives were originally housed in numerous cardboard boxes manufactured for the sale of undeveloped glass plate negatives. Sears annotated the outside of the boxes with project or client names and/or locations, but the contents do not always match these labels. In addition, because very few of the glass plate negatives and lantern slides were labeled or captioned, it is not always evident where one job ended and another began if multiple projects were stored in the same carton. As a result, there are many instances in the Sears Collection where images have been inadvertently mislabeled because their identification is not apparent. Misidentified images are subject to correction as their proper identification is discovered. Each project has been assigned its own unique AAG job number based on its geographic origin. Those groups of images that have not been identified as to their location have been assigned a project number starting with 'SRS.' The collection is arranged into 3 series: 1) Photographic images (including glass plate negatives, film negatives, glass lantern slides, and photograph albums) 2) Plans and Drawings 3) Monographs
Biographical/Historical note:
Thomas Warren Sears was born in 1880 in Brookline, Massachusetts. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University in 1903 and Bachelor of Science degree in landscape architecture from the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard in 1906. Sears was an amateur photographer who won awards for his photography while at Harvard. In 1915 his images were published in the monograph, Parish Churches of England. After graduation he worked for the firm of Olmsted Brothers Landscape Architects for two years and then briefly practiced in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1913, Sears established a landscape design office in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where he spent the remainder of his professional career. Sears at one point was in a professional partnership; some of his design plans list the firm name of Sears and Wendell. He was made a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects in 1921.

Sears designed many different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments. His designs were primarily located in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. Just a few of his private landscapes include Marengo in Easton, Maryland; Sunnybrook, the Isaac H. Clothier, Jr. estate in Radnor, Pennsylvania; and Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland. In 1915, Sears started work on Reynolda, a country estate in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He generated design plans for the property intermittently over the next two decades. Reynolda's formal gardens, greenhouses, and acres of fields and woodlands subsequently became part of Wake Forest University.

During World War I, Sears designed Army camps in Battle Creek, Michigan and Spartanburg, South Carolina. He also helped lay out Langley Field, at that time an experimental aviation field in Hampton Roads, Virginia. In the 1940s, Sears designed the amphitheater at Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania for concerts, outdoor performances, and other special events. During that decade he also worked on Colonial Revival gardens at Pennsbury, William Penn's country estate in Bucks County, Pennsylvania located by the Delaware River. Sears retired in 1964 and died in 1966.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Philadelphia Architects and Buildings Project (PAB), administered by The Athenaeum of Philadelphia, includes references to design projects by Sears.

Harvard University's Loeb Library includes a number of images by Sears, some of them documenting gardens that he designed.

Harvard University's Fine Arts Library, Special Collections includes a collection of photographs and negatives of English parish churches by Sears, c. 1908. Some of the images were published in the monograph, Parish Churches of England.

The Reynolda House Museum of American Art in Winston-Salem, North Carolina includes plans by Sears of Reynolda in its Estate Archives.
Provenance:
Gift of Eleanor Sears Tibbetts, Sears' daughter, to the Horticulture Services Division (later Smithsonian Gardens) in 1992.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
For information or study purposes only. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Photographers  Search this
Landscape architects  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Switzerland  Search this
Gardens -- Scotland  Search this
Gardens -- Italy  Search this
Gardens -- Germany  Search this
Gardens -- France  Search this
Gardens -- England  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Blueprints
Albums
Plans (drawings)
Lantern slides
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection.
Identifier:
AAG.SRS
See more items in:
Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-srs
Online Media:

The Residents of Arlington Cemetery

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2010-02-23T20:34:21Z
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianMagazine
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianMagazine
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_VcKDQaVwx7c

Colin Powell Reads Gettysburg Address

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2013-11-19T14:40:42Z
Topic:
American History  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Mn4pUQmimOc

Smithsonian Institution Castle: James Smithson

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2009-11-02T17:18:17Z
Topic:
Museum administration  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianCastle
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianCastle
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_x3Brwn8wxAA

Christian Carter, descendant of contractor, Jacob Moore

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2015-08-25T15:44:18Z
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Youtube Category:
Nonprofits & Activism  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAnacostia
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAnacostia
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_y2qLlHlLbEc

Tibetan Skeleton Dance from the 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2009-07-30T13:38:05Z
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
Youtube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianfolkways
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianfolkways
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_KXySQRI14H0

Aerial America: Georgia (Full Episode)

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2020-04-21T20:00:05Z
Youtube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Sq5x25-Qb9w

Tibetan Skeleton Dance

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2011-06-20T19:29:44Z
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianfolklife
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianfolklife
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_vooQpqcAeJQ

Kennedy's Final Resting Place

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2013-05-20T14:41:47Z
Youtube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_ZPXRm6QpGPE

1960 Normandie, France Part 2

Creator:
Human Studies Film Archives  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2014-12-30T02:36:37Z
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
HSFAFilmClips
YouTube Channel:
HSFAFilmClips
Data Source:
Human Studies Film Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_uIq_zUv0EK8

Gottlieb and Bodansky Family Papers

Creator:
Bodansky, Lony Gottlieb  Search this
Gottlieb, Camilla Klaber, 1884-1964  Search this
Bodansky, Harry  Search this
Gottlieb, Hermann, 1875-1943  Search this
Extent:
1.5 Cubic feet (4 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Theresienstadt (concentration camp)
Date:
1901-1981, undated
Summary:
The Gottlieb and Bodansky family papers are a collection of correspondence, immigration material, photographs, and ephemera related to the family of Hermann and Camilla Gottlieb and their daughter Lony Gottlieb Bodansky. Hermann and Camilla were interred at Theresienstadt concentration camp by the Nazi government during World War II.
Scope and Contents:
The Gottlieb and Bodansky family papers are a collection of letters, diaries, immigration material, photographs, and ephemera related to the family of Herman and Camilla Gottlieb and their daughter Lony Gottlieb Bodansky and her husband Harry Bodansky. Herman and Camilla were interned at Theresienstadt by the Nazis during World War II. Herman died in 1943 while at Terezin and Camilla survived and immigrated to the United States in 1946. Lony Gottlieb and Harry Bodansky immigrated to the United States in 1938. The greatest portion of the materials in all series and subseries are written in German.

The collection is divided into two series. Each series is arranged by subject and chronologically at the folder level beginning with correspondence arranged by date then followed by other materials arranged chronologically and within each folder chronologically:

Series 1, Camilla Klauber Gottlieb Papers, 1901-1981, undated, is arranged into two subseries: Subseries 1, Purse Contents, 1901-1981, undated and Subseries 2, Papers, 1937-1964, undated.

Subseries 1, Purse Contents, 1901-1981, undated, is arranged with loose purse papers first, then United States War Department Envelope (WDE) documents (in ten folders), then the envelope marked "Mia" envelope (in one folder), all the contents of Camilla's purse. Each grouping begins with correspondence. The correspondence is between relatives and friends in the United States, Germany, Austria, and Palestine (later Israel). In addition to correspondence, this subseries also contains diaries, documents related to Hermann Gottlieb; financial, medical, education, immigration, and employment materials as well as photographs. The one item dated "1981" is a document that was produced earlier but carries dates up to 1981.

Subseries 2, Papers, 1937-1964, undated, contains papers relating to the Gottlieb family but that were not contained within the purse. The subseries begins with correspondence arranged chronologically and then with documents arranged chronologically. In addition to correspondence this series contains a diary for Camilla; obituary files for both Camillia and Hermann, immigration documents, travel papers, financial, loose photographs consisting of snapshots as well as formal portraits and passport photographs, and one photograph album with small snapshots of Camilla, family, and scenery.

Series 2, Bodansky Family, 1933-1964, undated, is arranged chronologically with correspondence heading the series. This series contains material about and generated by Lony Gottlieb Bodansky and her husband Harry Bodansky. The series contains correspondence, diaries, schooling, medical, immigration and travel documents for Lony; immigration materials related to their sustained efforts to secure Camilla Gottlieb status in the United States; financial material; news clippings (obituaries, fashion and a few German language items); ephemera; documents related to Harry Bodansky's efforts on behalf of Gerard T. Oschinsky's desire to immigrate to the United States; one photograph album with unidentified snapshot photographs of Lony and Harry as well as other friends and/or family members taken circa 1930s-1940s. There are also photographs taken at the 1939 New York World's Fair.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into two series.

Series 1, Camilla Klauber Gottlieb Papers, 1901-1981, undated

Subseries 1, Purse contents, 1901-1981, undated

Subseries 2, Papers, 1937-1964, undated

Series 2, Bodansky Family Papers, 1933-1964, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Camilla Klauber Gottlieb (1884-1964), nickname "Mia", was born on December 10, 1884 in Vienna, Austria to Ludwig and Caroline Hirsch Klauber. She married Hermann Gottlieb (1875-1943) on August 15, 1918 in Vienna. They had one child, Lony (1919-1970). During the rise of the Nazi government in Germany, efforts were repeatedly made by their daughter, Lony, the Klauber relations in the United States, and Harry Bodansky and his family to secure Camilla and Harry's immigration to the United States. These efforts failed. During World War II, Camilla and her husband were interned in Theresienstadt concentration camp by the Nazi government. Hermann died while in Theresienstadt of natural causes. Camilla was at last allowed to immigrate to the United States in 1946. After her immigration to the United States Camilla lived in New York City with Lony and her son-in-law Harry Bodansky (1919-2009). For a time Camilla worked at home as a hand embroiderer sewing insignia on sweaters and scarves for G.A. Embroidery Company of New York. She moved with her family when they relocated to Kensington, Maryland in 1952. Camillia died in Maryland in 1964 and was interred in the Adas Israel Cemetery in Kensington.

At some point, Camilla acquired a purse. She used this purse as a defacto file cabinet at least until 1952. Within this purse she kept all of the documents detailed in Series 1, Subseries 1.

Harry Bodansky was born on March 19, 1919 in Berlin, Germany and with the rise of Adolf Hitler he and his family moved to Vienna, Austria. He and Lony Gottlieb both attended the same school in Vienna, Austria. Lony immigrated to the United States in 1938. Harry, his parents and brother Ralph had also immigrated to the United States in 1938. Lony and Harry married in 1943 and lived in New York, New York. Harry attended the City College of New York and obtained a degree in economics. He received his master's in economics from Columbia University. He reportedly sold purse handles before becoming a writer on business and economics for a German language publication. The Bodanskys moved to Kensington, Maryland in 1952 when Harry accepted a job with the Commerce Department. They had two sons, Harvey and Robert. Lony died in 1970 and Harry died on May 21, 2009 and was interred in the Adas Israel Cemetery in Kensington.

References

"Harry Bodansky, economist, activist, 90", obituary, Washington Jewish Week, May 27, 2009.

"Mr. Harry Bodansky", obituary, Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home, Inc., website, accessed January 31, 2012.
Related Materials:
Objects related to this acquisition, Camilla's purse, clothing, jewelry, examples of her embroidery, and other objects are housed in the Division of Home and Community Life. See accesion #: 2011.0164.01-2011.0164.48.
Provenance:
Donated to the Division of Home and Community Life, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian by Robert Bodansky in August 2011.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research use. Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with cotton gloves.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Reproduction permission from Archives Center: reproduction fees may apply. All duplication requests must be reviewed and approved by Archives Center staff.
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Citation:
The Gottlieb and Bodansky Family Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1245
See more items in:
Gottlieb and Bodansky Family Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1245
Online Media:

Helen Curran Collection of Irene Castle Documents and Photographs Albums

Compiler:
Fenner, Helen Curran  Search this
Donor:
Fenner, Gloria J.  Search this
Names:
Castle, Irene, 1893-1969  Search this
Castle, Vernon  Search this
Extent:
0.3 Cubic feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Clippings
Photographs
Photograph albums
Date:
1940
Summary:
One scrapbook of newspaper clippings and one photograph album about and of Irene Castle, notable dancer, film star, and animal rights activist.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of materials from one scrapbook and one photograph album. Box one contains photographs and box two various newspaper and magazine clippings. The photographs include images of Irene and Vernon dancing, stills taken from the film, "The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle" (1939), personal photographs belonging to Helen Curran taken at Fire Island, and photographs of Orphans of the Storm. The clippings date from 1917 to 1969 and include publicity material from the film "Patria" (1917), articles on Orphans of the Storm, Irene Castle's role in shaping modern fashion, and several obituaries.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Irene Castle and her husband Vernon are considered to be among the forerunners in bringing modern dance to the United States in the early part of the twentieth century. She was born Irene Foote on April 17, 1893 in New Rochelle, New York. She met Vernon, a British vaudeville actor and comedian, in 1910, and the couple was married in 1911. Soon after their marriage they moved to France where the couple gained notice for their ballroom dance routines. Upon returning to the United States, the couple rose to stardom with original dances such as the "Texas Tommy," the "Foxtrot," and the "Castle Walk." The Castles were influential in introducing ragtime to American society and elevating the music and dance style to a more sophisticated level. Irene is credited with introducing the flapper look to America, including bobbed hair, straight, loose dresses, and headache bands.

Upon the outbreak of World War One, Vernon left the stage to join the Royal Canadian Flying Corps. Meanwhile, Irene made several feature films, including the popular serial, Patria. Vernon was killed in a plane crash while performing a training exercise in Texas on February 15, 1918. Irene never chose another dance partner and ended her public career in 1923.

Irene married three times after Vernon's death. She gave birth to two children with her third husband, Major Frederick McLaughlin. In 1939, Irene was consulted on the biographical film, The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle, starring Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire. She devoted her later life to humanitarian work, particularly in the field of animal rescue. She established Orphans of the Storm, a shelter for dogs in Deerfield, Illinois, and remained an active advocate of animal rights. Irene died of congestive heart failure in Eureka, Arkansas on January 29, 1969. She is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, the Bronx, and New York next to Vernon Castle.

Helen Curran was creator of the scrapbooks. Helen's parents, Sam and Edna Curran, were managers of Orphans of the Storm animal shelter. Helen Curran Fenner considered Irene Castle a role model and they became good friends. The donor of this collection, Gloria J. Fenner, was the stepdaughter of Helen Curran.
Related Materials:
The Archives Center holds footage of Irene and Vernon Castle's feature film The Whirl of Life (1915). The footage can be found in the Ernie Smith Jazz Film Collection (AC0491) under the title Social Dance, 1903-1961, RV OF491.1. There are also several pieces of Castle sheet music in the Sam DeVincent Sheet Music Collection, #300. They can be found in series 18, folder "Irene and Vernon Castle".
Provenance:
Donated by Ms. Gloria J. Fenner in 2010.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Dancers  Search this
Celebrities -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Clippings -- 20th century
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin -- 20th century
Photograph albums -- 20th century
Citation:
Helen Curran Collection of Irene Castle Documents and Photographs Albums, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1202
See more items in:
Helen Curran Collection of Irene Castle Documents and Photographs Albums
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1202
Online Media:

Eubie Blake Letter and Music Manuscripts

Composer:
Blake, Eubie, 1883-1983  Search this
Donor:
Dwyer, Lawrence  Search this
Extent:
0.15 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Music
Correspondence
Date:
1969 - 1969
Summary:
Collection consists of one letter and six music manuscripts by James H. "Eubie" Blake.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of one handwritten letter by Eubie Blake to Professor John Garvey, director of the University of Illinois Jazz Band, dated August 3, 1969. There are five undated manuscripts in Blake's hand of his arangements for the songs Manda, Poor Archie, Brittwood Rag, March of the Senegalese, and the W.C. Handy song, Yellow Dog Blues. In the letter Blake requests that Garvey, when playing any of these songs (for which he enclosed the manuscripts,) please mention his (Blake's) name as the arranger.

In the letter Blake also mentions Here Tis, but that manuscript was not included in this donation.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged in one series.

Series 1: Letter and Music Manuscripts, 1969
Biographical / Historical:
James Herbert "Eubie" Blake, noted ragtime pianist, was born February 7, 1883 in Baltimore, Maryland. Some government records show his birth year as 1887. His parents Emily "Emma" Johnston and James Sumner Blake had formerly been enslaved. Blake was their only child to live to maturity. Blake learned to play the pump organ and the piano while still a young child. Blake began his career as a pianist, songwriter, and arranger in 1915 in Baltimore playing piano in Aggie Shelton's bordello. He formed a songwritng partnership with Noble Sissle in 1915. In 1921, their musical Shuffle Along became a hit on Broadway and ran for fourteen months. Blake's career spanned his entire life. Perhaps his most recognizable song, I'm Just Wild About Harry, is considered a standard of the American musical canon. His life was the subject of the Broadway musical, Eubie, that premiered in 1978.

Blake married twice first to Avis Elizabeth Cecelia Lee (1881-1939) the daughter of Lawrence and Florence Lee. After her death from tuberculosis in March 1939, Blake married Marion Gant Tyler (1896-1982), widow of Willie Tyler, violinist, and daughter of James H. Gant and Nattie Thomas, on December 27, 1945 in Norfolk, Virginia. Marion acted as his business manager until her death.

Blake died in Brooklyn, New York, on 1983 February 12. He and Marion are both buried in Cypress Hills Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York.

Sources

The New Grove Dictionary of Jazz, page 114. Death certificate for Avis Blake, dated 1939, New York, New York City Municipal Deaths, 1795-1949," database Family Search, accessed July 5, 2019

Certificate of Marriage for James Hubert Blake and Marion Louise Gant, dated 1945 December 27, Virginia Marriage Certificates, 1936-1988, Family Search, accessed July 5, 2019
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution by Lawrence Dwyer in 2016.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Arrangement (Music)  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts -- Music -- 1960-1970
Music -- Manuscripts
Correspondence -- 1960-1970
Citation:
Eubie Blake Letter and Music Manuscripts, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1400
See more items in:
Eubie Blake Letter and Music Manuscripts
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1400

Father Charles E. Coughlin Collection

Topic:
Liberation Journal
Social Justice
Dearborn Independent
Creator:
Coughlin, Charles E. (Charles Edward), 1891-1979  Search this
Names:
Ford, Henry, 1863-1947  Search this
Pelley, William Dudley, 1890-1965  Search this
Extent:
9 Cubic feet (27 boxes, 1 map-folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Letters (correspondence)
Pamphlets
Periodicals
Lectures
Articles
Photographs
Books
Sermons
Speeches
Audio cassettes
Date:
1919-2015, undated
Scope and Contents:
This refence collection was assembled to assist in writing a biography of the Reverend Mr. Charles E. Coughlin. The collection contains books, booklets, published sermons, published lectures, pamphlets and other printed materials. Of these, 57 were written by Coughlin. The remainder of the materials relate to him directly or have chapters or passages relating to him. Additionally, there are periodicals, including newspaper and magazine articles, and a full set of Coughlin's weekly publication, Social Justice, 1936-1942; other periodicals such as William Dudley Pelley's weekly Liberation Journal, 1938-1948; copies of Henry Ford's Dearborn Independent; original photographs, including images of Coughlin and of his church; letters; copies of the FBI's files on Coughlin; and (non-original) recordings of his broadcasts.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in four series.

Series 1: Coughlin, Charles E., Writings and Speeches, 1930-1972, undated

Series 2: Photographs and Ephemera, 1927-1979, undated

Series 3: Periodicals and Publications, 1919-2012

Series 4: Reference Materials, 1933-2015, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Charles Edward Coughlin was born on October 25, 1891 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada to Thomas J. and Amelia Mahoney Coughlin. He was educated in Canada and attended St. Michael's College, Toronto. After graduation he prepared for Holy Orders within the Basilian Fathers at St. Basil's Seminary. He was ordained to the Roman Catholic priesthood in 1916. Coughlin left the Basilian order after 1923 and moved to Detroit, Michigan.

Coughlin was accepted into the Roman Catholic Archidiocese of Detroit in 1923. He was eventually assigned to the Shrine of the Little Flower in Royal Oak, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. His reputation for formidable preaching led to the growth of his congregation, and in 1926 Coughlin began broadcasting after a Klu Klux Klan cross burning on the lawn of the church.

He eventually expanded the topics of his broadcast to the political arena. It was with this programmatic change that Coughlin became one of the most controversial figures in the first half of the twentieth century. Described as the "Radio Priest," "The Fighting Priest," and the "Angel of the Airways," Coughlin broadcast weekly from a radio studio in Royal Oak from 1926-1940. Taking a strident and nationalistic tone, he lambasted immigrants, bankers, Communists and other groups. Breaching the line between religion and politics he also lectured and sermonized on government policy. While initially favoring the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt, he eventually became one of the president's harshest critics.

In 1936 he began publishing Social Justice a weekly paper. Coughlin's broadcasts were so successful that between 1931-1936 a new Shrine of the Little Flower was built. The zig-zag Art Deco style of the Shrine became a tourist destination for Coughlin's fans. His increasingly harsh rehtoric coincided with the outbreak of World War II. While stating he was not antisemitic, he professed support for some of the governmental policies of Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini in part because they were a check on Communist Russia. The Vatican and many Roman Catholic American bishops disagreed and wanted Coughlin to leave the airwaves. Eventually he was forced off the air and publication of Social Justice was halted.

Coughlin remained parish priest at the Shrine of the Little Flower until his retirment in 1966. He spent his retirement publishing and giving the occasional interview. Coughlin died on October 27, 1979. He is buried in the Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Southfield, Michigan.
Separated Materials:
Objects related to Father Charles E. Coughlin are held in the Division of Cultural and Community Life.
Provenance:
The collection was purchased by the National Museum of American History from Todd Moriarty. Moriarty had acquired the collection from an individual who amassed the materials with plans to write a book on Coughlin.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Reproduction restricted due to copyright or trademark. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Anti-communist movements -- United States  Search this
Religion and politics  Search this
Catholic Church  Search this
Radio in religion  Search this
Priests  Search this
Catholicism  Search this
Radio broadcasting  Search this
Radio in politics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Letters (correspondence) -- 20th century.
Pamphlets -- 20th century
Periodicals -- 20th century
Lectures -- 20th century
Articles -- 20th century
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- 20th century
Books -- 20th century
Sermons
Speeches -- 20th century
Audio cassettes -- 20th century
Citation:
Charles E. Coughlin Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1389
See more items in:
Father Charles E. Coughlin Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1389
Online Media:

William D. Stone General Store Ledger Book and Papers

Creator:
Stone, William Dickinson, 1836-1908  Search this
Donor:
Perdue, Crispin  Search this
Extent:
0.3 Cubic feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Financial records
Ledgers (account books)
Place:
Novelty (Va.)
Virginia -- 19th century
Date:
1865-2003
bulk 1865-1885
Summary:
A general store ledger and business papers from the William D. Stone General Store located in Franklin County, Virginia and a Stone and Parker family history.
Scope and Contents:
The William D. Stone General Store Ledger and Papers consists of a ledger book from a general store in Franklin County, Virginia, containing account information about products purchased, by whom, and the prices paid for a two year period, 1865-1867. The ledger is comparable to other general store ledgers of the time in what it documents and records. There is one folder of assorted business papers containing legal papers, correspondence, promissory notes, and lists. There is also a folder containing a Stone and Parker family history written in 2003. The bulk of the materials covers the time period, 1865-1885.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized in one series.

Series 1: General Store Ledger and Papers, 1865-2003, undated
Biographical / Historical:
William Dickinson Stone (1836-1908) was the son of Edmond and Nancy Stone. He was born in Pittsylvania County, Viriginia. He joined the Confederate Army at Chatham, Pittsylvania County in May 1861. He served in Company F, 6th Virginia Cavalry for the duration of the war. He reportedly returned home from the war to find his land confiscated. He and his brother opened a country store at Novelty, Franklin County, Virginia, which he operated from 1865 until he married Mary Rosabelle Parker in 1867. He purchased a farm in Franklin County. They raised a family and left many descendants. Stone died in October 1908 and was buried in the Stone family cemetery, at Rocky Mount, Franklin County, Virginia.

What is commonly known as the general store grew out of farm store, or plantation store, culture. This was a store where landowners could sell goods and food stuffs produced on their own land while also speculating and selling goods imported from elsewhere. This later grew into the general store being independent of a particular farm and standing on its own as a mercantile establishment solely dependent on its own success as a store for survival. During the 19th century general stores were a common feature of many towns and rural by-ways. The stores carred general merchandise, a variety of goods and staples needed by the surrounding community. These general stores may also have functioned as post offices, trading centers, and local banks. Items often were bartered when ready cash was not available. General stores were not unique to any one region of the United States and while they may have been called by a different name in different parts of the country, they were a staple of the rural agarian lifestyle of the United States well into the early 20th century.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, by Crispin Perdue in 2015.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Merchants -- 1860-1870  Search this
General stores -- 1860-1870  Search this
Civil war  Search this
Commerce -- 1860-1870  Search this
Storekeepers -- 1860-1870  Search this
Genre/Form:
Financial records -- 1860-1870
Ledgers (account books) -- 1860-1870
Citation:
William D. Stone General Store Ledger Book, 1865-1867, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1358
See more items in:
William D. Stone General Store Ledger Book and Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1358
Online Media:

Westbrook Theatre Corporation Records

Creator:
Westbrook Theatre Corporation  Search this
Westbrook Theatre  Search this
Other:
Robinson, Verna Kimball, 1904-1988  Search this
Robinson, Colby W., 1900-1950  Search this
Colby Theatre -- 20th century  Search this
Hawkes, Philip, 1897-1962 -- 20th century  Search this
Extent:
0.15 Cubic feet (1.5 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Fryeburg, Maine
Westbrook, Maine
Bingham, Maine
Date:
1934-1950, undated
bulk 1939-1942
Summary:
This collection contains the business records of the Westbrook Theatre Corporation of Westbrook, Maine. Records include the Colby, Rialto, and Knights of Pythias motion picture theatres in Bingham, Fryeburg, and elsewhere. The collection includes financial records, business correspondence, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
Series 1, Westbrook Theatre Corporation Records, 1934-1950, undated. This series contains ledgers, business-related correspondence and documents, monthly accounts detailing attendance, cost, revenue, and program for the three theatres managed by Westbrook; equipment advertising and specifications, licenses, receipts, documents related to various film exchanges and motion picture production companies (including Paramount, RKO, and Universal), union contracts, check books, a weekly report card book (a book of standardized forms for motion picture projectors produced by the International Photographers of the Motion Picture Industry, a branch of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE)), and black and white photographs of the Colby Theatre in Bingham, Maine.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series.
Biographical / Historical:
The Westbrook Theatre Corporation was formed July 30, 1934 in Westbrook, Maine. The president was Colby W. Robinson and Philip W. Hawkes was treasurer. There were 161 shares of stock divided among Robinson (eighty shares), Hawkes (eighty shares), and Marion Hawkes (one share). At its inception the corporation's stock was valued at ten dollars a share. The corporation ran the Colby Theatre in Bingham, the Rialto Theatre, and later rented the Knights of Pythias Hall in Fryeburg, Maine.

The Corporation was independent, not allied with or owned by one motion picture studio. Film rentals were handled through exchanges, and motion pictures produced by Paramount, RKO, and Universal (to name three producers) regularly appeared on its programs. Programs included such first run films as Citizen Kane, Young Man With a Horn, and The Howards of Virginia, motion pictures with well-known stars produced by the major studios. B pictures made up a considerable portion of the fare as well as motion picture serials such as the Blondie comedies, and Westerns. The meticulous recording of daily programs, attendance, and receipts as well as supporting documents provides an accurate basis for research into the daily life of an independently run motion picture theatre.

The papers indicate that day to day management and running of the theatres was the job of Robinson and his wife Verna. Later Verna's sister, Lucy, seems to have joined the business. With Robinson's death in 1950 it is unknown if the Corporation continued or was dissolved. Philip and Marion Hawkes rarely show up in the documents. The Hawkeses eventually moved to Southern California so perhaps that explains their absence from the records.

Colby W. Robinson was born in Bingham, Maine on November 16, 1900, the son of Walter E. Robinson and Nellie M. Preble. Robinson's father was a merchant. On October 21, 1925 Robinson married Verna L. Kimball, the daughter of Leon L. and Ruth Clifford Kimball. Verna's father was a farmer in Albany, Maine and Verna was born on February 28, 1904 in Albany. By the 1940 United States census, they were living in Portland, Maine along with Verna's younger sister Lucy. Robinson listed his occupation as theatre manager; Verna was listed as bookeeper, and Lucy was a theatre cashier. Robinson died in 1950, and it is unclear if the business continued past his death as the records in this collection cease in 1950. Verna died November 28, 1988. Both of them are buried in the village cemetery at Bingham, Maine. They had no children.

Phillip Hawkes, treasurer, was born in Westbrook, Maine on July 17, 1897 to E. Leroy and Maude Laura Hawkes. Leroy Hawkes was a laundryman. He married Marion A. Harlow on April 5, 1924. By the 1930 census, Hawkes is listed as a superintendent in a laundry. Hawkes died on September 21, 1962 and Marion died November 17, 1986. Both are buried at Forest Lawn Cypress Cemetery in Orange County, California.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian, by Archives Center employee Craig A. Orr in 2013.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Motion pictures -- History  Search this
Motion picture industry  Search this
Knights of Pythias  Search this
Theater -- History -- 20th century  Search this
Citation:
Westbrook Theatre Corporation Records, 1934-1950, undated, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Westbrook Theatre Corporation Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1296
See more items in:
Westbrook Theatre Corporation Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1296

Philadelphia Theater Plat Book

Creator:
Simonson, Frank  Search this
Donor:
See, Wayne  Search this
See, Wayne  Search this
Names:
American Theatre -- Geographic subdivision--Philadelphia (Pa.)  Search this
Arch Street Theatre -- Geographic subdivision--Philadelphia (Pa.)  Search this
Forrest Theatre -- Geographic subdivision--Philadelphia (Pa.)  Search this
Kensington Theatre -- Geographic subdivision--Philadelphia (Pa.)  Search this
Standard Theatre -- Geographic subdivision--Philadelphia (Pa.)  Search this
Wilmington Theatre -- Geographic subdivision--Wilmington (Del.)  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Cubic feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Design drawings
Plat books
Date:
1911-1913, undated
Summary:
Theater plat book used at the Philadelphia Theater in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania showing stage plats for various productions.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of one item, a theater plat book compiled by Frank Simonson, a stage carpenter, containing design drawings and placement for stage sets for a variety of plays. The volume includes not only diagrams for the placement of flats and platforms, furniture, and props but also includes elevation renderings for a small number of plays. The plats are not always dated and contain little information other than dimensions and placement of sets, flats, and furniture. The volume illustrates a wide range of the sometimes simple, sometimes elaborate, sets employed in the theater of the early 20th century.

Series 1, Theater Plat Book, 1911-1913, undated The volume was begun in 1911 when Frank Simonson was employed at the American Theatre in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 1913 is the latest date found in this plat book. A list of plays appears at the beginning of the volume, and the designs are indexed. The volume contains set diagrams for many popular and now obscure plays including Uncle Tom's Cabin, The Prisoner of Zenda, Romeo and Juliet, Lena Rivers, George M. Cohan's Forty-Five Minutes From Broadway, Jane Eyre, Secret Service, The Squaw Man, and many others. The volume is indexed and contains plats and/or renderings for 152 plays.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into one series.

Series 1: Theater Plat Book, 1911-1913, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Frank Simonson was born in April 1879 in New York, New York, the son of George and Harriet Hunter Simonson. George was a carpenter and his son persumably learned the trade from him. The family lived in East Rockaway, Queens until 1900 when upon George's death, they moved to Palmer Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On August 23, 1902 he married Mabel Matheys, the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Warley Matheys in Manhattan, New York. The Simonsons first lived on Gordon Street in Philadelphia, but by 1920 they had moved to East Dauphin Street. He and his wife appear to have had no children.

Simonson was a charter member of the local chapter of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE). He built sets for several Philadelphia theaters, including the Arch Street Theater, Standard Theater, Forrest Theater, Kensington Theater, American Theater, and the Wilmington Theater. In the 1900 United States Census Simonson listed his occupation as "stage carpenter". In the 1906-1907 Julius Cahn's Official Theatrical Guide Simonson is listed as "prop man" for the Standard Theater. In the 1909-1910 edition of the Cahn guide he is listed at the same theater as a "stage carpenter". Simonson's plat book was started in 1911 while he was employed at the American Theater, Philadelphia. By the 1940 Census Simonson was listed as "installing sound equipment" in the Metropolitan Opera House in Philadelphia where he was listed as part of the technical staff. Simonson died on August 18, 1958 and was buried in Oakland Cemetery, Philadelphia.

The plat book was obtained by Wayne See in 1981 when IATSE (Local 8) was vacating its offices at 1720 Delancey Street in Philadelphia.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian by Wayne See in May 2014.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Stagecraft  Search this
Theater  Search this
Stagehands  Search this
Vaudeville  Search this
Genre/Form:
Design drawings
Plat books
Citation:
Philadelphia Theater Plat Book, 1911-1913, undated, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1318
See more items in:
Philadelphia Theater Plat Book
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1318

Humphrey Family Postcard Album

Collector:
Humphrey, Joseph  Search this
Humphrey, Marion  Search this
Humphrey Family  Search this
Names:
Humphrey, Charles Frederick, General  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Cubic feet (1 box)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Albums
Greeting cards
Postcards
Picture postcards
Date:
ca. 1905-1906.
Summary:
An album of postcards dating from 1903 to 1907, including some that are unsent and undated. Many are addressed to members of the Humphrey family, but the individual who created the album is unknown.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of a single album of postcards that are both correspondence and blank. Postcards that were mailed are dated from 1903 to 1906; others are undated. Many of the postcards are reproductions of scenic images from places including, but not limited to, New York City, New York, Atlantic City, New Jersey, Annapolis, Maryland, and Nice, France. Other postcards are Christmas holiday cards, and there are several cartoon postcards of the story Madame Butterfly. There are four "real photo" postcards on photographic postcard paper. The recipients of the postcards vary, and there is no information as to who compiled the album. Several addressees of the postcards are members of the Humphrey family.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series.

Series 1: Postcard Album, 1903-1907
Biographical / Historical:
Many members of the Humphrey family experienced long and distinguished careers in the military. Charles Frederick Humphrey Sr. was born in Tioga County, New York on September 2, 1844. His military career began at the age of eighteen when he enlisted in the Fifth Artillery, regular army, in March 1863, as a Private. Humphrey married Juanita Foster DaCosta and the union produced five sons; Evan Harris, Charles Frederick Jr., Julian F., Marion Bell and Joseph DaCosta. Humphrey's military service spanned forty four years. He was the first recipient of the Civil War Campaign Medal and also received the Medal of Honor and Distinguished Service Cross. When Humphrey retired on July 1, 1907, Congress honored his service with the rank of Major General, mostly based on the recommendation of President Taft. After retirement Humphrey resided in Washington, D.C. and his five sons continued the tradition of long military service.

Sons Evan Harris (March 5, 1875-August 30, 1963) and Charles Frederick Jr. (August 11, 1876-January 22, 1968) retired as Brigadier Generals of the United States Army. Another son, Marion Bell Humphrey (September 15, 1887-August 20, 1953) retired as a Colonel of the United States Marine Corps. Julian F. Humphrey retired from the United States Merchant Marine and lastly Joseph Da Costa Humphrey also retired from military service. Charles Frederick Humphrey Sr. died on June 4, 1926 at the age of 81 at Walter Reed General Hospital and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors. Other members of the Humphrey family are also buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
Provenance:
Provenance unknown. The album was found in the collections of the National Air and Space Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. : Album pages are slightly warped, and some are torn where they secure the postcards; some postcards are worn around the edges and slightly torn.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Wit and humor  Search this
Christmas  Search this
Tourism  Search this
Caricatures and cartoons  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albums -- 1900-1920
Greeting cards
Postcards -- 1900-1910
Picture postcards -- 1900-1920
Citation:
Humphrey Family Postcard Album, ca. 1905-1906. Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1196
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1196

Haskell and Barker Car Company Photographic Negatives

Creator:
Haskell & Barker Car Company  Search this
Extent:
13.5 Cubic feet (47 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
1926-1957
Summary:
A collection of photograpic negatives from the Haskell and Barker Car Company, manufacturers of railroad cars, of Michigan City, Indiana.
Scope and Contents:
An extensive and detailed guide to this collection was produced by John N. Stine of the Division of Transportation, National Museum of American History in 1991 and typed by Mary E. Braunagel, published by the Smithsonian Institution. The guide gives the negative number and a brief description or caption to each negative. The negatives are film and not glass plate. The collection was also scanned to video disc. The following quotes are from the Division of Transportation guide.

"A collection of photographs documenting the Haskell and Barker Car Company's activities from 1926 to 1957. The gaps between negative numbers assigned by Haskell and Barker indicate that a portion were either discarded by the photographer or removed from the file and not replaced. Although the car building operation at Michigan City, Indiana began in 1852, the photos listed in this catalogue represent the complete holdings of the Division of Transportation", and these represent the complete holdings transferred to the Archives Center.

"A great deal of attention has been directed at the operation of the plant. Shop scenes recording special tooling, testing of car components and the construction or upgrading of the car building plant are plentiful. In some instances a car is photographed during each step of construction, others only after completion. Occasionally a car was returned to the plant for a rebuild either due to its becoming obsolete or due to major damage. In any case, these repairs are well documented."

"Scenes showing shop personnnel operating car building equipment or engaged in the assembly of rolling stock are abundant."

"This is a very fine collection in that it deviates from the standard practice of recording finished cars and concentrates on the daily operation of the building plant. Except for some World War II troop sleeper views, all of the pictures are of railroad freight stock: box, hopper, refrigerator, tank, flat, and cabooses."

"The photos themselves range in quality from fair to excellent." From the Division of Transportation guide to the Haskell and Barker Car Company, Michigan City, Indiana, Photographic Collection, 1991. Copies of this guide are available in the Archives Center reading room and at the National Museum of American History library.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in one series. The photographic negatives are arranged by negative number assigned by Smithsonian Photographic Services within broad chronological order.

Series 1: Photographic Negatives, 1926-1957, undated
Biographical / Historical:
In 1852, the wagon and freight car firm of Sherman, Haskell, Aldridge & Company was founded in Michigan City, Indiana on the shores of Lake Michigan. The founders of the company were Dr. Mason C. Sherman, Frederick Haskell (1810-1890), and Hiram Aldridge, Haskell's brother-in-law. The three reportedly had moved to Michigan City from Ogdensburg, New York. Sherman left the firm in 1855 and sold his interest to John Barker (1818-1878). Barker, a merchant and grain broker, had originally come from Andover, Massachusetts to Michigan City in 1835. The firm's name was changed to Haskell, Barker & Aldridge. In addition to rail cars the firm produced Woodbury corn shelling threshing machines and J.J. Mann reapers. Upon Aldrige's retirment in 1858 the firm became known simply as Haskell & Barker. In 1871 the firm was incorporated as the Haskell & Barker Car Company. Haskell became president, Barker treasurer, and Nathaniel P. Rogers secretary. Rogers had joined the firm in 1864 as an accountant. John Barker retired in 1869, and his son John H. Barker joined the firm. Haskell retired in 1883, and John H. Barker became president with Rogers as secretary and treasurer. John H. Barker and Rogers ran the company until Rogers' death in 1906.

Haskell & Barker initially manufactured passenger and wood-structure freight rail cars. By the late 1850s they had ceased manufacture of passenger cars and devoted themselves strictly to freight cars. The American Civil War brought a surge in business because of government contracts. This increase in business not only grew the company but made it one of the largest employers in Indiana and one of the wealthiest.

The company at one time produced 15,000 cars a year and in 1907 was the largest factory complex in Indiana, covering fifty-one acres along Eighth and Wabash Streets. In 1907 there were 990,000 feet of factory space. The south yards consisted of 1,308,344 square feet on 109 acres. In 1913, Haskell & Barker suffered a massive fire at the south yards. In 1916 it became know as Haskell & Barker, Inc. After 1922 it was a subsidiary of the Pullman Car Company and in 1934 became known as the Haskell & Barker Shops of Pullman-Standard. It returned to manufacturing passenger cars briefly during World War II.

The factory is said to have been the birthplace of the modern assembly line, an innovation often credited to Henry Ford. The factory also produced the PS-1, the first standardized box car on American railroads. As the company entered the late 20th century, production shifted to other locations and the company announced the closing of the facility in December of 1970. At that time the workforce numbered seventy with over 1,000 workers having been laid off. The physical plant suffered a massive fire in July 1973 which totally destroyed the entire complex. Only two buildings survived, the original Haskell & Barker office built in 1914 and the machine shop next door. A warehouse on the north side of the complex also escaped the fire but was later razed.

The site of the Haskell & Barker factory site was made into an outlet shopping mall named Lighthouse Place, with the Pullman Cafe in the surviving Pullman buildings. The shopping center, renamed Prime Outlets by 2007, was at the time Michigan City's biggest attraction with over 3 million visitors.

Frederick Haskell was born in East Windsor, Connecticut in 1810, the son of Eli B. Haskell (1778-1861) and Sophia Bissell (1785-1816). He married Caroline E. Aldridge (1822-1900) on November 11, 1852 in Chazy, Clinton County, New York. Haskell was a dry goods merchant, as well as a miller and textile manufacturer before moving to Michigan City and becoming involved with Haskell & Barker. He and Caroline adopted a son, Frederick Tudor Haskell (1854-1935). Haskell retired in 1883 and sold his interests in the company. He died on May 6, 1890 in Chicago, Illinois and was buried in Odgensburg Cemetery, Ogdensburg, New York. His estate was valued at $1,635,000 and was left to his wife, various relations, and his adopted son.

John Barker married Cordelia Collamer (1818-1894) and the couple had at least two children, Anna and a son, John Henry Barker (1844-1910). John H. joined the company in 1869 upon the retirement of his father. John H. had been successfully engaged in the wholesale grocery business in Chicago and later in Springfield, Illinois prior to his return to Michigan City. John H. became the General Manger of the company, and in 1883 he became President. By 1910 he was worth an estimated fifty to sixty million dollars. The company became prosperous enough that John H. built a substantial mansion on Washington Street in Michigan City in 1905. This mansion was later listed on the National Register of Historic Places. John Barker was also president of the Harbor Company and played an instrumental role in many improvements in Michigan City, including erecting a bandstand in Washington Park. John H. was married twice. His first marriage was to Jennie M. Brooks (1843-1891). They had three children, who all died before the age of five. He married his second wife, Katherine Fitzgerald (circa 1858-1910) in 1893. They had one daughter, Catherine (1896-1970) who later married Charles V. Hickox. Both John H. and his wife died in 1910, and they were buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Michigan City.

Sources

Egelhof, Joseph, "Chicago Leads Nation As Rail Supply Source", Chicago Daily Tribune, January 13, 1952.

Harper, Charlton E. Railway Car Builders of the United States and Canada. New York, NY: Interurban Press, 1957.

"Our Heritage", The Michigan City News Dispatch, 1976. http://www.mclib.org/ourheri1.htm

"A Look Back", The Michigan City News Dispatch, 2007.

Sederberg, Deborah, "Book takes a look back at Washington Park history", thenewsdispatch.com, May 13, 2011. findagrave.com (last accessed April 25, 2013 and May 1, 2013.)
Provenance:
Originally collected for the Division of Transportation (now the Division of Work & Industry) reference files. Date and source of acquisition unknown.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning intellectual property rights. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Railroads -- Rolling-stock  Search this
Railroads -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Freight cars  Search this
Railroad companies  Search this
Railroad trains  Search this
Citation:
Haskell and Barker Car Company Photographic Negatives, 1926-1957, undated, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1183
See more items in:
Haskell and Barker Car Company Photographic Negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1183
Online Media:

W.A. Fishbaugh Panama Canal Photograph Album

Creator:
Hunt, Mary Alice Minear  Search this
Hunt, George Laird  Search this
Fishbaugh, William Arthur  Search this
Minear, A. Bruce  Search this
Source:
Engineering and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Former owner:
Engineering and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Extent:
0.15 Cubic feet (1 box)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Photograph albums
Place:
Panama Canal (Panama)
Panama -- 1900-1910
Date:
1905-1908.
Summary:
Photograph album of commercially-produced photographs of Panama Canal construction.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection consists of a photograph album of 100 commercially produced views of Panama Canal construction. Also included are some views of life in the Canal Zone, including hospitals, villages, street scenes, jungles, cemeteries, animal life, and bullfights. The album was assembled by A. Bruce Minear, who was sent to Panama by President Theodore Roosevelt to develop the YMCA for the men working on the canal. Most photographs are captioned.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in one series.

Series 1, Photograph Album, 1905-1907
Historical:
On November 18, 1903, the United States and Panama negotiated the Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty, which granted the U.S. permission to construct a canal that would join the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Construction for the Panama Canal began on May 4, 1904. The large workforce (at its highest population in 1913 it numbered 44,733 men, not including those sick, on leave, or otherwise absent) had a great impact on Panama. As there were not enough amenities to accommodate them when they arrived, they built entire communities, paved streets, improved communication systems, and installed water and sewage systems. Likewise, the railroad was improved for more efficient transportation of supplies, labor, food, and equipment. Much to the credit of Chief Sanitary Officer Dr. William Crawford Gorgas, yellow fever was completely eradicated on the Isthmus and malaria cases greatly reduced. Native villages and towns along the planned construction route were required to relocate.

The first self-propelled, ocean-bound vessel traveled on the canal on January 7, 1914, and the canal was formally opened in August of that year. The Panama Canal construction project was the most expensive construction project in U.S. history to that date, costing $375,000,000.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

W. P. Stine Panama Canal Papers (NMAH.AC.1039)

John Frances Little Panama Canal Scrapbook Photograph Albums (NMAH.AC.0708)

Katherine Kingsford Panama Canal Photograph Album (NMAH.AC.1040)

A.R. Van Tassell Photograph Albums (NMAH.AC.1015)
Provenance:
This collection was donated to the National Museum of American History's Division of the History of Science and Technology, Engineering and Industry Collections by Mary Alice Minear Hunt and George Laird Hunt, 1987.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research and access on site by appointment. Unprotected photographs must be handled with gloves.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Villages -- Panama  Search this
Streets -- Panama  Search this
Hospitals -- Panama  Search this
Jungles -- Panama  Search this
Animals -- Panama  Search this
Bullfights  Search this
Canals -- Panama  Search this
Cemeteries -- Panama  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1900-1910
Photograph albums -- 20th century
Citation:
W.A. Fishbaugh Panama Canal Photograph Album, 1905-1908, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1021
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1021
Online Media:

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By