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Oral history interview with Clay Spohn

Interviewee:
Spohn, Clay Edgar, 1898-1977  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Extent:
84 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1976 January 9-February 5
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Clay E. Spohn conducted 1976 January 9-February 5, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Clay E. Spohn (1898-1977) was a painter and educator from New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded 2 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 41 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.spohn76
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-spohn76

Oral history interview with William Douglas Carlson

Interviewee:
Carlson, William, 1950-  Search this
Creator:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Alfred University -- Students  Search this
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Cleveland Institute of Art -- Students  Search this
Lowe Art Museum  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Pilchuck Glass Center (Stanwood, Wash.)  Search this
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign -- Faculty  Search this
University of Miami -- Faculty  Search this
Billeci, Andre  Search this
Carpenter, James, 1949-  Search this
Chihuly, Dale, 1941-  Search this
Dailey, Dan, 1947-  Search this
Daley, William, 1925-  Search this
Fereighi, Christine  Search this
Heizer, Michael, 1944-  Search this
Heller, Doug, 1946-  Search this
Hilton, Eric  Search this
Marquis, Richard, 1945-  Search this
Marx, Bonnie  Search this
Matta-Clark, Gordon, 1943-1978  Search this
Serra, Richard, 1938-  Search this
Smith, Terry, 1960 June 15-  Search this
Stella, Frank  Search this
Young, Brent  Search this
Extent:
7 Items (Sound recording: 7 sound files (4 hr., 6 min.), digital, wav)
89 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2009 June 24-25
Scope and Contents:
An interview of William Douglas Carlson conducted 2009 June 24-25, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Carlson's home, in Miami, Florida.
Carlson discusses his move to the University of Miami in 2003 after 27 years at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign; his recent site-specific installation Procellous Wall at the Lowe Art Museum in Coral Gables, Florida; the change in his work since his move to Miami, finishing a series of pieces that began in 2000 dealing with language, and his sense of being in a transitional period with his work; growing up in a small town in Ohio, and his early use of adhesives, the field his father worked in, as the spur for his later work in laminating glass; classes at the Art Students League in New York City and Woodstock, New York; attending the Cleveland Institute of Art; spending the summer of 1971 in Stanwood, Washington, helping set up the Pilchuck Glass School, then returning to set up a glass program at the Cleveland Institute of Art with Christine Federighi; the lure of glass, and the danger that its beauty can overshadow artistic substance, which led in part to his decision to mix it with other materials; the influence of minimalism and of Russian constructivism, architecture and modern design; graduate studies at Alfred University, Alfred, New York; accepting a teaching job at the University of Illinois in 1976; work with lamination and expanding scale in his work; use of Vitrolite; large-scale installation work, beginning in the early 1980s, including Optional Refractions and Allele; reflection on the deliberate, design-focused nature of his work; his language series beginning in 2000; the series Pragnanz; philosophy of teaching; the value of intensive learning environments such as craft schools compared with the cross pollination of ideas available at a larger university; the imperative for craft to integrate new materials, technology, and ideas while retaining the importance of the hand; the role of galleries and collectors, and involvement in larger art and craft venues, including the May Show and SOFA; his stint as a judge in a barbecued rib cook-off; the effect of seminal exhibitions such as like "Objects: USA," [1969] and "Poetry of the Physical" (1986) in setting a standard of professionalism for and providing visibility to makers; impact of his international travel; a turn away from pure design and towards a more poetic ambiance in the language series; the use of projected light and his use of cast prismatic shadows in his installation The Nature of Things in Jacksonville, Florida; the issue of scale in his work; artists whose work he admires, including Frank Stella, Richard Serra, Michael Heizer, Tony Smith, Gordon Matta-Clark, William Daley; studio glass as an international movement; involvement with various craft organizations, and wrestling with the definition of a craft artist; preparations to move to Massachusetts and spend some contemplative time thinking about and working on new directions. He recalls Brent Young, Dale Chihuly, Jamie Carpenter, Christine Federighi, Richard Marquis, Eric Hilton, Andre Billeci, Dan Dailey, Doug Heller and Bonnie Marx.
Biographical / Historical:
William Douglas Carlson (1950- ) is a glass artist and educator in Miami, Florida. Carlson was educated at Alfred University.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 6 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Constructivism (Art)  Search this
Glass art -- Technique  Search this
Glass art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Glass artists -- Florida -- Interviews  Search this
Minimal art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.carlso09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carlso09

Elizabeth Hertz letters from William and Marguerite Zorach

Creator:
Hertz, Grace Elizabeth, 1920-  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Faculty  Search this
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Dayton Art Institute  Search this
Ipcar, Dahlov, 1917-2017  Search this
Zorach, Marguerite, 1887-1968  Search this
Zorach, Peggy  Search this
Zorach, Tessim  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1943-2006
Summary:
Elizabeth Hertz letters from William and Marguerite Zorach measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1943-2006. Thirty-five letters and cards, mainly from William and Marguerite Zorach, document daily activities, visits, and reference art exhibitions and lectures. Also included are a few cards and letters from Tessim and Peggy Zorach and Dahlov Ipcar, and one letter from the Dayton Art Institute where Zorach lectured in 1951, for which the visit was facilitated by Elizabeth Hertz.
Scope and Contents:
Elizabeth Hertz letters from William and Marguerite Zorach measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1943-2006. Thirty-five letters and cards, mainly from William and Marguerite Zorach, document daily activities, visits, and reference art exhibitions and lectures. Also included are a few cards and letters from Tessim and Peggy Zorach and Dahlov Ipcar, and one letter from the Dayton Art Institute where Zorach lectured in 1951, for which the visit was facilitated by Elizabeth Hertz.
Arrangement:
Due to the small size of this collection the papers are arranged as one series.
Biographical / Historical:
(Grace) Elizabeth "Beth" Hertz (1920- ) is an artist and was a student of William Zorach's at the Art Students League in New York. Hertz maintained a relationship with William and Marguerite, as well as with their children Tessim and Dahlov. Following her time as Zorach's student, Hertz visited their summer home at Robinhood Farm in Georgetown, Maine, where she assisted in daily chores while receiving critiques on her artwork. Into the 1950s, visits were more infrequent but Hertz still looked to Zorach for advice on her art career and frequently exchanged news about their families and careers. In 1951 Elizabeth Hertz facilitated William Zorach's guest lecture at the Dayton Art Institute Commencement Dinner.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art are the Zorach Family papers, 1900-1987.
Provenance:
The Elizabeth Hertz letters from William and Marguerite Zorach, 1943-2006, was donated by Leah Hertz, daughter-in-law of Elizabeth Hertz, in 2017.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Occupation:
Painters -- Ohio  Search this
Topic:
Women artists--Ohio  Search this
Citation:
Elizabeth Hertz letters from William and Marguerite Zorach, 1943-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hertgrac
See more items in:
Elizabeth Hertz letters from William and Marguerite Zorach
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hertgrac

Oral history interview with Adolph Gottlieb

Interviewee:
Gottlieb, Adolph, 1903-1974  Search this
Interviewer:
Seckler, Dorothy Gees, 1910-1994  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
United States. Works Progress Administration  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Sloan, John, 1871-1951  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound cassettes (Sound recordings (90 min.))
27 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1967 Oct. 25
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Adolph Gottlieb conducted 1967 Oct. 25, in New York, by Dorothy Seckler, for the Archives of American Art.
Gottlieb speaks of his childhood in New York; his decision to pursue art and its connection to a generational rebellion against traditional middle class values; his interest in art by the age of fifteen; the cultural influence of pop culture and comic strips (Mutt and Jeff); his interrupted high school career at Stuyvesant; his eighteen month stay in Europe (1921) studying in museums and various art schools; his subsequent exposure to Matisse, Picasso, and Leger; his experiences with German Expressionism in Vienna, Munich, Dresden, and Berlin; his return to the states; his attraction to Italian and French Renaissance painting as well as Ingres Courbet, and Delacroix; his time spent attending Saturday classes at the Arts Student League under John Sloan; the influence of John Sloan's cubist side; his foresight of the transient nature of the Ashcan school; his belief in painting from the imagination and memory; Cezanne's influence insofar as the notion of how to approach the forms of nature in terms of their volume; his instinct to maintain the surface and to keep it flat; his use of muddy, gray, brown, subdued colors, applied in a rich juicy impasto style; his first exhibition with the Art Alliance; his relationship with Rothko and Avery and specifically the heavy influence of Avery on his subject matter after his marriage;his short time working for the WPA in 1936; his self-discovery in Arizona; his literary influences, Pound, Joyce, Proust, 19th century writers, and Russian writers; his return to New York City and his further abstraction and reduction of means; his use of a horizon as the result of a shift in forms; his budding interest in primitive art (particularly African Art); the formation of his pictographs and the influence of the Surrealists and the philosophy of Jung and the collective unconscious; his belief in surface techniques to achieve freshness, much like the automism; the elimination of compartmentalization in his work in the 50's; his interest in certain opposing images; art as a matter of subjective rather than objective; his more refined work, more colorful, and more subtle work of the mid 50's; his distaste for academic devises; his recent Burst paintings; and his impulse to work on a larger scale.
Biographical / Historical:
Adolph Gottlieb (1903-1974) was a painter from New York, N.Y.
General:
Transferred from original acetate tape reels.
Sound quality is poor.
The recording ends before the conclusion of the interview.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Topic:
Ashcan school of art  Search this
Surrealism  Search this
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Art, Abstract -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Expressionism (Art)  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.gottli67
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gottli67

Oral history interview with Al Hansen

Interviewee:
Hansen, Al, 1927-1995  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Pratt Institute -- Students  Search this
Reuben Gallery  Search this
Brecht, George  Search this
Callahan, Harry M.  Search this
Dine, Jim, 1935-  Search this
Dunn, Bob  Search this
Dunn, Judith  Search this
Eisenhauer, Lette  Search this
Goldfine, Pauline  Search this
Groth, John, 1908-1988  Search this
Higgins, Dick, 1938-1998  Search this
Kaprow, Allan  Search this
Karp, Ivan C., 1926-2012  Search this
Mac Low, Jackson  Search this
Maciunas, George, 1931-1978  Search this
Marisol, 1930-2016  Search this
McCarey, Don  Search this
Moorman, Charlotte  Search this
Muller, Jan, 1922-1958  Search this
Nakian, Reuben, 1897-1986  Search this
Oldenburg, Claes, 1929-  Search this
Ortiz, Rafael Montanez  Search this
Paik, Nam June, 1932-  Search this
Poons, Larry  Search this
Segal, George  Search this
Smith, Tony, 1912-1980  Search this
Vostell, Wolf, 1932-1998  Search this
Waring, James, 1922-1975  Search this
Watts, Robert, 1923-1988  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound tape reels (Sound recording, 5 in.)
112 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1973 November 6-13
Scope and Contents:
Interview of Al Hansen conducted 1973 November 6-13, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art.
Hansen traces his personal history, recalling his childhood and early education in Queens; his service in the armed forces; and jobs he held in social work, advertising, off-Broadway theater, and art galleries. He describes taking classes with John Groth at the Art Students League in the 1940s; with Reuben Nakian at Pratt in the 1950s; and with John Cage at the New School in 1958. He also discusses the rise of New York as an art center; his interest in film; his involvement in experimental sound and music; his approach to creating Happenings and that of other artists; organizing poetry readings at the Epitome Coffee Shop; his Hershey bar wrapper collages; the writing of his book, "A Primer of Happenings and Space Time Art," (New York: Something Else Press 1965); his interactions with Fluxus and George Maciunas; participating in the "Below Zero" show at the Reuben Gallery in 1959; attending the Destruction In Art symposium in London in 1966; and his recent exhibitions in Germany. People he recalls include Tony Smith; Pauline Goldfine [ph]; Dick Higgins; Wolf Vostell; Larry Poons; Allan Kaprow; Claes Oldenburg; Don McCarey [ph]; Jim Dine; George Brecht; Jackson Mac Low; James Waring; Marisol Escobar; Ivan Karp; Bob Watts; George Segal; Judith Dunn; Bob Dunn; Jan Müller; Nam June Paik; Raphael Ortiz; Charlotte Moorman; and Lettie Lou Eisenhauer.
Biographical / Historical:
Al Hansen (1927-1995) was an artist from New York, New York. Founder of Fluxus art movement and one of the first Happenings artists.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Fluxus (Group of artists)  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Happenings (Art)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.hansen73
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hansen73

Oral history interview with Lloyd Goodrich

Creator:
Goodrich, Lloyd, 1897-1987  Search this
Interviewer:
Phillips, Harlan B. (Harlan Buddington), 1920-  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
National Academy of Design (U.S.)  Search this
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Eakins, Thomas, 1844-1916  Search this
Field, Hamilton Easter  Search this
Force, Juliana, 1876-1948  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
Miller, Kenneth Hayes, 1876-1952  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Watson, Forbes, 1880-1960  Search this
Extent:
225 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Date:
1962 June 13-1963 March 25
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Lloyd Goodrich conducted 1962 June 13-1963 March 25, by Harlan Phillips, for the Archives of American Art. Goodrich speaks of his youth in Nutley, New Jersey; his family background; his father's influence; his friendship with Reginald Marsh; studying at the Art Students League under Kenneth Hayes Miller; attending the National Academy of Design; his interest in music and poetry; deciding upon a career in art; working as a writer, editor, and critic for "The Arts"; his travels for "The Arts"; critics he knew; his book on Thomas Eakins; his work with the Public Works of Art Project; political problems with government support of the arts in the 1930s through the 1950s; working as a curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art; the problem of forgeries; the Whitney's relationship with other museums; and politics at the Whitney. He recalls Juliana Force, Forbes Watson, Alfred Stieglitz and Hamilton Easter Field.
Biographical / Historical:
Lloyd Goodrich (1897-1987) was a museum director and art historian living in New York, New York.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. No audio exists. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art and state  Search this
Art -- Forgeries  Search this
Museum directors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Function:
Art museums -- New York (State) -- New York
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.goodri62
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-goodri62

Oral history interview with Don Freeman

Interviewee:
Freeman, Don, 1908-1978  Search this
Interviewer:
McGlynn, Betty Hoag  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
United States. Works Progress Administration  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Sloan, John, 1871-1951  Search this
Tolegian, Manuel J. (Manuel Jerair), 1911-1983  Search this
Wickey, Harry  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recording, 5 in.)
19 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1965 June 4
Scope and Contents:
Interview of Don Freeman conducted 1965 June 4, by Betty Hoag McGlynn, for the Archives of American Art, in his home, in Santa Barbara, Calif. Freeman speaks of his childhood in San Diego with his guardian; his high school years spent in St. Louis at a public school Prineipia (and his teacher Kathryn Cherry); the knowledge of his artistic destiny as a child; his move to New York City in 1929; his time spent working as an unbooked trumpet player for jazz orchestras on Broadway; his formative years at the Art Students League under the guidance of John Sloan;
the influence of Robert Henri and "Art Spirit;" his decision to do illustrations for the theater section of the Herald Tribune of ongoing performances; his time spent studying with Harry Wickey (etcher and sculptor); his relationship and marriage to wife Lydia as well as description of life in downtown Manhattan immediately following the stock market crash ; time at Art Students League studying along side with Jackson Pollock, Manuel Tolegian, Whitney Darrel; his decision to work for the WPA in
the graphics department completing lithographs (1933-1934); "Freedom of the Press," a painting completed around the same time and the possible influence of Reginald Marsh; his interest in a project called "Paint for the People" (a public works project for the New York Subway system); time spent illustrating for the WPA theater magazine "The Living Magazine;" his opinions concerning acetate and stone as well as the use of mezzotint; his personal magazine which he published for four years (name unknown); a general summary of his feelings towards the WPA as an artistic force; his separation from the Union Uprisings due to his success within the program;
his work on "Our Flying Navy" a series of illustrations (now compiled as a book) used for advertisement for the Navy; his participation in the Association of American Artists before his term spent in the Army during WWII; his budding career as a children's books writer and illustrator (Barton Press); his illustrations for William Soroyan"s The Human Comedy; his move back west and his son Roy; and his current occupation of giving "Chalk Talks" around the country, speaking with students about art, music, theater.
Biographical / Historical:
Don Freeman (1908-1978) was an Illustrator from New York, N.Y. Went to New York City at the age of 21. Studied with John Sloan and Harry Wickey at the Art Students League.
General:
An unrelated interview of Ben Messick conducted by B. Hoag McGlynn is also on this tape.
Provenance:
Conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Illustrators -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Artists' materials  Search this
Illustration of books  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.freema65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-freema65

Oral history interview with Lee Bontecou

Interviewee:
Bontecou, Lee, 1931-  Search this
Interviewer:
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Brooklyn College -- Faculty  Search this
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Bellamy, Richard  Search this
Brackman, Robert, 1898-  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Doyle, Tom  Search this
González, Julio, 1876-1942  Search this
Hesse, Eva, 1936-1970  Search this
Stankiewicz, Richard, 1922-1983  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Extent:
118 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2009 January 10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Lee Bontecou conducted 2009 January 10, by Dore Ashton, for the Archives of American Art, at Knoedler and Company, in New York, New York.
Bontecou speaks of her interest in art as a young child and her parents' encouragement and influences; her two years at community college before studying painting then sculpture under William Zorach at the Arts Students League in New York City; her time working, living and studying in Rome though the Fulbright Scholarship; her abstracted figural works in Rome influenced by ancient Greek and Roman sculpture; her exploration in Europe of non-American influences and her admiration of the strong design sense in Italy; returning to the United States and working in the New York City art scene and exhibiting her works at Leo Castelli's Gallery; different techniques including welding and vacuum forming; meeting her husband, Bill Giles, and raising her daughter, Vallie, in New York City; leaving New York City and the Castelli Gallery for Pennsylvania and the ability to experiment in her artwork; teaching at Brooklyn College where she worked with Morris Dorsky and enjoyed a wide range of students; her lack of affiliation with art movements, including Pop Art; her illness and her current work; and her strong belief that an M.F.A. is useless and that young artists have to make themselves. Bontecou also recalls Robert Brackman, Julio Gonzales, Alexander Calder, Richard Bellamy, Gabriel Kahn, Richard Stankewiczs, Tom Doyle, Eve Hesse, Sandra and Jack Beale, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Lee Bontecou (1931- ) is a sculptor and printmaker from New York, New York. Bontecou studied at the Art Students League of New York and taught at Brooklyn College.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 42 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Pop art  Search this
Sculpture -- Technique  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.bontec09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bontec09

Bernhard H. Berntsen papers

Creator:
Berntsen, Bernhard H. (Bernhard Hilmar), 1900-1992  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Faculty -- Photographs  Search this
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students -- Photographs  Search this
Federal Art Project (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Norwegian Art and Craft Club (Brooklyn, N.Y.)  Search this
United States. Works Progress Administration  Search this
Willard Parker Hospital (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Kahlo, Frida -- Photographs  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957 -- Photographs  Search this
Suzuki, Sakari, 1900- -- Photographs  Search this
Extent:
0.4 Linear feet ((60 items partially microfilmed on 1 reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1931-1987
Scope and Contents:
Sketches, photographs, notes, a scrapbook, and printed material.
REEL 2787: A notebook containing sketches and notes on the completion of the Willard Parker Hospital mural, New York City, which Sakari Suzuki painted with the assistance of Berntsen for the Federal Arts Project in 1936-1938; and 9 photographs of the Willard Parker mural, 2 of which show Suzuki and 2 of Suzuki and Berntsen at work. The Willard Parker Hospital was later demolished.
UNMICROFILMED: A chronology of Berntsen's career; 24 sketches in pencil and in pen and ink of ironworkers and construction workers, ca. 1933-1934, and of visitors to the National Gallery where Berntsen was a guard, ca. 1966-1971; three letters from Bernsten to his wife Alma, 1947-1952; loose newspaper clippings, ca. 1933-1985, and a scrapbook of newspaper clippings (in Norwegian and English) concerning Berntsen's involvement with the Norwegian Art and Craft Club, and his paintings and sketches of workers at construction sites where he worked as an ironworker, ca. 1931-1976; two exhibition announcements, 1964 and 1986; photographs, ca. 1933-1987, mostly snapshots, include Berntsen painting, Bernsten in his National Gallery of Art guard uniform with Chief Justice Earl Warren, one of students and faculty of the Art Students League (ca. 1933-1934), one of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo in New York, several of Berntsen and Suzuki at work on the Willard Parker Hospital mural, ca. 1938, of events sponsored by the Norwegian Art and Craft Club, and of works of art. Also included are photocopies of works of art.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, mural painter, ironworker; Chicago, Ill., New York, N.Y. and Va. Born in Oslo, Norway. Berntsen also was the model for the laborer who stands behind Lenin in the controversial Diego Rivera mural for Radio City Music Hall.
Provenance:
Material on reel 2787 transferred from the National Collection of Fine Arts, who received it from Berntsen, 1975. Unmicrofilmed material donated 1993 and 2002 by Berntsen's great-grandson, Cliff Miller.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration, American  Search this
Art museum attendance -- Pictorial works  Search this
Norwegian American artists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.bernbern
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bernbern

Peggy Bacon papers

Creator:
Bacon, Peggy, 1895-1987  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Kraushaar Galleries  Search this
Alder, Jules  Search this
Bacon, Charles Roswell, 1868-1913  Search this
Brook, Alexander, 1898-1980  Search this
Bunner, Rudolph Francis  Search this
Lay, Charles Downing, 1877-1956  Search this
Remsen, Ira, 1846-1927  Search this
Schmidt, Katherine, 1898-1978  Search this
Varian, Dorothy, 1895-1985  Search this
Extent:
4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
1893-1973
bulk 1900-1936
Summary:
The papers of printmaker, illustrator, caricaturist, and writer Peggy Bacon measure 3.6 linear feet and date from 1893 to 1973, with the bulk of materials dating from 1900 to 1936. Much of the collection consists of family correspondence, although writings, photographs, artwork, and personal business records from Bacon's late career are also found.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of printmaker, illustrator, caricaturist, and writer Peggy Bacon measure 3.6 linear feet and date from 1893 to 1973, with the bulk of materials dating from 1900 to 1936. Much of the collection consists of family correspondence, although writings, photographs, artwork, and personal business records from Bacon's late career are also found.

Correspondence is found between Peggy Bacon and her parents, Elizabeth and Charles Roswell Bacon. Letters to her mother describe in detail her life as an art student and artist at the Art Students League; summer schools in Port Jefferson, Long Island and Provincetown, Massachusetts; the Woodstock artists' colony; and her early years in New York City. Letters from her husband, Alexander Brook, to her mother are also present. Letters to Bacon include letters from her early teacher Jonas Lie, and from friends and fellow artists Catherine Wiley, Dorothy Varian, Katherine Schmidt, Anne Rector Duffy, and others. Her parents' extensive correspondence includes letters to her father from the artists Jules Adler, Rudolph Bunner, Ira Remsen, and Charles Downing Lay.

The collection also contains Peggy Bacon's school reports and writing assignments, a marriage certificate, scattered poetry manuscripts and notes by Peggy Bacon, and fiction manuscripts by Charles Roswell Bacon. Personal business records date from the 1960s and 1970s and include publisher's royalty statements, gallery sales statements, and scattered business correspondence with Antoinette Kraushaar and other staff at the Kraushaar Galleries. Photographs depict Bacon and her family, friends, homes, and works of art. Artwork includes several original drawings and sketches by Bacon, as well as artwork by Alexander Brook, Charles Roswell Bacon, and others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1893-1913 (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1893-1939, 1969-1972 (Boxes 1-3; 3 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1897-1934, 1963-1972 (Box 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1905-1920 (Boxes 4-5; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1905-1935, 1973 (Box 5; 3 folders)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1900-1963 (Box 5, OV 6; 4 folders)

Series 7: Artwork, undated (Box 5, OVs 6-8; 9 folders)
Biographical Note:
Peggy Bacon was born in 1895 in Ridgefield, Connecticut, and grew up an only child after the death of two younger brothers in infancy. Her parents, Charles Roswell Bacon and Elizabeth Chase Bacon, had met at the Art Students League, where her father had studied with Robert Henri. Her father pursued a career in painting and writing until his suicide in 1913, and her mother painted miniatures.

A child of artists, Bacon began to draw at a very early age, and by age ten she was already earning money for her illustrations, drawings of literary characters made for dinner place cards. She did not attend school until 1909, when her parents sent her to a boarding school in Summit, New Jersey. She began her formal art training shortly after her father's death, enrolling in the School of Applied Arts for Women at the end of 1913. In the summer of 1914, she attended Jonas Lie's landscape class in Port Jefferson, Long Island, and continued private studies with him in New York City. Lie gave Bacon her first solo exhibition in 1915. From 1915 until 1920, she studied at the Art Students League under John Sloan, Kenneth Hayes Miller, George Bellows, Mahroni Young, and others. In the summers, she took classes first in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and then in Woodstock, New York, where she studied with Andrew Dasburg.

Bacon's circle was formed at the Art Students League, and the League's summer school in Woodstock. She met her husband, Alexander Brook, in Woodstock, and they were married in 1920. Both were active in the Woodstock Artists Association. Other artists in their close-knit group included Dorothea Schwarz (Greenbaum), Anne Rector (Duffy), Betty Burroughs (Woodhouse), Katherine Schmidt (Kuniyoshi Shubert), Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Molly Luce, Dorothy Varian, Edmund Duffy, Dick Dyer, David Morrison, and Andrew Dasburg. Many from this group were involved in the short-lived satirical magazine at the League called Bad News, published in 1918 with several of Bacon's earliest satirical drawings. Her first book, The True Philosopher and Other Cat Tales, was published in 1919. Brook and Bacon traveled to England in 1920, where their daughter Belinda was born. A son, Sandy, was born in Woodstock in 1922. In the early 1920s, Brook worked with Juliana Force at the Whitney Studio Club, and they were involved in the cultural life that sprang up around the gallery, which featured up-and-coming artists. For many years, Bacon and her family split their time between New York and Woodstock, and later summered in Cross River, NY. After divorcing Brook in 1940, Bacon spent summers in Ogunquit, Maine.

Though she initially thought of herself as a painter, she built her reputation on her drawings and prints, which often satirized the people around her in their natural habitats - artists in life classes, at dances, and in social situations, or a throng of people in a museum, on a city sidewalk, or a ship's deck. She became sought after for her illustrations and witty, topical verse in magazines such as Dial, Delineator, The New Yorker, New Republic, Fortune, and Vanity Fair. She helped to establish the American Print Makers, an artists' organization based in the Downtown Gallery which sought greater exhibition opportunities for printmakers. Bacon illustrated over sixty books, nineteen of which she also wrote, between 1919 and 1966, including many children's books and a successful mystery novel called The Inward Eye (1952). In 1933 she received a Guggenheim Fellowship and used it to complete a collection of caricatures of art world figures called Off With Their Heads (1934), the success of which prompted a spate of commissions for caricatures. Bacon stopped making caricatures in 1935, but they include some of her best-known work.

Bacon exhibited frequently, in New York and in major museum exhibitions nationally, showing her prints, drawings, pastels, and watercolors. She had over thirty solo exhibitions at such venues as Montross Gallery, Alfred Stieglitz's Intimate Gallery, and the Downtown Gallery, and was represented by Rehn Galleries and later Kraushaar Galleries. Bacon also taught extensively in the 1930s and 1940s, at the Fieldston School, Art Students League, Hunter College, Temple University, the Corcoran Gallery, and other places. In the 1950s, she returned to painting. She made her last prints in 1955. In the early 1970s, Bacon's eyesight failed, and she eventually went to live with her son in Cape Porpoise, Maine. She died in 1987.
Related Material:
Among the other resources relating to Peggy Bacon in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Bacon, May 8, 1973; and letters to Bernice and Harry Lurie from Peggy Bacon, 1969-1977. Additional Peggy Bacon papers are available at Syracuse University.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Peggy Bacon in 1973 and Kraushaar Galleries in 2008.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Drawings
Citation:
Peggy Bacon papers, 1893-1972. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bacopegg
See more items in:
Peggy Bacon papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bacopegg
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Karl Schrag

Interviewee:
Schrag, Karl  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Atelier 17  Search this
Becker, Maurice, 1889-1975  Search this
Bissière, Roger, 1888-1964  Search this
Broner, Robert, 1922-  Search this
Cloar, Carroll  Search this
Farr, Fred, 1914-1973  Search this
Hayter, Stanley William, 1901-1988  Search this
Horak, Bohuslav, 1914-2004  Search this
Kienbusch, William, 1914-1980  Search this
Lhote, André, 1885-1962  Search this
Refregier, Anton, 1905-  Search this
Sloan, John, 1871-1951  Search this
Sternberg, Harry, 1904-2001  Search this
Tanguy, Yves, 1900-1955  Search this
Extent:
45 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1970 October 14-20
Scope and Contents:
Interview of Karl Schrag conducted 1970 October 14-20, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art. Schrag speaks of his childhood in Germany; how his parents were nervous about him becoming an artist; going to various art schools; studying with Bissiere; his first exhibition in Brussels; moving to America because of the political situation in Europe; enrolling in the Art Students League; getting involved with Atelier 17; how the mid-1940s were crucial in his development; American artists he found interesting; his thoughts on the Abstract Expressionists; how he started teaching; joining Tamarind workshop; his first retrospective, the Ford Foundation-A.F.A Show; being on the Fulbright jury; how his pictures relate to each other; his technique; and becoming the Director of Atelier 17. He recalls Andre L'Hote, Roger Bissiere, Harry Sternberg, Anton Refregier, William Kienbusch, Fred Farr, Carroll Cloar, John Sloan, Maurice Becker, Stanley William Hayter, Yves Tanguy, Bohuslav Horak, Robert Broner, Margaret Lowenbraun, and many others.
Biographical / Historical:
Karl Schrag (1912-1995) was a painter and printmaker from New York, N.Y.
General:
Tape 2 is mostly blank.
Originally recorded on 3 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 25 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript is available on the Archives of American Art's website.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.schrag70
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-schrag70

Oral history interview with Eugene V. Thaw

Interviewee:
Thaw, Eugene Victor  Search this
Interviewer:
McElhinney, James Lancel, 1952-  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Cleveland Museum of Art  Search this
Columbia University -- Students  Search this
E.V. Thaw & Co.  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Pollock-Krasner Foundation  Search this
St. John's College (Annapolis, Md.) -- Students  Search this
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Franka, Gunther  Search this
Held, Julius Samuel, 1905-  Search this
Ketterer, Norbert  Search this
Krasner, Lee, 1908-1984  Search this
Landau, Jack, 1925-1967  Search this
Marca-Relli, Conrad, 1913-2000  Search this
Matisse, Pierre, 1900-1989  Search this
Meiss, Millard  Search this
Mitchell, Joan, 1926-1992  Search this
Offner, Richard, 1889-1965  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Rousseau, Theodore, 1912-  Search this
Shapiro, Meyer  Search this
Simon, Norton, 1907-1993  Search this
Vavala, Evelyn Sandberg  Search this
Extent:
33 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2007 October 1-2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Eugene V. Thaw conducted 2007 October 1-2, by James McElhinney, for the Archives of American Art's Art Dealers Association of America Project, at Thaw's residence, in New York, N.Y.
Thaw speaks of his childhood in New York City; Mexican art in his home including watercolors by Diego Rivera; beginning classes at the Art Student's League of New York at age 14; attending St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland; attending Columbia University for graduate courses in art history and studying with Meyer Shapiro and Millard Meiss; an early interest in Old Master, Renaissance, and German Expressionist art; studying in Florence, Italy for four months after World War II; opening The New Bookstore and Gallery with friend Jack Landau above the Algonquin Hotel upon his return to New York City; giving Joan Mitchell and Conrad Marca-Relli their first shows; ending his partnership with Landau, closing the bookstore, and moving the gallery to Madison Avenue; becoming involved in the international art market; the practice of buying and selling works of art in shares with other dealers; showing American and European artists; renaming the gallery E.V. Thaw & Company; operating essentially as a one-man gallery with very limited staff; his relationship with museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Cleveland Museum of Art; his personal collections, including extensive ancient Eurasian artifacts and American Indian art; establishing the Pollock-Krasner Foundation; the philanthropic vision of his own foundation, the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust; his retirement from dealing; the "hand of the artist" in historical context and its lack of significance in contemporary art; and advice for young and emerging art dealers. Thaw also recalls Richard Offner, Evelyn Sandberg-Vavala, Norbert Ketterer, Günther Franka, Pierre Matisse, Leo Castelli, Julius Held, Theodore Rousseau, Lee Krasner, Norton Simon, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Eugene Thaw (1927- ) is an art dealer from New York, N.Y. James McElhinney (1952- ) is a painter and educator from New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 26 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript is available on the Archives of American Art's website.
Topic:
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.thaw07
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-thaw07

Houghton Cranford Smith papers

Creator:
Smith, Houghton Cranford, 1887-1983  Search this
Names:
Académie Julian  Search this
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Butler Institute of American Art  Search this
Cape Cod School of Art  Search this
Carnegie Institute, Museum of Art  Search this
Passedoit Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Pratt Institute. Art School -- Students  Search this
University of Kansas -- Faculty  Search this
Lhote, André, 1885-1962  Search this
Ozenfant, Amédée, 1886-1966  Search this
Saint-Gaudens, Homer, b. 1880  Search this
Smith, Laura Gilbert Williams  Search this
Webster, E. Ambrose (Edwin Ambrose), 1869-1935  Search this
Extent:
2.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Postcards
Notebooks
Notes
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Place:
Chile -- description and travel
Paris (France) -- description and travel
Provincetown (Mass.) -- Description and Travel
Date:
1890-1991
Summary:
The papers of painter Houghton Cranford Smith measure 2.2 linear feet and date from 1890-1991. They consist of eight scrapbooks compiled by his widow containing correspondence with family and friends, biographical materials, sketches, school work, extensive clippings, exhibition catalogs, travel documents and numerous photographs of family and friends.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of painter Houghton Cranford Smith measure 2.2 linear feet and date from 1890-1991. They consist of eight scrapbooks compiled by his widow containing correspondence with family and friends, biographical materials, sketches, school work, extensive clippings, exhibition catalogs, travel documents and numerous photographs of family and friends.

Biographical materials include photographs of Smith, of his artwork and of friends and family in Provincetown and New Mexico, school documents from the Foebel Academy, the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and the Art Students' League, autographed menus, correspondence, including postcards and letters to family and friends sent from Bermuda and Jamaica, customs declarations, exhibition catalogs, newspaper clippings, a passport to Chile, newsletters, and Smith's teaching contract from the University of Kansas. Additionally, there are significant photographs and letters documenting Smith's art studies with E. Ambrose Webster at the Cape Cod School of Art in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

The collection also includes Smith's correspondence from France and South America. A significant portion of the collection includes papers from his time in France from 1913-1914, where he studied at the Parisian art school Academie Julian. These include a log from a tandem bicycle trip with classmate Harold P. Browne, an invitation to the Bal Randolphe, a Browne Art Class brochure and a narrative entitled "A Party of Fugitives from France," which describes Smith's forced fleeing from France after the French mobilization in 1914. There are also papers describing his South American travels which include notes and correspondence about Argentina, Uruguay and his time in Chile, which spans five years.

Materials documenting Smith's return to France and studies at the Academie Ozenfant from 1926 to 1933 include Smith's passport, ship passenger lists and other travel documents, correspondence with family, French identification letters, exhibition catalogs, newspaper clippings and his Academie Ozenfant list of classes and student card. Of particular note are correspondence from and a picture of Sir Walter Kitchener, governor of Bermuda, and letters from wife Elena Peralta to her parents-in-law. Topics covered in the correspondence of this scrapbook include sons Houghton Jr. and Gerrit and the birth of daughter Florence, financial difficulties, art teachers Amadee Ozenfant and Andree L'hote and the family's travels to Bermuda, New Mexico and New York City.

Materials from later in Smith's life include correspondence from Smith to second wife Laura Gilbert Williams, exhibition catalogs and registers, photographs of artwork, newspaper clippings of reviews received for Smith's exhibited paintings and congratulatory letters from family and friends on Smith's successful exhibits and feature article in The American Artist. Additionally, there is significant correspondence with the Passedoit Gallery, Homer Saint-Gaudens of the Carnegie Institute regarding the exhibition and purchase of Smith's artwork and Smith's gifted painting to the Butler Institute of American Art. Additionally, there are several biographical newspaper articles and a biographical sketch written by his wife Laura after his death.

Of note is the artist's original handwritten notes and final published version of his reminiscence "The Provincetown I Remember," notes about painting with various colors and color charts, related assignments from Smith's Color Theory Class, a signed copy of the book Color by E. Ambrose Webster, Smith's former art teacher, pencil sketches, a class notebook about lettering and an address book.
Arrangement:
As requested by the donor, the original arrangement has been maintained, but the collection has been rehoused for preservation purposes. The collection is arranged as 4 series.

Series 1: Scrapbooks, 1890-1991 (Boxes 1-2; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Writings, 1963-1991 (Box 2; 2 folders)

Series 3: Printed Material, 1916-1991 (Box 2, OV 4; 6 folders)

Series 4: Miscellany, circa 1920s-1977 (Box 2, OV 3; 7 folders)
Biographical Note:
Painter Houghton Cranford Smith (1887-1983) traveled extensively and painted throughout his life. He lived and studied art in France, South America, New York City and Provincetown. He had three children, Houghton Jr., Gerrit and Florence with his first wife, Elena Peralta. He held the position of Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas department of Drawing and Painting from 1921-1925.

Smith became widely recognized for his artwork in the 1940s. He married his second wife, Laura Gilbert Williams, in 1941. He has exhibited at many venues including the Passedoit Gallery, Corcoran Gallery, Richmond Museum, Columbia Art Museum, Walker Memorial Gallery, Art Institute of Kansas City and the Provincetown Art Association. For six consecutive years he was represented at Carnegie Institute's annual invitation exhibition.
Provenance:
Florence Cranford Smith Shepard donated her father's papers in 1993-1994.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown  Search this
Art teachers -- Kansas  Search this
Topic:
Color in art  Search this
Color guides  Search this
Art, American -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown  Search this
Art students -- France -- Paris  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Postcards
Notebooks
Notes
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Houghton Cranford Smith papers, 1890-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.smithoug
See more items in:
Houghton Cranford Smith papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-smithoug

Oral history interview with Barbara Novak

Interviewee:
Novak, Barbara  Search this
Interviewer:
McElhinney, James Lancel, 1952-  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Barnard College -- Students  Search this
Brooklyn Museum  Search this
Harvard University -- Students  Search this
Aaron, Dan  Search this
Bochner, Mel, 1940-  Search this
Bosa, Louis, 1905-  Search this
Coremans, Paul B., 1908-1965  Search this
Davis, Meredith (Meredith J)  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Feldman, Morton, 1926-1987  Search this
Ferber, Linda S.  Search this
Goetzmann, William  Search this
Hayes, Bartlett H., 1904-1988  Search this
Held, Julius Samuel, 1905-  Search this
Hesse, Eva, 1936-1970  Search this
Hopper, Edward, 1882-1967  Search this
Hutchinson, Peter A., 1930-  Search this
Icahn, Belle  Search this
Karolik, Maxim  Search this
Kaufman, William  Search this
Krasner, Lee, 1908-1984  Search this
Lane, Fitz Henry, 1804-1865  Search this
Lawrence, Marion  Search this
LeWitt, Sol, 1928-2007  Search this
McCoy, Ann Wyeth  Search this
Melkoff, Edward  Search this
Nevins, Kate Lockwood  Search this
O'Doherty, Brian  Search this
Presser, Josef, 1909-1967  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Reff, Theodore  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Rowland, Ben  Search this
Scharf, William, 1927-  Search this
Shapiro, Marge  Search this
Smithson, Robert  Search this
Watts, Marissa  Search this
Wyeth, Andrew, 1917-2009  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (Sound recording: 4 sound files (4 hr., 26 min.), digital)
89 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Europe -- description and travel
Utah -- Description and Travel
Date:
2013 October 8-17
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Barbara Novak conducted 2013 October 8-17, by James McElhinney, for the Archvies of American Art, at Novak's home in Manhattan, New York.
Novak speaks of her early art training; learning to draw at the age of eight with help from her uncle William Kaufman and later taking art classes with Belle Icahn; Edward Melkoff; Joseph Presser; and classes at the Art Students League; becoming Expressionist in her painting; her year in Europe as a Fulbright student from Harvard University; the powerful lectures of Julius Held at Barnard College that launched her career; feeling that she devised a system by which works of art can be understood through looking closely at their physical properties and how she tries to develop the individual in her students; her time as a docent at the Brooklyn Museum in the American art collection; which led her to becoming an Americanist; her book, "Alice's Neck" and the inspiring Utah landscape; the importance of Fitz Henry Lane's work; the embodiment in American art of Pragmatism and Transcendentalism; and being led to Luminism; her books showing how to understand American culture through art, covering formal, contextual, and spiritual elements; hosting the first television show on art, "Vision of Art"; her husband Brian O'Doherty's background in art; the importance of nature for Cole and Durand; that common sense should be used in describing works of art, rather than assuming current events influenced the artist; her education at Harvard; Margaret Fuller and writing "The Margaret-Ghost"; Marcel Duchamp; Andrew Wyeth; Edward Hopper; Robert Rauschenberg; Mark Rothko; and Lee Krasner; and that the most exhilarating time intellectually for her was the 1960s with a group that included Robert Smithson, Sol LeWitt, Eva Hesse, Peter Hutchinson, Morton Feldman, Mel Bochner, and others. Barbara also recalls Mrs. Nevins, William Scharf, Paul Cormans [ph], Marion Lawrence, Marge Shapiro, Maxim Karolick, William Goetzmann, Ann McCoy, Ben Rowland, Bart Hayes, Ted Reff, Dan Aaron, Louis Bosa, Linda Ferber, Meredith Davis, Marissa Watts, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Barbara Novak (1929- ) is an art historian in New York, New York. James McElhinney (1952- ) is a painter and educator in New York, New York.
General:
Originally recorded as 4 sound files. Duration is 4 hr., 26 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Fulbright scholars  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Expressionism (Art)  Search this
Luminism (Art)  Search this
Pragmatism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.novak13
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-novak13

Oral history interview with Marisol

Interviewee:
Marisol, 1930-2016  Search this
Interviewer:
Roberts, Colette, 1910-  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Ecole nationale supérieure des beaux-arts (France) -- Students  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recording, 7 in.)
34 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1968 Feb. 8
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Marisol conducted 1968 Feb. 8, by Colette Roberts, for the Archives of American Art.
In the interview Marisol speaks of her childhood spent both in Chile and France; the encouragement of her parents and teachers to draw freely; her progression from painting, to drawing, to collage and reliefs; the influence of Europeans, Matisse and Picasso, and American, Rauschenberg; her time spent in museums as a child and the subsequent exposure to DaVinci and Rembrandt; her art education, predominantly in New York at the Art Students League and briefly in Paris at the Ecole des Beaux Art; her association with the Abstract Expressionists at the Club; the contrast of her work to the dream-based Surrealists; her first show for Castelli in 1957; her shows at the '62 and '64 annual exhibitions at the Stable; her more recent exhibitions for the Carnegie and Sidney Janis Gallery of The Beach and The Party; the origins of her wood drawings as a discovery while drawing lines to be sculpted upon wood; her experience working for the Daily Telegraph and completing portraits of historical figures such as Charles DeGalle; the literary influence of Dostoeveski, and more specifically Crime and Punishment; her recent apathy for visual entertainments and diversions (like the Ballet). Both in the interview and afterwards in a supplemental biographical addition Roberts and Marisol allude to her resistence to sit for interviews. The artist feels that she doesn't "have much to say."
Biographical / Historical:
Marisol (1930- ) is a sculptor in New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 1 digital wav file. Duration is 1 hr., 15 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators.
Restrictions:
Use requires an appointment.
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Collagists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Surrealism  Search this
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mariso68
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mariso68

Oral history interview with George McNeil

Interviewee:
McNeil, George, 1908-1995  Search this
Interviewer:
Seckler, Dorothy Gees, 1910-1994  Search this
Creator:
Diller, Burgoyne, 1906-1965  Search this
Names:
American Abstract Artists  Search this
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Pratt Institute. Art School -- Students  Search this
United States. Work Projects Administration  Search this
Cavallon, Giorgio, 1904-1989  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Dehner, Dorothy, 1901-1994  Search this
Dlugoszewski, Lucia, 1931-2000  Search this
Gorky, Arshile, 1904-1948  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Hopper, Jo N. (Josephine Nivison), 1883-1968  Search this
Kline, Franz, 1910-1962  Search this
Levy, Edgar  Search this
Manso, Leo  Search this
Matulka, Jan, 1890-1972  Search this
Pereira, I. Rice (Irene Rice), 1902-1971  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Vytlacil, Vaclav, 1892-1984  Search this
Extent:
18 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1965 June 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview of George McNeil conducted by Dorothy Seckler for the Archives of American Art. McNeil speaks of his childhood and his family; becoming interested in art during high school; attending Pratt Institute, and not being satisfied there; deciding to drop out of Pratt after attending a lecture from Vaclav Vytlacil; going to the Metropolitan Museum every day drawing and analyzing paintings; meeting Arshile Gorky while at the Metropolitan Museum; attending the Art Students League; studying with Hans Hofmann; the start of the American Abstract Artists; his involvement in the WPA's mural project; attending Teachers College at Columbia before joining the Navy; re-entering the New York art scene during the forties and liking it very much; meeting and being influenced by Pollock; his views on the state of painting; how his work has evolved; the various stages in the way a painting developed for him; how The Club and the Eighth Street Club has influenced him; the ideas discussed at The Club, and how he feels surrealism was not a big influence on them; Jackson Pollock's influence on abstract expressionism; artists he admires or has admired; and his thoughts on the contemporary art scene. He recalls Vaclav Vytlacil, Arshile Gorky, Jan Matulka, David Smith, Dorothy Dehner, Edgar Levy, Leo Manso, Burgoyne Diller, Irene Rice Pereira, Hans Hofmann, Jo Hopper, Giorgio Cavallon, Linda Lindaberg (Cavallon), Mercedes Kahls, George Byron Brown, Albert Swinden, Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollack, Franz Kline, Jack Tworkov, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, and many others.
Biographical / Historical:
George McNeil (1908-1995) was a painter and a printmaker in Brooklyn, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound tapes. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 49 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript is available on the Archives of American Art's website.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Painting  Search this
Surrealism  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mcneil65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mcneil65

Oral history interview with Molly Luce

Interviewee:
Luce, Molly, 1896-1986  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Wheaton College (Ill.) -- Students  Search this
Bacon, Peggy, 1895-1987  Search this
Bishop, Isabel, 1902-1988  Search this
Brook, Alexander, 1898-1980  Search this
Burroughs, Alan  Search this
Forbes, Edward Waldo, 1873-1969  Search this
Goodrich, Lloyd, 1897-1987  Search this
Hopper, Jo N. (Josephine Nivison), 1883-1968  Search this
Miller, Kenneth Hayes, 1876-1952  Search this
Schmidt, Katherine, 1898-1978  Search this
Extent:
44 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1981 Mar. 10-June 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Molly Luce conducted 1981 Mar.10-1981 June 18, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Luce speaks of her childhood; her early interested in drawing and botany; her two years of study at Wheaton College; her training at Art Students League; her acquaintances from the League including Anne Rector, Katherine Schmidt, Kenneth Hayes Miller; her travels in Europe with her first husband, Alan Burroughs; her residences in Minneapolis, Boston, and finally Little Compton; and observations on a range of her own paintings. She recalls Lloyd Goodrich, Dennis Miller, Kenneth Hayes Miller, Peggy Bacon, Isabel Bishop, Dorothy Varian, Alexander Brook, Edward Forbes, and many others.
Biographical / Historical:
Molly Luce (1896-1986) was a painter in Little Compton, R.I.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 3 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hrs., 27 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Painters -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.luce81
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-luce81

Oral history interview with Thomas Adrian Fransioli

Interviewee:
Fransioli, Thomas Adrian, 1906-1997  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
National Gallery of Art (U.S.)  Search this
University of Pennsylvania -- Students  Search this
Brown, Margaret E., d. 1957  Search this
Eggers, O. R. (Otto Reinhold), 1882-1964  Search this
Feiss, Carl  Search this
Finley, David E. (David Edward)  Search this
Klauder, Charles Z. (Charles Zeller), 1872-1938  Search this
Pope, John Russell, 1874-1937  Search this
Walker, John, 1906-1995  Search this
Extent:
2 Items (Sound recording: 2 sound files, digital, wav file)
37 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1981 April 21
Scope and Contents:
Interview of Thomas Adrian Fransioli, conducted April 21, 1981, by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, in Wenham, Massachusetts.
Fransioli speaks of his upbringing in Seattle, Washington; training and friendships at architectural school at the University of Pennsylvania; working in North Carolina, Virginia, Philadelphia, and Cleveland as an architect, interior designer, and draftsman; his commission for a grand country house in Virginia, 1932-1934; his work for John Russell Pope on the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.; work in photographic reconnaissance for the U.S. Army during World War II; visiting Hiroshima after the atomic bomb; his training at the Art Students League; his paintings of cityscapes and houses; the promotion of his career by Margaret Brown of Boston; and influences upon him. Fransioli also recalls Charles Klauder, Margaret Brown, Carl Feiss, Otto Eggers, John Walker, David Finley; and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Thomas Adrian Fransioli (1906- 1997) was an architect and painter from Massachusetts. He was born in Seattle, Washington.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Topic:
Architects -- Massachusetts -- Interviews  Search this
Architecture -- Study and teaching  Search this
Interior decorators -- Massachusetts -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Interviews  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Japan -- Hiroshima  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Photography  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.fransi81
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-fransi81

Oral history interview with Oscar Collier

Interviewee:
Collier, Oscar, 1924-  Search this
Interviewer:
Polcari, Stephen  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Baylor University -- Students  Search this
University of Iowa -- Students  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound cassettes (Sound recordings (90 min. each), analog)
58 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1994 June 22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Oscar Collier conducted 1994 June 22, by Stephen Polcari, for the Archives of American Art, in Seaman, Ohio.
Collier tells about his childhood in Texas; his education at Baylor University, University of Iowa, and the Art Students League in New York; his acquaintance with other artists, among them Will Barnet, Peter Busa, Robert Barrell, Lee Krasner, and Jackson Pollock; his involvement with and perceptions of Indian Space Painting; and his eventual transition into publishing as a career.
Biographical / Historical:
Oscar Collier (1924- ) is a painter from New York. Associated with "Indian Space Painting," so named for its roots in Pre-Columbian American Indian art.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 32 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for this interview was provided by the Horace Goldsmith Foundation.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.collie94
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-collie94

Brents Carlton papers

Creator:
Carlton, Brents, 1903-1962  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Golden Gate International Exposition (1939-1940 : San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Arnautoff, Victor Mikhail, 1896-1979  Search this
De Patta, Margaret, 1903-1964  Search this
Dean, Mallette, 1907-  Search this
Helser, Carrie Carlton  Search this
Neuhaus, Eugen, 1879-1963  Search this
Nichols, Dale, 1904-  Search this
Smith, Judson, 1880-1962  Search this
Extent:
4.7 Linear feet
0.528 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Prints
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Date:
1903-2014
Summary:
The papers of sculptor and painter Brents Carlton measure 4.7 linear feet and 0.528 GB and date from 1903 through 2014. The collection consists of biographical material, correspondence, personal business records, notes, a scrapbook, exhibition files, art work, photographs, digital photographs, and printed material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of sculptor and painter Brents Carlton measure 4.7 linear feet and 0.528 GB and date from 1903 through 2014. The collection consists of biographical material, correspondence, personal business records, notes, a scrapbook, exhibition files, art work, photographs, digital photographs, and printed material.

Biographical materials include several autobiographical accounts, school-related materials, a student card from the Art Students' League, and other identification cards.

Correspondence consists primarily of letters from family members and colleagues, including letters from Victor Arnautoff, H. Mallette Dean, Margaret De Patta, Eugen Neuhaus, Dale Nichols, and Judson T. Smith.

Personal business records include bank passbooks, pharmacy licensing records, receipts, income tax records, and ledgers of income, expenses, and art work sold.

Notes consists of Brents Carlton's address book, notebooks, and meeting minutes, as well as notes written by his daughter Carrie Carlton Helser.

There is one scrapbook. Exhibition files include correspondence, notes, photographs, and printed material related to the Golden Gate International Exhibition and other shows. There are also sketches, drawings, and prints by Carlton in the artwork series.

Photographic material includes an album, slides, negatives, and prints depicting Brents Carlton and his artwork, friends, family, and studios.

Printed material includes magazines, brochures, catalogs, and clippings.

A 2015 addition to the Brents Carlton papers includes additional biographical material, correspondence, personal business records, photographic material, and printed material.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 10 series. Series 10 consists of a 2015 addition to the papers that was not integrated into the other series, although there are similar types of materials.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1921-1944 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1922-1987 (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 1, 6)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1924-1959 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 4: Notes, circa 1923-2009 (0.1 linear feet; Boxes 1, 6, 0.013 GB; ER01)

Series 5: Scrapbook, 1928-1962 (0.2 linear feet; Box 6)

Series 6: Exhibition Files, 1927-1983 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1, OV 8)

Series 7: Art Work, 1924-1962 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1, 6, OV 8)

Series 8: Photographs, 1923-circa 1960 (0.6 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, 6-7)

Series 9: Printed Material, 1923-2012 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 10: 2015 Addition to the Brents Carlton Papers, 1903-2014 (2.3 linear feet; Boxes 2-5, 7, 0.515 GB; ER02-ER03)
Biographical / Historical:
Brents Carlton was a sculptor and painter who worked primarily in San Francisco, California.

Brents Carlton was born on October 31, 1903, in Roswell, New Mexico; his family later moved to Arkansas. In 1924, Carlton moved to San Francisco to attend the California School of Fine Arts for four years. From 1928 to 1929, he studied under a scholarship at the Art Students' League in New York, after which he returned to San Francisco and established his own studio at Polk Street. In order to support his family, Carlton was also employed as a pharmacist for 30 years.

In 1937, Carlton moved to a studio on Montgomery Street. In 1938, Carlton was commissioned to create four of his most notable works for the Golden Gate International Exposition (1939-1940) on Treasure Island: two large cast concrete figures for the Fountain of Western Waters at the Court of Pacifica, and two 18-foot bas-relief figures for the façade of the California State Building. He married Jessie Bosworth in 1939 and they had a daughter Carrie.

In the mid-1940s, Carlton relocated to a new studio above the pharmacy on Mission Street, where he worked. Due to failing health in the late 1950s, Carlton switched from sculpture to painting. Brents Carlton died of cancer on September 6, 1962 in San Francisco. His works have been exhibited in the California Palace of the Legion of Honor, the Oakland Art Gallery, and the San Francisco Museum.
Provenance:
The Brents Carlton papers were donated by the artist's daughter Carrie Carlton Helser in 1991 and 2015.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California  Search this
Topic:
Sculptors -- California  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Prints
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Brents Carlton papers, 1903-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.carlbren
See more items in:
Brents Carlton papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carlbren

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