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Rudolf Arnheim papers

Creator:
Arnheim, Rudolf  Search this
Names:
Harvard University  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Sarah Lawrence College  Search this
University of Michigan  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Kepes, Gyorgy, 1906-2001  Search this
Sheldon, Alice Bradley, 1915-1987  Search this
Extent:
9.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Diaries
Date:
1919-1998
Summary:
The papers of art historian, educator, writer and psychologist Rudolf Arnheim measure 9.6 linear feet and date from 1919 to 1998. The papers document his career in New York, Michigan, and abroad through biographical material, correspondence, writings, lectures, diaries, printed material, and sound recordings.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian, educator, writer and psychologist Rudolf Arnheim measure 9.6 linear feet and date from 1919 to 1998. The papers documents his career in New York, Michigan, and abroad through biographical material, correspondence, writings, lectures, diaries, printed material, and sound recordings.

Biographical material includes a bibliography, biographical sketches, contracts and agreements, sound cassettes of interviews, and other miscellaneous material.

Correspondence is with colleagues, editors, publishers, and universities on various subjects. The bulk of the correspondence is arranged by subject such as architects, art historians, dance, and film. There is correspondence with Harvard University, University of Michigan, Museum of Modern Art, and New School of Social Research, as well as various individuals such as Josef Albers, Gyorgy Kepes, and Alice Sheldon.

Writings and lectures include book reviews, articles, lecture drafts and notes, sound recordings of lectures, manuscripts, and copies of published articles.

Arnheim's diaries date from 1919 to 1987 and discuss his early life as a student in Germany and career as an educator and lecturer. Some diaries include draft writings.

Printed material includes lecture announcements, reviews, clippings, programs, brochures, assorted material from Sarah Lawrence College, and two instructional sound cassettes.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 5 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1939-1991 (Box 1; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1940-1998 (Boxes 1-5; 4.4 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Lectures, 1930-1989 (Boxes 5-8; 2.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Diaries, 1919-1987 (Boxes 8-9; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1928-circa 1990 (Boxes 9-11; 1.2 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Rudolf Arnheim (1904-2007) was a writer, educator, art historian and psychologist who was born in Germany and immigrated to the United States where he primarily worked in New York and Massachusetts.

Rudolf Arnheim was born in Berlin, Germany on July 15, 1904. He received his doctorate in psychology from the University of Berlin in 1928. Arnheim worked as a film critic and editor for several magazines and journals after graduation. During this time, he gathered information which would be compiled in his book Film as Art (1932). When the Nazis came into power in 1933, Arnheim moved to Rome where he worked at the Institute for the Educational Film for six years, then moved to London in 1939 and worked as a translator for the British Broadcasting Company.

Arnheim immigrated to the United States in 1940. In 1943, he became a psychology professor at Sarah Lawrence College where he continued to teach until 1968. He also taught at the New School for Social Research during this time. From 1959 to 1960, he was a Fulbright lecturer at Ochanomizu University in Tokyo, Japan. After Sarah Lawrence College, Arnheim became a Professor of Psychology of Art at Harvard University, where he stayed until 1974 when he moved to Ann Arbor, Michigan with his wife Mary. He was a visiting professor at the University of Michigan from 1974 to roughly 1984.

Among his many publications are Art and Visual Perception, Toward a Psychology of Art, Visual Thinking, Entropy and Art, Picasso's Guernica, and The Power of Center. Arnheim died in Ann Arbor in 2007.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Rudolf Arnheim conducted by Robert F. Brown, May 16, 1972. Additional papers on Rudolf Arnheim related to psychology are available at the Archives of the History of Psychology in Akron, Ohio.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reel 3767) including correspondence with German publishers and editors, 1959-1982; Dumont Buchverlag, 1963-1980; Carl Hanser Varlag, 1974-1981; Helmut Diederich, 1974-1981; Franz Rudolf Knubel, 1971-1981; Werner Korbs, 1976-1982; Jurgen Weber, 1972-1981; and others. The originals were returned to Rudolf Arnheim after microfilming and subsequently donated to the Schiller-Nationalmuseum Deutsches Literaturarchiv, Germany. This material is not described in the collection container inventory or the finding aid.
Provenance:
The Rudolf Arnheim papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in several installments between 1974 to 1998 by Rudolf Arnheim. Arnheim also loaned material for microfilming in 1986.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and electronic records with no duplicate access copies requires advance notice.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- United States  Search this
Art--Study and teaching--Germany  Search this
Art historians -- Massachusetts  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- Massachusetts  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- Massachusetts  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Diaries
Citation:
Rudolf Arnheim papers, 1919-1998. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.arnhrudo
See more items in:
Rudolf Arnheim papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-arnhrudo

Mathias Joseph Alten scrapbook

Creator:
Alten, M. (Mathias), 1871-1938  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (v. containing 115 items (on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1920-1965
Scope and Contents:
Clippings primarily, also exhibition catalogs, reproductions of a cover of magazine THE COMMONWEALTH.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter; Grand Rapids, Michigan.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1980 by Diane Boozer and Gloria Gregory via art historian J. Gray Sweeney, an authority on Alten.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- Michigan  Search this
Citation:
Mathias Joseph Alten scrapbook. Owned by Gloria Gregory and Diane Boozer. Microfilmed by Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.altemath
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-altemath

Masked performer wearing male Chi wara headdress, Bamako (national district), Mali. [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1971
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art--Antelopes  Search this
Animals in art--Composite animals  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Headdresses--headgear  Search this
Local number:
7
E 1 BMB 1 EE 71
EEPA EECL 3363
Restrictions & Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. For information on photo services and research appointments, please visit <http://africa.si.edu/research/archives.html> or contact Archives staff at elisofonarchives@si.edu <mailto:elisofonarchives@si.edu>
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_117272

Masked performer wearing male Chi wara headdress, Bamako (national district), Mali. [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1971
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art--Antelopes  Search this
Animals in art--Composite animals  Search this
Headdresses--headgear  Search this
Local number:
E 1 BMB 2 EE 71
EEPA EECL 3364
Restrictions & Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. For information on photo services and research appointments, please visit <http://africa.si.edu/research/archives.html> or contact Archives staff at elisofonarchives@si.edu <mailto:elisofonarchives@si.edu>
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_117273

Masked performer wearing male Chi wara headdress, Bamako (national district), Mali. [slide]

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Physical description:
slide : col
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1971
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art--Antelopes  Search this
Animals in art--Composite animals  Search this
Headdresses--headgear  Search this
Local number:
7
EEPA EECL 3365
Restrictions & Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. For information on photo services and research appointments, please visit <http://africa.si.edu/research/archives.html> or contact Archives staff at elisofonarchives@si.edu <mailto:elisofonarchives@si.edu>
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field photographs 1942-1972
Data Source:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_117274

Rebecca Beal papers

Creator:
Beal, Rebecca J.  Search this
Names:
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim, 1893-1967  Search this
Eichholtz, Jacob, 1776-1842  Search this
Poor, Henry Varnum, 1887-1970  Search this
Extent:
7.6 Linear feet ((on 11 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1949-1982
Scope and Contents:
Research material on Jacob Eichholtz; and letters.
REELS 3668-3678: Beal's research papers for her book on her great grandfather, painter, Jacob Eichholtz. Arranged in subject files and include research notes; correspondence; printed material; typescripts of the text; and two exhibition catalogs. Also includes photographs and negatives of portraits and paintings by Eichholtz; and publications (including the one Beal wrote) on Pennsylvania art and artists.
REEL 1079: 34 letters from Charles Burchfield and 6 letters from Henry Varnum Poor to Beal.
Biographical / Historical:
Art historian, patron; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Jacob Eichholtz was a 19th century painter. Beal is his great granddaughter. She wrote a book about him, JACOB EICHHOLTZ, 1776-1842: PORTRAIT PAINTER OF PENNSYLVANIA, published in 1969.
Related Materials:
Documents of Rebecca J. Beal are also located at LancasterHistory.
Provenance:
Donated 1976 and 1988 by Rebecca J. Beal.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Painters -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.bealrebe
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bealrebe

Alfred Hamilton Barr papers

Creator:
Barr, Alfred H., Jr., 1902-1981  Search this
Names:
Foundation for Arts, Religion and Culture  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Barr, Margaret Scolari, 1901-1987  Search this
Canaday, John, 1907-1985  Search this
Catlin, Stanton L. (Stanton Loomis)  Search this
D'Harnoncourt, Rene, 1901-1968  Search this
Gray, Camilla  Search this
Hightower, John Brantley, 1933-  Search this
Matisse, Henri, 1869-1954  Search this
Penrose, Roland, Sir  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Soby, James Thrall, 1906-1979  Search this
Extent:
61 Microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
[ca. 1915-1983]
Scope and Contents:
Files kept during Barr's tenure at the Museum of Modern Art, including personal and professional correspondence with museum officials, curators, writers, historians, critics, art associations, foundations, magazines, artists, and collectors, including John Canaday, Stanton Catlin, Camilla Gray, Rene d'Harnoncourt, John Hightower, Roland Penrose, and James Thrall Soby; files on staff, exhibitions, publications and collections of MoMA, and abstract art, cubism and futurism, some related to Barr's book CUBISM AND ABSTRACT ART, 1936; files on the Foundation for Arts, Religion and Culture (ARC), Barr's travels, lectures, speeches, exhibitions, publications, political controversies, and artists and collections in the U.S.S.R.; writings, including travel notebooks regarding his trip to Russia, 1959, visits with Pablo Picasso, 1956, and Henri Matisse, 1952; exhibition catalogs, clippings and printed material; and photographs.
Also included are material collected by Margaret Scolari Barr, including Alfred's obituaries, A MEMORIAL TRIBUTE, 1981, an invitation and guest list to the memorial service, and condolence letters; and photocopies of autograph letters, ca. 1920s-1970s, from the Barr's collection sold to Arthur A. Cohen in 1975.
Biographical / Historical:
Museum director, curator, and critic; New York, N.Y. Died 1981. Became the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in 1929. He was married to Margaret Scolari Barr, art historian and teacher.
Provenance:
The Museum of Modern Art was responsible for the selection, organization and arrangement of the papers microfilmed. Five series were not microfilmed, including Matisse (6 ft.), Picasso (7 ft.), Russian culture (6 ft.), family letters (2 ft.), and education (2 ft.).
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Museum directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art museum directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Cubism  Search this
Art, Abstract  Search this
Art, Russian  Search this
Function:
Art museums -- New York (State) -- New York
Citation:
Alfred H. Barr, Jr. papers, [ca. 1915-1983]. Owned by the Museum of Modern Art. Museum of Modern Art requires full citation to include microfilm reel and frame numbers, and reference to MoMA as the owner of the Alfred H. Barr papers.
Identifier:
AAA.barralfr
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-barralfr

Kit Smyth Basquin papers

Creator:
Basquin, Kit  Search this
Extent:
4.8 Linear feet
3.49 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Date:
1992-2012
Summary:
The papers of New York City art historian and curator Kit Smyth Basquin measure 4.8 linear feet and 3.49 GB and date from 1992-2012. The collection documents Basquin's dissertation research on artists Lynne Allen, Lesley Dill, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, and Pat Steir.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York City art historian and curator Kit Smyth Basquin measure 4.8 linear feet and 3.49 GB and date from 1992-2012. The collection documents Basquin's dissertation research on artists Lynne Allen, Lesley Dill, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, and Pat Steir.

Writing and Research Files include a wide variety of materials such as correspondence, interviews and transcripts, photographic materials, printed materials, journals, exhibition catalogs, writings, sound and video recordings and subject files. Some of the materials are in digital format, including sound and video recordings. Also included is a bound copy of Basquin's dissertation, "Words Expand Postmodern Prints: Pat Steir, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Lynne Allen, and Lesley Dill." The collection contains seventeen sound cassettes of recorded interviews and one lecture.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as one series

Series 1: Writing and Research Files, 1992-2012 (4.8 linear feet; Box 1-6, 3.49 GB; ER01-ER07)
Biographical / Historical:
Kit Smyth Basquin (194?- ) is an art historian in New York City. Before retiring, she was Associate for Administration in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. In 2009 she completed her dissertation in Interdisciplinary Studies at Union Institute and University. She holds a Masters in Art History from Indiana University, Bloomington, and had previously worked as Assistant Director for Collections and Public Programs at the Patrick and Beatrice Haggerty Museum of Art in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives of American Art in 2014 by Kit Smyth Basquin.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Kit Smyth Basquin papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Citation:
Kit Smyth Basquin papers, 1992-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.basqkit
See more items in:
Kit Smyth Basquin papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-basqkit

Matthew Baigell papers

Creator:
Baigell, Matthew  Search this
Names:
Benton, Thomas Hart, 1889-1975  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry, 1895-  Search this
Gropper, William, 1897-1977  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy, 1923-1997  Search this
Lozowick, Louis, 1892-1973  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton, 1890-1973  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
Sherman, Hoyt Leon, 1903-  Search this
Weichsel, John, 1870-1946  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 1 reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
[ca. 1965-1985]
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence, writings and research material concerning Thomas Hart Benton and Baigell's other writings. Also included is a ca. 1965 interview with Hoyt Sherman conducted by Baigell.
REEL 2086: Letters, notes, and writings, some illustrated, ca. 1967-1972, from Thomas Hart Benton to Baigell for Baigell's writings and biography of Benton. Benton writes about synchronism, cubism, regionalism, social realism, John Weichsel, Stuart Davis, Stanton Macdonald-Wright, Reginald Marsh, and others, and his life. Inluded is a copy of Benton's 53-page handwritten manuscript, "The Thirties," describing his mural commissions and the controversies with the social realists over his regionalist style of painting. Also included are 2 letters from Louis Lozowick, and one each from William Gropper and Harry Gottlieb in response to Baigell's questions of social realism, regionalism, and art in the 1930's.
ADDITION: Letters, research notes, and writings on Thomas Hart Benton, as well as correspondence with Dorothy Dehner, Doris Lee, Louis Lozowick, Raphael Soyer and Ben Shahn, among others, relating to Baigell's book, "The American Scene: American Painting of the 1930s," (1974). Also included is an interview with colleague Hoyt Sherman conducted by Baigell, ca. 1965, in which Sherman discusses perception, Cézanne, and Sherman's most famous pupil, Roy Lichtenstein, who always testified that he was profoundly influenced by Sherman's methods and philosophy. Sherman analyzes Lichtenstein's work and recalls the artist during his student days at Ohio State University, and discusses his possible impact on Lichtenstein.
Biographical / Historical:
Art historian; New York, N.Y. b. 1933. Baigell is associate professor of art, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
Provenance:
Donated 1980, 2002 and 2004 by Matthew Baigell.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Cubism  Search this
Regionalism  Search this
Social realism  Search this
Muralists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.baigmatt
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-baigmatt

Oral history interview with Rudy Autio

Creator:
Autio, Rudy, 1926-2007  Search this
Interviewer:
Kangas, Matthew  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recording, 7 in.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1982 Aug. 3-1982 Aug. 8
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Rudy Autio conducted by art historian Matthew Arvid Kangas, August 3 and 8, 1982.
Biographical / Historical:
Sculptor; Missoula, Montana.
Provenance:
Donated 1984 by Matthew Arvid Kangas.
Restrictions:
Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Montana  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.autirudy
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-autirudy

ArtTable, Inc. records

Creator:
ArtTable, Inc.  Search this
Names:
Artwire  Search this
Albers, Patricia  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Tuchman, Phyllis  Search this
Weiss, Dorothy, 1921-  Search this
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet
90.41 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Interviews
Date:
1979-2013
Summary:
The records of non-profit organization ArtTable, Inc., measure 1.4 linear feet and 90.41 GB and date from 1979-2013. The collection includes administrative documents, correspondence, and printed material, as well as audiovisual and born-digital recordings and transcripts of interviews conducted by the organization as part of an oral history project on women in the art world.
Scope and Contents:
The records of non-profit organization ArtTable, Inc., measure 1.4 linear feet and 90.41 GB and date from 1979-2013. The collection includes administrative documents, correspondence, and printed material, as well as audiovisual and born-digital recordings and transcripts of interviews conducted by the organization as part of an oral history project on women in the art world.

Administrative records consist of board and committee meeting minutes; mailings to members that include newsletters, event schedules, and subscription slips; membership lists; ArtTable, Inc.'s biannual publication Artwire; and some miscellaneous clippings.

The interview portion of the collection consists of audiovisual material and transcripts, some in digital format, of interviews with gallery owners, art historians, art critics, and curators that were conducted for ArtTable's oral history project from 2000 to 2013. Interviewees include Patricia Albers, Lucy Lippard, Phyllis Tuchman, Dorothy Weiss and others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as two series.

Series 1: Administrative Records, 1980-1994 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Oral History Interviews, 1979, 1999-2013 (0.9 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, 90.41 GB; ER01-ER28)
Biographical / Historical:
ArtTable, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the business, financial, administrative, and scholastic leadership of women in the visual arts. Members include curators, museum administrators, art historians, and gallery owners. Founded in San Francisco, California in 1980, ArtTable, Inc. now has chapters throughout the United States.
Provenance:
The records were donated in multiple installments by ArtTable, Inc. from 1994-2014.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing born-digital and audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.

.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Women art dealers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Function:
Nonprofit organizations
Arts organizations
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
ArtTable, Inc. records, 1979-2013. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.arttabl
See more items in:
ArtTable, Inc. records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-arttabl

Wayne Andersen papers

Creator:
Andersen, Wayne V.  Search this
Names:
Ferber, Herbert, 1906-1991  Search this
Golub, Leon, 1922-2004  Search this
Lipton, Seymour, 1903-1986  Search this
Moore, Henry, 1898-1986  Search this
Schaefer-Simmern, Henry, 1896-  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Extent:
11.6 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 2 reels))
0.2 Linear feet (Addition)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1952-1994
Scope and Contents:
Primarily research material used for Andersen's book American Sculpture in Process, 1930-1970. Included are sculpture files, containing photographs and printed materials; writings and research notes; and 663 letters and ca. 50 statements of purpose from prominent American sculptors, among them Calvin Albert, Oliver Andrews, Leonard Baskin, Wolfgang Behl, Charles Biederman, Helen Beling, Harry Bertoia, Roger Bolomey, Lothar Brabant, Alexander Calder, Cosmo Campoli, Chryssa, Lindsey Decker, Jose de Rivera, Stephen DeStaebler, Nancy P. Dryfoos, Ted Egri, Herbert Ferber, Richard Filipowski, Francis Foster, Leon Golub, Florence Grippe, Peter Grippe, Dimitri Hadzi, Martha Hadzi, Tom Hardy, Wally Hendrick, Paul Keith, Robert Laurent, Pietro Lazzari, Israel Levitan, Jacques Lipchitz, Seymour Lipton, Jim Melchert, Joseph Messina, Henry Moore, G. W. Owen, Tony Padovano, Nathan Raisen, Richard Randell, George W. Rickey, Hugo Robus, John Rood, Bernard Rosenthal, Theodore Roszak, David Smith, George Spaventa, Takis, Michael Todd, Hugh Townley, Charles Umlauf, Vasa, David von Schlegell, Jane Wasey, and Elbert Weinberg. Also included are business correspondence and financial papers relating to Andersen's consulting work for the Boston Redevelopment Authority, E.A.T. (Experiments in Art and Technology), and the Federal Reserve Bank. A smaller set of papers consists of material relating to Andersen's longtime friend and mentor, art educator, philosopher, and artist Henry Schaefer-Simmern, including a questionnaire sent to Andersen from Raymond Berta along with his dissertation abstract on Schaefer-Simmern, 1988; correspondence, including letters from Schaefer-Simmern, 1952-1989; photos of art work admired by Schaefer-Simmern. Also included are clippings, and a keynote speech by Andersen, 1994, "A Global Revision of Historical Time."
Biographical / Historical:
Art historian, educator; Massachusetts. Born 1928.
Provenance:
Donated by Wayne Andersen, 1979 and 1994.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art historians  Search this
Topic:
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Sculpture, American -- History -- Sources  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.andewayn
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-andewayn

Alexander Archipenko papers

Creator:
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Names:
Archipenko Art School (Woodstock, N.Y.)  Search this
Archipenko, Angelica  Search this
Archipenko, Frances  Search this
Spies, Walter  Search this
Extent:
19.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Date:
1904-1986
bulk 1930-1964
Summary:
The Alexander Archipenko papers measure 19.5 linear feet and date from 1904 to 1986, with the bulk of materials dating from 1930 to 1964. The sculptor's personal and professional life is documented by correspondence, financial records, scrapbooks, printed matter, and photographs documenting his art, exhibitions, travel, teaching activities, and the Archipenko Art School. Archipenko wrote and lectured extensively about his philosophies of art and the relationship between art and nature. The papers include drafts, notes, and final manuscripts of published and unpublished writings, and notes, outlines, transcripts, and audio recordings of some of his lectures.
Scope and Content Note:
The Alexander Archipenko papers measure 19.5 linear feet and date from 1904 to 1986, with the bulk of materials dating from 1930 to 1964. The sculptor's personal and professional life is documented by correspondence, financial records, scrapbooks, printed matter, and photographs documenting his art, exhibitions, travel, teaching activities, and the Archipenko Art School. Archipenko wrote and lectured extensively about his philosophies of art and the relationship between art and nature. The papers include drafts, notes, and final manuscripts of published and unpublished writings, and notes, outlines, transcripts, and audio recordings of some of his lectures.

Correspondence concerns both personal and professional matters. Among Archipenko's personal correspondents are relatives and friends in the Ukraine, his wife Angelica during her extended stays in Mexico and California, and other women. Professional correspondence is with dealers, curators, scholars, collectors, colleges and universities concerning exhibitions, sales and commissions, loans, and teaching and lecture engagements.

Archipenko wrote and lectured extensively about his philosophy of art, art in nature, and theories concerning creativity and the universe. His papers include manuscripts, drafts, notes and supporting materials for his book published in 1960, Archipenko: Fifty Creative Years, 1908-1958. Similar documentation of unpublished writings, as well as notes, outlines, and some transcripts of lectures and talks are also in the series.

Records concerning the Archipenko Art School are sparse, with only one photograph of students in Berlin, 1921. Surviving records include printed matter, a cashbook, student roster, and scrapbook containing photographs, printed matter, and a typescript copy of a statement by Archipenko, "How I Teach." Most of this material focuses on the New York and Woodstock schools, with only a few items concerning Chicago. In addition, files regarding Archipenko's teaching activities at schools other than his own include course descriptions, student rosters, grades, and printed matter.

Financial records consist of banking records, paid bills, and miscellaneous items. Paid bills include invoices and receipts for art supplies, shipping, and storage. Among the miscellaneous items are price lists, royalties paid by the Museum of Modern Art for Woman Combing Her Hair, and sales records.

Nine scrapbooks contain clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, lecture notices, advertisements and brochures of the Archipenko Art School, and a small number of photographs. Printed matter consists primarily of clippings about Archipenko and exhibition catalogs with related announcements and invitations. Miscellaneous items include books about Archipenko, catalogs of museum collections containing works by Archipenko, and reproductions. Of special interest is a brochure about the Multiplex Advertising Machine that bears a similarity to the Archipentura, an "apparatus for displaying Changeable Pictures" Archipenko invented circa 1924 and patented in 1927.

Photographs are of people, Archipenko's travels and miscellaneous places, exhibitions, works of art, events, and miscellaneous subjects. Five photograph albums mainly document travels. Slides and transparencies include black and white lantern slides probably used to illustrate lectures.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 10 series. Lantern slides and glass plates are housed separately and closed to researchers, but listed where they fall intellectually within the collection.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1908-1964 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1, OV 28)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1922-1970 (4.1 linear feet; Boxes 1-5)

Series 3: Subject Files, 1940-1958 (6 folders; Box 5)

Series 4: Writings, 1923-1971 (3.2 linear feet; Boxes 5-8, Film can FC 30)

Series 5: Teaching, 1921-1952 (0.8 linear feet; Box 9, Film cans FC 31-33)

Series 6: Financial Records, 1923-1971 (1.5 linear feet; Box 9-10)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1910-1961 (1.2 linear feet; Boxes 22-25)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1913-1987 (3.7 linear feet; Boxes 11-14, 26, OV 29)

Series 9: Miscellaneous, 1916-1966 (0.5 linear feet; Box 14, 16, Film can FC 34)

Series 10: Photographic Material, 1904-1964 (3.6 linear feet; Boxes 14-15, 17-21, 26-27)
Biographical Note:
Alexander Archipenko (1887-1964) was the son of an engineer/inventor and grandson of an icon painter. Among the first modern sculptors of the 20th century to be associated with the Cubist movement, Archipenko was known for his innovative use of concave space. His major contribution was the realization of negative form through use of a hole to create a contrast of solid and void. His sculpto-paintings united form and color; begun in 1912, these polychromed constructions are among the earliest mixed-media works known, and sometimes incorporated objects. Eventually, his Cubist-inspired work evolved into the simplified, abstract shapes for which he is best known. Although known primarily as a sculptor, Archipenko produced paintings, drawings, and prints as well.

At age 15, Archipenko began studying art at the University of Kiev in his native city; he was expelled three years later for criticizing the teachers. He then went to Moscow where he worked on his own and exhibited in several group shows; his first solo exhibition was held in the Ukraine in 1906.

Archipenko made Paris his home from 1908 until the outbreak of World War I. Soon after his arrival, he enrolled in the Ecole des Beaux-Arts; this association lasted but two weeks, and marked the end of Archipenko's formal training. He continued to study art by spending large amounts of time visiting art museums and painting on his own. During this period, he began exhibiting in the Salon des Independents with the Cubists, and as a member of the "Section d'Or" participated in that group's exhibitions. His first one-man exhibition in Germany was held at the Folkwant Museum (1912) and his work was featured in the Armory Show (1913).

In 1912, at the age of 25, Archipenko established his first art school in Paris. He spent the war years working quietly outside of Nice, and soon afterwards circulated an extensive exhibition of his works throughout Europe. In 1921, Archipenko settled in Berlin, opened an art school there, and married sculptor Angelica Bruno-Schmitz, who was known professionally as Gela Forster.

Archipenko's reputation was solidly established and the majority of his ground-breaking work - adaptation of Cubist ideas to sculpture, sculpto-paintings and incorporation of negative space in sculpture - was accomplished prior to his 1923 arrival in the United States. One of his most innovative works executed in America was the Archipentura, invented circa 1924 and patented in 1927, a machine with rolling cylinders that displayed "animated paintings" using motion and light. Other creations of note are carved Lucite sculptures, illuminated from within, that were executed in the mid-1940s.

Upon settling in the United States in 1923, Archipenko opened his art school in New York City; a summer school was established in Woodstock, New York the following year. Within a few years, Archipenko purchased land near Woodstock and began construction of a home, personal studio, and buildings for the school. At various times during the 1930s, Archipenko resided in Chicago and Los Angeles, and operated schools while living in those cities. For many years during the 1940s, Angelica served on the sculpture faculty at the Escuela de Belles Artes in San Miguel Allende, Mexico.

In addition to running his own schools, Archipenko taught at a number of colleges and universities, where he ran workshops, and served as a visiting professor. He wrote and lectured extensively about his philosophy of art and theories of creativity, publishing several articles and a book, Archipenko: Fifty Creative Years, 1908-1958 (1960).

Angelica Archipenko died in 1957. Three years later Archipenko married sculptor Frances Gray, a former student. During the early 1960s, the couple traveled extensively on a lecture tour that accompanied a solo exhibition to several German cities. Archipenko died in New York City, February 25, 1964.

The following chronology is excerpted from Alexander Archipenko: A Centennial Tribute by Katherine Janszky Michaelsen and Nehama Guralnik (National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, 1986) and Archipenko: The Sculpture and Graphic art, Including a Print Catalogue Raisonne by Donald Karshan, Ernst Wasmuth Verlag (Tubingen, Germany, 1974).

1887 -- Born to Porfiry Antonovich and Poroskovia Wassilievna Machova Archipenko in Kiev, Ukraine, Russia. Father a mechanical engineer, professor of engineering, and inventor; grandfather an icon painter.

1900 -- Studied and copied Michelangelo drawings from a book given him by his grandfather during a long confinement following a leg injury.

1902-1905 -- Painting and sculpture student in Kiev art school; expelled for criticizing his teachers.

1906 -- First one-man show in the Ukraine. Worked in Moscow and exhibited in several group shows.

1908 -- Moved to Paris and enrolled in the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. Quit formal art instruction after two weeks, continued to study art on his own by visiting museums.

1910 -- Exhibited in the Salon des Independants with the cubists (also in 1911-1914 and 1919).

1912 -- Opened art school in Paris. "Section d'Or" formed in Paris with Archipenko among its members. The group exhibited until 1914, and briefly after World War I. First solo exhibition in Germany, Folkwant Museum, Hagen.

1913 -- Represented in the Armory Show. Executed first prints (lithographs).

1914 -- Began making sculpto-paintings.

1914-1918 -- Spent the war years working near Nice.

1919-1920 -- Began extensive tour exhibiting his works in various European cities (Geneva, Zurich, Paris, London, Brussels, Athens, Berlin, Munich, etc.).

1920 -- One-man exhibition in the Venice Biennale.

1921 -- First solo exhibition in the United States at the Societe Anonyme, Inc., New York; a symposium, Psychology of Modern Art and Archipenko, was held during the course of the show. Moved to Berlin and opened art school. Married sculptor Angelica Bruno-Schmitz [known professionally as Gela Forster]. First print commission.

1923 -- Moved to the United States and opened art school in New York City.

1924 -- Established a summer school at Woodstock, New York.

1927 -- "Archipentura" patented ("Apparatus for displaying Changeable Pictures and methods for Decorating Changeable Display Apparatus," nos. 1,626, 946 and 1,626,497).

1928 -- Became an American citizen.

1929 -- Bought land near Woodstock, New York, and began construction of school and studio buildings.

1932 -- Lectured on his theories of creativeness at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

1933 -- Taught summer session at Mills College, Oakland, California, and Chouinard School, Los Angeles.

1935 -- Moved to Los Angeles and opened art school.

1935-1936 -- Taught summer sessions at the University of Washington, Seattle.

1936 -- Moved to Chicago and opened art school. Associate instructor at New Bauhaus School, Chicago.

1938 -- Returned to New York; reopened art school and Woodstock summer school.

1944 -- Taught at the Dalton School, New York City.

1946-1947 -- Returned to Chicago; taught at the Institute of Design.

1947 -- Began making carved plastic sculptures with internal illumination.

1950 -- Taught at University of Kansas City, Missouri.

1950-1951 -- Lecture tour of the southern cities of the United States.

1951 -- Taught at Carmel Institute of Art, California, University of Oregon, and University of Washington, Seattle.

1952 -- Taught at University of Delaware, Newark.

1953 -- Elected Associate Member of International Institute of Arts and Letters.

1955-1956 -- One-man exhibition tours in Germany (Dusseldorf, Darmstadt, Mannheim, and Recklinghausen).

1956 -- Taught at University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

1957 -- Death of Angelica.

1959 -- Awarded gold medal, XIII Biennale de'Arte Triveneta, III Concorso Internationale del Bronzetto, Padua, Italy.

1960 -- Archipenko: Fifty Creative Years, 1908-1958 by Alexander Archipenko and Fifty Art Historians published by Tekhne (a company established by Archipenko for the purpose). Married Frances Gray, a sculptor and former student. Recovered plasters of early work stored by French friends since the end of World War I. Traveling exhibition in Germany (Hagen, Münster, and Dusseldorf).

1962 -- Elected to the Department of Art, National Institute of Arts and Letters.

1964 -- Dies in New York City.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives are the Donald H. Karshan papers relating to Alexander Archipenko, originally accessioned as part of the Alexander Archipenko papers, but later separated to form a distinct collection.

The Archives also has the National Collection of Fine Arts records relating to Alexander Archipenko.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reels NA11-NA12, NA16-NA18, and NA 20-NA22) including biographical material, correspondence, exhibition records, writings, printed material and photographs. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
In 1967, the Alexander Archipenko papers, previously on deposit at Syracuse University, were loaned to the Archives of American Art for microfilming by his widow Frances Archipenko Gray. In 1982, Ms. Gray donated most of the material previously loaned and microfilmed to the Archives of American Art, along with additional items.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. research facility. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Lantern slides and glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.
Rights:
The Alexander Archipenko papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Sculpture -- Technique  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Cubism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Alexander Archipenko papers, 1904-1986, bulk 1930-1964. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.archalex
See more items in:
Alexander Archipenko papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-archalex
Online Media:

Stephen Antonakos papers

Creator:
Antonakos, Stephen, 1926-2013  Search this
Names:
Allentown Art Museum  Search this
Ethniko Mouseio Synchronēs Technēs (Greece)  Search this
Fischbach Gallery  Search this
Galerie Bernier  Search this
Galleria Bonomo  Search this
Galleriaforma  Search this
Ileana Tounta Contemporary Art Center  Search this
John Weber Gallery  Search this
Kalfayan Galleries  Search this
Konrad Fischer Gallery  Search this
La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art  Search this
Lori Bookstein Fine Art  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Mouseio Benakē  Search this
Rose Art Museum  Search this
Savannah College of Art and Design  Search this
The Drawing Room  Search this
Ādo furondo gyararī  Search this
Adler, Sebastian  Search this
Bladen, Ronald, 1918-1988  Search this
Kitagawa, Fram, 1946-  Search this
Kokkinos, George  Search this
Koshalek, Richard  Search this
Marzona, Egidio  Search this
Spector, Naomi  Search this
Extent:
24.2 Linear feet
1.73 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Transcripts
Interviews
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Drawings
Blueprints
Obituaries
Date:
1932-2014
bulk 1960-2014
Summary:
The papers of American sculptor Stephen Antonakos measure 24.2 linear feet and 1.73 GB and date from 1932-2014, with the bulk of the material dating from 1960-2014. The collection documents Antonakos's pioneering work in neon, through biographical material, correspondence, writings and notes, project files, exhibition files, printed and digital material, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of American sculptor Stephen Antonakos measure 24.2 linear feet and 1.73 GB and date from 1932-2014, with the bulk of the material dating from 1960-2014. The collection documents Antonakos's pioneering work in neon, through biographical material, correspondence, writings and notes, project files, exhibition files, printed and digital material, and photographs.

Biographical material comprises biographical statements and resumes, transcripts of 5 interviews, copies of obituaries, and other records relating to Antonakos's memorial service in 2013.

Correspondence is primarily professional, with scattered personal correspondence, and provides suppemental documentation of all aspects of the artist's career, including gifts, sales, loans, and consignments to galleries and museums such as Fischbach Gallery; John Weber Gallery; Lori Bookstein Fine Art; Galleria Bonomo, Bari; Art Front Gallery, Tokyo; Galerie Bonnier, Stockholm; Galerie Bernier, Athens; Kalfayan Gallery, Athens; Galerie Citronne, Poros; Konrad Fischer Gallery, Berlin; Daniel Marzona Gallery, Berlin; The American Academy of Arts and Letters; The Metropolitan Museum of Art; The Museum of Modern Art; the Onassis Cultural Center; the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; the Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University; the Smith College Museum of Art; the Dallas Museum of Art; the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Athens; the State Museum of Contemporary Art, Thessaloniki; and the Benaki Museum, Piraeus.

Writings and notes provide artist statements on all aspects of Antonakos's work, as well as teaching notes from the 1960s.

Project files are a rich source of information on Antonakos's work in neon, particularly for the large-scale permanent Public Works including Hampshire College, Amherst; the Tacoma Dome; Pershing Square, Los Angeles; the Atlanta Hartsfied Airport; the 59th Street Transfer Station, New York City; Faret Tachikawa, Japan; the Stadtsparkasse, Cologne; the Reading Power Plant, Tel Aviv; the San Antonio Public Library; the University of Dijon; the Attiko Metro, Athens; the Mitchell International Airport, Milwaukee; and the Airport of Puglia, Bari. All aspects of the artist's work, from conception on paper through execution and reception by the public, are documented here in correspondence, artist statements and proposals, contracts, insurance records, original drawings, plans and blueprints, printed and digital material, and photographs. Ideas and proposals for projects not executed are also documented in this series, and comprise the same types of material.

Antonakos's conceptual Packages are documented in lists, letters of transmittal, and photographs. The series also holds the contents of a Package given to the Archives of American Art in 1975 and opened, as requested, after his death: a 35mm microfilm of a sketchbook kept by Antonakos from 1974-1975, with sketches and notes about his neon projects.

Antonakos's artistic development can be traced chronologically in the exhibition files from some of his earliest work with neon in combination with found objects, to the use of neon alone. Exhibition files document the artist's progression from placing neon on a base or wall and at the corners and ceilings of rooms, to placing tubes at the edges of panels in order to generate a colored glow around them; furthermore, they document the evolution from his early boxes, contained spaces, and indoor and outdoor rooms, to his meditation spaces and chapels. Also in evidence in this series is the artist's prolific output of drawings, which were shown in numerous exhibitions. Exhibition files include documentation from circa 100 solo shows and from his over 250 group shows, at venues including Allentown Art Museum, the Benaki Museum, The Drawing Room, Galleriaforma, Genoa, Ileana Tounta Contemporary Art Center, Athens, John Weber Gallery, La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, Lori Bookstein Fine Art, the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Athens, Rose Art Museum, and the Savannah College of Art and Design. Many of the files include Antonakos's original drawings and plans.

Printed material comprises announcements and catalogs for Antonakos's solo and group exhibitions, posters of the same, press and publicity clippings, and 10 publications about or including Antonakos and his work.

There are 7 photographs of Antonakos, including portraits by George Kokkinos and photos with others including Sebastian Adler, the artist's daughter Evangelina Mary Spector Antonakos, Naomi Spector Antonakos, Ronald Bladen, and Richard Koshalek. Also found are photos of artwork by category, and digital photographs of sample images.

The collection includes 1 reel of microfilm (35mm).
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1970s-2014 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1964-2014 (3.25 linear feet; Boxes 1-4, 24)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1966-2012 (0.3 linear feet; Box 4, 0.932 GB; ER01)

Series 4: Project Files, 1965-2014 (8.6 linear feet; Boxes 4-11, 24, OVs 25-40, 0.275 GB; ER02-ER04)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, 1960-2014 (8.95 linear feet; Boxes 11-19, 24, OVs 40-45, 0.094 GB; ER05)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1959-2013 (3.3 linear feet; Boxes 19-23, OVs 46-47)

Series 7: Photographs, 1932-2013 (0.5 linear feet; Box 23, 0.431 GB; ER06)
Biographical / Historical:
American sculptor Stephen Antonakos (1926-2013) was a pioneer in the use of neon as an artistic medium from the early 1960s onward. Born in Agios Nikolaos in southern Greece, he immigrated to the US with his family at the age of four and lived in New York City thereafter.

After serving in WWII he established his first studio in the 1950s in New York City's fur district, a fertile neighborhood for the found objects and found materials of his early large Assemblages, Constructions, and "Sewlages" (sewn fabric collages) through that decade, when he worked also as a commercial artist. Seeing the neon signs in these Manhattan streets night after night released his intuition of the medium's untapped flexibility. He called neon "a paradise" he wished to "control" in his own new way, with abstract geometric forms in space.

Concentric neon circles and squares appeared first, notably in the transitional White Light (1962). Mostly black, it incorporated a cut-up Thonet chair and a box-form of found rabbit fur. In the same year, he moved on to his central engagement with neon in architectural space with his Hanging Neon, whose colored tubes jut diagonally into the viewers' space from a box suspended from the ceiling. He continued this key dynamic boldly in many large mid-1960s installations: Orange Vertical Neon, Red Neon from Wall to Floor, and Red Neon from Wall to Wall. There are small-scale models from the period for many more. All fulfill the artist's definition of his work as "real things in real spaces."

His 1962-63 Pillows and Pillow Drawings, exhibited first at the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, are distinguished by the intense engagement of the hand: cutting, adding, sewing, stuffing, drawing, layering, and combining materials in ways that clearly predict his constant practice with drawings and collages through the following decades. The subsequent role of works on paper in forming Antonakos's development cannot be over-emphasized; he drew almost every day. The physicality of these compositions and of the cuts and tears and layering in his collages through the years, make them not images, but objects. The same holds for the many Travel Collages produced from the late 1970s through 2001.

Throughout the 1970s, medium-scale two- and three-dimensional variations of his geometric vocabulary were strategically positioned on white walls in formal dialogue with their sites' ceilings, floors, inside corners, and outside corners. Known as the Direct Neons, these works were exhibited extensively in galleries and museums across Europe and the US. As ever, new work was conceived for each venue's particular sites.

A very large group of Project Drawings from the late 1960s through the early 1970s charts Antonakos's thinking through the Direct Neons and on into installations of greater scale, his Walls and Rooms.

First shown in Athens, the Walls investigated both bold and subtle variations of almost "syntactical" relationships between the neon forms "drawn" on the colored surfaces. Two 1973 Rooms allowed simultaneous formal engagement with interior and exterior architectural spaces. In both, making the entire interior a single unit fulfilled Antonakos's hope of including the viewer within the space of the art. San Francisco Room was exhibited inside the Museum of Art. The Room, placed outdoors in downtown Grand Rapids, offered more viewing options from greater distances, rooftops and, very importantly, with exposure to the daily 24-hour cycle of natural light. 1974, Outdoor Neons for the Fort Worth Art Museum upped the ante further with enormously greater scale and geometric diversity. This was nourishment for Antonakos's central concerns uniting light, form, and time throughout his future Public Works.

The mid-1970s saw a definitive change in the drawings. They became completely abstract, without reference to anything outside the work itself. Often made in series, they explored complete and incomplete linear forms in relation to the proportions of the sheets.

All through the 1970s Antonakos produced his conceptual Packages. Filled, sealed, and sent to individuals or groups of friends, they were meant either never to be opened, to be opened on a specific date, or to be opened after the death of the artist. There were approximately thirty projects. An important set sent in 1974 and 1975 to Richard Artschwager, Daniel Buren, Sol LeWitt, and Robert Ryman to be filled by them was opened twenty-five years later as the central event during the major exhibition Time Boxes 2000 at the Brandeis's Rose Art Museum. Less concerned with their contents than with our consciousness through time of not knowing, they relate to such concepts as "incomplete circle" -- knowing what/that we do not know/see. The Greek art historian Savvas Michael has written: "The material of the Packages is time."

From the late 1970s, for over thirty years, there was an active practice of Public Works in neon. More than fifty were constructed and installed in indoor and outdoor sites in airports, rail stations, university campuses, banks, and downtown areas in cities across the US, Europe, and Japan. They range from the spare 15' incomplete square on the facade of the San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art to the almost 500' treatment of the chimney complex of the Reading Power Plant in Tel Aviv. Antonakos began each project by considering the formal qualities of the site day and night and its use by the public. He considered working for the public a special responsibility.

Moving into the 1980s, Antonakos placed neon forms on painted unstretched canvases and on the faces of large geometric forms on walls and floors. This period also saw the crucial introduction of neon placed behind the edges of wall Panels, so that only the colored glows are seen. These Panels developed into one of his major practices to the end -- their single or segmented geometric surfaces variously monochrome, painterly, or gold or silver-leafed. They have been extensively exhibited in Europe and the US. In 2009 the public-scaled neon Panel The Road to Mistra was commissioned for the Onassis Cultural Center in New York. In response to this work, the New York art historian Irving Sandler wrote, "Essentially a classicist in the Constructivist tradition, he has revealed the poetry of neon."

Antonakos started to design his Chapels and Meditation spaces with neon in the late 1980s and continued through the rest of his life. Their roots lie in his lifelong commitment to Greek Orthodoxy and in the evolution of his activation of geometric space. They include his 1993 Chapel of the Saints in a fortress in Rhodes, which he described in a letter to Elias Kollias as being, at that point, "the masterwork of my life." The full-scale iron Chapel of the Heavenly Ladder was exhibited in the XLVII Venice Biennale and is permanently installed now in Thessaloniki. In 2003, the Greek art critic Alexandra Koroxenides wrote of Antonakos's "capacity to create surroundings of meditation and spirituality." Many Chapels have been created for important temporary exhibitions here and in Greece, and small precise models exist for more of them.

Through the 1980s and to the end, the drawings on various papers and vellums developed in many directions, some full of white space, some filled to the hilt with intensely colored forms -- sometimes singly and often in series. In the mid-1990s Antonakos began using the multicolored pencil, in dense overall hatchings and later in open spatial "clouds." One drawing of 72 dense square units is like an installation as it plays out rhythmically across the four walls of the gallery. The various ideas of the drawings intersect with those of his collages, reflecting always the active hand. Colored or bare, cut, torn, layered, pleated, or crumpled, they maintain their objecthood within the frame.

All these themes and techniques climaxed in his major Artist's Book, Alphavitos, later in the 1980s. Its many material and printing innovations are structured around the cumulative appearance of hand-made papers with letters of the Greek Alphabet recurring intermittently until the last bears the complete alphabet. The composition of complete and incomplete circles and squares on the front and back covers are in silver on the unique volume and in leather relief on the edition. The book incorporates endless ideas of form, color, scale, proportion and, of course, time, as the pages are turned. Related white wood, silver, and marble Reliefs grew out of the making of the book, as did new graphic variations of some of the plates. In 2011 he began a new series of Gold works. Small sculptures shaped with "incomplete" areas sit on bases, and framed works in gold-leafed Mylar and Tyvek hang in frames. As with the drawings, some have cut edges or various forms cut out of them or are crumpled. They are made in varying sizes, singly and in powerful series, and all have many different "faces" as they intersect with the course of natural light over the day. In Greece, they are seen as echoes of Byzantium.

In 2011, Antonakos took on a climactic project in the ruins of an old oil factory in Elefsina, Greece -- a part of the 40 year history of their Festival of Aeschylus. In thirty-four locations throughout the continuous indoor and outdoor site of 17,000 square meters, he placed spare linear neon forms, accumulations, columns, and Panels, hoping, he said, that the visitors might sense "some of the things that I have found in my life and art." It can be seen in the photographs of Panos Kokkinias and on the artist's website.

Antonakos had over 100 solo exhibitions and over 250 group shows. His work has been the subject of numerous books and catalogues including the key 1999 monograph Antonakos by Irving Sandler. The major catalogue for the 2007-2008 Retrospective organized by the J. F. Costopoulos Foundation at the Benaki Museum in Athens includes essays by Martin Filler, Eleftherios Iconomou, Katerina Koskina, Daniel Marzona, and Brian O'Doherty. His work is in the collections of the major museums of New York, Athens, and Thessaloniki, and in many other museums in the US and Europe. In 2011 he received the Lifetime Achievement Awards from the National Academy of Art and the Greek America Foundation.

Since 1963 his studio has been located in Soho.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Stephen Antonakos dated 1975, May 9.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 1975 and 1981 by Stephen Antonakos, and in 2014 by Naomi Spector Antonakos.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.

Use of archival born-digital records with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Stephen Antonakos papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Neon sculpture  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Interviews
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Drawings
Blueprints
Obituaries
Citation:
Stephen Antonakos papers, 1932-2014, bulk 1960-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.antostep
See more items in:
Stephen Antonakos papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-antostep

Masked performer wearing male Chi wara headdress, Bamako (national district), Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
"The male ci wara headdress epitomizes what art historian Robert Goldwater describes as the 'vertical' style, one of the three distinctive regional idioms developed by Bamana blacksmiths that draw upon the form of the antelope to interpret the mythical figure Ci Wara. The soaring vertical axis of the male antelope's horns suggests power and grace. They angle ever so slightly as they rise, bending sharply at the summit in hooked tips. that upward movement is echoed by the ears, which are elongated, narrow vertical volumes. The rest of the headdress, in contrast, is wavy lines and rounded curves. Ci wara headdresses are often augmented with jewelry in anticipation of performances. James Brink comments that 'men are responsible for preparing the headdresses and dressing the performers; women take care of washing the costume and providing the jewelry that will make the headdresses beautiful'." [La Gamma A., 2002: Genesis: Ideas of Origin in African Sculpture. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Yale University Press, New Haven and London]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.
Local Numbers:
7

E 1 BMB 1 EE 71
General:
Citation source: Archives staff.
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Selgem EE11915400
A photographic print resides in the collection.
Series Reference: 1.
Frame value is 18.
Slide No. E 1 BMB 1 EE 71
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 3363
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Mali
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref19735

Masked performer wearing male Chi wara headdress, Bamako (national district), Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
"The male ci wara headdress epitomizes what art historian Robert Goldwater describes as the 'vertical' style, one of the three distinctive regional idioms developed by Bamana blacksmiths that draw upon the form of the antelope to interpret the mythical figure Ci Wara. The soaring vertical axis of the male antelope's horns suggests power and grace. They angle ever so slightly as they rise, bending sharply at the summit in hooked tips. that upward movement is echoed by the ears, which are elongated, narrow vertical volumes. The rest of the headdress, in contrast, is wavy lines and rounded curves. Ci wara headdresses are often augmented with jewelry in anticipation of performances. James Brink comments that 'men are responsible for preparing the headdresses and dressing the performers; women take care of washing the costume and providing the jewelry that will make the headdresses beautiful'." [La Gamma A., 2002: Genesis: Ideas of Origin in African Sculpture. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Yale University Press, New Haven and London]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.
Local Numbers:
E 1 BMB 2 EE 71
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
7
Frame value is 21.
Slide No. E 1 BMB 2 EE 71
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 3364
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Mali
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref19736

Masked performer wearing male Chi wara headdress, Bamako (national district), Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
"The male ci wara headdress epitomizes what art historian Robert Goldwater describes as the 'vertical' style, one of the three distinctive regional idioms developed by Bamana blacksmiths that draw upon the form of the antelope to interpret the mythical figure Ci Wara. The soaring vertical axis of the male antelope's horns suggests power and grace. They angle ever so slightly as they rise, bending sharply at the summit in hooked tips. that upward movement is echoed by the ears, which are elongated, narrow vertical volumes. The rest of the headdress, in contrast, is wavy lines and rounded curves. Ci wara headdresses are often augmented with jewelry in anticipation of performances. James Brink comments that 'men are responsible for preparing the headdresses and dressing the performers; women take care of washing the costume and providing the jewelry that will make the headdresses beautiful'." [La Gamma A., 2002: Genesis: Ideas of Origin in African Sculpture. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Yale University Press, New Haven and London]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.
Local Numbers:
7
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
7
Frame value is 22.
Slide No. E 1 BMB 3 EE 71
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 3365
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Mali
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref19737

Marcel Duchamp lecture at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute

Compiler:
Miller, Richard N.  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Armory Show 50th anniversary exhibition (1963 : Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute)  Search this
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute  Search this
Cassatt, Mary, 1844-1926  Search this
Courbet, Gustave, 1819-1877  Search this
Daumier, Honoré, 1808-1879  Search this
Degas, Edgar, 1834-1917  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Gauguin, Paul, 1848-1903  Search this
Gogh, Vincent van, 1853-1890  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Ingres, Jean-Auguste-Dominique, 1780-1867  Search this
James McNeill Whistler, 1834-1903  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Monet, Claude, 1840-1926  Search this
Puvis de Chavannes, Pierre, 1824-1898  Search this
Ryder, Albert Pinkham, 1847-1917  Search this
Seurat, Georges, 1859-1891  Search this
Signac, Paul, 1863-1935  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (sound recording (49 min, 30 sec.), digital)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
February 17, 1963
Scope and Contents:
Lecture on CD of Marcel Duchamp at the Munson-Williams Proctor Institute in Utica, N.Y. marking the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the 1913 Armory Show. Duchamp summarizes the art historical heritage leading up to the Armory Show, including such artists as Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Gustave Courbet, Honore Daumier, Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Georges Seurat, Paul Signac, Paul Gaugin, Vincent van Gogh, Albert Pinkham Ryder, James MacNeill Whistler, John Marin, Marsden Hartley, Max Weber, and Mary Cassatt, among others.
Biographical / Historical:
Richard N. Miller is an art historain in S. Orleans, Mass.
Provenance:
Donated in 2008 by Richard N. Miller, who made the recording.
Restrictions:
Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
authorization to publish, quote or reproduce must be obtained from Richard N. Miller and Jacqueline Matisse Monnier.
Occupation:
Art historians -- Massachusetts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.millricha
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-millricha

Oral History Interviews

Collection Creator:
ArtTable, Inc.  Search this
Extent:
0.9 Linear feet (Boxes 1-2)
90.41 Gigabytes (ER01-ER28)
Type:
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Date:
1979
1999-2013
Scope and Contents:
Series includes video, sound, and born-digital recordings from interviews held with gallery owners, art historians and critics, museum administrators, and curators; interview transcripts; some background material related to the interviewees such as resumes, clippings, and correspondence; and consent forms signed by the interviewees.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing born-digital and audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.

.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
ArtTable, Inc. records, 1979-2013. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.arttabl, Series 2
See more items in:
ArtTable, Inc. records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-arttabl-ref6

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet (Box 17-19)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1945-2012
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence dates from circa 1943-2012 and, as with Series 2, contains mixed business and personal correspondence from artists, family, friends, writers, publishers, museums, and galleries. While predominantly correspondence, small artworks, printed material, and writings by others are mixed in. The largest amounts of correspondence are with actor Eusebio Lázaro, art historians Fred Licht and Norbert Lynton, and her second husband Matti Megged. Types of correspondence include letters and postcards. Correspondence is in English, Spanish, and French.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Dore Ashton papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Dore Ashton papers, 1849, circa 1928-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.ashtdore, Subseries 8.2
See more items in:
Dore Ashton papers
Dore Ashton papers / Series 8: Addition to the Dore Ashton Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-ashtdore-ref718

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