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Lake Bosumtwi, south of Kumasi, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1959
Local Numbers:
U 2 GHA 27 EE 59
General:
The date on the slide is OCT 59.
Local Note:
57938 1 32
Frame value is 1.
Slide No. U 2 GHA 27 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Landscape -- Photographs  Search this
Natural landscapes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 18711
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref10258

Lake Bosumtwi, south of Kumasi, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
Lake Bosumtwi is situated in south-central Ghana, 17 miles (27 km) southeast of Kumasi. The only true inland lake in the country, it has no surface outlet and was formed in a meteorite impact crater. With an area of 19 square miles (49 square km) and a depth of 230-240 feet (70-73 metres), the lake is fed by small streams that tumble down the crater's steep sides (500-1,400 feet [150-425 metres] above water level). Development of tourist facilities on the lakeshore in 1976 led to the resettlement of the residents of Abonu. ["Lake Bosumtwi." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2009. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 11 May. 2009]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Local Numbers:
U 2 GHA 28 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
57938 1 32
Frame value is 3.
Slide No. U 2 GHA 28 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 18712
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref10259

Natural landscapes

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
Lake Bosumtwi, sacred lake of the Asante, near Kumasi, Ghana. The date on the slide is OCT 59.
Local Numbers:
U 2 GHA 29 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
57938 1 32
Frame value is 4.
Slide No. U 2 GHA 29 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Landscape -- Photographs  Search this
Natural landscapes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 18713
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref10260

Natural landscapes

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
Lake Bosumtwi, sacred lake of the Asante, near Kumasi, Ghana. The date on the slide is OCT 59.
Local Numbers:
U 2 GHA 30 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
57938 1 32
Frame value is 12.
Slide No. U 2 GHA 30 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Landscape -- Photographs  Search this
Natural landscapes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 18714
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref10261

Natural landscapes

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
Lake Bosumtwi, sacred lake of the Asante, near Kumasi, Ghana. The date on the slide is OCT 59.
Local Numbers:
U 2 GHA 30.1 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
57938 1 32
Frame value is 17.
Slide No. U 2 GHA 30.1 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Landscape -- Photographs  Search this
Natural landscapes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 18715
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref10262

Lake Bosumtwi, south of Kumasi, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
Lake Bosumtwi is situated in south-central Ghana, 17 miles (27 km) southeast of Kumasi. The only true inland lake in the country, it has no surface outlet and was formed in a meteorite impact crater. With an area of 19 square miles (49 square km) and a depth of 230-240 feet (70-73 metres), the lake is fed by small streams that tumble down the crater's steep sides (500-1,400 feet [150-425 metres] above water level). Development of tourist facilities on the lakeshore in 1976 led to the resettlement of the residents of Abonu. ["Lake Bosumtwi." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2009. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 11 May. 2009]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Local Numbers:
U 2 GHA 31 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
57938 1 32
Frame value is 7.
Slide No. U 2 GHA 31 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Natural landscapes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 18716
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref10263

Natural landscapes

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1959
Scope and Contents:
Lake Bosumtwi, sacred lake of the Asante, near Kumasi, Ghana. The date on the slide is OCT 59.
Local Numbers:
U 2 GHA 32 EE 59
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
57938 1 32
Frame value is 11.
Slide No. U 2 GHA 32 EE 59
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Landscape -- Photographs  Search this
Natural landscapes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 18717
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref10264

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 1 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Frame value is 25.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 1 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4654
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21166

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 2 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Frame value is 27.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 2 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4655
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21167

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 2.0.1 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Frame value is 28.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 2.0.1 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4656
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21168

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 3 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
12
Frame value is 21.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 3 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4657
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21169

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 3.0.1 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
12
Frame value is 24.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 3.0.1 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4658
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21170

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 4 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
12
Frame value is 25.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 4 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4659
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21171

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 5 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
12
Frame value is 22.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 5 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4660
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21172

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 5.0.1 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
12
Frame value is 29.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 5.0.1 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4661
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21173

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 5.0.2 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
12
Frame value is 31.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 5.0.2 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Animals -- Africa  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4662
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21175

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 6 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
12
Frame value is 4.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 6 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4663
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21176

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 7 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
12
Frame value is 6.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 7 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4664
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21177

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 8 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
12
Frame value is 5.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 8 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4665
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21178

Shrine house priestess Okomfoyaa Anosua and attendants, Besease, Ghana

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Asante (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Ghana
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Similar to a typical traditional Asante courtyard house, a shrine house or 'Obosomfie' is made up of 4 buildings enclosing a central courtyard or 'gyase'. Three of the buildings are open to the courtyard with raised floors. One of these is reserved for the drummers; another room is used by the singers; the third open room is used as a cooking area where ceremonial meals were regularly prepared to be partaken of by the gods. The fourth building, housing the shrine, is closed by decorated walls or intricate open-work screen walls. The entry to this room is usually strictly restricted to the priest and his attendants. In their communication with mankind, the 'abosom' or tutelary spirits, require a medium. This function is carried out by priests known as 'akomfo' (sing. okomfo). These have the ability to become possessed by their 'obossom' (pl. abossom) and, by so doing, act as the mouthpiece of the god, offering advice or prophesying the future." [Asante Traditional Buildings. World Heritage. A Ghana Museums and Monuments Publication]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
F 2 ASH 9 EE 70
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
12
Frame value is 3.
Slide No. F 2 ASH 9 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Dance  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 4666
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Ghana
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref21179

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