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F. Luis Mora papers

Creator:
Mora, F. Luis (Francis Luis), 1874-1940  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Faculty  Search this
Lotos Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Louisiana Purchase Exposition (1904: Saint Louis, Mo.)  Search this
National Academy of Design (U.S.)  Search this
Salmagundi Club  Search this
Compton, Sophia  Search this
Downes, William Howe, 1854-1941  Search this
Stribling, T. S. (Thomas Sigismund), 1881-1965 (Birthright)  Search this
Twain, Mark, 1835-1910 (Man that corrupted Hadleyburg)  Search this
Extent:
1.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Illustrations
Diaries
Sketches
Illustrated letters
Christmas cards
Photographs
Awards
Place:
Spain -- description and travel
Date:
1891-1986
bulk 1891-1922
Summary:
The papers of painter and illustrator F. Luis Mora measure 1.7 linear feet and date from 1891 to 1986, with the bulk of material dating from 1891 to 1922. The collection includes biographical information, correspondence, 242 monthy pocket diaries by Mora, and printed and photographic materials.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of painter and illustrator F. Luis Mora measure 1.7 linear feet and date from 1891 to 1986, with the bulk of material dating from 1891 to 1922. The collection includes biographical information, correspondence, 242 small monthly pocket diaries by Mora, and printed and photographic materials.

Biographical material includes one folder containing Mora's Rothschild Prize certificate.

The correspondence is primarily with galleries regarding sales, the value of artwork, and Mora's murals for the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904. There is also correspondence with Mora's family and friends regarding his personal life and a family vacation in Cadiz, Spain. The collection also includes two Christmas cards, several illustrated letters and two invitations to Mora's solo art shows. Some of the correspondence is to and from Mora's first wife, Sophia Compton.

The majority of the writings consists of 242 monthly pocket diaries, which contain brief daily entries and some sketches. Mora writes about his work, memberships in the Salmagundi Club and the National Academy of Design, and teaching at the Art Student League. He also discusses his ideas about painting and his observations of the art scene, including his visit to the 1913 Armory Show. Also included is a handwritten "Editorial" by Mora, probably for election to the Lotos Club.

Printed material includes clippings, brochures, programs, advertisements, exhibition catalogs, books, and magazines. Two books, The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg and Other Essays and Stories, by Mark Twain (1917), and Birthright, by T.S. Stribling (1922), both illustrated by Mora, are included, along with over a dozen magazines containing illustrations by Mora.

Photographs include black and white photographs and glass plate negatives of Mora, family and friends, students, and artwork. Black and white pictures of Mora's artwork include his "Thine is Glory" mural (1919), the "National Academy Jury of 1907" painting (1907) and an etching of his daughter, Rosemary. Glass plate negatives are of his first wife, Sophia Compton, her mother Emma, Mora's father Domingo, the painting "Dance of Salome" (1893), Mora's brother-in-law Alfred Compton, his Boston Museum and Chase School of Art classes, and the Perth Amboy Terra Cotta Company, where Mora's father worked.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged as 5 series. Records are generally arranged alphabetically by subject. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, circa early 1900s (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1900-1969 (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 3: Writings, 1899-1922 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1895-1986 (Boxes 1-2 and OV 3; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 5: Photographic Materials, 1891-1941 (Box 2, MGP 1, MGP 2; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical/Historical note:
Francis Luis Mora (1974-1940) was born in Montevideo, Uruguay. In 1877, he and his family moved to Catalonia, Spain and in 1880, they moved again to the United States where they eventually settled in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. Both his father, Domingo, and his brother, Joseph, were also noted sculptors.

Mora studied at the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and at the Art Students League of New York. He was a muralist, oil and watercolor portrait painter, and etcher, though he is best known for his illustrations in magazines such as Century, Harper's, and Ladies' Home Journal. He was a member of the Salmagundi Club and the National Academy of Design and taught at the Art Students League of New York and the Chase School of Art. He and his wife, Sophia ("Sonia") Compton, had a daughter, Rosemary, in 1918. After his wife's death, Mora married May Gosman Safford in 1932. Mora died at the age of 64 in 1940.
Related Archival Materials note:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are the F. Luis Mora Art Works and Photographs (available on microfilm reel 5053) and a F. Luis Mora Letter to William John Wittemore (available on microfilm reel D30, frame 534.)
Provenance:
The F. Luis Mora papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Cornelia Colton, the daughter of Mora's second wife, May Safford, in 1975. Additional papers were donated in 2008 by Gwen Compton, Mora's niece.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.
Rights:
The F. Luis Mora papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Illustrators  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Muralists  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Illustrations
Diaries
Sketches
Illustrated letters
Christmas cards
Photographs
Awards
Citation:
F. Luis Mora papers, 1891-1986, bulk 1891-1922. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.moraflui
See more items in:
F. Luis Mora papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-moraflui
Online Media:

Carl Zigrosser papers

Topic:
Modern school magazine
Creator:
Zigrosser, Carl, 1891-  Search this
Names:
American Artists Group  Search this
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Art in America  Search this
Independent Citizens Committee for the Arts, Sciences, and Professions  Search this
John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation  Search this
Philadelphia Museum of Art  Search this
Print Club (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Print Council of America  Search this
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum  Search this
Tamarind Lithography Workshop  Search this
Weyhe Gallery  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Arms, John Taylor, 1887-1953  Search this
Barr, Alfred H., Jr., 1902-1981  Search this
Boyd, E. (Elizabeth), 1903-1974  Search this
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim, 1893-1967  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Carrington, Fitz Roy, 1869-1954  Search this
Castellón, Federico, 1914-1971  Search this
Colker, Ed, 1927-  Search this
Cook, Howard Norton, 1901-1980  Search this
Dehn, Adolf, 1895-1968  Search this
Durieux, Caroline, 1896-1989  Search this
Dwight, Mabel, 1876-1955  Search this
Flannagan, John Bernard, 1895?-1942  Search this
Girard, André  Search this
Hayter, Stanley William, 1901-1988  Search this
Hopper, Edward, 1882-1967  Search this
Huntley, Victoria Hutson, 1900-1971  Search this
Ingersoll, R. Sturgis (Robert Sturgis), b. 1891  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Keppel, Frederick, 1845-1912  Search this
Kimball, Fiske, 1888-1955  Search this
Kohn, Misch, 1916-  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo, 1889-1953  Search this
Lankes, Julius J., 1884-1960  Search this
Lasansky, Mauricio, 1914-  Search this
Mauzey, Merritt, 1898-  Search this
McNulty, Kneeland  Search this
Michener, James A. (James Albert), 1907-  Search this
Mitchell, Marian  Search this
Nalbandian, Karnig  Search this
Norman, Dorothy, 1905-1997  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia , 1887-1986  Search this
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Ronnebeck, Arnold, 1885-1947  Search this
Rose, Ruth Starr, 1887-1965  Search this
Rosenwald, Lessing J. (Lessing Julius), 1891-1979  Search this
Ruellan, Andrée, 1905-2006  Search this
Schniewind, Carl Oscar, 1900-1957  Search this
Seidenberg, Roderick, 1889-1973  Search this
Spratling, William, 1900-1967  Search this
Spruance, Benton, 1904-1967  Search this
Sternberg, Harry, 1904-2001  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Teng, Kuei  Search this
Valentin, Curt, 1902-1954  Search this
Warneke, Heinz (Heinrich), 1895-1983  Search this
Weston, Edward, 1886-1958  Search this
Wickey, Harry  Search this
Wright, Frank Lloyd, 1867-1959  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Extent:
30 Linear feet ((on 63 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1891-1971
Scope and Contents:
Personal and professional records including correspondence, writings, notes, printed material, subject files, photograph album, and diaries relating to Zigrosser's work as an authority on prints and printmaking and his personal relationships with artists.
Included are: correspondence with family and with over 900 printmakers, painters, sculptors, acquaintances, friends, associates, organizations, museums, publishers, and magazines; general correspondence, notes, clippings, and manuscripts pertaining to The Modern School Magazine; files of correspondence from Zigrosser's work at: the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1932-1971; John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation; Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and Museum, 1946-1971, including correspondence with Frank Lloyd Wright concerning the Guggenheim Memorial Museum; Print Council of America, 1954-1971, regarding exhibitions, council meetings and other matters; and the Tamarind Workshop, 1960-1971.
Of particular interest is material relating to the 1913 Armory Show, including Zigrosser's annotated catalog, notes and sketches. Also included are speeches and notes, 1930-1968; manuscripts for lectures and unpublished materials; memorabilia; a photo album of sculpture by John B. Flannagan; art work, including prints and drawings by Karig Nalbandian, prints by Rockwell Kent, and oversized works of art on paper by Mabel Dwight, Wanda Gag and Kent; family photograph album; journals and pamphlets (covers only); and diaries, 1916-1971, discussing personal and professional events such as art openings, conversations and activities with Rockwell Kent, Alfred Stieglitz, and Georgia O'Keeffe, among others.
Among the correspondents are: the American Artists Group, John Taylor Arms, Art in America magazine, Art Institute of Chicago, Alfred Barr, E. Boyd, Charles Burchfield, Alexander Calder, Fitz Roy Carrington, Federico Castellon, Ed Colker, Howard N. Cook, Crown Publishers, Adolf Dehn, Caroline Durieux, John Bernard Flannagan, Andre Girard, Stanley William Hayter, Edward Hopper, Victoria Hutson Huntley, Independent Citizens Committee for the Arts, Sciences and Professions, R. Sturgis Ingersoll, Frederick Keppel, Rockwell Kent, Fiske Kimball, Misch Kohn, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Julius Lankes, Mauricico Lasansky, Merritt Mauzey, Kneeland McNulty, James A. Michener, Marian Mitchell,
Museum of Non-Objective Painting (Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum), Karnig Nalbandian, Dorothy Norman, Georgia O'Keeffe, Walter Pach, Harold Paris, Print Club (Philadelphia), Diego Rivera, Ruth Starr Rose, Arnold Ronnebeck, Lessing J. Rosenwald, Andre Ruellan, Carl Oscar Schniewind, Roderick Seidenberg, William Spratling, Benton Spruance, Alfred Stieglitz, Harry Sternberg, Tamarind Lithography Workshop, Kuei Teng, U.S. Office of War Information, Curt Valentin, Heinz Warneke, Edward Weston, Weyhe Gallery, Whitney Museum of American Art, Harry Wickey, and Adja Yunkers.
Biographical / Historical:
Print curator; Philadelphia, Pa.; d. 1975. Graduated Columbia University in literature. Worked with prints in New York City at Keppel and Co. and Weyhe Gallery; print curator at Philadelphia Museum of Art 1940-1963; author of books on prints and art works.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming, 1991, by the University of Pennsylvania Special Collections Department, Van Pelt Library. Zigrosser donated the papers to the University in 1972. Portions of the papers not microfilmed include research files, manuscript materials for published work, family records, and journals.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce must be obtained from: Attn: Nancy Shawcross, Curator of Manuscripts, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, University of Pennsylvania, 3420 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104-6206; phone: 215-898-2065; e-mail: shawcros@pobox.upenn.edu.
Occupation:
Artists -- United States  Search this
Printmakers -- United States  Search this
Museum curators -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Prints -- societies, etc  Search this
Prints -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Prints, American  Search this
Prints, European  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.zigrcarl
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-zigrcarl

Colin de Land collection

Creator:
De Land, Colin, 1955-2003  Search this
Names:
American Fine Arts, Co.  Search this
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Art Cologne  Search this
Art Forum Berlin  Search this
Biennale di Venezia  Search this
Documenta  Search this
International Art Fair  Search this
Balk, Dennis  Search this
Beckwith, Patterson  Search this
Davey, Moyra  Search this
Dion, Mark, 1961-  Search this
Fend, Peter  Search this
Fraser, Andrea  Search this
Greene, Carol  Search this
Heilmann, Mary, 1940-  Search this
Marks, Matthew  Search this
McDonald, Daniel  Search this
Morris, Paul  Search this
Pierson, Jack, 1960-  Search this
Wadlin, Craig  Search this
Waters, John, 1946-  Search this
Extent:
15.15 Linear feet
0.901 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Motion pictures (visual works)
Video recordings
Date:
1968-2008, bulk 1980-2003
bulk 1980-2003
Summary:
The Colin de Land collection measures 15.15 linear feet and 0.901 GB and dates from 1968 to 2008, with the bulk of the collection dating from the early 1980s through 2003. The majority of the collection consists of photographic material, primarily snapshots, documenting daily life in and around de Land's gallery American Fine Arts, Co., as well as de Land's pesonal life and affairs. There are candid photographs of exhibition openings, day-to-day gallery operations, art fairs, vacations, social gatherings, and New York City street scenes. Also included are some personal objects belonging to de Land and his wife Pat Hearn, as well as two scrapbooks containing items once decorating the walls of de Land's office at American Fine Arts. The collection includes video recordings documenting trips to Cape Cod, Hearn's illness, and occasional art world events.
Scope and Contents:
The Colin de Land collection measures 15.15 linear feet and 0.901 GB and dates from 1968 to 2008, with the bulk of the collection dating from the early 1980s through 2003. The majority of the collection consists of photographic material, primarily snapshots, documenting daily life in and around de Land's gallery American Fine Arts, Co., as well as de Land's pesonal life and affairs. There are candid photographs of exhibition openings, day-to-day gallery operations, art fairs, vacations, social gatherings, and New York City street scenes. Also included are some personal objects belonging to de Land and his wife Pat Hearn, as well as two scrapbooks containing items once decorating the walls of de Land's office at American Fine Arts. The collection includes video recordings documenting trips to Cape Cod, Hearn's illness, and occasional art world events.

The bulk of the collection consists of snapshots, along with their negatives and the envelopes provided by commercial photographic printers. The envelopes are sometimes annotated. The photographs, not typically identified by photographer, were taken by de Land, Hearn, and gallery employees, artists, and visitors. Most of the snapshots provide a candid record of life within de Land's circle, and not formal documentation of gallery exhibitions.

The figures in this collection often occupied blurred boundaries between artist, gallery employee, critic, and friend. Many of the photographs include AFA staff, including Daniel McDonald, Patterson Beckwith, and Craig Wadlin. Also of note are photos showing AFA artists, including John Waters, Mark Dion, Andrea Fraser, Moyra Davey, Dennis Balk, Peter Fend, and Jack Pierson.

In addition to life within the gallery, de Land's cameras also documented a larger art world of the era, candidly showing openings at other galleries, art fairs such as Art Basel, Art Cologne, and the Berlin Artforum, as well as festivals including the Venice Biennale and Documenta, many of which included AFA artists. There is some documentation of the Gramercy International Contemporary Art Fair and The Armory Show. The photographs frequently include de Land and Hearn's friends and fellow art dealers Paul Morris, Matthew Marks, and Carol Greene. Some images include artists that showed at Pat Hearn Art Gallery, such as Mary Heilmann. Collectors, celebrity visitors to the gallery, and critics also occasionally appear in the photographs. There is one 1968 photograph of de Land's mother and a small number of 1970s images of both de Land and Hearn.

In addition to the snapshots, there are a variety of other photographic formats, including digital, in the collection. The contents of the slides are of similar nature to the snapshots. The contact sheet binders offer some formal exhibition installation documentation, but are not exhaustive.

The collection also includes film and video footage. Thirty-five reels of Super-8 motion picture film primarily documents frequent vacations to Cape Cod, as well as the final stages of Hearn's illness and subsequent death. The 31 DV-mini cassettes include similar content, and some footage of opening receptions and other art world events.

Most of the official gallery records are missing, most likely lost in the frequent floods in the gallery basement. Two scrapbooks include material that was often photographed on the walls surrounding de Land's desk at AFA. Additional artifacts include one small painting by artist Charles Clough, inscribed to Hearn, a baseball hat frequently worn by de Land and appearing in many of the snapshots, and one page of an autographed calendar.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 4 series:

Series 1: Photographic Material, 1968-2003, bulk 1980-2003 (14 linear feet; Box 1-14, 0.901 GB; ER01)

Series 2: Scrapbooks, circa 1980s-2003 (0.2 linear feet; Box 19)

Series 3: Video and Film Recordings, circa 1980-2003 (1.1 linear feet; Box 15, 16, 18)

Series 4: Artifacts, 1988-2008 (0.3 linear feet; Box 14, 17, 19)
Biographical / Historical:
Colin de Land (1955-2003) was a gallery owner whose New York City spaces challenged traditional modes of exhibition and art dealing.

Raised in Union City, New Jersey, de Land came to the art world from an academic background, having studied philosophy and linguistics at New York University. In 1984, de Land opened Vox Populi, a largely unrenovated space in the East Village, at 511 East 6th Street. The gallery showed experimental work by emerging artists, including the enigmatic John Dogg, thought to be a collaboration between de Land and artist Richard Prince.

In 1986, De Land opened his longest standing gallery, American Fine Arts, Co. (AFA), in the same space previously occupied by Vox Populi. The gallery moved to SoHo in 1988, first to 40 Wooster Street then to 22 Wooster Street in 1993. During the late 1990s, as most SoHo galleries moved to Chelsea, AFA remained a mainstay of the downtown arts scene. De Land's wife, Pat Hearn, whom he married in 1999 after over a decade together, was also a well known art dealer. Her gallery, Pat Hearn Art Gallery, also moved from the East Village to SoHo, later becoming one of the first to set down roots in Chelsea.

Known for his eccentric fashion and unorthodox business style, de Land cultivated a culture of experimentation within the AFA community. He typically hired young art students or recent graduates, often nurturing their own artistic careers. Along with a group of Cooper Union graduates, many of whom worked at the gallery, he founded the artist collective Art Club 2000. De Land often showed artists working in hybrid media, for example film and photography or music and installation. He was especially interested in ecological and environmental art, as well as work that took as its subject exhibition practice and the act of creating art. He often staged large thematic group shows. Artists who showed at the gallery included Mark Dion, John Waters, Andrea Fraser, Moyra Davey, Dennis Balk, Peter Fend, Tom Burr, James Welling, Mariko Mori, Dan Graham, Jessica Stockholder, Alex Bag, Christian Philipp Muller, and Jack Pierson.

In 1994, de Land and Hearn, along with gallerists Matthew Marks and Paul Morris, established the Gramercy International Contemporary Art Fair. Fashioned after the tradition of inexpensive hotel art fairs, four galleries were invited to exhibit artwork in rooms of the Gramercy Park Hotel, to be sold in a cash and carry model. The fair became an annual event, branching out to other cities, including Miami and Los Angeles, and growing significantly in size in New York. It later became known as The Armory Show.

De Land often carried a point-and-shoot camera and kept several on hand in the gallery. He documented opening receptions, art world social gatherings, concerts, and day-to-day happenings and invited visitors to the gallery and employees to do the same.

After Hearn's death from liver cancer in 2000, de Land became involved with Kembra Pfahler, the performance artist and leader of the rock band The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black. De Land took over Hearn's Chelsea gallery, operating it as a second location of AFA. Following his own struggle with cancer, de Land passed away in 2003. AFA remained open, closing at the end of 2004 with a tribute group exhibition to de Land.
Related Materials:
The archival gallery records of Colin de Land's art gallery American Fine Arts, Co. as well as the gallery records of the Pat Hearn Gallery are available at the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College in New York. The gallery records there also include a fair amount of de Land's personal papers. Bard also acquired de Land's and Hearn's personal library.
Provenance:
The Colin de Land papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 2008 by Dennis Balk, an artist represented by American Fine Arts, Co. and a close friend of de Land.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings and born-digital records in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Motion pictures (visual works)
Video recordings
Citation:
Colin de Land papers, 1968-2008, bulk 1980-2003. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.delacoli
See more items in:
Colin de Land collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-delacoli
Online Media:

Walt Kuhn Family papers and Armory Show records

Creator:
Kuhn, Walt, 1877-1949  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Association of American Painters and Sculptors (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
International Exhibition of Modern Art  Search this
Kit Kat Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Penguin Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen), 1862-1928  Search this
Kuhn, Brenda, 1911-  Search this
Kuhn, Vera, d. 1961  Search this
Oldfield, Otis, 1890-1969  Search this
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Quinn, John, 1870-1924  Search this
Sheeler, Charles, 1883-1965  Search this
Photographer:
Rainford, Percy  Search this
Weston, Edward, 1886-1958  Search this
Extent:
31 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Diaries
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Date:
1859-1984
bulk 1900-1949
Summary:
The Walt Kuhn Family papers and Armory Show records measure 31 linear feet and date from 1859 to 1984, with the bulk of material dating from 1900 to 1949. Papers contain records of the legendary Armory Show of 1913, also known as the International Exhibition of Modern Art, which introduced modern European painting and sculpture to the American public. Papers also contain records of the Association of American Painters and Sculptors (AAPS), the artist-run organization that mounted the Armory Show; records of the New York artists' clubs the Kit Kat Club (founded 1881) and the Penguin Club (founded 1917); and the personal and family papers of New York artist Walt Kuhn (1877-1949), one of the primary organizers of the Armory Show.
Scope and Contents note:
The Walt Kuhn Family papers and Armory Show records measure 31 linear feet and date from 1859 to 1984, with the bulk of material dating from 1900 to 1949. Papers contain records of the legendary Armory Show of 1913, also known as the International Exhibition of Modern Art, which introduced modern European painting and sculpture to the American public. Papers also contain records of the Association of American Painters and Sculptors (AAPS), the artist-run organization that mounted the Armory Show; records of the New York artists' clubs the Kit Kat Club (founded 1881) and the Penguin Club (founded 1917); and the personal and family papers of New York artist Walt Kuhn (1877-1949), one of the primary organizers of the Armory Show.

As Secretary for the AAPS, Kuhn retained the bulk of existing records of that organization and of the Armory Show. Minutes and correspondence make up most of the AAPS records (Series 2), as well as documents related to John Quinn's legal brief against a tariff on imported works of living artists. Armory Show Records (Series 1) include personal letters, voluminous business correspondence, a record book, miscellaneous notes, inventories and shipping records, two large scrapbooks, printed materials, a small number of photographs, and retrospective accounts of the show. The printed materials and photographs in Kit Kat Club and Penguin Club Records reflect Kuhn's deep involvement in those clubs.

The Walt Kuhn Family Papers (Series 4) contain records of his artwork, career, travels, personal and professional associations, family members, and work in vaudeville, film, and interior design. Notable among the family papers are illustrated letters and other cartoons; sketches, drawings, watercolors, and prints; candid letters from Walt to Vera Kuhn discussing art scene politics and personalities in New York, Paris, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Florida, and the Midwest; general correspondence with artists, dealers, collectors, journalists, writers, models, and fans; notes in index card files containing biographical anecdotes of the Kuhns' many contacts; provenance files that document the origin and fate of Kuhn's paintings, sculptures, and prints; papers relating to Kuhn's exhibitions and his relationships with the Marie Harriman Gallery and Durand-Ruel Gallery; and photographs and drawings depicting Kuhn's early years in Munich, Germany and Fort Lee, New Jersey; trips to Nova Scotia, New England, the Western United States, and Europe; New York and summer studios, among other subjects.
Arrangement:
This collection has been arranged into 4 series, with multiple subseries in Series 1 and 4.

Series 1: Armory Show Records, 1912-1963 (Boxes 1-2, 27-31, 56, OV 36; 3.6 linear feet)

Series 2: Association of American Painters and Sculptors (AAPS) Records, 1911-1914, undated (Box 3; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Kit Kat Club and Penguin Club Records, 1909-1923, undated (Box 3, 32, 56, OVs 37-38; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Walt Kuhn Family Papers, 1859-1984, undated (Box 3-26, 32-35, 56-57, OVs 39-55, 58; 26.7 linear feet)

In general, documents are arranged chronologically, alphabetically, or by type of material. Copy negatives and copy prints made from documents in this collection have been filed separately from originals, in a folder marked "copy." Duplicates of original records made or obtained by the Kuhns have been filed separately as well.

Existing envelopes are filed in front of correspondence and enclosures directly after. Correspondence in the Armory Show Records and AAPS Records is arranged alphabetically, and correspondents are listed in the box inventory following series descriptions below.
Biographical/Historical note:
Walt Kuhn (1877-1949) was an etcher, lithographer, and watercolorist, as well as being a teacher, an advisor to art collectors, an organizer, and a promoter of modern art. He played a key role in the art scene of New York City in the early 20th century, and was among the small group that organized the infamous Armory Show of 1913, officially known as the International Exhibition of Modern Art, held at the 69th Regiment Armory building in New York City. After the Armory Show, Kuhn went on to a distinguished career as a painter. He was best known for his sober oil portraits of show people, clowns, acrobats, and circus performers, but was equally prolific in landscapes, still lifes, and figure and genre drawings.

Walt Kuhn was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1877. After a brief career as a bicycle shop owner in downtown Brooklyn, Kuhn traveled West in 1899 to San Francisco, CA and earned his living as a cartoonist for newspapers such as Wasp. After two years in California, he moved back East and then on to Europe to pursue further art training. He briefly attended the Académie Colarossi studio in Paris, but quickly moved to Munich where he joined the class of Heinrich von Zügel in the Royal Academy.

Kuhn returned to New York City in 1904 and took up an active role in the art scene there, participating in the Salmagundi Club and the Kit Kat Club, teaching at the New York School of Art, and cartooning for Life, Judge, Puck, and other publications. In 1910, he participated in an exhibition of Independent Artists on 35th St. with Robert Henri and met artist Arthur B. Davies.

In 1911, when the National Academy of Design opened their annual exhibition, Kuhn, Henry Fitch Taylor, Elmer MacRae, and Jerome Myers were exhibiting at Clara Potter Davidge's Madison Gallery. To these four young artists, the Academy exhibition was typically lackluster, and the attention it received was unwarranted. Sensing that they were not alone in their attitude, they decided to organize. They invited a dozen other artists to join them, thus forming the Association of American Painters and Sculptors (AAPS). The group elected Kuhn Secretary and Arthur B. Davies President, and with the help of attorney and art collector John Quinn, they incorporated and began raising funds for an independent exhibition the following year.

In September of 1912, at Davies' suggestion, Kuhn traveled to Cologne, Germany to view the Sonderbund Internationale Kunst-Austellung. There he saw presented, in overwhelming volume, the work of his European contemporaries and their modern antecedents, the post-impressionists. He immediately began selecting and securing artwork for the upcoming AAPS exhibition. Kuhn traveled through Germany, Holland, France, and England, visiting private collectors, dealers, and artists. In Paris, Kuhn was joined by Davies and American artist and art agent Walter Pach. Kuhn and Davies sailed for New York in November, leaving the details of European arrangements to Pach.

The resulting Armory Show exhibition opened in New York in February 1913, and a selection of the foreign works traveled to Chicago and Boston in March and April. It included approximately 1300 American and European works of art, arranged in the exhibition space to advance the notion that the roots of modernism could be seen in the works of the old masters, from which the dramatically new art of living artists had evolved. Savvy and sensational publicity, combined with strategic word-of-mouth, resulted in attendance figures over 200,000 and over $44 thousand in sales. The Armory Show had demonstrated that modern art had a place in the public taste, that there was a market for it and legitimate critical support as well.

During the first World War, Kuhn stayed in NY and was active in the Kit Kat Club, an artists' club founded in 1881, which provided its members with collective studio space, live models, exhibitions, and an annual costume ball. In 1917, Kuhn founded another group called the Penguin Club, which had similar objectives to the Kit Kat Club, but with Kuhn himself as the gatekeeper. In addition to exhibitions and costume balls, the Penguin Club held summer outings and stag dinners, and maintained collective studio and exhibition space on East 15th Street in Manhattan. Its members included Americans and European artists displaced by the war in Europe. In the 1920s, Kuhn expanded a few sketches he had written for Penguin Balls into full-blown vaudeville productions, some of which were incorporated into larger musical revues such as The Merry Go Round and The 49ers and traveled around the country. Kuhn's theater work continued until 1928, and his fascination with show business continued to influence him throughout his life.

In the 1920s and 1930s, Kuhn gradually achieved recognition for his artwork, with sales to private collectors and dealers including Edith Halpert, Merritt Cutler, Lillie Bliss, John Quinn, and Marie Harriman. Kuhn also promoted other young painters whose work he liked, including Otis Oldfield, Lily Emmet Cushing, John Laurent, Frank di Gioia, and the self-taught Vermont artist Patsy Santo. Sometimes artists would contact him by mail, asking for lessons or advice. His lengthy letters to students offer coaching in technique and subject matter, as well as in the overall problem of success in art.

In 1929, Kuhn moved into the 18th St. studio that he would keep until the end of his life. He kept a rack of costumes in the studio, mostly made by Vera Kuhn, and his models, many of them stage and circus performers, would come and sit for Kuhn's portraits. The same year his painting The White Clown was exhibited at the newly established Museum of Modern Art in New York, bringing intense publicity and sales interest. Around this time, Kuhn began to receive the support of collector Duncan Phillips and curator Juliana Force of the Whitney Museum of American Art, both of whom made purchases and consistently exhibited his work.

Marie Norton Whitney Harriman, second wife of railroad magnate and diplomat W. Averell Harriman, shared a professional liaison with Kuhn that would take many forms and last until his death. Soon after the success of The White Clown, Kuhn established a relationship with the Marie Harriman Gallery, where he participated in group and solo shows during the height of his career. Kuhn also traveled with the Harrimans to Europe in 1931, where the three visited important private collections and acquired many valuable modern paintings for the Harrimans. Their collection, so heavily influenced by Kuhn's ideas about art, would eventually go to the National Gallery of Art.

Kuhn was an artist who understood the art business and never shied away from it. For Kuhn, promoting the ideas and practitioners of a certain brand of modernism was an expression of both aesthetic ideology and pragmatic self-interest. His contribution to the public discourse on modernism situated his own work at the heart of art history and the marketplace. Regardless of his motivations, he was indisputably a key player at a pivotal time in American art, when academic art was riotoulsy overturned to make way for modernism. His paintings are now held in major museum collections around the country, where most of them arrived with bequests from the collectors Kuhn had cultivated so carefully in his lifetime.

Sources consulted for this biography include The Story of the Armory Show (1988) by Milton W. Brown, Walt Kuhn, Painter: His Life and Work (1978) by Philip Rhys Adams, and "Walt Kuhn" by Frank Getlein, in the 1967 catalog of the Kennedy Galleries, Inc.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Archives of American Art holds the papers of Walter Pach, the European representative of the Armory Show.
Provenance:
The Walt Kuhn Family papers and Armory Show records were loaned for microfilming and later donated to the Archives of American Art by Walt Kuhn's daughter Brenda Kuhn in several installments between 1962 and 1979. An additional accession of letters, photographs, and an artifact was purchased by the Archives in 2000. Another addition was donated by Terry DeLapp, Kuhn's dealer, in 2015.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Etchers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Watercolorists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Lithographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Societies, etc. -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
New York school of art  Search this
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Diaries
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Citation:
Walt Kuhn Family papers and Armory Show records, 1859-1984. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kuhnwalt
See more items in:
Walt Kuhn Family papers and Armory Show records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kuhnwalt
Online Media:

Manierre Dawson papers

Creator:
Dawson, Manierre, 1887-1969  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Blum, Jerome, 1884-1956  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen), 1862-1928  Search this
Heap, Jane  Search this
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Stein, Gertrude, 1874-1946  Search this
Watson, Dudley Crafts, 1885-  Search this
Extent:
30 Items ((on 2 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1904-1963
Scope and Contents:
Letters; a journal, 1908-1922, 1939-1940; a record of Dawson's painting and sculpture, 1904-1963; and an exhibition catalog.
REEL 64: Letters received including, 11 from Walter Pach of the Association of American Painters and Sculptors, 7 from Dudley Crafts Watson as Director of the Milwaukee Art Society, and letters from Jerome Blum, from Chicago journalist Hi Simousy, and from G. G. Wing, president of the Ludington State Bank, for which Dawson painted a mural. Also included is a xerox of a journal, 1908-1922, 1939-1940, in which Dawson comments on: work as a draftman for Holabird and Roche, Chicago, and other architectural firms, meetings with Gertrude Stein, Arthur Davies, Dudley Watson and Walter Pach; the Armory Show, the Montross Gallery Show and the subsequent tour; meetings with Margaret Anderson and Jane Heap. Entries after 1914 record domestic affairs on Dawson's farm in Ludington, with intermittent comments on his painting and sculpture.
REEL 2428: Dawson's record of paintings and sculpture, 1904-1963; and an exhibition catalog of the Milwaukee Art Society, 1914.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, sculptor; Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Chicago, Illnois, Ludington, Michigan.
Provenance:
Material on reel 64 donated 1969 by Manierre Dawson. Material on reel 2428 donated 1982 by Marianne Gedo, who was doing research on Dawson.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.dawsmani
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-dawsmani

Marcel Duchamp lecture at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute

Compiler:
Miller, Richard N.  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Armory Show 50th anniversary exhibition (1963 : Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute)  Search this
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute  Search this
Cassatt, Mary, 1844-1926  Search this
Courbet, Gustave, 1819-1877  Search this
Daumier, Honoré, 1808-1879  Search this
Degas, Edgar, 1834-1917  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Gauguin, Paul, 1848-1903  Search this
Gogh, Vincent van, 1853-1890  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Ingres, Jean-Auguste-Dominique, 1780-1867  Search this
James McNeill Whistler, 1834-1903  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Monet, Claude, 1840-1926  Search this
Puvis de Chavannes, Pierre, 1824-1898  Search this
Ryder, Albert Pinkham, 1847-1917  Search this
Seurat, Georges, 1859-1891  Search this
Signac, Paul, 1863-1935  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (sound recording (49 min, 30 sec.), digital)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
February 17, 1963
Scope and Contents:
Lecture on CD of Marcel Duchamp at the Munson-Williams Proctor Institute in Utica, N.Y. marking the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the 1913 Armory Show. Duchamp summarizes the art historical heritage leading up to the Armory Show, including such artists as Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Gustave Courbet, Honore Daumier, Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Georges Seurat, Paul Signac, Paul Gaugin, Vincent van Gogh, Albert Pinkham Ryder, James MacNeill Whistler, John Marin, Marsden Hartley, Max Weber, and Mary Cassatt, among others.
Biographical / Historical:
Richard N. Miller is an art historain in S. Orleans, Mass.
Provenance:
Donated in 2008 by Richard N. Miller, who made the recording.
Restrictions:
Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
authorization to publish, quote or reproduce must be obtained from Richard N. Miller and Jacqueline Matisse Monnier.
Occupation:
Art historians -- Massachusetts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.millricha
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-millricha

Walter Pach papers

Creator:
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Association of American Painters and Sculptors (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Brummer Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Laurel Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
New York School of Art  Search this
Avery, Milton, 1885-1965  Search this
Barye, Antoine-Louis, 1796-1875  Search this
Brooks, Van Wyck, 1886-1963  Search this
Burroughs, Bryson, 1869-1934  Search this
Charlot, Jean, 1898-1979  Search this
Chase, William Merritt, 1849-1916  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen), 1862-1928  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Duchamp-Villon, Raymond, 1876-1918  Search this
Faure, Elie, 1873-1937  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
Matisse, Henri, 1869-1954  Search this
Miró, Joan, 1893-  Search this
Monet, Claude, 1840-1926  Search this
Of, George F. (George Ferdinand), b. 1876  Search this
Ogihara, Moriye  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente, 1883-1949  Search this
Pach, Magda, 1884-1950  Search this
Pach, Nikifora  Search this
Pach, Raymond  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Prendergast, Maurice Brazil, 1858-1924  Search this
Renoir, Auguste, 1841-1919  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Schamberg, Morton L., 1881-1918  Search this
Sloan, John, 1871-1951  Search this
Villon, Jacques, 1875-1963  Search this
Extent:
20.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Prints
Drawings
Diaries
Travel diaries
Photographs
Date:
1857-1980
Summary:
The papers of New York artist, critic, historian, writer, art consultant and curator Walter Pach, measure 20.7 linear feet and date from 1857-1980. The collection documents Pach's promotion of modernism through his role in the landmark 1913 Armory Show, his relationships with artists and art-world figures and his extensive writings on art. Records include biographical material, correspondence with family, friends and colleagues including noted artists, handwritten and edited versions of manuscripts by Pach, diaries and journals, business records, printed material, scrapbooks, sketchbooks and artwork by Pach and others, and photographs of Pach and his family, friends, and colleagues. The collection also includes 12 linear feet of selections from Walter Pach's library.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of New York artist, critic, historian, writer, art consultant and curator Walter Pach, measure 20.7 linear feet and date from 1857-1980. The collection documents Pach's promotion of modernism through his role in the landmark 1913 Armory Show, his relationships with artists and art-world figures and his extensive writings on art. Records include biographical material, correspondence with family, friends and colleagues including noted artists, handwritten and edited versions of manuscripts by Pach, diaries and journals, business records, printed material, scrapbooks, sketchbooks and artwork by Pach and others, and photographs of Pach and his family, friends, and colleagues. The collection also includes 12 linear feet of selections from Walter Pach's library.

Biographical material includes a copy of Pach's birth certificate and two passports for Walter and Magda Pach, in addition to address books, association membership cards and certificates.

Correspondence is both personal and professional. Family correspondence includes letters from Pach's son, Raymond, his first wife Magdalene (Magda), and his second wife Nikifora, whom he married in 1951 following the 1950 death of Magda. General correspondence includes letters from artists including Jean Charlot, Arthur B. Davies, Marcel Duchamp, Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Jacques Lipchitz, Henri Matisse, Claude Monet, Maurice Prendergast, Diego Rivera, Morton Livingston Schamberg, John Sloan, and Jacques Villon; and other art-world figures including writers Van Wyck Brooks and Elie Faure, and Bryson Burroughs, curator of painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Writings series represents an extensive collection of hand-written manuscripts, typescripts, annotated drafts and notes for published and unpublished writings by Pach, including lectures, monographs such as Queer Thing, Painting and Ananias, or The False Artist, and journal and newspaper articles such as "Pierre-Auguste Renoir" (1912).

Diaries and journals include one of particular note recording Pach's trip to Europe circa 1903-1904, with William Merritt Chase's class.

Business records include 2 notebooks recording sales at the Armory Show in New York, Boston and Chicago, a record book with handwritten lists of paintings owned and sold by Pach in the early 1930s, and two books, one maintained by Nikifora Pach, recording pictures sold, lectures and publications by Pach from the early 1900s to the early 1960s.

Printed material documents Pach's career through exhibition catalogs of Pach's solo and group exhibitions, news clippings about Pach, including reviews of his writings on art, and an almost comprehensive collection of copies of Pach's published journal and newspaper articles.

Scrapbooks include a book of reviews and original letters pertaining to Pach's book Ananias or the False Artist, and a scrapbook documenting Pach's activities during the 1920s which included his first one-man show at the Brummer Gallery in New York and the publication of his books Masters of Modern Art and Raymond Duchamp-Villon.

Artwork inlcudes a small group of drawings and three sketchbooks by Pach. Also of note are two print portfolios published in 1947 by the Laurel Gallery which include an essay and an etching by Pach, in addition to hand-pulled prints by artists such as Milton Avery, Reginald Marsh and Joan Miro.

Photographs are of Pach from childhood through to the 1950s, in addition to Magda and Raymond Pach and other family members, artists, colleagues and friends. Included are photographs of William Merritt Chase's class and Robert Henri's class at the New York School of Art, circa 1904, and photos of artists including Robert Henri, Moriye Ogihara, and Pablo Picasso. Photographs of artwork by Pach and other artists can also be found here including Mexican mural projects by José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera, and works by Antoine-Louise Barye and George Of.

Selections from Pach's library include works written by or translated by Pach, and items central to Pach's interests and work.
Arrangement note:
The Walter Pach papers are arranged as ten series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1884-circa 1950s (Box 1, 9; 9 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1883-1980 (Box 1-3, FC 23; 2.1 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1899-circa 1950s (Box 3-5; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Diaries and Journals, 1903-circa 1950s (Box 5; 5 folders)

Series 5: Business Records, circa 1913-circa 1960s (Box 5-6; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, circa 1900-1977 (Box 6-7, 9; 1.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, circa 1890-circa 1940s (Box 7, 9; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 8: Artwork, circa 1860-circa 1950s (Box 7, 10; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographs, 1857-1959 (Box 7-8, 10; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 10: Selections from Walter Pach's Library, 1880-1963 (Box 11-22; 12 linear feet)
Biographical/Historical note:
New York artist, critic, writer, art consultant, and curator, Walter Pach (1883-1958) was an influential promoter of modern art and was instrumental in organizing the landmark Armory Show in 1913.

Walter Pach was born in New York City, July 11, 1883. His father, Gotthelf Pach, was a prominent commercial photographer who, along with his family, ran the New York firm of Pach Brothers. The company did the bulk of the photographic work for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the young Pach often accompanied his father on museum assignments. In 1903, Pach graduated from the City College of New York with a degree in art. He also studied with Robert Henri at the New York School of Art and went abroad to paint with William Merritt Chase in the summers of 1903 and 1904.

In 1906 Pach presented his first art history lecture at the Westfield State Normal School in Westfield, Massachusetts.

In 1907, Pach went to France and as an artist and critic moved among the Parisian avant-garde and became part of the Gertrude and Leo Stein circle. Gertrude Stein's "Portrait of Walter Pach was painted in 1908. Pach wrote extensively about modern art and through his numerous books, articles, and translations of European art texts, brought an emerging modernist viewpoint to the American public. In 1908 he wrote the first article published in America on Cézanne, and also wrote on such established artists as Claude Monet, whom he interviewed in 1908 for Scribner's Magazine..

Pach organized exhibitions of contemporary art for important New York City galleries of the period, as well as the landmark exhibition of 1913, "The International Exhibition of Modern Art," commonly known as the Armory Show. Along with painters Arthur B. Davies and Walt Kuhn, he brought together leading contemporary European and American artists. Pach served with Kuhn as administrator, publicist and gallery lecturer for the Armory Show Chicago for the run of the exhibition.

Pach helped to form major collections for John Quinn and Walter Arensberg. He was also instrumental in securing individual works of art for museums, such as a portrait for the Louvre Museum by American master Thomas Eakins, and Jacques-Louis David's Death of Socrates for the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Pach married artist Magdalene Frohberg in February 1914, and their son Raymond was born at the end of that year. The Pachs lived primarily in New York, but spent time abroad from 1928 to 1932. Intermittently, they lived on the West Coast, where Pach taught at the University of California at Berkeley. In the 1920s he taught at the University of Mexico on a Shilling Fund grant, lecturing and writing on Native American art and developing a strong interest in Pre-Columbian art. He took an active interest in organizing exhibitions and raising money for a museum to be dedicated to the indigenous art of the Americas. In addition, he was a friend of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera and helped organize the Mexican chapter of the Society of Independent Artists, the New York-based organization he founded in 1917 with Walter Arensberg and Marcel Duchamp.

While not well known today as a painter, Walter Pach devoted much of his creative effort to painting. He considered himself both an artist and a writer, even though friends like art historian Bernard Berenson urged him to devote all his time to writing. Among his writings are monographs on a wide range of subjects, social commentary on the art world, and a book on museum structures. Among his first publications were a series of brochures produced for the 1913 Armory Show, including Odilon Redon and, in the same year, A Sculptor's Architecture, a book about the work of Raymond Duchamp-Villon, a close friend whom he admired greatly. In 1923, Pach wrote Georges Seurat, a book later cited by art historian John Rewald as an important early text on the artist. Masters of Modern Art and the monograph Raymond Duchamp-Villon were published the following year, and in 1928 Pach's well-known indictment of opportunistic artists and corruption in the art world, Ananias, or The False Artist, created a stir in art circles. Pach considered Vincent Van Gogh to be a seminal figure in the development of modern art and was the first historian to lecture on him in America. In 1936, he published his well-received monograph, Vincent Van Gogh. His recollections of a life spent in art, Queer Thing, Painting appeared in 1938. Ingres was published in 1939, as well as Masterpieces of Art, written for the 1939 New York World's Fair, for which Pach was exhibition director. His Art Museum in America, published in 1948, called into question the relevance, responsibility, and future direction of the American art museum. He long championed the artists of Mexico and published an essay on Diego Rivera in 1951 for the National Museum of Fine Arts, Mexico, for its 50-year retrospective exhibition on the artist. The Classical Tradition in Modern Art, Pach's last book, was published posthumously in 1959.

Pach's fluency in French, German, and Spanish allowed him to understand and interpret new avant-garde ideas developing in Europe and to translate them for an English-speaking audience. His language skills also allowed him to communicate personally with many noted artists in Europe and Mexico and to mediate between gallery dealers and museum curators on their behalf. His correspondence with major figures in 20th-century art are a fascinating and important source of information, not only about the artists themselves but about the art world in general during the first half of this century.

Chronology of Exhibitions and Writings

1908 -- "Cézanne," by Walter Pach, the first American article on the subject, published in December issue of Scribner's.

1911 -- "Albert P. Ryder," by Walter Pach, published in January issue of Scribner's.

1912 -- Met with Arthur B. Davies and Walt Kuhn to begin preparations for the Armory Show. Was responsible for the exhibition's European operations. Completed Portrait of Gigi Cavigli (exhibited at the Armory Show the following year). "Pierre-Auguste Renoir," by Walter Pach, published in May issue of Scribner's.

1913 -- Exhibited 5 paintings and 5 etchings in "The International Exhibition of Modern Art" (Armory Show), which opened in New York City on February 13. Served as administrator, publicist, and gallery lecturer for the Armory Show Chicago with Kuhn for the run of the exhibition. At the close of the show, Matisse, Brancusi, and Pach were hanged in effigy by the students of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

1915 -- Publication of The John Quinn Collection, catalog of a collection Pach was instrumental in assembling.

1916 -- Founded Society of Independent Artists in collaboration with Marcel Duchamp, Walter Arensberg, and others. Adviser to collector Walter Arensberg.

1917 -- Designed sets for Wallace Stevens's play, Bowl, Cat and Broomstick, produced at the Neighborhood Playhouse, New York City. Arranged a Gino Severini exhibition at Stieglitz's 219 gallery, New York City.

1918 -- "Universality in Art," by Walter Pach, published in February issue of Modern School. "Jean Le Roy," by Walter Pach, published in October issue of Modern School

1919 -- "The Schamberg Exhibition," by Walter Pach, published in May 17 issue of the Dial. Wrote introduction for Odilon Redon, the catalog for a graphics show at Albert Roulliers Gallery, Chicago.

1920 -- "The Art of the American Indian," by Walter Pach, published in January 20 issue of the Dial. His paintings abandoned the cubist-futurist mode and returned to a more naturalistic style.

1921 -- Publication of History of Art: Ancient Art, volume 1, by Elie Faure, translated by Walter Pach.

1922 -- Lecturer, University of Mexico, where he developed a strong interest in Pre-Columbian art. Lectured at Société Anonyme. Publication of History of Art: Mediaeval Art, volume 2, by Elie Faure, translated by Walter Pach. Contributed a chapter, "Art," to Civilization in the United States: An Inquiry by Thirty Americans, edited by Harold E. Stearns.

1923 -- Publication of Georges Seurat by Walter Pach. Publication of The Art of Cineplastics and History of Art: Renaissance Art, volume 3, by Elie Faure, translated by Walter Pach. "Georges Seurat," by Walter Pach, published in March issue of the Arts.

1924 -- Publication of Masters of Modern Art, by Walter Pach. Publication of Raymond Duchamp-Villon, by Walter Pach. Publication of History of Art: Modern Art, volume 4, by Elie Faure, translated by Walter Pach. "The Greatest American Artist," by Walter Pach, published in January issue of Harper's Magazine.

1926 -- "Graveur Américain," by Léon Rosenthal, an article about Pach's graphics (illustrated with an original etching, New York), published in September issue of Byblis, Miroir des Arts du Livre et de L'Estampe. "Brancusi," by Walter Pach, published in December 1 issue of the Nation. Instructor, New York University. First solo exhibition at Brummer Gallery, New York, New York.

1927 -- "What Passes for Art," by Walter Pach, published in June issue of Harper's Magazine

1928 -- Publication of Ananias, or The False Artist, by Walter Pach. Pach family relocated to Europe.

1929 -- "The Evolution of Diego Rivera," by Walter Pach, published in January issue of Creative Art. "John Ruskin and Walter Pach: Defenders of the Faith," by W.H. Downes, published in August issue of American Museum Art.

1930 -- Publication of An Hour of Art, by Walter Pach. Publication of History of Art: The Spirit of the Forms, volume 5, by Elie Faure, translated by Walter Pach. "Notes sur le classicisme de Delacroix," by Walter Pach, published in June issue of L'Amour de L'Art.

1931 -- Solo exhibition at Kraushaar Gallery, New York City, with review published in March 21 issue of Art News. "Raymond Duchamp-Villon," by Walter Pach, published in May issue of Formes XV.

1932 -- "Le Classicisme de Barye," by Walter Pach, published in November issue of L'Amour de L'Art . Returned to the United States.

1933 -- "Address at the Worcester Opening of International, 1933," by Walter Pach, and "Georges Rouault," by Walter Pach, both published in January issue of Parnassus. "American Art in the Louvre," by Walter Pach, published in May issue of Fine Arts 20. "On Owning Pictures," by Walter Pach, published in August issue of Fine Arts 20. "Rockefeller, Rivera and Art," by Walter Pach, published in September issue of Harper's Magazine.

1934 -- Organized Maurice Prendergast retrospective for Whitney Museum of American Art.

1935 -- Exhibition at Knoedler Gallery, New York City included Walter Pach's Respice, Adspice, and Prospice, a fresco commissioned for the City College of New York by the Class of 1903.

1936 -- Exhibition of watercolors at Kleemann Galleries, New York City. Publication of Vincent Van Gogh, by Walter Pach." The Raphael from Russia," by Walter Pach, published in January issue of Virginia Quarterly Review. "First Portfolio of American Art," by Walter Pach, published in October 3 issue of Art News. Wrote foreword to First Exhibition in America of Géricault, catalog of exhibition at Marie Sterner Gallery, New York City. "The Outlook for Modern Art," by Walter Pach, published in April issue of Parnassus. Article about Pach's City College mural published in February issue of City College Alumnus Magazine.

1937 -- Publication of The Journal of Eugène Delacroix, translated by Walter Pach. Publication of Thomas Eakins, by Walter Pach, catalog of exhibition at Kleemann Gallery, New York City.

1938 -- Publication of Queer Thing, Painting: Forty Years in the World of Art, by Walter Pach. "Delacroix Today," by Walter Pach, published in January issue of Magazine of Art.

1939 -- Publication of Ingres, by Walter Pach. Appointed general director, "Masterpieces of Art" exhibition, New York World's Fair.

1940 -- Publication of Masterpieces of Art, New York World's Fair, 1940, Official Illustrated Catalogue, by Walter Pach.

1941 -- Solo exhibition at Schneider-Gabriel Gallery, New York City.

1942 -- "Newly Discovered Ingres: The Lovers," by Walter Pach, published in October issue of Art in America Exhibition at Whitney Museum of American Art, "Between the Wars: Prints by American Artists, 1914-1941," included Walter Pach's etching Saint-Germain-des-Pres (1911). Lecturer, University of Mexico, Shilling Fund grant.

1943 -- "A Newly Found American Painter: Hermenegildo Bustos," by Walter Pach, published in January issue of Art in America. "Unknown Aspects of Mexican Painting," by Walter Pach, published in October issue of Gazette des Beaux-Arts. Marriage of son, Raymond.

1944 -- "The Eight, Then and Now," by Walter Pach, published in January issue of Art News. "Problemas del arte americano," by Walter Pach, published in December issue of Origenes.

1946 -- "La Barricade in America," by Walter Pach, published in July issue of Art News. "On Art Criticism," by Eugène Delacroix (first published in Revue de Paris, May 1829), translated by Walter Pach for catalog of exhibition at Curt Valentin, New York City.

1947 -- Publication of Picasso, by Juan Larrea, edited by Walter Pach. Publication of "Museums Can Be Living Things," by Walter Pach, in Laurels Number One, Laurel Gallery. Etching, Scopasian Head, by Walter Pach, included in Laurels Number Two, Laurel Gallery.

1948 -- Publication of The Art Museum in America, by Walter Pach. "The Past Lives On," by Walter Pach, parts 1 and 2, published in October and November issues of American Artist.

1949 -- "Thus Is Cubism Cultivated," by Walter Pach, published in May issue of Art News.

1950 -- Contributed a chapter, "The State of the Arts in the Democratic Way of Life: A Postscript," to Perspectives on a Troubled Decade: Science, Philosophy and Religion, 1939-1949, edited by Lyman Bryson, Louis Finkelstein, and R. M. MacIver. Death of wife, Magdalene.

1951 -- "Reaciones entre la cultura nordeamericana y la ombre de Diego Rivera," a major essay by Walter Pach published in Diego Rivera, 50 años de su labor artistica, exposition de normenaje nacional, Museo nacional de artes plasticas, Mexico City. Married Nikifora.

1953 -- "A Modernist Visits Greece," by Walter Pach, reprinted in autumn issue of Archaeology.

1954 -- "John Sloan," by Walter Pach, published in August issue of Atlantic Monthly.

1956 -- "Introducing the Paintings of George Of (1876-1954)," by Walter Pach, published in October issue of Art News.

1958 -- Professor, City College of New York. Died, New York City, following an operation for stomach ulcers.

1959 -- Publication of The Classical Tradition in Modern Art, by Walter Pach.

1986 -- Exhibition, "Walter Pach, A Retrospective," at Asheville Art Museum, Asheville, North Carolina.

1988 -- Exhibition, "The Art of Walter and Magda Pach," at Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.

1990 -- Exhibition, "Discovering Modernism: Selections from the Walter Pach Papers," at the Archives of American Art, New York City.

1991 -- Exhibition, "The Paintings of Walter Pach," at Forum Gallery, New York City.
Related Materials:
Papers of Walter Pach, 1885-1956, are also located at the Helen Farr Sloan Library & Archives.
Separated Materials note:
When the Archives of American Art acquired the Walter Pach Papers, some portion of his library was also received. The bulk of the library was transferred to the Smithsonian's American Art/Portrait Gallery Library where the items could be properly cataloged, cared for, and used.
Provenance:
The Walter Pach papers were acquired in several installments. After Pach's death his widow, Nikifora Pach, sold Pach's papers to Salander-O'Reilly Galleries. They were purchased by the Archives of American Art in 1988 with a grant from the Brown Foundation, Inc.

Eight family photographs, donated by Raymond Pach, son of Walter Pach, were received in 1990.

In 2012 Francis M. Naumann donated an additional 5.7 linear feet of material to the Archives of American Art.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Walter Pach papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art schools -- Photographs  Search this
Art critics  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Art historians  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- Expertising  Search this
Mural painting and decoration, Mexican  Search this
Artists  Search this
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Prints
Drawings
Diaries
Travel diaries
Photographs
Citation:
Walter Pach papers, 1857-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.pachwalt2
See more items in:
Walter Pach papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pachwalt2
Online Media:

Judith Zilczer papers

Creator:
Zilczer, Judith  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Benton, Thomas Hart, 1889-1975  Search this
Coady, Robert J., 1881-1921  Search this
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Dawson, Manierre, 1887-1969  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Hartmann, Sadakichi, 1867-1944  Search this
Linder, Richard  Search this
Munson, Gorham Bert, 1896-1969  Search this
Quinn, John, 1870-1924  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Extent:
0.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
1910-1995
bulk 1973-1995
Summary:
The papers of curator, art historian, and author Judith Zilczer measure 0.4 linear feet and date from 1910-1995, with the bulk of material dated 1973-1995. The papers contain project files and related correspondence, unpublished manuscripts, photographs, and printed material documenting her research as an independent art historian.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of curator, art historian, and author Judith Zilczer measure 0.4 linear feet and date from 1910-1995, with the bulk of material dated 1973-1995. The papers contain project files and related correspondence, unpublished manuscripts, photographs, and printed material documenting her research as an independent art historian.

This collection documents the correspondence and research of Judith Zilczer pertaining to her doctoral dissertation, The Aftermath of the Armory Show, 1913-1918, where she examines the arguments of both artists and critics over the question of abstraction in art during the early period of the twentieth century. Research files include information on Sadakichi Hartmann, Thomas H. Benton, Manierre Dawson, Andrew Dasburg, John Quinn, Alfred Stieglitz, Michael Brenner, Robert J. Coady and Gorham Munson. Project files document Synchromism, the Forum Exhibit and the Hartley Symposium at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Richard Lindner Exhibition at the Hirshhorn Museum. Written transcripts include "Robert J. Cody, Man of the Soil" and "Musical Analogy". Researchers should note that this collection does not include a copy of her doctoral thesis.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 2 series.

Series 1: Project Files, 1910-1995 (Box 1; 21 folders)

Series 2: Writings, circa 1980s (Box 1; 3 folders)
Biographical / Historical:
Judith Zilczer (1948-) was an art historian, author, and Curator Emerita of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington D.C. She organized more than two dozen exhibitions in her twenty-nine years at the museum, where she served as Historian, Curator of Paintings, and Acting Chief Curator. Her exhibition publications include Willem de Kooning from the Hirshhorn Museum Collection (1993), Richard Lindner: Paintings and Watercolors, 1948-1977 (1996), and Visual Music: Synaesthesia in Art and Music Since 1900 (2005). A 1975 graduate of the doctoral program of the University of Delaware, she wrote her thesis on The Aftermath of the Armory Show 1913-1918. She has received numerous awards, including the 2006 George Wittenborn Memorial Book Award of the Art Libraries Society of North America. Dr. Zilczer has written and lectured widely on modern and contemporary art and is a leading authority on the art of Willem de Kooning.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Paul Allen Reed conducted by Judith Zilczer, April 29, 1994.

Additionally, Papers relating to art commissioned for the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1992-1998, donated by Judith Zilczer, can be found at Archives of American Art.

The Smithsonian Institution Archives in Washington, D.C. holds a large collection of Judith K. Zilczer Papers, 1975-2003.
Provenance:
Creator Judith Zilczer donated her papers to the Archives of American Art in 2014.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Occupation:
Authors -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Curators -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Art, Abstract  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Art historians -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Synchromism (Art)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Judith Zilczer papers, 1910-1995, bulk 1973-1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.zilcjudt
See more items in:
Judith Zilczer papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-zilcjudt
Online Media:

Virginia Teague papers relating to the Armory Show

Creator:
Teague, Virginia Vanderbilt  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Association of American Painters and Sculptors (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Copley Society (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen), 1862-1928  Search this
Taylor, Henry Fitch, 1853-1925  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1913-1962
bulk 1913-1917
Summary:
The papers of New York historian Virginia Teague measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1913-1962, with the bulk of materials from 1913-1917. The papers consist of scattered records and papers compiled by Virginia Teague for the intended purpose of writing a history of the 1913 Armory Show, also known as the International Exhibition of Modern Art, organized by the Association of American Painters and Sculptors (AAPS). Documents include correspondence, business records, and printed material mostly in connection with the Copley Society and AAPS.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York historian Virginia Teague measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1913-1962, with the bulk of materials from 1913-1917. The papers consist of scattered records and papers compiled by Virginia Teague for the intended purpose of writing a history of the 1913 Armory Show, also known as the International Exhibition of Modern Art, organized by the Association of American Painters and Sculptors (AAPS). Documents include correspondence, business records, and printed material mostly in connection with the Copley Society and AAPS.

There are a few letters from Elmer MacRae and Vera Kuhn to Virginia Teague recalling the Armory Show. There is one letter from Art Alliance of America Secretary, Elizabeth Grimball, to Henry Fitch Taylor advocating "preparedness" for artists in the event of international hostilities.

Records of the Association of American Painters and Sculptors include meeting minutes, 1913-1915, with agendas, drafts and completed reports of proceedings, checklists of attendees, a hand-written statement by Walt Kuhn, signed by Arthur B. Davies and Elmer McRae, and a mimeograph copy of the AAPS Constitution. Additional correspondence is between Henry Fitch Taylor, George Luks, and James Townsen regarding a review published in American Art News.

Records of the Copley Society are mostly related to the Armory Show. Business records include an exhibition contract and daily sales tallies from the Copley Society, which hosted the Boston venue at Copley Hall. Correspondence is with Walt Kuhn, Arthur B. Davies, John Quinn, Holker Abbott, Edward Warren, L. Flanders, and the law firm of Brandeis, Dunbar & Nutter, and regards a disagreement over sharing revenue generated by the Armory Show exhibition; and letters from General Services Administration and the U.S. Treasury Department regarding customs records for the Armory Show.

Printed material includes catalogs and clippings about the Armory Show.
Biographical / Historical:
Virginia Vanderbilt Teague was a historian in New York, N.Y. and Vermont and was the wife of sculptor and painter R. Lewis Teague. The collection consists of material related to the 1913 Armory Show, also known as the International Exhibition of Modern Art. The exhibition opened at the 69th Street Regiment, in New York City, in February 1913, and traveled to Chicago's Art Institute of Chicago, in March, and Boston's Copley Hall, in April.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are the Walt Kuhn, Kuhn family and Armory Show records, which contain records of the Association of American Painters and Sculptors kept by Walt Kuhn, Secretary of AAPS. Correspondence (January 1951) between Teague and Vera Kunn in the Walt Kuhn, Kuhn family papers, and Armory Show records in the Archives of American Art shed some light on Teague's intentions to compile a history of the Armory Show and contact she had with others to gather materials.
Provenance:
The Virginia Teague papers relating to the Armory Show were donated to the Archives of American Art in 2010 by Adam and Clover Bergmann, son and daughter of Rudolph Bergmann, Virginia Teague's friend. The papers were found in Bergmann's home after his death in 2009.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to orginal papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Citation:
The Virginia Teague papers relating to the Armory Show, 1913-1962. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.teagvirg
See more items in:
Virginia Teague papers relating to the Armory Show
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-teagvirg

John Quinn ledgers

Creator:
Quinn, John, 1870-1924  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Association of American Painters and Sculptors (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Durand-Ruel Galleries (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
M. Knoedler & Co.  Search this
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
Montross Gallery  Search this
Penguin Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Photo-Secession Galleries (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Tiffany Studios  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen), 1862-1928  Search this
Derain, André, 1880-1954  Search this
Duchamp-Villon, Raymond, 1876-1918  Search this
Epstein, Jacob, Sir, 1880-1959  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Kuhn, Walt, 1877-1949  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton, 1890-1973  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Pascin, Jules, 1885-1930  Search this
Prendergast, Maurice Brazil, 1858-1924  Search this
Redon, Odilon, 1840-1916  Search this
Renoir, Auguste, 1841-1919  Search this
Schamberg, Morton L., 1881-1918  Search this
Severini, Gino, 1883-1966  Search this
Sheeler, Charles, 1883-1965  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Villon, Jacques, 1875-1963  Search this
Vollard, Ambroise, 1867-1939  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Volumes ((ca. 390 p. on 1 microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Volumes
Date:
1909-1924
Scope and Contents:
Ledgers detailing the art purchases of John Quinn. Entries include the Association of American Painters and Sculptors listing purchases from the Armory Show, February to June 1913, of works by Cezanne, Renoir, Raymond Villon-Duchamp, Andre Derain, Jules Pascin, Odilon Redon, Walt Kuhn, Jacques Villon and others. Also entered are purchases from Alfred Stieglitz's Photo-Secession Gallery for paintings by Marsden Hartley, John Marin, Severini and Stanton Macdonald-Wright. Purchases from art dealers include M. Knoedler & Co. (for works by Morton Schamberg), Montross Gallery (for works by Arthur B. Davies, Maurice Pendergast, Walt Kuhn, Charles Sheeler, Max Weber), William Macbeth Gallery, Durand Ruel & Sons, and Ambroise Vollard.
Other entries of note include those for Jacob Epstein, one for Tiffany Studios detailing extensive refurbishing and refinishing of numerous items of furniture, and one for the Penguin Club enumerating the cost incurred for the installation of the VORTICIST EXHIBITION.
Biographical / Historical:
Art patron and lawyer; New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1986 by Thomas F. Conroy, Quinn's nephew by marriage. Mr. Conroy intends to donate these papers to the New York Public Library where the John Quinn Memorial Collection is housed.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art patrons  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art patronage  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.quinjohl
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-quinjohl

Margaret Casey Gates papers

Creator:
Gates, Margaret Casey, 1903-1989  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Federal Art Project  Search this
Federal Works Agency  Search this
Phillips Collection  Search this
Phillips Memorial Gallery. Art School  Search this
Clark, Betty Jean  Search this
Dove, Arthur Garfield, 1880-1946  Search this
Fitzpatrick, Daniel Robert, 1891-1969  Search this
Garrett, Alice Warder  Search this
Gates, Robert Franklin, 1906-1982  Search this
Gernand, John, 1913-1990  Search this
Knaths, Karl, 1891-1971  Search this
Lewis, John L.  Search this
Rayford, Julian Lee  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Taylor, Prentiss, 1907-1991  Search this
Extent:
1 Linear foot
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Writings
Sketchbooks
Date:
1934-1988
Summary:
The papers of Washington, D.C. painter Margaret Casey Gates date from 1934-1988, and measure 1.0 linear foot. Gates' papers document her work as a painter, her projects for the New Deal federal arts programs, the Phillips Memorial Gallery and its art school, where she attended school and later worked as secretary and where her husband Robert Franklin Gates was a teacher, and the Washington, D.C. arts scene. Found are scattered correspondence, seven sketchbooks by Gates and two sketchbooks of her divorced husband Robert Franklin Gates. Miscellaneous notes and writings, a scrapbook, printed material, and photographs of Gates, her husband, friends, artwork, and views of the Virgin Islands are also included in the papers.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Washington, D.C. painter Margaret Casey Gates date from 1934-1988, and measure 1.0 linear foot. Gates' papers document her work as a painter, her projects for the New Deal federal arts programs, the Phillips Memorial Gallery and its art school, where she attended school and later worked as secretary and where her husband Robert Franklin Gates was a teacher, and the Washington, D.C. arts scene. Found are scattered correspondence, seven sketchbooks by Gates and two sketchbooks of her divorced husband Robert Franklin Gates. Miscellaneous notes and writings, a scrapbook, printed material, and photographs of Gates, her husband, friends, artwork, and views of the Virgin Islands are also included in the papers.

Twelve folders of scattered correspondence include letters from the Federal Works Agency and one or two letters each from friends and individuals that reflect Gates' wide range of interests and activities. Correspondents include Betty Jean Clark, Arthur G. Dove, D. R. Fitzpatrick, Alice Garrett, John Gernand, Karl Knaths, John L. Lewis, a Brazilian artist named Portinari, Julian Lee Rayford, Alfred Stieglitz, and Prentiss Taylor.

Artwork consists of seven of Margaret Casey Gates' sketchbooks and two of Robert Franklin Gates' sketchbooks of both abstract and figural sketches. Margaret's sketchbooks contain landscapes that illustrate her travels to Colorado, Florida, Maine, Maryland, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, and the Virgin Islands. Sketchbook #2 contains pencil, ink, and pastel drawings of St. Thomas in the Virgin Islands and an intimate drawing of Robert Franklin Gates, Mitchell Jamieson, and Prentiss Taylor asleep on a ship. Artwork also includes a fine caricature of Robert Franklin Gates by Karl Knaths.

Notes and writings primarily consist of scattered notes and brief descriptive accounts of Gates's experiences at the Phillips Gallery, and at the Colorado Springs Art Center. Her extensive descriptions of her travels to the Virgin Islands are also illustrated.

A scrapbook primarily contains clippings, but also includes an award certificate, letters concerning various topics including Pepsi-Cola's annual art competition and Federal Works Agency projects, brochures for the Phillips Gallery Art School and for the McLean Art Club, and a photograph of the mural at the Mebane, North Carolina post office.

Printed material consists of clippings including copies of the rare magazines The Washington Spectator and the American University publication Right Angle, announcements and catalogs for exhibitions of Gates's work, and miscellaneous booklets and brochures. There is also printed material concerning the Armory Show including a copy of the booklet The Story of the Armory Show by Walt Kuhn.

Photographs are of Margaret Casey Gates, Robert Franklin Gates, friends including Prentiss Taylor, her home, and her artwork. Photographs of Margaret and Robert Gates and their artist friends during their visits to the Virgin Islands in the 1930s are of primary interest, offering unique glimpses of that culture during the 1930s. These photographs include aerial photographs of St. Thomas and photographs by Prentiss Taylor.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 6 series. Each series is arranged chronologically.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1934-1986 (Box 1; 12 folders)

Series 2: Artwork, 1935-1965 (Box 1; 12 folders)

Series 3: Notes and Writings, 1939-1984 (Box 1; 7 folders)

Series 4: Scrapbook, 1938-1961 (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1935-1988 (Box 1; 20 folders)

Series 6: Photographs, 1934-1976 (Box 1; 19 folders)
Biographical Note:
Margaret Casey was born in 1903 in the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C. She studied art in the studio of Bertha Perry, and from 1924 to 1926 at the Corcoran Art School. She later studied under Henry Varnum Poor at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center.

After working as a commercial artist from 1928-1929, Casey began studying at the Phillips Memorial Gallery in 1931 under C. Law Watkins. There, she met her husband, painter Robert Franklin Gates, and married on January 7, 1933. Robert Franklin Gates (1906-1982), who came to Washington, D.C. in 1930, also studied at the Phillips Gallery Art School and worked with Karl Knaths between 1934 and 1947.

Between 1934 and 1941, Robert Gates, with other artists including Mitchell Jamieson and Prentiss Taylor, made several painting trips to the Virgin Islands on a fine arts commission from the U. S. Treasury Department. Margaret Gates accompanied her husband and produced artwork of her own. She also documented their travels. During this same time, Robert taught at the Phillips Gallery Art School and Margaret was employed as the Art School's secretary. In 1937, they purchased a house in McLean, Virginia where Margaret lived until 1980.

In 1939, Margaret Gates won honorable mention in a national mural competition held by the Section of Fine Arts of the U. S. Public Buildings Administration and was subsequently commissioned by the Federal Works Agency to execute a mural for the Post office at Mebane, North Carolina. The mural was completed and installed in 1941.

During the late 1940s and early 1950s, Margaret Gates wrote articles on art for Washington, D. C. publications including the column "The People vs. Art" for American University's Right Angle, and for the magazine The Washington Spectator.

Margaret and Robert Gates were divorced circa 1955. They had no children.

Margaret Gates exhibited her work in the first exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in 1941, as one of many winners of a national competition sponsored by the Federal Works Agency for artwork to decorate a Marine hospital for lepers in Louisiana. She also exhibited in the "Group Show of Washington Painters" at the Bignou Gallery in New York City, as well as at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Philips Collection, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Cincinnati Art Museum, and the Baltimore Museum of Art. A retrospective of her work was exhibited at the Watkins Gallery of American University in 1981. Several of her paintings are in the collection of the Phillips Gallery.

Margaret Casey Gates died on November 4, 1989, in Mitchellville, Maryland.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are the papers of Gates' divorced husband Robert Franklin Gates dating from 1910-1988.
Provenance:
The Margaret Casey Gates papers were a bequest from Gates' estate in 1994, executed by her niece Joyce D. Svedberg.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Margaret Casey Gates papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
New Deal, 1933-1939  Search this
Post office buildings -- North Carolina  Search this
Painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art teachers -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Women painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Writings
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Margaret Casey Gates papers, 1934-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.gatemarg
See more items in:
Margaret Casey Gates papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gatemarg

Oral history interview with Abraham Walkowitz

Interviewee:
Walkowitz, Abraham, 1880-1965  Search this
Interviewer:
Cowdrey, Mary Bartlett, 1910-1974  Search this
Lerner, Abram, first director and curator  Search this
Names:
"291" (Gallery)  Search this
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Society of Independent Artists (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Bliss, Lizzie P. (Lizzie Plummer), 1864-1931  Search this
Boswell, Peyton, 1904-  Search this
Chase, William Merritt, 1849-1916  Search this
Cox, Kenyon, 1856-1919  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen), 1862-1928  Search this
Duncan, Isadora, 1877-1927  Search this
Epstein, Jacob, Sir, 1880-1959  Search this
Hassam, Childe, 1859-1935  Search this
Kuhn, Walt, 1877-1949  Search this
Monet, Claude, 1840-1926  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia , 1887-1986  Search this
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Extent:
66 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1958 December 8-22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Abraham Walkowitz conducted by Abram Lerner and Mary Bartlett Cowdrey for the Archives of American Art.
Walkowitz discusses his childhood and schooling; travelling abroad; influence of Claude Monet exhibit; his book, "Artists of Walkowitz: 100 Portraits"; Paul Cezanne's death; meeting artists in Europe; his 1908 exhibition of modern art at the Julius Haas Gallery, New York; getting Max Weber a show at the Haas Gallery; Steiglitz and his "291" Gallery; the Armory Show, especially the roles of Arthur B. Davies, Walt Kuhn, and Walter Pach; reactions to Nude Descending a Staircase; the Society of Independent Artists; thoughts on criticism of his work; his relationship with the critic Peyton Boswell; the importance in his work of dancer Isadora Duncan; opinions on American art, modern art, art schools, students and patrons; good art versus bad art; and the role of critics. Among others he recalls are Lizzie Bliss, William Merritt Chase, Kenyon Cox, The Eight, Jacob Epstein, Childe Hassam, and Georgia O'Keeffe.
Biographical / Historical:
Abraham Walkowitz (1880-1965) was a painter in New York, New York.
General:
Sound has been lost on tape reels; reels discarded.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Art critics  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Eight (Group of American artists)  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.walkow58
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-walkow58

Ann Uhry Abrams interview of William Gropper

Interviewer:
Abrams, Ann Uhry  Search this
Abrams, Ann Uhry  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
New York Tribune. (New York.)  Search this
Bellows, George, 1882-1925  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Ray, Man, 1890-1976  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Interviewee:
Gropper, William, 1897-1977  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (sound cassette (45 min.), analog)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1974 May 11
Scope and Contents:
An interview with William Gropper conducted by Ann Uhry Abrams as a part of research for her Ph.D. dissertation, "Catalyst for Change: American Art and Revolution, 1906-1915," Emory University, 1975.
Gropper discusses art classes as a youth in New York, the 1913 Armory show, and working for the New York Tribune as a young adult. He recalls Robert Henri, George Bellows, Man Ray, Alfred Stieglitz, Max Weber and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Ann Uhry Abrams is an art historian and professor in Atlanta, Georgia.
Provenance:
Donated 2013 by Ann Uhry Abrams.
Restrictions:
Use of interview requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.gropwill3
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gropwill3

Papers relating to the 1913 Armory Show 50th Anniversary Exhibition

Creator:
Carlton, Margaret Gillies, 1903-1998  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Armory Show 50th anniversary exhibition (1963 : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Henry Street Settlement (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Gogh, V. W. van (Vincent Willem), b. 1890  Search this
Kroll, Leon, 1884-1974  Search this
Marceau, Henri, 1896-1969  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1962-1995
Scope and Contents:
Business files, letters, photographs and printed material relating to the the 1913 Armory Show, 50th Anniversary exhibition sponsored by the Henry Street Settlement, of which Margaret Carlton was co-chair. Business files relate to committees, contributions, publicity, and guests. Photographs are of the event and many come from the album "Armory Show 1963."
Letters to Carlton, found in two scrapbooks, are from Charles Collingwood, Leon Kroll, Henri Marceau, V.W. Van Gogh, and Adelaide Taylor. Printed material includes two posters (one signed and numbered by Marcel Duchamp) and exhibition catalogs signed by Duchamp, Stuart Davis, William Zorach, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Margaret Carlton was an exhibition organizer in Woods Hole, Mass.
Provenance:
Donated 1995 by Margaret Gillies Carlton and 2009 by Mary, Ann and Rhona Carlton, daughters of Margaret Gillies Carlton via Jenn Swope, an in-law of the Carlton family.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.carlmarg
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carlmarg

The art show that shocked America [motion picture] / CBS News Eyewitness

Creator:
CBS News  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Clark, Kenneth, 1903-  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel (sd., b&w, 16 mm.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Film reels
Video recordings
Date:
1963
Scope and Contents:
Host Charles Collingwood reports for CBS News from the opening of the Armory Show, 50th anniversary exhibition, April 1963, at the site of the original exhibition, the Armory 69th St. Regiment, New York, N.Y. The anniversary exhibition was organized by the Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, and sponsored by the Henry St. Settlement. Collingwood discusses the importance of the original exhibition, negative reviews in the press, huge attendance figures, and the impact on modern art. He interviews Sir Kenneth Clark and Marcel Duchamp. Telecast on the CBS-TV documentary show Eyewitness.
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
New York : CBS News, 1963.
General:
Transferred from 16mm motion picture film to videocassette (VHS). Videocassette later digitized.
Other Title:
Eyewitness (Television program)
Provenance:
Provenance unknown; possibly received with Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute Armory Show 50th anniversary exhibition records, 1965.
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.cbsnews
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cbsnews

Greenwich Art Society records

Creator:
Greenwich Art Society (Greenwich, Conn.)  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Greenwich Society of Artists (Greenwich, Conn)  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1912-1987
Scope and Contents:
Minutes of meetings, 1922-1959; lists of expenses, 1914-1958; a list of exhibitions; form letters; a resume of Dorothy Ochtman; clippings, 1912-1957; exhibition announcements and catalogs, 1912-1958; 7 exhibition entry announcements, 1954-1958; course announcements, 1929-1958; a brochure THE GREENWICH ART SOCIETY: A CHRONICLE OF THE YEARS 1977-1987; and a medal designed by Tiffany from the National Arts Club to the Greenwich Art Society, 1936. Material on the 1913 Armory Show includes an invitation, a photograph of the installation, and a pin.
Biographical / Historical:
Art society. Formerly the Greenwich Society of Artists. Founded 1912. Some members were associated with the "Cos Cob School," and many associated with the development of the American Impressionist movement. Founders and early members included Edward Clark Potter, Leonard Ochtman, Elmer MacRae, William B. Tubby, Joseph Howland Hunt, Sr., Florence W. Gotthold, George Wharton Edwards and Alden Twachtman. Dorothy Ochtman was secretary, 1928-1946, and President, 1947-1948.
Provenance:
Donated 1987 by the Greenwich Art Society through Sue Dunlap, Historian of the Society.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Art -- Societies, etc. -- Connecticut -- Greenwich  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.greeart
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-greeart

Joseph S. Trovato papers

Creator:
Trovato, Joseph S., 1912-1983  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Armory Show 50th anniversary exhibition (1963 : Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute)  Search this
Association of American Painters and Sculptors (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Hamilton College (Clinton, N.Y.)  Search this
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute. Museum of Art  Search this
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim, 1893-1967  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Soby, James Thrall, 1906-1979  Search this
Extent:
3.8 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on one reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
[ca. 1945-1980]
Scope and Contents:
Research material for the 50th anniversary exhibition of the Armory Show and other exhibitions curated by Trovato; correspondence; writings; sound and video recordings; and printed material.
REEL 2018: Papers mainly relating to the Armory Show-50th Anniversary Exhibition arranged by Trovato for the Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, New York, in February 1963. The Armory Show (International Exhibition of Modern Art) was originally organized by the American Painters and Sculptors, 1913. Included are: correspondence; research notes; lists of Armory Show artists with their birth and death dates and the 1963 locations of the works they exhibited in the Armory Show; loan forms; exhibition catalogs; newspaper and magazine clippings; and photos. Also included are exhibition catalogs with introductions written by Trovato and catalogs for exhibitions of his work.
ADDITION: Correspondence; lecture notes; Hamilton College and Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute files containing correspondence, installation photographs and sketches, lectures, and printed material; a video recording, narrated by Trovato, for the exhibition, "Olympics in Art" (l980); a sound recording (reel-to-reel and dup.cassette) of Trovato, Marcel Duchamp and James T. Soby discussing the "Armory Show of l913 Revisited" (l963); wallpaper samples designed by Charles Burchfield; and clippings.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter and museum administrator; Clinton, N.Y.
Other Title:
Armory Show - 50th anniversary exhibition.
Provenance:
Material on reel 2018 lent for microfilming 1980 by Joseph S. Trovato, and all except exhibition catalogs subsequently donated 1981 and 1991 with unmicrofilmed material by Trovato's widow, Mrs. Ruth O. Trovato. [Official museum records of the 50th anniversary exhibition were also donated in 1965 and 1981 by the Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute and are described separately.] Additional material is expected including photographs of Trovato and his work, exhibition material, painting records, Edward Root research file, Munson-Williams-Proctor files, and printed material.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Museum administrators  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Clinton  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.trovjose
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-trovjose

Edwin Ambrose Webster papers

Creator:
Webster, E. Ambrose (Edwin Ambrose), 1869-1935  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Extent:
2.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
1821-1968
Summary:
The papers of painter and educator Edwin Ambrose Webster measure 2.2 linear feet and date from 1821 to 1968. Found within the papers are biographical material; business and personal correspondence; writings; teaching and research files, including information on Webster's participation in the 1913 Armory show; printed material; artwork; and photographic materials of Webster, his family and friends, and his work.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and educator Edwin Ambrose Webster measure 2.2 linear feet and date from 1821 to 1968. Found within the papers are biographical material; business and personal correspondence; writings; teaching and research files, including information on Webster's participation in the 1913 Armory show; printed material; artwork; and photographic materials of Webster, his family and friends, and his work.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1821-1930 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1900-1940 (2 folders; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, 1910-1930 (3 folders; Box 1)

Series 4: Teaching Files, 1930-1933 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1911-1939 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1, OVs 5-6)

Series 6: Artwork, 1890-1930 (1.1 linear feet; Boxes 1-3, Artifacts 4, 7)

Series 7: Photographic Materials, 1875-1930 (8 folders; Box 1)

Series 8: Karl Rodgers Research Files, 1940-1968 (6 folders; Box 1)
Biographical / Historical:
Painter and educator Edwin Ambrose Webster (1869-1935) lived and worked in Provincetown, Massachusetts and was known for his vibrant landscapes and for opening the first modernist art school in Provincetown.

Born in Chelsea, Massachusetts, Webster began his art studies at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts under Frank Benson and Edmund Tarbell, where he received a three year scholarship to study abroad at the Academie Julian. There, he studied under Jean Laurens and Jean-Joseph Constant and was awarded several additional student prizes for his work. Upon his return, Webster established himself as a founding member of the burgeoning art colony in Provincetown, opening his Summer School of Art in 1900, which he operated for the next thirty five years.

Alongside his teaching duties, Webster continued to develop a modernist style and was invited to exhibit in the 1913 Armory Show. In 1918, he traveled to France to study Cubism under Albert Gleizes and Jean Metzinger, and upon his return to Provincetown, began incorporating these techniques into his paintings as well as into his lectures and classes. As an active organizer within the art colony, Webster helped to found the Provincetown Art Association in 1914 and served as its director from 1917 to 1919. In 1916, he also hosted the first exhibition of the woodblock carving group, the Provincetown Printers, at his studio. Webster died at his Provincetown home in 1935.
Provenance:
The papers were donated in 1974 by the wife of Mrs. Webster's nephew, Mrs. Karl F. Rodgers. Additional materials were donated by Mrs. Rodgers in 1975.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Edwin Ambrose Webster papers are owned by the Archvies of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Edwin Ambrose Webster papers, 1821-1968. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.webse
See more items in:
Edwin Ambrose Webster papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-webse
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Louis Bouché

Interviewee:
Bouché, Louis, 1896-1969  Search this
Interviewer:
Morse, John D., 1906-  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Penguin Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Wanamaker Gallery of Modern Decorative Art  Search this
DuMond, Frank Vincent, 1865-1951  Search this
Romanowsky, Dimitri  Search this
Extent:
23 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1959 August 7
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Louis Bouché conducted on 1959 August 7, by John D. Morse, for the Archives of American Art.
Bouché speaks of his art education in France; painting trips to Brittany; studying at the Art Students League with Dimitri Romanovsky and Frank Vincent DuMond; the Armory Show, 1913; managing a gallery at Wanamaker's (the Wanamaker Gallery of Modern Decorative Art) in the 1920s; his technique and materials; teaching; the Penguin Club; his taste in books and music; and abstract expressionism.
Biographical / Historical:
Louis Bouché (1896-1969) was a painter and teacher in New York, New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav file. Duration is 53 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Art students -- France  Search this
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Sculptors -- United States -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.bouche59
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bouche59

The story of the Armory Show / by Walt Kuhn

Creator:
Kuhn, Walt, 1877-1949  Search this
Names:
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Association of American Painters and Sculptors (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Extent:
25 Pages (19 cm.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1938
Scope and Contents:
History of the Armory Show, written and published by Walt Kuhn. "The Armory show of 1913 (International Exhibiton of modern art [was] given under the auspices of the Association of American Painters and Sculptors)..."
Biographical / Historical:
Kuhn was a painter and secretary of the Association of Painters and Sculptors, the organizer of the International Exhibition of Modern Art held 1913 at the 69th St. Armory, NYC, known as the Armory Show.
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
New York, 1938.
Provenance:
Donated by David Kasmire, 1993.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Exhibitions  Search this
Modernism (Art) -- Exhibitions  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.kuhnwals
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kuhnwals

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