Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
46 documents - page 1 of 3

Peter Howard Selz papers

Creator:
Selz, Peter Howard, 1919-  Search this
Names:
College Art Association of America  Search this
Institute of Design (Chicago, Ill.) (Faculty)  Search this
Marlborough Gallery  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Pomona College (Claremont, Calif.)  Search this
San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District (Calif.)  Search this
University of California, Berkeley. University Art Museum  Search this
Baykam, Bedri, 1957-  Search this
Beckmann, Max, 1884-1950  Search this
Benton, Fletcher, 1931-  Search this
Bergman, Ciel, 1938-  Search this
Bury, Pol, 1922-2005  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Chase-Riboud, Barbara  Search this
Christo, 1935-  Search this
Christo, 1935- (Running fence)  Search this
Conner, Bruce  Search this
Dubuffet, Jean, 1901-  Search this
Feininger, Lyonel, 1871-1956  Search this
Giacometti, Alberto, 1901-1966  Search this
Golub, Leon, 1922-2004  Search this
Graves, Morris, 1910-  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Hadzi, Dimitri, 1921-2006  Search this
Lebrun, Rico, 1900-1964  Search this
Lindner, Richard, 1901-  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia , 1887-1986  Search this
Onslow-Ford, Gordon  Search this
Paris, Harold, 1925-  Search this
Petlin, Irving, 1934-  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Tinguely, Jean, 1925-  Search this
Extent:
31.5 Linear feet
0.696 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Place:
San Francisco Bay Area (Calif.)
Date:
1929-2014
bulk 1950-2005
Summary:
The papers of art historian and writer Peter Howard Selz measure 31.5 linear feet and 0.696 GB and date from 1929 to 2018, with the bulk of the materials from 1950 to 2005. The papers document Selz's long career via correspondence, writings, professional files, project files, membership and association records, artists' research files, exhibition files, personal business records, printed and digital materials, and nine scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian and writer Peter Howard Selz measure 31.5 linear feet and 0.696 GB and date from 1929 to 2018, with the bulk of the materials from 1950 to 2005. The papers document Selz's long career via correspondence, writings, professional files, project files, membership and association records, artists' research files, exhibition files, personal business records, printed and digital materials, and scrapbooks.

Correspondence is with colleagues, artists, museums, and galleries concerning a wide variety of topics, including exhibitions and publications. The bulk of the correspondence consists of alphabetical files (two linear feet) that includes correspondence with artists. Notable correspondents include Pol Bury, Alexander Calder, Gordon Onslow Ford, Alberto Giacometti, Morris Graves, Philip Guston, Dimitri Hadzi, Jacques Lipchitz, Georgia O'Keeffe, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Jean Tinguely, and others. Eight additional files of chronological correspondence is with curators, arts organizations, and publishers. Additional correspondence is found in the professional files, project files, membership files, artists' research files, and exhibition files.

The bulk of the writings series is comprised of files related to Selz's books and includes typescript drafts and galleys, printed and digital material, correspondence, and publishing contracts. Files are found for Art in Our Times, Art of Engagement, Beyond the Mainstream, and Theories of Modern Art. Other writings consist of drafts of articles, essays, notes, and lectures by Selz. Also included are writings by others, including materials related to Paul Karlstrom's biography of Selz.

Professional files document curatorial and teaching positions at the Chicago Institute of Design, Pomona College, University of California, Berkeley, and the Museum of Modern Art. The series includes contracts, recommendations, syllabi, and correspondence.

Project files document Selz's professional work on specific art projects, panels, and symposiums. There is extensive documentation of Selz's work as project director of Christo's Running Fence, as well as other environmental art work projects by Christo, the Berkeley Art Project, Disney Art Project, "Funk Art" symposium, and the "Art and Politics in the 20th Century" symposium. Project files contain a wide variety of materials, such as correspondence, printed material, financial records, reports, photographs, and other documents. There are 2 tape reels, 1 VHS, and 1 sound cassette.

Membership and association records document Selz's involvement with or membership in various art councils, trustee boards, such as the College Art Association, Art in Chicago Advisory Committee, Bay Area Rapid Transit (B.A.R.T.) Art Council, and the San Francisco Crafts and Folk Art Museum Advisory Board, among others. Materials include meeting minutes, bulletins, correspondence, and memoranda.

Artists' Research Files consist of a wide variety of research materials Selz compiled about artists for lectures, writings, projects, exhibitions, etc. Files vary and may include original and photocopied correspondence, photographic material, resumes, printed and digital material, and writings. There is also 1 sound cassette. Files are found for Bedri Baykam, Max Beckmann, Fletcher Benton, Ciel Bergman, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Bruce Conner, Jean Dubuffet, Lyonel Feininger, Leon Golub, Dimitri Hadzi, Rico Lebrun, Harold Paris, Irving Petlin, among many others.

Exhibition files include catalogs, reviews, clippings, writings, correspondence, and other material documenting exhibitions organized by Selz. Limited materials are found for the MOMA Art Nouveau exhibition. More extensive documentation is found for Seven Decades of Modern Art, 1895-1965, The Joint Show (1967), The American Presidency in Political Cartoons (1976), American Modern Art Between the Two World Wars (1979), German Realism in the Twenties: Artist As Social Critic (1980), Twelve Artists from the German Democratic Republic (1989), a Richard Lindner Retrospective (1996), Spaces of Nature (1999), Color and Fire: Defining Moments in Studio Ceramics, 1950-2000 (2000), and a Nathan Oliviera Retrospective (2002), among others. Some of the materials are in digital format.

Personal business records are related to the Mark Rothko estate and Kate Rothko's legal case against Marlborough Gallery, Inc. Also included in this series are Peter Selz's school transcripts, bequests, royalty statements, house designs, and other material.

Printed materials include clippings, prints of articles written by Peter Selz, exhibition announcements and invitations, and photocopies of artwork images.

There are nine disbound scrapbooks dating from the 1940s up through 2012 containing clippings, exhibition announcements, and photographs of art events, Selz, and artists. This series also includes materials from the 2018 addition that may have previously been compiled in binders.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 10 series. When possible the original order of Peter Selz was maintained. However, multiple accessions were merged and integrated.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1942-2013 (2.3 linear feet; Box 1-3, Box 37)

Series 2: Writings, 1942- circa 2014 (8.3 linear feet; Box 3-10, OV 32, Box 37, 0.035 GB; ER01, ER12)

Series 3: Professional Files, 1949-2012 (1 linear feet; Box 11, Box 37)

Series 4: Project Files, 1962-2015 (2.8 linear feet; Box 12-14, OV 33, Box 37)

Series 5: Membership and Association Records, 1958-2014 (1.1 linear feet; Box 14-15, Box 37)

Series 6: Artists' Research Files, 1955-2014 (7.9 linear feet; Box 15-22, OV 34-35, 0.520 GB; ER02-ER08)

Series 7: Exhibition Files, 1959-2014 (5.2 linear feet; Box 23-27, Box 38, 0.093 GB; ER09-ER11)

Series 8: Personal Business Records, 1929-2014 (1.2 linear feet; Box 28-29, OV 36, Box 38)

Series 9: Printed Material, 1957-2014 (0.3 linear feet; Box 29, Box 38)

Series 10: Scrapbooks, 1947-2018 (1.4 linear feet, Box 29-31, Box 38)
Biographical / Historical:
Peter Howard Selz (1919-2019) was a pioneering historian of modern art, professor, and writer who taught at the University of California, Berkeley, from 1965-1988 and founded and directed the Berkeley Art Museum from 1965-1973.

Selz was born in 1919 in Munich, Germany to Eugene Selz and Edith Drey Selz. In 1936, the family fled Nazi Germany and immigrated to the United States. Selz attended Columbia University from 1937 to 1938 and became a naturalized citizen in 1942. During World War II, Selz served in the U.S. Army in the Office of Strategic Services. He married writer Thalia Cheronis in 1948 but they later divorced in 1965; he married several times afterwards.

After the war, Selz attended and taught at the University of Chicago where he received a Ph. D. in German Expressionism. He spent a year in Paris, 1949-1950, at the Sorbonne and École du Louvre on a Fulbright grant. He received a second Fulbright grant in 1953 to study at the Royal Museums of Art and History in Belgium. From 1953-1955, Selz also taught at the Chicago Institute of Design.

In 1955 Peter Selz accepted a position to chair the art history department at Pomona College in Claremont and relocated to California for a few years. He also became director of the college's art gallery.

In 1958 Selz moved to New York City to become curator of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art and was there through the transformative mid-1960s. While at MOMA, he organized several significant exhibitions of modern art, including the 1960 Jean Tinguely "Homage to New York," a sculpture that destroyed itself (and started a fire) in the sculpture garden of the museum; New Images of Man (1959), the Art Nouveau show (1960), and the Art of Assemblage (1961). He also launched important retrospectives, including the first Rodin retrospective in the United States and a comprehensive exhibition of Alberto Giacometti's work in 1965.

In 1965, Peter Selz returned to California to become the founding director of the Berkeley Art Museum at the University of California, Berkeley, a position he held until 1973. He organized exhibitions of Funk, film, and ceramicists like Peter Voulkos and Robert Arneson. Peter Selz later became project director for Christo's "Running Fence", the 24.5-mile long fabric fence over the Marin County hills in 1976. He also served concurrently as a professor of art history at UC until retiring in 1988.

Peter Selz was a member of the College Art Association's board of directors for two terms, 1958-1964 and 1966-1971. Selz is a prolific writer, and the author or co-author of numerous books, exhibition catalogs, and articles. Notable books include German Expressionist Painting (1957), Art in a Turbulent Era (1965), Art in Our Times (1981), and Sam Francis (1975).

In 1988 Peter Selz was named emeritus professor at University of California, Berkeley. In 1993 he was on the acquisitions committee of the Museums of Fine Arts, San Francisco. In 2012, Selz curated The Painted Word exhibition. Selz died in 2019 in Albany, California.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds oral history interviews of Peter Selz conducted by Paul J. Karlstrom on July 28, 1982, October 12, 1982, and November 3, 1999.
Provenance:
The Peter Howard Selz papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Peter Selz in multiple installments from 1976 through 2014. Additional papers were donated in 2018 by Gabrielle Selz, Peter Selz's daughter.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Authors -- California -- Berkeley  Search this
Art historians -- California -- Berkeley  Search this
Topic:
Realism  Search this
Political cartoons  Search this
Pop art  Search this
Environment (Art)  Search this
Painting, Abstract  Search this
Ceramics  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Exhibitions  Search this
Art -- Germany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Peter Howard Selz papers, 1929-2018, bulk 1950-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.selzpete
See more items in:
Peter Howard Selz papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-selzpete
Online Media:

Robert Perine research material on the Chouinard Art Institute

Creator:
Perine, Robert  Search this
Names:
Chouinard Art Institute (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Chouinard, Nelbert, 1879-1967  Search this
Extent:
1.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
circa 1923-circa 1985
Summary:
The Robert Perine research material on the Chouinard Art Institute measures 1.8 linear feet and date from circa 1923 to circa 1985. Documents consist of research material used in Perine's book Chouinard: An Art Vision Betrayed (1985) including catalogs for the Chouinard Institute and California Institute of the Arts; notes and preliminary writings for the book, including an annotated table of contents and a bibliography; floor plans of the Institute; material concerning the lawsuit brought against the board of trustees in an attempt to prevent the closing of the school; 158 photographs of Nelbert Chouinard, classes, students and buildings; and 27 sound cassettes of interviews of 52 artists and staff, some with partial transcripts.
Scope and Contents:
The Robert Perine research material on the Chouinard Art Institute measures 1.8 linear feet and date from circa 1923 to circa 1985. Documents consist of research material used in Perine's book Chouinard: An Art Vision Betrayed (1985) including catalogs for the Chouinard Institute and California Institute of the Arts; notes and preliminary writings for the book, including an annotated table of contents and a bibliography; floor plans of the Institute; material concerning the lawsuit brought against the board of trustees in an attempt to prevent the closing of the school; 158 photographs of Nelbert Chouinard, classes, students and buildings; and 27 sound cassettes of interviews of 52 artists and staff, some with partial transcripts.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as four series.

Series 1: Writings, 1930, 1962, circa 1980-circa 1985 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Printed Material, 1931-1984 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Photographs, circa 1923-1977 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 4: Interviews, circa 1979 (0.9 linear feet; Box 1-3)
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, educator, and author Robert Perine (1922-2004), was a student and later a professor at the Chouinard Art Institute. The Chouinard Art Institute was founded in Los Angeles, California, by Ms. Nelbert M. Chouinard in 1921. The Institute received financial support from Walt Disney who also oversaw its merger with the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music to form the Californian Institute of the Arts in 1961. The Chouinard Art Institute continued to operate as its own entity within the California Institute of the Arts until it was completely absorbed by the California Institute of the Arts in 1972.
Provenance:
The research material was donated to the Archives of American Art by Robert Perine in 1987.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Educators -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Authors -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Chouinard Art Institute (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
California Institute of the Arts  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Robert Perine research material on the Chouinard Art Institute, circa 1923-circa 1985. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.perirobe
See more items in:
Robert Perine research material on the Chouinard Art Institute
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-perirobe

Oral history interview with Millard Sheets

Interviewee:
Sheets, Millard, 1907-1989  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Names:
Chouinard Art Institute (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Chamberlin, F. Tolles (Frank Tolles), 1873-1961  Search this
Feitelson, Lorser, 1898-1978  Search this
Hatfield, Dalzell, 1893-1963  Search this
Lebrun, Rico, 1900-1964  Search this
Modra, Theodore B., 1873-1930  Search this
Extent:
167 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1986 October-1988 July
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Millard Sheets conducted 1986 October-1988 July, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
Sheets speaks of his childhood and early education; attending Chouinard Art Institute and being influenced by instructor F. Tolles Chamberlin; teaching at Scripps College Foundation of Art from 1931 to 1955; the beginnings of the California Watercolor Society; his painting career; his thoughts on Southern California Modernism; the growth and development of California art; artists including Lorser Feitelson and Rico Lebrun; designing forty buildings for Howard Ahmanson from the 1950s through the 1970s; his relationships with art critics; his involvement with architecture and design; and his philosophy as an art teacher. He recalls Theodore Modra and Dalzell Hatfield.
Biographical / Historical:
Millard Sheets (1907-1989) was a painter, educator, designer, and mural painter from California.
General:
Originally recorded on 8 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 16 digital wav files. Duration is 8 hr., 13 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- California  Search this
Painters -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Designers -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Educators -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Muralists -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Watercolorists -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.sheets86
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sheets86

The use of power and color / by Frederick J. Schwankovsky

Creator:
Schwankovsky, Frederick John, 1885-1974  Search this
Extent:
1 Volume ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Volumes
Date:
undated
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, writer, teacher; Los Angeles, California.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1964 by Frederick J. DeSt. V. Schwankovsky.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Authors -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Educators -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.schwfred
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-schwfred

San Francisco Art Association and related organizational records

Creator:
San Francisco Art Association  Search this
Names:
California School of Design  Search this
Mark Hopkins Institute of Art  Search this
San Francisco Art Institute  Search this
San Francisco Museum of Art  Search this
Western Round Table of Modern Art (1949 : San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Bateson, Gregory  Search this
Boas, George, 1891-  Search this
Burke, Kenneth, 1897-  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Frankenstein, Alfred V. (Alfred Victor), 1906-1981  Search this
Geddes, Norman Bel, 1893-1958  Search this
Goldwater, Robert John, 1907-1973  Search this
MacAgy, Douglas, 1913-  Search this
Milhaud, Darius, 1892-1974  Search this
Ritchie, Andrew Carnduff  Search this
Schoenberg, Arnold, 1874-1951  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Wright, Frank Lloyd, 1867-1959  Search this
Extent:
9 Microfilm reels
9 Sound cassettes (Sound recordings)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Sound cassettes
Date:
1871-1978
bulk 1871-1920
Scope and Contents:
Primarily records of the San Francisco Art Association (1871-1920), but also of the California School of Design (1873-1905) (briefly called the Mark Hopkins Institute of Art in 1893), the Palace of Fine Arts (1915-1945), The Western Round Table on Modern Art (1949), the San Francisco Art Institute (1911-1978), the San Francisco Museum of Art (1921-1970), and the Douglas MacAgy papers (1944-1950).
REELS 1288-1289: 3 vol. containing minutes of board of trustees meetings of the Association and Institute, 1871-1915, and minutes of the meetings of the board of directors of the California School of Design, 1873-1905.
REELS 2429-2433: Historical data contains material relating to the museum. San Francisco Art Association records include correspondence; photographs; membership records; organizational and registrarial records; reports; printed material; and materials regarding the Palace of Fine Arts. San Francisco Museum of Art section includes correspondence; minutes of board meetings; reports; legal documents; clippings; and printed materials. "Western Round Table on Modern Art" conference sponsored by SFAA, April 8-10, 1949, includes letters to organizer Douglas MacAgy regarding arrangements, publicity, and comments, including several from participants Gregory Bateson, Kenneth Burke, George Boas, Marcel Duchamp, Alfred Frankenstein, Norman Bel Geddes, Robert Goldwater, Darius Milhaud, Andrew Ritchie, Arnold Schoenberg, Mark Tobey, and Frank Lloyd Wright; Abstract of Proceedings; transcripts of the meeting edited by participants; clippings; and photographs. The microfilm also includes papers of Douglas MacAgy; and correspondence, clippings, and photographs of artists' models for the San Francisco Art Institute.
REELS 4962-4963: Files, primarily correspondence, from the director, J. Nilsen Laurvik, from the 43rd (1919) and 44th (1920) San Francisco Art Association Annual Art Exhibition of the Works of American Artists, pertaining to its organization, promotion and administration; and additional material relating to the "Western Round Table on Modern Art," including transcripts from the Apr. 8th session edited by participants, some with notes and letters, and a final draft of an edited version; a scrapbook of publicity clippings on the Round Table; and 30 photographs taken during the conference.
Also included are 9 audio cassettes (copied from original Webcor wire recordings) of the entire proceedings of the "Western Roundtable."
Biographical / Historical:
The San Francisco Art Association (SFAA) was founded in 1871 and incorporated in 1889. The California School of Design was established under the auspices of SFAA in 1874, changing its name to the Mark Hopkins Institute of Art in 1893 after the Mark Hopkins mansion was given to SFAA. It became the San Francisco Institute of Art in 1907, and the California School of Fine Arts in 1917. From 1916-1924, SFAA retained the Palace of Fine Arts, which had been part of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. In 1921, SFAA incorporated the San Francisco Museum of Art (SFMA) into its administration although each retained autonomy. In 1961, SFAA merged with the School and was renamed the San Francisco Art Institute. A change in the constitutional by-laws officially dissolved the SFAA in 1966, leaving the SFAI and the SFMA. In 1976, SFMA changed its name to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
On April 8-10, 1949, the SFAA sponsored the Western Round Table of Modern Art, organized by Douglas MacAgy for the purpose of bringing together a representation of the best informed opinion to discuss questions about art of the day.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1977-1987 by the San Francisco Art Institute. The sound recordings were borrowed from the San Francisco Art Institute, recorded on cassette in 1987 and then the orginal wire tapes were subsequently returned to the San Francisco Art Institute.
Restrictions:
Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Function:
Art museums -- California -- San Francisco
Arts facilities -- California -- San Francisco
Art Schools -- California -- San Francisco
Identifier:
AAA.sanfraaa
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sanfraaa

David Park papers

Creator:
Park, David, 1911-1960  Search this
Names:
Bruno, Phillip A.  Search this
Mills, Paul Chadbourne, 1924-  Search this
Staempfli, George W.  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet ((microfilmed on 3 reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1917-1973
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence; artwork; sketchbooks; photographs and slides; list of works and receipts; a master's thesis; and a calendar.
REEL 849: Lists of works and receipts; master's thesis by Paul Mills, "David Park and the New Figurative Painting," 1962; drawings and sketches; photographs of Park's works.
REELS 3001-3002: Correspondence of David and Lydia Park, 1959-1966, with George W. Staempfli and Phillip A. Bruno of Staempfli Gallery, and with the Park's attorney concerning the estate; 55 original works, in oil, pastel, ink, pencil and watercolor; 3 undated sketchbooks of figure and landscape studies; 51 photographs and slides of paintings by Park; a November 1971 calendar from Santa Barbara Museum of Art announcing the acquisition of Park's THREE NUDES; and miscellany.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, teacher; California. Park taught at the California School of Fine Arts from 1943-1952. Worked in Bay Area figurative painting style.
Provenance:
Material on reel 849 lent for microfilming 1974 and material on reels 3001-3002 donated 1974 by Lydia Park Moore, widow of Park.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California  Search this
Art teachers -- California  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- California  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- California -- San Francisco Bay Area  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.parkdavi
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-parkdavi

Otis Oldfield letters and photograph

Creator:
Oldfield, Otis, 1890-1969  Search this
Names:
San Francisco Museum of Art  Search this
Extent:
6 Items ((on 1 microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1913, 1925-1926
Scope and Contents:
Five letters, 1925-1926, to "Odette" (Mrs. Helena Marguerita Da Rosa). Oldfield describes his work at the San Francisco Museum of Fine Arts and daily activities as an artist. Also included is a photograph of Oldfield, 1913.
Biographical / Historical:
Otis Oldfield (1890-1969) was a painter and teacher from San Francisco, Calif.
Provenance:
Donated 1982 by Mrs. Betty Chidlaw.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.oldfotis
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-oldfotis

Otis Oldfield papers

Creator:
Oldfield, Otis, 1890-1969  Search this
Names:
Chittenden, Alice Brown, 1859 or 60-1944  Search this
Cuneo, Rinaldo, 1877-1939  Search this
Dixon, Maynard, 1875-1946  Search this
Gee, Yun, 1906-  Search this
Groninger, Homer  Search this
Labaudt, Lucien, 1880-1943  Search this
Oldfield, Helen, 1902-1981  Search this
Roche, Marcel  Search this
Ryan, Beatrice Judd  Search this
Stackpole, Ralph, 1885-1973  Search this
Taylor, Mildred  Search this
Extent:
62 Items ((on 2 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1910-1975
Scope and Contents:
Business correspondence; manuscript material; 2 financial log books kept by Oldfield and his widow, 1927-1974; 3 photo albums, one with photos of Oldfield, Ralph Stackpole and Homer Groninger, and 2 albums of works, 1924-1948; loose photos of works, of Oldfield, Yun Gee, Ralph Stackpole, Rinaldo Cuneo, Helen Oldfield, Marcel Roche and others, 1921-1957; 3 scrapbooks, 1910-1940, including catalogs and announcements, manuscript and printed material, clippings, and correspondence with Beatrice Judd Ryan, Mildred Taylor, Alice Chittenden, Lucien Labaudt and Maynard Dixon; clippings; and miscellany.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, teacher; San Francisco, California. Oldfield went to Paris in 1909 where he studied briefly at the Academie Julian. He remained in France until 1924, serving in the French army during World War I, and after the war was exhibiting at the Salon des Independents and the Salon d' Automne. He taught at the California School of Fine Arts, 1925-1942, and became known for his talents as a bookbinder as well as painter. He taught at the California College of Arts and Crafts, 1945-1951 and privately until his death.
Provenance:
Material lent for microfilming 1975 by Helen Oldfield, widow of Oldfield.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.oldfotip
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-oldfotip

William Morehouse papers

Creator:
Morehouse, William, 1929-1993  Search this
Extent:
1 Linear foot ((on 1 microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1929-1976
Scope and Contents:
A baby book, 1929; biographical documents; military records; an award certificate; correspondence, undated and 1947-1976; a marriage certificate, divorce papers, and miscellaneous legal papers, 1955-1974; receipts and income tax records; price lists; sales records; loan forms for works of art; miscellaneous business records pertaining to dealings with the Bolles Gallery, 1950-1975; papers relating to Morehouse's teaching career at Sonoma State College; 3 sketchbooks, undated and 1950-1967;
miscellaneous writings by Morehouse, 1937-1949; a poem "Painting #509 by William Morehouse" by Lloyd Clark; clippings, 1949-1976; exhibition announcements and catalogs, 1954-1975; miscellaneous printed material; and photographs of Morehouse, his exhibitions, and his works of art, undated and 1934-1975.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, sculptor; San Francisco, California.
Provenance:
Donated 1976 by William Morehouse.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California  Search this
Sculptors -- California  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
Sculpture, American  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.morewill
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-morewill

Oral history interview with Dominic Di Mare

Interviewee:
Di Mare, Dominic, 1932-  Search this
Interviewer:
Mayfield, Signe  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
60 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 June 4-10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Dominic Di Mare conducted 2002 June 4-10, by Signe Mayfield, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at his home and studio, in Tiburon, California.
Di Mare speaks of growing up in Monterey, California, around thread, as his mother crocheted and his fisherman father made lures; drawing as a child; receiving the Junior Scholastic Art Awards in high school; enrolling at Monterey Peninsula College and San Francisco State; acquiring a teacher's degree and taking a craft class; being "enthralled" by setting up a loom; teaching art in junior high schools; getting married and buying a loom; reading Craft Horizon magazine and becoming inspired by the work of Kay Sekimachi; buying yarn from Helen Pope at The Yarn Depot and forming a friendship with her; exhibiting at The Yarn Depot; participating in craft competitions and showing his work to Paul Smith, the director of the Museum of Contemporary Crafts; his first show at the Museum of Contemporary Crafts in 1965; exhibiting at Museum West (the west coast extension of the Museum of Contemporary Crafts); recognizing "self and struggle and passion" in Ferne Jacobs' work; his dealers including Marjorie Annenberg (Annenberg Gallery, San Francisco), Ruth Braunstein (Braunstein/Quay Gallery, San Francisco), Susan Cummins (Susan Cummins Gallery, Mill Valley, Calif.), and Florence Duhl (Florence Duhl Gallery, New York); receiving a grant from the Marin Arts Council; quitting his teaching job, receiving an NEA grant, and becoming a full-time artist; collectors Dan and Hillary Goldstein; the beauty of poet Betty Parks' article, "Dominic Di Mare: Houses for the Sacred," in American Craft (October/November 1982); his "shrine" imagery; his military service during the Korean War and being assigned to a post office in Paris, France; going to the Louvre and encountering the Nike, "winged victory" sculpture; and Jack Lenore Larson's support.
Di Mare considers himself to be "self-taught" although he attended the California College of Arts and Crafts, San Francisco State, and Rudolph Schaefer School of Design. He also talks about autobiographical elements in his work; his "personal, artistic vocabulary"; the repetition of black and white; his use of sticks and feathers; and cross shapes, representing the church and a ship's mast. He comments on making portraits during his summers in Switzerland and making magical wands; and his artistic philosophy. Di Mare also recalls Camille Cook, Helen Drutt, Trude Guermonprez, Sophi Harpe, Gyongy Laky, Marjorie Livingston, Hal Painter, June Schwarcz, Rose Slivka, Millie Tresko, and Dorian Zachai.
Biographical / Historical:
Dominic Di Mare (1932- ) is a fiber artist from Tiburon, California. Signe Mayfield is an art historian.
General:
Originally recorded 3 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 47 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Patrons must use transcript. Transcript available online. Sound recordings (3 cassettes) are ACCESS RESTRICTED; Written permission required.
Occupation:
Weavers -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Fiberwork  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Weaving -- California  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.dimare02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-dimare02

Dominic Di Mare papers

Creator:
Di Mare, Dominic, 1932-  Search this
Names:
California College of Arts and Crafts (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Palo Alto Arts Center  Search this
Susan Cummins Gallery  Search this
Extent:
3.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Sketches
Drawings
Date:
1950-2003
Summary:
The papers of Dominic Di Mare measure 3.2 linear feet and date from 1950 to 2003. The collection provides an overview of Di Mare's career as a fiber artist through biographical information, correspondence, writings, printed material, artwork, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Dominic Di Mare measure 3.2 linear feet and date from 1950 to 2003. The collection provides an overview of Di Mare's career as a fiber artist through biographical information, correspondence, writings, printed material, artwork, and photographs. Of particular interest is the material concerning Di Mare's 1998 retrospective exhibition, including correspondence, a guest book, writings, publications, and photographs.

Biographical material includes award certificates from the American Craft Council and an extensive professional resumé. The correspondence series includes personal and professional correspondence as well as three folders of incoming and outgoing correspondence with the Susan Cummins Gallery, revealing the relationship that Di Mare had with the gallery during the 1990s. Writings include those by Di Mare and others. Of note are numerous artist statements and an illustrated journal from 1971. The printed material provides researchers with press clippings, exhibition catalogs, announcements, and published material on Di Mare, as well as other printed material on topics that Di Mare found of interest, including craft in education and the art of his colleagues. The artwork series includes many drawings, the highlight being a sketchbook of color drawings and diagrams spanning a thirty year period. The extensive collection of photographs include many portraits of Di Mare, photos of exhibitions, and numerous photos and slides of his artwork.

An unprocessed small addition of 0.4 linear feet consists of correspondence with colleagues, arts organizations, galleries, and museums regarding exhibitions and publications; photographs of De Mare at work and of works of art, including two flash drives containing images of works of art; exhibition catalogs and announcements; and one schematic drawing of an unidentified work by De Mare, 1990.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into six series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1987-2003 (box 1; 4 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1970-2002, undated (box 1; 7 folders)

Series 3: Writings, 1971-1977, undated (box 1; 7 folders)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1964-2003, undated (box 1-2; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Artwork, 1950-1999, undated (box 3; 3 folders)

Series 6: Photographs, 1959-2001, undated (box 3-4; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 7: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1950-2003 (box 5; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Fiber artist Dominic Di Mare was born in San Francisco, California, in 1932. He grew up working on his father's fishing boat and was artistically influenced by the process of making rope and fishing lines. After finishing high school, Di Mare attended the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland and later received his art teaching certification at San Francisco State University. In 1960, Di Mare married Margaret Nef, bought his first loom, and began teaching at Francisco Junior High School. He and his wife had three children together, Marcello, Lorenzo, and Livia. A highly respected teacher, Di Mare taught at Francisco Junior High until 1976, when he left to work in his studio full-time.

A self taught fiber artist, Di Mare has explored, throughout his career, the imagery of the ocean and the shore. He works with fiber, wood, handmade paper, and small found objects to create unique sculptures. Since his first one person show at The Yarn Depot in 1963, Di Mare has participated in numerous national and international exhibitions and has been represented by the Anneberg Gallery and Braunstein Gallery in San Francisco, Florence Duhl Gallery in New York, and most recently the Susan Cummins Gallery in Mill Valley, California. In 1998 the Palo Alto Art Center curated "Dominic Di Mare: A Retrospective," which traveled throughout the country. In 1999 Di Mare received the American Crafts Council Gold Medal Award.
Related Material:
The Archives also has a transcribed interview of Dominic Di Mare, conducted June 4 and 10, 2002 by Signe Mayfield for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America. The interview was conducted in Di Mare's home in Tiburon, California.
Provenance:
Dominic Di Mare donated his papers in 2003 and 2013 to the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Sculptors -- California  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Fiber artists -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Sketches
Drawings
Citation:
Dominic Di Mare papers, 1950-2003. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.dimadomi
See more items in:
Dominic Di Mare papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-dimadomi

Oral history interview with Richard Diebenkorn

Interviewee:
Diebenkorn, Richard, 1922-1993  Search this
Interviewer:
Larsen, Susan C.  Search this
Names:
Bischoff, Elmer, 1916-1991  Search this
Jonson, Raymond, 1891-1982  Search this
Loran, Erle, 1905-1999  Search this
Mendelowitz, Daniel Marcus  Search this
Park, David, 1911-1960  Search this
Extent:
153 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1985 May 1-1987 December 15
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Richard Diebenkorn conducted 1985 May 1-1987 December 15, by Susan Larsen, for the Archives of American Art.
Diebenkorn speaks of his family background and early life; his education and his service in the Marine Corps; his introduction to modernism; his early abstract work; the formation of the Bay Area figurative school and the relationship between art in New York and in the Bay Area; teaching; critical and public reaction to his work; important exhibitions of his work; vacillating between the figurative and the abstract in his painting; his working methods. He recalls Daniel Mendelowitz, Erle Loran, Raymond Jonson, David Park, and Elmer Bischoff.
Biographical / Historical:
Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993) was a painter from California.
General:
Originally recorded on 10 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 16 digital wav files. Duration is 7 hr., 43 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others. [Another interview of Diebenkorn was donated by Larsen, 1977].
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- California -- San Francisco Bay Area  Search this
Painting, Abstract -- California -- San Francisco Bay Area  Search this
Painting -- California -- San Francisco Bay Area  Search this
Painters -- California -- San Francisco Bay Area -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.dieben85
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-dieben85

Oral history interview with Leo Holub

Interviewee:
Holub, Leo, 1916-2010  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Creator:
Art Schools in California Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Art Schools in California Oral History Project  Search this
Golden Gate International Exposition (1939-1940 : San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District (Calif.)  Search this
Stanford University. Dept. of Art  Search this
University of California, San Francisco. School of Fine Arts -- Faculty  Search this
University of California, San Francisco. School of Fine Arts -- Students  Search this
Adams, Ansel, 1902-1984  Search this
Arnautoff, Victor Mikhail, 1896-1979  Search this
Barnes, Matthew Rackham, 1880-1951  Search this
Corbett, Edward, 1919-  Search this
Cunningham, Imogen, 1883-1976  Search this
Gaw, William A., 1891-1973  Search this
Hackett, Dick  Search this
Holub, Florence  Search this
Mackey, Spencer, 1880-1958  Search this
Mondale, Walter F., 1928-  Search this
Oldfield, Otis, 1890-1969  Search this
Packard, Emmy Lou, 1914-1998  Search this
Piazzoni, Gottardo, 1872-1945  Search this
Randolph, Lee F., b. 1880  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Sinel, Joseph Claude, 1889-1975  Search this
Smith, Hassel, 1915-2007  Search this
Sterne, Maurice, 1878-1957  Search this
Weston, Edward, 1886-1958  Search this
White, Minor  Search this
Wilson, Charis, 1914-2009  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (90 min), analog)
34 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 July 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Leo Holub conducted 1997 July 3, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art, in San Francisco, Calif.
Holub discusses his background, being born in Arkansas, moving to New Mexico, and then to Oakland, Calif. (1923); early educational experiences in Oakland, and later at the Art Institute of Chicago; seeing Edward Weston's photographic work at an exhibition in Chicago, and admiring Weston's nude studies of Charis Wilson; his return to the Bay Area; his studio on Montgomery St. (Monkey Block); meeting painter Matthew Barnes, who had assisted Diego Rivera with his murals at the California School of Fine Arts (CSFA), 1931-1932; his experiences as a student at CSFA- its program and instructors which included Maurice Sterne, Gottardo Piazzoni, Lee Randolph, Dick Hackett, Otis Oldfield, William Gaw, Spencer Mackey, and Victor Arnautoff; fellow students including Hassel Smith, Ed Corbett, and Florence Michelson (his future wife); and his beginning awareness of modernism.
Holub discusses his involvement with the Golden Gate International Exposition (1939); apprenticeship with industrial designer Joe Sinel and the advent of the product design era; his founding of Design Development Associates, and staying only a year before moving to Grass Valley, Calif. for his son's health; his return to the Bay Area, succeeding Emmy Lou Packard at the San Francisco Planning Office graphic arts dept.; working at the housing agency and redevelopment agency and as chief designer for the Bay Area Rapid Transit report.
He recalls his encounter with Ansel Adams at the 1955 Yosemite workshop where Holub produced a pictorial map of Yosemite; Adam's "zone system" of exposing for shadows and developing for highlights; going on to teach at CSFA (1955-1957), where Imogen Cunningham was a guest instructor; Minor White replacing him; his ten years at Stanford University's planning office (1960-1970); his campus views "Stanford Scene" that were used by the university to appeal for more space for the art dept., and his shows at Stanford's art gallery in 1964 and at the Washington, D.C. home of Vice President Walter Mondale in 1980.
Biographical / Historical:
Leo Holub (1916-2010) was a photographer, lithographer, and teacher from San Francisco, Calif.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators. Other interviewees in the Art Schools in California Oral History Project include: Emerson Woelffer, Charles Linder, Paul Carey (1993), and Paul Carey and Stephanie Caloia (1997), with funding provided by the Bente and Gerald E. Buck Collection.
Topic:
Photographers -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Photography  Search this
Photography -- California -- San Francisco Bay Area  Search this
Function:
Art Schools -- California
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.holub97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-holub97

Jan Stussy papers

Creator:
Stussy, Jan, 1921-  Search this
Names:
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton, 1890-1973  Search this
Extent:
1.2 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 3 reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
1955-1985
Scope and Contents:
Letters, writings, photographs, audio cassette tapes, exhibiiton catalogs, slides, and printed material, much of it concerning Stanton Macdonald-Wright.
REEL 2200: Biographical information; copies and drafts of letters sent; statements and writings on art; exhibition catalogs and announcements; clippings; photographs of Stussy and his work; and slides of works of art.
REEL 2728: Letters from Stanton Macdonald-Wright while in Hawaii, Italy, and Japan; a photograph of Macdonald-Wright with Stussy, Kim Stussy, and Jean Macdonald-Wright; photographs of Macdonald-Wright at Ester Robles Gallery; and memorial essays on Macdonald-Wright, University of California.
REEL 3976: Six letters from Stanton Macdonald-Wright; 3 manuscripts by Macdonald-Wright, "Roots of Synchronism", two chapters from "The Image of Fire", and a foreword for a Jan Stussy exhibition brochure; a manuscript by Stussy about Macdonald-Wright; clippings; exhibition announcements and catalogs for Stussy and Macdonald-Wright; a copy of IN MEMORIUM, containing Stussy's essay, "Stanton Macdonald-Wright, 1890-1973"; a copy of THE FURTIVE WALL illustrated by Stussy; a copy of STUSSY DRAWINGS; two photographs of Stussy and Macdonald-Wright; and ephemera.
UNMICROFILMED: 402 slides of Stussy's art work; 3 audio cassettes of Stussy and Macdonald-Wright discussing art, music, and oriental philosophy; 2 audio cassettes of Macdonald-Wright's lecture at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art; and a black and white instructional film, 22:05 minutes, transferred to 3/4" video tape, titled "The Ideals of Occidental Composition: a graphic analysis by S. Macdonald-Wright" photography by Paul Park, undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, educator; Los Angeles, California. Stussy was born in 1921 in Benton County, Missouri. Taught at UCLA. Studied with Stanton Macdonald-Wright and remained life-long friends with him. Married to artist, Maxine Kim Stussy.
Provenance:
Donated 1976-1985 by Jan Stussy.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Synchromism (Art)  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Jan Stussy papers. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stusjan
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stusjan

Oral history interview with William Gaskin

Interviewee:
Gaskin, William, 1892-1968  Search this
Interviewer:
Ferbraché, Lewis  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (Calif.)  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Bufano, Beniamino, 1898-1970  Search this
Hiler, Hilaire, 1898-1966  Search this
Kingman, Dong, 1911-  Search this
Extent:
4 Sound tape reels (Sound recordings , analog, 7-1/2 ips, 7 in.)
71 Pages (Transcript: (on one partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 Feb. 28
Scope and Contents:
An interview of William Gaskin conducted 1964 Feb. 28, by Lewis Ferbraché, for the Archives of American Art.
Gaskin speaks of his education at the San Francisco Institute of Art; his early interest in theater and literature; and his involvement with the WPA-FAP in San Francisco. He discusses a WPA mosaic project; how artists' careers were affected by the WPA; and the effects of politics on the WPA. He mentions Beniamino Bufano, Hilaire Hiler, and Dong Kingman.
Biographical / Historical:
William Gaskin, b. 1892; d. 1968, Art administrator of San Francisco, Calif.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Arts administrators -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.gaskin64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gaskin64

Marguerite Wildenhain papers

Creator:
Wildenhain, Marguerite  Search this
Names:
Anderson, Eugene Newton  Search this
Eliot, T. S. (Thomas Stearns), 1888-1965  Search this
Marcks, Gerhard  Search this
Wildenhain, Frans, 1905-1980  Search this
Extent:
3.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Motion pictures (visual works)
Video recordings
Date:
1930-1982
Summary:
The papers of California ceramicist and educator Marguerite Wildenhain measure 3.7 linear feet and date from 1930 to 1982. Found within the papers are biographical sketches; correspondence with patrons, students, and colleagues, including Eugene Anderson, T. S. Eliot, and Gerhard Marcks; writings by Wildenhain and others; designs for pottery and other artwork; one scrapbook; news clippings, exhibition catalogs, and scattered printed material. Also found are photographs of Marguerite and Frans Wildenhain, Pond Farm, workshops, exhibitions,and artwork, as well as two film reels depicting Wildenhain lecturing and in her studio. There is a 0.3 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2020 that includes photographs and negatives of Wildenhain's works of art, circa 1960-1970, (many in the collection of Forrest L. Merrill or Luther College) taken by David Stone and photographs at Pond Farm, circa 1980. Additional photographs are of Wildenhain and her works of art, circa 1950 (possibly taken by Otto Hagel).
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of California ceramicist and educator Marguerite Wildenhain measure 3.7 linear feet and date from 1930 to 1982. Found within the papers are biographical sketches; correspondence with patrons, students, and colleagues, including Eugene Anderson, T. S. Eliot, and Gerhard Marcks; writings by Wildenhain and others; designs for pottery and other artwork; one scrapbook; news clippings, exhibition catalogs, and scattered printed material. Also found are photographs of Marguerite and Frans Wildenhain, Pond Farm, workshops, exhibitions,and artwork, as well as two film reels depicting Wildenhain lecturing and in her studio. There is a 0.3 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2020 that includes photographs and negatives of Wildenhain's works of art, circa 1960-1970, (many in the collection of Forrest L. Merrill or Luther College) taken by David Stone and photographs at Pond Farm, circa 1980. Additional photographs are of Wildenhain and her works of art, circa 1950 (possibly taken by Otto Hagel).
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1943 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1940-1981 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1940-1980 (Box 1-2; 1.0 linear foot)

Series 4: Artwork, circa 1961-1969, 1975 (Box 2, OV 5; 4 folders)

Series 5: Scrapbooks, 1934-1963 (Box 2; 3 folders)

Series 6: Printed Material, circa 1932-1982 (Box 2, OV 5; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, 1930-1976 (Box 2-3, OV 4; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 8: Audio-Visual Recordings, 1954, circa 1965 (Box 3, FC 6-7; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 9: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1950-1980 (Box 8, OV 9; 0.3 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Marguerite Wildenhain (1896-1985) was a ceramicist and educator in Guerneville, California. Born Marguerite Friedlaender in Lyon, France, Wildenhain received training in sculpture at the Berlin School of Applied Arts. She later worked as a designer for the Royal Berlin Porcelain Factory, leaving in 1919 to apprentice in pottery at the Bauhaus, under Max Krehan and Gerhard Marcks. After receiving her degree as master-potter, she was employed at the Municipal School for Arts and Crafts in Halle Saale, Germany. Fleeing the Nazis in 1933, she and her husband, potter Frans Wildenhain, operated a workshop in Holland before immigrating to the United States in 1940. In 1942 she settled near Guerneville, California, and established an artist colony known as Pond Farm. Following her divorce, she remained at Pond Farm and operated a summer school which lasted until 1980, training approximately 25 students each summer.
Related Material:
Also found at the Archives of American Art are the Marguerite Wildenhain exhibition records, 1977-1981, donated by the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art; an oral history interview of Marguerite Wildenhain conducted 1982 Mar. 14, by Hazel Bray; and the Frans Wildenhain papers, 1890-1986. Additional Marguerite Wildenhain letters to Gerhard Marcks are located at the Archiv fur Buldende Kunst of the Germanisches Museum, Nurnberg, Germany.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Marguerite Wildenhain in 1973-1981. Additional material was donated in 2020 by David Stone, a student of Wildenhain.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Ceramicists -- California  Search this
Artists' studios -- California -- Photographs  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Motion pictures (visual works)
Video recordings
Citation:
Marguerite Wildenhain papers, 1930-1982. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.wildmarg
See more items in:
Marguerite Wildenhain papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wildmarg
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Morris Broderson

Interviewee:
Broderson, Morris, 1928-2011  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Names:
Ankrum Gallery  Search this
Ankrum, Joan  Search this
Ankrum, Morris, d. 1964  Search this
De Erdely, Francis, 1904-1959  Search this
Extent:
66 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1998 March 11 and 13
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Morris Broderson conducted 1998 March 11 and 13, by Paul J. Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art, at Broderson's home, in Los Angeles, California.
Broderson discusses his childhood and family background and the way in which he saw the world as a congenitally hearing impaired person; his first meeting with Joan Ankrum, who was married at the time to Broderson's uncle, Morris Ankrum; Ankrum's special interest in him, recognizing a talent for drawing, encouraging his learning to speak, and arranging art lessons at an early age; his recognition of Ankrum's marital unhappiness and encouragement for her to leave her husband; his art education through private lessons with Francis De Erdely; enrollment at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles; his perspective on events in his relationship with Ankrum that led her to abandon her career as an actress and become an art dealer in order to show Broderson's work; exhibitions at the Ankrum Gallery; his favorite themes and subjects in his work and why he used them; his homosexuality and its possible reflection in his art; credit to Ankrum for her key role in his development as an artist; the role of his deafness in his interaction with the world and to a lesser extent, his artistic expression, but rejecting the idea that it was a determining factor; and his current series of paintings and hopes for the future.
Biographical / Historical:
Morris Gaylord Broderson (1928-2011) was a painter from Los Angeles, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound tape cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 5 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 8 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Deaf artists  Search this
Hearing impaired  Search this
Gay artists  Search this
Deafness  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.broder98
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-broder98

Gurdon G. Woods papers

Creator:
Woods, Gurdon G., 1915-  Search this
Names:
Otis Art Institute  Search this
San Francisco Art Institute  Search this
DeFeo, Jay, 1929-1989  Search this
Siegriest, 1899-1989  Search this
Siegriest, Lundy, 1925-  Search this
Extent:
0.8 Linear feet
0.2 Linear feet (Addition)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Date:
1948-1987
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence; notes and writings by Woods and his students; printed material; photographs of Woods and his work; 4 sketches and drawings by his students, undated; 1 certificate from San Francisco Art Institute, undated, various subject files, 1948-1981.
Included are: correspondence with Grace McCann Morley, Jock Reynolds, Richard Hayton, Sean Elwood and others, 1960-1987; notes and writings by Woods and his students; student drawings by Joan Brown and others, and original Christmas cards received; clippings, 1955-1978; files on the San Francisco Art Festival, 1950-1951, San Francisco Art Association, the San Francisco Art Commission, the San Francisco Museum of Art, and other events and topics; gallery announcements, posters and exhibition catalogs;
writings by Woods including commencement addresses, lectures, proposals and one manuscript "New Prospects in Design Education"; proposals for long range development of the visual arts program at the University of California at Santa Cruz (1970-1979); and photographs and slides of Woods and his artwork.
ADDITION: One b&w photograph of Louis Siegriest and his son Lundy; one b&w photograph of Jay DeFeo, ca. 1960; and two exhibition catalogs on the Siegriests, 1980 and 1986; newspaper review of Woods' 1993 exhibit.
Biographical / Historical:
Sculptor and art instructor; San Francisco and Santa Cruz, California.
Provenance:
Material donated 1991 and 1992 by Gurdon Woods.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- California -- Santa Cruz  Search this
Sculptors -- California -- Santa Cruz  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Art festivals  Search this
Sculpture, American -- California  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- California  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Identifier:
AAA.woodgurd
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-woodgurd

Woman's Building records

Creator:
Woman's Building (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Names:
Feminist Studio Workshop  Search this
Women's Graphic Center (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
De Bretteville, Sheila Levrant  Search this
Raven, Arlene  Search this
Extent:
33.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Artists' books
Date:
1970-1992
Summary:
The records of the Woman's Building feminist arts organization in Los Angeles measure 33.5 linear feet and date from 1970-1992. Originally founded by artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven in 1973, the Woman's Building served as an education center and public gallery space for women artists in southern California. The records document both the educational and exhibition activities and consist of administrative records, financial and legal records, publications, curriculum files, exhibition files, grant funding records and artist's works of arts and prints. A significant portion of the collection documents the Women's Graphic Center, a typesetting, design, and printing service operated by The Woman's Building.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Woman's Building measure 33.5 linear feet and date from 1970 to 1992. The organization played a key role as an alternative space for women artists energized by the feminist movement in the 1970s. The records document the ways in which feminist theory shaped the Building's founding core mission and goals. During its eighteen year history, the Building served as an education center and a public gallery space for women artists in Los Angeles and southern California; the records reflect both functions of the Building's activities.

The Administrative Files series documents the daily operations of the Building, with particular emphasis on management policies, budget planning, history, cooperative relationships with outside art organizations and galleries, special building-wide programs, and relocation planning. Included in this series are the complete minutes from most Building committees from 1974 through closing, including the Board of Directors and the Advisory Council. The General Publicity and Outreach series is particularly complete, containing publicity notices from most events, exhibits, and programs held at the Woman's Building, including brochures, announcements, programs, invitations, press releases, newspaper clippings, and magazine articles.

The Woman's Building's educational programs centered on courses offered by the Feminist Studio Workshop and the Extension Program. While the Workshop provided a two-year program for women interested in fully developing their artistic talent, the Extension Program offered a broad range of classes, specifically oriented to working women interested in art and art vocations. The records fully document both programs, focusing on the course development and descriptions, teacher contracts, class evaluations, budget planning, and scholarship programs. Although the Archives does not have the entire slide library, there are files concerning the establishment and administration of the library, as well as a few folders of slides.

The Gallery Programs series houses the records of the visual, performing, literary and video arts events held at the Woman's Building. Administrative files detail the daily operation of the gallery spaces. The files in the remaining subseries are primarily arranged by event and contain proposals, announcements, publicity, and artist biographies.

The Women's Graphic Center became a profit-making arm of the Woman's Building in 1981 but the typesetting and design equipment had been used by staff and students since 1975. The records in this series focus on the work produced at the Center, including general projects and artist designs and art prints. Many of the design and printing examples were produced for Woman's Building events and programs.

The Artist's Works of Art series includes artist books, resumes, correspondence, postcards, and samples of art in the form of sketches, drawings, and prints. There is also material related to Woman's Building projects. Especially noteworthy is the "What is Feminist Art?" project where artists gave their responses in various formats and mediums from text to pieces of artwork.

The Printed Materials series contains feminist and art publications not produced by or for the Woman's Building.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series.

Series 1: Administrative Files, circa 1970-1991 (Box 1-9, 32; 9 linear feet)

Series 2: Educational Programs, 1971-1991 (Box 10-14; 4.9 linear feet)

Series 3: Gallery Programs, 1973-1991 (Box 14-20, OV 54; 5.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Women's Graphic Center, circa 1976-1989 (Box 20-23, 32, OV 33-50; 5.6 linear feet)

Series 5: Artists' Works of Art, circa 1972-1990 (Box 24-25, OV 51-53; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 6: Grants, 1974-1992 (Box 25-30; 5.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material (Not Woman's Building), 1970-1983 (Box 30-31; 1.3 linear feet)
Historical Note:
In 1973, artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven founded the Feminist Studio Workshop (FSW), one of the first independent schools for women artists. The founders established the workshop as a non-profit alternative education center committed to developing art based on women's experiences. The FSW focused not only on the development of art skills, but also on the development of women's experiences and the incorporation of those experiences into their artwork. Central to this vision was the idea that art should not be separated from other activities related to the developing women's movement. In November of 1973 the founders rented workshop space in a vacated building in downtown Los Angeles and called it The Woman's Building, taking the name from the structure created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The FSW shared space with other organizations and enterprises including several performance groups, Womanspace Gallery, Sisterhood Bookstore, the National Organization of Women, and the Women's Liberation Union.

When the building they were renting was sold in 1975, the FSW and a few other tenants moved to a three-story brick structure, originally designed to be the administrative offices of the Standard Oil Company in the 1920s. In the 1940s, it had been converted into a warehouse and consisted of three floors of open space, conducive to publically available extension classes and exhibitions offered by the Woman's Building staff and students. By 1977, the majority of the outside tenants had left the Woman's Building, primarily because they were unable to sustain business in the new location. The new building was more expensive to maintain and the FSW staff decided to hire an administrator and to create a board structure to assume the financial, legal, and administrative responsibility for the Building. The funds to operate came from FSW tuition, memberships, fund-raising events, and grant monies.

In 1981, the Feminist Studio Workshop closed, as the demand for alternative education diminished. The education programs of the Building were restructured to better accommodate the needs of working women. The Woman's Building also began to generate its own artistic programming with outside artists, including visual arts exhibits, performance art, readings, and video productions. That same year, the Woman's Building founded the Women's Graphic Center Typesetting and Design, a profit-making enterprises designed to strengthen its financial base. Income generated from the phototypesetting, design, production, and printing services was used to support the educational and art making activities of the Building.

When the graphics business closed in 1988, the Woman's Building suffered a financial crisis from which it never fully recovered. The Building closed its gallery and performance space in 1991.
Related Material:
Among the other resources relating to the Woman's Building in the Archives of American Art is an oral history with Suzanne Lacy on March 16, 1990, March 24, 1990, and September 24, 1990. While not credited as a founding member, Lacy was among the first group of staff of the Woman's Building which she discusses in her interview.

The Getty Research Institute also holds a large collection on the Woman's Building which includes a wide range of material relating to its exhibitions, activities, and projects.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art donated 5 boxes of video tape from the collection to the Long Beach Museum of Art, Video Annex in 1994. According to documentation, this was the desire of Sandra Golvin and the Board of Directors of the Woman's Building.
Provenance:
The Woman's Building records were donated to the Archives of American Art in 1991 by Sandra Golvin, President of the Board of Directors. An small addition of a set of "Cross Pollination" posters was donated in 2019 by by ONE Archives at University of Southern California Libraries via Loni Shibuyama, Archives Librarian.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Women artists -- California  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Arts organizations -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Function:
Nonprofit organizations -- California -- Los Angeles
Genre/Form:
Slides
Artists' books
Citation:
Woman's Building records, 1970-1992. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.womabuil
See more items in:
Woman's Building records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-womabuil
Online Media:

Gyöngy Laky papers

Creator:
Laky, Gyöngy, 1944-  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of California, Davis. Art Dept. -- Faculty  Search this
Laky, Zyta  Search this
Extent:
21.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Date:
1912-2007
Scope and Contents:
Biographical information, correspondence, writings, photographs, printed material, works of art, and a video.
Biographical / Historical:
Gyöngy Laky (1944- ) is a textile artist and educator in San Francisco, Calif.
Provenance:
Donated 2004-2010 by Gyöngy Laky as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America. Additions are expected.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Laky's diary from her year in India, 1971-1972 (1 fldr) is ACCESS RESTRICTED: written permission required. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Fiber artists -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Educators -- California  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.lakygyon
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lakygyon

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By
  • Archives of American Art