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William Burroughs and Brion Gysin writings

Creator:
Gysin, Brion, 1916-1986  Search this
Burroughs, William S., 1914-1997  Search this
Names:
Hotel Les Goelands (Saint-Jean-de-Luz, France)  Search this
Bradshaw, David  Search this
Brady, John  Search this
Grinstein, Elyse, 1929-2016  Search this
Grinstein, Stanley, 1927-2014  Search this
Extent:
0.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Photographs
Date:
1997
1963-1973
Summary:
The writings of American writer William S. Burroughs and British writer Brion Gysin measure 0.4 linear feet and date from 1963 to 1973, and 1997. This collection includes three books of writings by Burroughs and Gysin and one folder of letters from artist David Bradshaw to art collectors Stanley and Elyse Grinstein about William Burroughs.
Scope and Contents:
The writings of American writer William S. Burroughs and British writer Brion Gysin measure 0.4 linear feet and date from 1963 to 1973, and 1997. This collection includes three books of writings by Burroughs and Gysin and one folder of letters from artist David Bradshaw to art collectors Stanley and Elyse Grinstein about William Burroughs.

The three books of writings by William Burroughs and Brion Gysin use a "cut-up technique" of diaristic writings. Drawings, clippings, photos, and other items are pasted onto the pages throughout the books. Two of the books were created in agenda books and the third was created in a Les Goelands notebook. The third book has been identified as "John Brady's book," after a friend of Burroughs. There are a few loose pages from the Les Goelands notebook in a corresponding folder and one folder of letters about Burroughs written by the artist David Bradshaw.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 1 series.

Series 1: Writings, 1963-1973, 1997 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1)
Biographical / Historical:
William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) was a writer in New York, Mexico, Morocco, and Kansas. Burroughs's friend, painter and poet Brion Gysin, developed the "cut-up technique" of writing, a form of collage using blocks of randomly arranged text, which was popularized by Burroughs. Gysin taught the cut-up technique to Burroughs at the Beat Hotel in Paris, France around 1959, and Burroughs implemented the technique to create his third novel, Naked Lunch. The two continued to collaborate on projects and remained close friends.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art are the papers of Stanley and Elyse Grinstein, who were prominent art collectors and patrons.

The New York Public Library archive also possesses a substantial collection of William S. Burroughs papers.
Provenance:
The William Burroughs and Brion Gysin writings were donated in 2017 by the Grinstein family, via Ayn Grinstein, Ellen Grinstein Perliter, and Nancy Grinstein, executors.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The copyright for the material by William Burroughs and Brion Gysin is controlled by the William S. Burroughs Trust (which includes the Gysin Estate). The Wylie Agency LLC, 250 West 57th Street, Suite 2114, New York, N. Y. 10107, are literary agents representing the Estates of William S. Burroughs and Brion Gysin.
Topic:
Authors  Search this
Collagists  Search this
Experimental fiction  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Photographs
Citation:
William Burroughs and Brion Gysin writings, 1963-1973, 1997. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.burrwill
See more items in:
William Burroughs and Brion Gysin writings
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-burrwill
Online Media:

Buehr family papers

Creator:
Buehr family  Search this
Names:
Buehr, George Frederick, 1905-1983  Search this
Buehr, Karl Albert, 1866-1952  Search this
Buehr, Mary Guion Hess, 1871-1962  Search this
Granger, Kathleen Buehr  Search this
Hess, William, 1838-1964  Search this
Extent:
0.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Photographs
Date:
1880-1984
Summary:
The Buehr family papers date from 1880-1984 and measure 0.7 linear feet. The collection documents the lives and careers of a prominent Chicago family of artists, which included Karl Albert Buehr, his wife Mary Hess Buehr, their children Kathleen Buehr Granger and George F. Buehr, and Karl Buehr's brother-in-law, Will Hess. Found among the papers are biographical accounts, family histories, Karl Buehr's personal and professional correspondence, love letters between Karl and Mary Hess, writing by various family members, printed materials, artwork in the form of drawings by Kathleen Buehr Granger, and family and travel photographs, including two photo albums.
Scope and Content Note:
The Buehr family papers date from 1880-1984 and measure 0.7 linear feet. The collection documents the lives and careers of a prominent Chicago family of artists, which included Karl Albert Buehr, his wife Mary Hess Buehr, their children Kathleen Buehr Granger and George F. Buehr, and Karl Buehr's brother-in-law, Will Hess. Found among the papers are biographical accounts, family histories, Karl Buehr's personal and professional correspondence, love letters between Karl and Mary Hess, writing by various family members, printed materials, artwork in the form of drawings by Kathleen Buehr Granger, and family and travel photographs, including two photo albums.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as six series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1880-1976 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1898-1980 (8 folders; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1915-1970 (4 folders; Box 1)

Series 4: Printed Material, circa 1899-1984 (12 folders; Box 1-2, OV 3)

Series 5: Artwork, circa 1940-circa 1975 (6 folders; Box 2)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1886-1947 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)
Biographical Note:
The Buehr family was a prominent Chicago family of artists, which included Karl Albert Buehr, his wife Mary Hess Buehr, their children Kathleen Buehr Granger and George F. Buehr, and Karl Buehr's brother-in-law, Will Hess.

Born in 1866 in Germany, Karl Albert Buehr was a painter of genre scenes, portraits, and Impressionist landscapes. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Julian Academy in France and the London School of Art. From 1899 to 1902 he lived in Holland, and then spent the first decade of the twentieth century at Giverny, France. A member of the Giverny artists, Buehr exhibited widely in Europe. Buehr became a U.S. citizen and served in the U.S. Cavalry during the Spanish-American War. In Chicago he became a highly respected teacher at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and one of the city's most popular painters. Buehr died in Chicago in 1952.

Karl's wife, Mary Hess Buehr, was born in Chicago in 1871. She was a painter who studied in Holland and France, and held three exhibitions at the Paris Salon. Mary specialized in miniatures and decorative paintings. She was also a lithographer, lecturer, and teacher active in Chicago. She died in Orwell, Vermont, in 1962.

Their children, Kathleen and George F. Buehr, were both artists as well. George, known for his watercolors and collages, was director of museum education and a lecturer at the Art Institute of Chicago. He died in Chicago in 1983 at age 78. Kathleen was born in Chicago in 1902. A graduate of the Art Institute of Chicago, Kathleen was painter and author. Several of her articles are found in the papers, including "My Most Unforgettable Character," published in 1969 in The Reader's Digest.
Provenance:
George Buehr's wife, Margo Hoff, donated the family papers in April, 1986, as part of the Archives' Chicago survey project. George Granger, son of Kathleen Buehr Granger, donated the remaining material in June, 1986.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Buehr family papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Expatriate painters -- France -- Giverny  Search this
Impressionism (Art) -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art, American -- French influences  Search this
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Miniature painters  Search this
Landscape painters  Search this
Watercolorists  Search this
Art teachers  Search this
Portrait painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Photographs
Citation:
Buehr family papers, 1880-1984. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.buehfami
See more items in:
Buehr family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-buehfami
Online Media:

Prentiss Taylor papers

Creator:
Taylor, Prentiss, 1907-1991  Search this
Names:
American University (Washington, D.C.). Fine Arts Dept. -- Faculty  Search this
Golden Stair Press  Search this
Society of Washington Printmakers (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Field, Rachel, 1894-1942  Search this
Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967  Search this
Hurston, Zora Neale  Search this
Kahlo, Frida  Search this
Landeck, Armin, 1905-  Search this
O'Neill, Eugene, 1888-1953  Search this
Pinckney, Josephine, 1895-1957  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Robeson, Paul, 1898-1976  Search this
Robinson, Bill, 1878-1949  Search this
Stein, Gertrude, 1874-1946  Search this
Toklas, Alice B.  Search this
Van Doren, Mark, 1894-1972  Search this
Van Vechten, Carl, 1880-1964  Search this
Extent:
20.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Writings
Sketchbooks
Prints
Sound recordings
Date:
1885-1991
Summary:
The collection measures 20.4 linear feet, dates from 1885 to 1991 (bulk dates 1908-1986) and documents the career of Harlem Renaissance lithographer, teacher, and painter Prentiss Taylor. The collection consists primarily of subject/correspondence files (circa 16 ft.), reflecting Prentiss' career as a lithographer and painter, his association with figures prominent in the Harlem Renaissance, notably Carl Van Vechten and Langston Hughes, his activities as president of the Society of Washington Printmakers and other art organizations, his work in art therapy treating mental illness, and his teaching position at American University. The subject files contain mostly correspondence, but many include photographs and printed material. Also included are biographical, financial, legal and printed material; several hundred photographs; notes and writings; sketchbooks, drawings and a few prints by Taylor; and scrapbooks dating from 1885-1956.
Scope and Content Note:
The collection measures 20.4 linear feet, dates from 1885 to 1991 (bulk dates 1908-1986) and documents the career of Harlem Renaissance lithographer, teacher, and painter Prentiss Taylor. The collection consists primarily of subject/correspondence files (circa 16 ft.), reflecting Prentiss' career as a lithographer and painter, his association with figures prominent in the Harlem Renaissance, notably Carl Van Vechten and Langston Hughes, his activities as president of the Society of Washington Printmakers and other art organizations, his work in art therapy treating mental illness, and his teaching position at American University. The subject files contain mostly correspondence, but many include photographs and printed material. Also included are biographical, financial, legal and printed material; several hundred photographs; notes and writings; sketchbooks, drawings and a few prints by Taylor; and scrapbooks dating from 1885-1956.

The Langston Hughes files contain photocopies of letters from Hughes, greeting cards, ten original photographs of Hughes, and an autographed card printed with Hughes' poem, The Negro Speaks of Rivers. In addition, there is a contract between Hughes and Taylor, witnessed by Carl Van Vechten, forming the Golden Stair Press, through which many of Hughes' poems were printed with illustrations by Taylor. A rare edition of their first publication, The Negro Mother, is found here. Also found in this file is a 1932 final copy of Scottsboro Limited, another collaborative effort between Taylor and Hughes that focused on a case where nine black youths were falsely accused of raping two white women. The collection contains extensive correspondence about Taylor's lithograph of the same title and the printing of the publication. Other rare Harlem Renaissance publications found within Taylor's papers include Golden Stair Broadsides, Opportunity Journal of Negro Life, The Rebel Poet, and Eight Who Lie in the Death House, several of which were also illustrated by Taylor.

Prentiss Taylor's long association with Langston Hughes and other figures of the Harlem Renaissance stemmed from his early friendship with Carl Van Vechten. Taylor's papers contain correspondence with Van Vechten, autographed copies of Van Vechten's booklets, and numerous photographs of notable Harlem Renaissance figures, many taken by Van Vechten, including Zora Neale Hurston, Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, Eugene O'Neill, Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, Paul Robeson, and many others. Also found are period photographs of Charleston, South Carolina and Harlem street scenes.

95 letters from Rachel Field, 75 letters from Langston Hughes, 3 letters from Armin Landeck, 46 letters from Josephine Pinckney, 1 letter from Gertrude Stein, 7 letters from Alice B. Toklas, 1 postcard from Mark Van Doren, and 25 letters from Carl Van Vechten are photocopies. Originals of the Hughes and Toklas letters are located at the Yale University Library. Location of the remaining original letters are unknown.

The Prentiss Taylor papers offer researchers insight into the rich cultural documentation of the Harlem Renaissance and the development of twentieth-century printmaking as an American fine art.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into ten series. The largest series housing Subject Files is arranged alphabetically, primarily by name of correspondent, maintaining Taylor's original arrangement. The remaining series are arranged in chronological order. Oversized material from various series has been housed in Box 21 (Sol) and OV 22 and is noted in the Series Description/Container Listing Section at the appropriate folder title with see also/see references.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1918-1985, undated (Box 1; 6 folders)

Series 2: Miscellaneous Receipts, 1929-1986, undated (Box 1; 11 folders)

Series 3: Insurance Records, 1960-1976 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 4: Notes, 1921-1984, undated (Box 1; 18 folders)

Series 5: Writings, 1924-1971, undated (Box 1-2; 51 folders)

Series 6: Art Work, 1916-1975, undated (Box 2; 14 folders)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1885-1956 (Box 2, 21; 10 folders)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1914-1990, undated (Box 2-3, 21; 29 folders)

Series 9: Photographs, 1908-1984, undated (Box 3, 21; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 10: Subject Files, 1885-1991, undated (Box 3-21, OV 22; 18.0 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Prentiss Taylor was born in 1907 at the Washington, D. C. residence of his maternal grandmother, his birth assisted by his grandmother's cook, affectionately known as Cookie Belle.

In the 1920s, Taylor studied painting with Charles W. Hawthorne in Provincetown, but turned to lithography in the late 1920s to early 1930s during his enrollment at the Art Students League in New York City. He received further training in that medium at the George C. Miller workshop in New York. During this period, he also designed costumes for the American-Oriental Revue. Taylor worked primarily in the printmaking medium for the rest of his life, experimenting with various techniques and compositions and ultimately achieving a status as one this country's great lithographers. Taylor depicted mostly realistic and narrative scenes of subjects and themes that reflected his personal interests in music, architecture, religion and social justice.

During his time in New York, Taylor developed close friendships with poet Langston Hughes and writer Carl Van Vechten. He collaborated with Hughes in the formation of the Golden Stair Press to produce publications reflecting the ideas of the Harlem Renaissance. Taylor created a number of prints and illustration for the press and its publications.

After returning to Washington, D.C., Taylor's work was included in exhibitions at the Corcoran Gallery, the Smithsonian Institution, the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. He was represented by the Franz Bader Gallery in Washington, D.C., and by the Bethesda Art Gallery in Maryland. In 1942, Taylor was elected President of the Society of Washington Printmakers, a position he held for thirty-four years. He also worked as an art therapist for more than thirty years and taught oil painting at American University from 1955-1975.

Prentiss Taylor died October 7, 1991 in Washington, D.C.
Related Material:
Prentiss Taylor papers are also located at the Yale University Library.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel 1392) including three notebooks detailing Taylor's lithographs, a gift and sales notebook, a guestbook, exhibition announcements, and a brochure. Lent materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Prentiss Taylor lent the Archives of American Art material for microfilming in 1978. Papers were donated in 1978 and 1984 by Taylor, and in 1992 and 2004 by his companion, Roderick S. Quiroz, for the estate of Prentiss Taylor.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Prentiss Taylor papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art teachers -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Lithography -- 20th century -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Lithographers -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art therapy  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
Printmakers -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Writings
Sketchbooks
Prints
Sound recordings
Citation:
Prentiss Taylor papers, 1885-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.taylpren
See more items in:
Prentiss Taylor papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-taylpren
Online Media:

Nina Howell Starr papers

Creator:
Starr, Nina Howell  Search this
Names:
International Women's Art Festival  Search this
Museum of American Folk Art  Search this
Photographic Historical Society of New York  Search this
Professional Women's Photographers, Inc.  Search this
Sharon Arts Center  Search this
Southern Regional Council  Search this
Brandt, Helene, 1936-  Search this
Cohen, Stephenie  Search this
Coke, Van Deren, 1921-  Search this
Connor, Linda  Search this
Daitz, Evelyne Z.  Search this
DiSpirito, Henry, 1898-1995  Search this
Evans, Minnie, 1892-  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Ghent, Henri, 1926-  Search this
Kanaga, Consuelo, 1894-  Search this
Kernan, Margo, 1927-  Search this
Kruger, Louise, 1924-  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton, 1890-1973  Search this
Mainardi, Patricia  Search this
Morgan, Barbara Brooks, 1900-  Search this
Putnam, Wallace, 1899-1989  Search this
Ringgold, Faith  Search this
Rose, Ruth Starr, 1887-1965  Search this
Savage, Naomi, 1927-2005  Search this
Sherwood, Maggie, 1922-1984  Search this
Siskind, Aaron  Search this
Strand, Paul, 1890-1976  Search this
Szarwarski, John  Search this
Uelsmann, Jerry, 1934-  Search this
Extent:
21.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Interviews
Drawings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Prints
Date:
circa 1933-1996
Summary:
The papers of photographer and art historian Nina Howell Starr measure 21.2 linear feet and date from circa 1933 to 1996. The papers contain research files about various art historical topics, museums and galleries, photography, and artists. There are extensive files documenting Starr's relationship as researcher, dealer, and friend of folk painter Minnie Evans. Additionally, the papers include biographical materials, writings, speeches, project files, printed material collected or authored by Starr, and hundreds of artistic and documentary photographs and negatives created by Starr depicting her travels, Minnie Evans' paintings, roadside folk art, and other topics.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of photographer and art historian Nina Howell Starr measure 21.2 linear feet and date from circa 1933 to 1996. The papers contain research files about various art historical topics, museums and galleries, photography, and artists. There are extensive files documenting Starr's relationship as researcher, dealer, and friend of folk painter Minnie Evans. Additionally, the papers include biographical materials, writings, speeches, project files, printed material collected or authored by Starr, and hundreds of artistic and documentary photographs and negatives created by Starr depicting her travels, Minnie Evans' paintings, roadside folk art, and other topics.

Biographical materials are scattered and include grant and publication applications, curriculum vitae, lists of artwork, and miscellany.

Starr's lectures, writings, and project files are arranged into one series. They include Starr's student writings, a notebook about Civil Rights, files documenting her work on a Florida public housing project, the Southern Regional Council, and the League of Women Voters. A few files of general writings and lectures mostly concern folk artist Minnie Evans and the exhibition Women Photograph Men, held at the International Women's Arts Festival in 1976.

Subject files on artists, art history topics, photographers and photography (including Starr's work), and on folk artist and friend Minne Evans comprise the bulk of the collection. The files are a mix of collated materials and primary sources created by Starr and others and many contain correspondence, notes, photographs, and a few sketches and orginal prints. Also included are materials related to professional and organizational groups in which Starr was involved, including the Professional Women's Photographers, Inc., the Photographic Historical Society of New York, and the Museum of American Folk Art; files on several of Starr's exhibitions; and files on artists that contain printed materials, correspondence, and photographs. The file on Ruth Starr Rose contains prints and drawings. There are also photographs taken by Stephanie Cohen. Particularly rich files are found for Stephanie Cohen; Van Deren Coke, Director of the George Eastman Company; Evelyn Daitz, Director of the Witkin Gallery; Henry DiSpirito; Walker Evans; the Fotofolio printing company; curator Henri Ghent; photographer Consuelo Kanaga and husband Wallace Putnam; Margot Starr Kernan; Lucy Lippard; Stanton Mac-Donald Wright; Sharon Arts Center; photographer Paul Strand; curator John Szarwarski; and photographer Jerry Uelsman.

The collection also documents the friendship between painter Minnie Evans and Starr, and Starr's business dealings on Evans' behalf. There is correspondence about and with Evans, several sound recordings of interviews conducted by Starr and others with Evans, many with transcripts, financial documents, publications about Evans including exhibition catalogs, clippings, journal articles and monographs, two posters, a scrapbook, and one sketch by Evans.

Printed material includes published articles, exhibition catalogs and announcements, and clippings about Starr.

Photographic materials are extensive and include photographs and slides taken by Starr of friends, family, artwork by Minnie Evans, events, exhibition openings, world travels, and folk art, especially roadside. Prominent artists and art historians photographed include: photographers Maggie Sherwood, Naomi Savage, Barbara Morgan, Linda Connor, Aaron Siskind, Consuelo Kanaga, Faith Ringgold, and Walker Evans; sculptors Louise Kruger and Helene Brandt; feminist and art historian Pat Mainardi; and curators Henri Ghent and John Szarkowski. Starr's artistic photographic work is also represented, and includes two silver gelatin prints of Minnie Evans, and subject studies on hands, people, and nature, among others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series.

Series 1: Biographical material, 1954-circa 1990 (8 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Writings, Speeches and Projects, 1933-1995 (1.1 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 3: Subject Files, circa 1939-1996 (8.3 linear feet; Boxes 2-10)

Series 4: Minnie Evans, 1962-1996 (3.7 linear feet; Boxes 10-13, 23, OV 24)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1936-1995 (2.7 linear feet; Boxes 13-16, 23)

Series 6: Photographic Material, circa 1939-1993 (5.4 linear feet; Boxes 16-23, OV 24)
Biographical / Historical:
Nina Howell Starr (1903-2000) was a photographer, art dealer, and art historian who worked primarily in New York City. Born in Newark, New Jersey in 1903 as Cornelia Margaret Howell, Starr attended Wellesley College and graduated from Barnard in 1926. Also in 1926, she married Nathan Comfort Starr, an English professor, and, over the years the couple lived in Massachusetts, Maryland, Florida, and New York City.

In 1963, at the age of 60, Starr received the first M.F.A. in photography granted by the University of Florida. Starr exhibited widely in both solo and group exhibitions, including Magic Lantern (Photographer's Gallery, London, 1976), and the Strength of Women (Witken Gallery, 1991), and numerous shows featuring photographs of outsider art. Her "New Yorker" project became an exhibition in 2016. Her work is owned by several prominent museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography.

As art historian, self-proclaimed critic, and civil rights and feminist advocate, Starr lectured widely, wrote articles and letters to editors, and corresponded with many notable art world figures. She became especially interested in outsider and folk art. Starr met outsider artist Minnie Evans in 1962 and became Evans' lifelong friend, advocate, and representative dealer. She wrote about Evans and introduced Evans' works to galleries and other exhibition spaces in New York, including the Whitney Museum, where she guest-curated an exhibition of Evans' work in 1975.

Starr was an active member of professional organizations including the Photographic Historical Society of New York, Professional Women's Photographers, Inc., and the Museum of American Folk Art where she served on the Advisory Committee.

Nina Howell Starr died in 2000 in Connecticut at the age of 97.
Provenance:
The Nina Howell Starr papers were donated by Nina Howell Starr in 1996.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Nina Howell Starr papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Folk art -- United States  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
African American art  Search this
Folk art -- Photographs  Search this
Women photographers  Search this
Photography  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Interviews
Drawings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Prints
Citation:
Nina Howell Starr papers, circa 1933-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.starnina
See more items in:
Nina Howell Starr papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-starnina
Online Media:

Bibliography, Exhibition and Collections Lists

Collection Creator:
Starr, Nina Howell  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 28
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1972-1979
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Nina Howell Starr papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Nina Howell Starr papers, circa 1933-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Nina Howell Starr papers
Nina Howell Starr papers / Series 4: Minnie Evans / 4.1: Biographical Material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-starnina-ref489

Journal Documenting Care of Evans

Collection Creator:
Starr, Nina Howell  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 30
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1984
1996
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Nina Howell Starr papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Nina Howell Starr papers, circa 1933-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Nina Howell Starr papers
Nina Howell Starr papers / Series 4: Minnie Evans / 4.1: Biographical Material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-starnina-ref490

Chronologies - Drafts

Collection Creator:
Starr, Nina Howell  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 29
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1989-1993
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Nina Howell Starr papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Nina Howell Starr papers, circa 1933-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Nina Howell Starr papers
Nina Howell Starr papers / Series 4: Minnie Evans / 4.1: Biographical Material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-starnina-ref492

Funeral Materials and Obituaries

Collection Creator:
Starr, Nina Howell  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 32
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1987-1993
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Nina Howell Starr papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Nina Howell Starr papers, circa 1933-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Nina Howell Starr papers
Nina Howell Starr papers / Series 4: Minnie Evans / 4.1: Biographical Material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-starnina-ref493

Mary Cassatt letters

Creator:
Cassatt, Mary, 1844-1926  Search this
Names:
Cassatt, Robert Kelso  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1882-1926
Summary:
This small collection of sixty-three letters written by painter Mary Cassatt dates from 1882 to 1926. The bulk of these letters are to Cassatt's nephew, Robert Kelso Cassatt, and to his wife Minnie regarding family, mutual friends, and travel. The remaining letters are to friends regarding purchases of artwork, travel, and personal news. There is also one newsclipping of Cassett's obituary.
Scope and Contents:
This small collection of sixty-three letters written by painter Mary Cassatt dates from 1882 to 1926. The bulk of these letters are to Cassatt's nephew, Robert Kelso Cassatt, and to his wife Minnie regarding family, mutual friends, and travel. The remaining letters are to friends regarding purchases of artwork, travel, and personal news. There is also one newsclipping of Cassett's obituary.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 1 series.

Series 1: Mary Cassatt letters, 1892-1926 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)
Biographical / Historical:
Painter Mary Cassatt (1844-1926) lived and worked in Paris, France. She is one of the preeminent Impressionists known for her depictions of both the social and domestic lives of women and their children.

Cassatt was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania and began her art studies at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts at the age of sixteen. In 1865, she traveled to Paris to further her art studies under the private tutelage of Jean-Léon Gérôme and Thomas Couture, and augmented these studies with daily copying at the Louve. From 1868 to 1877, she traveled to Italy, Spain, Belgium, and Holland to view and copy the old masters and produced works that were accepted into the Paris Salon. With the encouragement of Edgar Degas, Cassatt began painting in the avant-garde Impressionist style in 1877. For the next ten years, Cassatt exhibited Impressionist paintings to critical international acclaim. After 1887, she began to experiment with other mediums and techniques, though she continued to focus her subject matter on the lives of women and children. Through the 1890s, she became a mentor to young American artists, acted as an advisor to American art collectors, and served as an ambassador for various art institutions. In 1904, she received France's Légion d'Honneur and continued producing works through the 1900s. In 1915, Cassatt stopped painting due to her failing eyesight, and lived in Le Mesnil-Théribus, France until her death in 1926.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the Frederick A. Sweet research material on Mary Cassatt and James McNeill Whistler; Nancy Hale research material on Mary Cassatt; the Mary Cassatt collection (reel C1); and the Mary Cassatt correspondence with Emily Sartain (reel 3658).
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reel N70-77) including letters written by Cassatt to Eugene Vail and Mabel and Mathilde Valet. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Items in this collection are gifts of various donors. The letters to Peter and Vollard were donated by Charles Feinberg in 1955. The letters to William T. Evans, Miss Lamb, and Miss Stillman were transferred from the National Museum of Art, Smithsonian Institution in 1980. An obituary and the letters to Robert Kelso Cassatt and his wife Minnie were donated by Alexander J. Cassatt Jr., the great nephew of Mary Cassatt, in 1986.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Mary Cassatt letters are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Women artists -- France -- Paris  Search this
Painters -- France -- Paris  Search this
Citation:
Mary Cassatt letters, 1882-1926. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cassmarl
See more items in:
Mary Cassatt letters
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cassmarl
Online Media:

William Merritt Chase papers

Creator:
Chase, William Merritt, 1849-1916  Search this
Names:
Art Club of Philadelphia  Search this
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Faculty  Search this
Shinnecock Summer School of Art -- Faculty  Search this
De Voll, F. Usher, 1873-1941  Search this
Extent:
0.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Date:
circa 1890-1964
Summary:
The papers of New York painter and art instructor, William Merritt Chase, measure 0.3 linear feet and date from circa 1890 to 1964. Papers include a resolution of the Art Club of Philadelphia on Chase's death, letters, writings by Chase consisting of typescripts of lectures and lecture notes, blank postcards primarily depicting reproductions of artwork, a scrapbook, and photographs of Chase, his family, homes, and studios, and photographs of works of art.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York painter and art instructor, William Merritt Chase, measure 0.3 linear feet and date from circa 1890 to 1964. Papers include a resolution of the Art Club of Philadelphia on Chase's death, letters, writings by Chase consisting of typescripts of lectures and lecture notes, blank postcards primarily depicting reproductions of artwork, a scrapbook, and photographs of Chase, his family, homes, and studios, and photographs of works of art.

Letters include a photocopy of a 1901 letter signed by 28 students of the Shinnecock Summer School thanking Chase for a painting; a 1903 postcard to Mr. Harold R. Shiffer from his aunt; a 1912 letter to Chase signed by 32 pupils of the Art Students League thanking him for his efforts on their behalf and acknowledging his "qualities of sympathy, interest, and an understanding of our individual needs;" a 1915 note from an unidentified writer; a 1920 letter to Chase's wife Alice, from Gertrude Abbey, wife of Edwin Austin Abbey, referencing a tile possibly created by Edwin Abbey that Mrs. Chase owns; a 1935 postcard to Chase's daughter Helen from an unidentified writer; and a 1964 letter to Helen Storm from Ala Story in which Story describes a Chase exhibition that he is organizing and apologizes for having given a sketchbook of drawings owned by Helen to the Morgan Library.

Writings include 4 sets of lecture notes (one labeled as being notes for a lecture at Shinnecock), which are a combination of annotated typescripts and handwritten pages, and a typescript of a 1906 "Talk on the Old Masters by Mr. Chase" for the New York School of Art. Also found is a notebook with handwritten notes on a talk Chase gave to students in Philadelphia, presumably at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

Writings by others consist of a six-page typescript entitled "Reminiscences of a Student," by F. Usher De Voll, describing his experiences of Chase as a teacher.

Postcards (blank) include 3 reproductions of works of art by Chase, 8 reproductions of works of art by other artists, and 2 scenic views.

A Chase family scrapbook consists of mounted prints, primarily cyanotypes, that document Chase's travels to Rome, Milan, Gibraltar and the Loire Valley, and visits to major monuments, and also includes images of Chase and his family at leisure during their travels, as well as five family portraits.

Photographs of the Chase family include one of Chase with his son, Dana, and one of Chase with his wife, Alice, both undated. Other family members and friends are generally unidentified but do include Virginia Gerson and possibly Alice Gerson. Also found are four portraits of Chase, four photographs of Chase in his studio, a copy print of students at the Shinnecock Art School in circa 1895, and a copy print of an 1880 Tile Club trip up the Hudson River. In addition to circa 1960 copy prints, photographs include a variety of vintage prints such as albumen cabinet cards, silver gelatin prints, and a tintype.
Arrangement:
Due to the small size of the collection, the papers are arranged as 1 series.

Series 1: William Merritt Chase Papers, circa 1890-1964 (0.3 linear feet.; Box 1, OV 2)
Biographical / Historical:
William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) was one of America's most prominent painters and art instructors in New York, New York and Shinnecock, Long Island, during the late 19th century. One of the first Impressionist landscape painters in the U. S, Chase was also a highly accomplished portrait and still life painter.

Born in Indiana, Chase lived in New York and St. Louis, Missouri, before traveling to Europe and studying at the Royal Academy in Munich. After returning to New York in 1878, he taught at the Art Students League until 1896. His studio in the Tenth Street Studio building became an important gathering place for artists, students and patrons. Chase was also a member of the Tile Club whose members shared an interest in the decorative arts and sought to have their designs translated into ceramic tiles, from 1877-1887.

Chase became one of the most important teachers of American artists around the turn of the century. He opened the Shinnecock Hills Summer Art School in 1891 and taught there until 1902, living in a house at Shinnecock designed by Stanford White. In 1896 he opened the Chase School of Art and also taught at the Brooklyn Art Association in 1887, and 1891-1896, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts from 1896-1909.

Chase was a member of the National Academy of Design, and was president of the Society of American Artists from 1885 to 1895.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming. Reel N69-115 includes an additional family scrapbook, undated, containing photographs of Chase, his wife and children, a notice of sale of the Chase house in Shinnecock Hills, N.Y. designed by Stanford White, and photographs of the house. Found on reel N69-119 are circa two hundred photographs of Chase at work, his wife, his studios in Philadelphia and on 5th Avenue and 10th Street New York City, and numerous snapshots of characters in a tableau vivant that include his family, friends, Mary S. Moore Cross, and others. Reel N69-137 contains letters from Chase to his wife during his travels abroad, one note from John Singer Sargent requesting the use of Chase's studio for the famous party Sargent gave for Isabella Stewart Gardner in 1890, and a six-page typescript, "Reminiscences of a Student," by F. Usher De Voll, and photographs of Chase's studio. Loaned materials were returned to the lenders and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The papers were received in a series of accessions between 1969 and 2010. A portion was loaned for microfilming by Robert S. Chase and Chapellier Galleries in 1969. Roger Storm, the widower of Chase's daughter Helen, donated lectures and speeches, a 1912 letter, and photocopies of a dinner menu and photos of artwork in 1969. Art collector Fred D. Bentley gave photographic copy prints of Chase's summer home, studio and art school. D. Frederick Baker, the author of the Chase catalogue raisonné, gave two letters, two postcards, the Chase family scrapbook, vintage photographs, and blank postcards in 2010. Baker received the material from Chase's estate via Chase's grandson, Jackson Case Storm.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The William Merritt Chase papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art teachers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios -- New York (State) -- New York -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Citation:
William Merritt Chase papers, circa 1890-1964. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.chaswill
See more items in:
William Merritt Chase papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chaswill
Online Media:

Dorothy Cavanagh research material on Henry Hudson Kitson

Creator:
Cavanagh, Dorothy, 1907-1986  Search this
Names:
Kitson, Henry Hudson, 1863?-1947  Search this
Kitson, Theo Alice Ruggles, 1876-1932  Search this
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1883-1983
Scope and Contents:
Research material for Cavanagh's "The Bronze Parade," an unpublished biography of sculptor Henry Hudson Kitson; and art work.
Included are lists of works by Henry Hudson and Theo Allice Ruggles Kitson, family geneaologies, reminiscences, extensive quotes from the Henry Hudson Kitson diaries, and two notebooks with additional information; a few letters; early and final drafts of the ca. 300 p. manuscript "The Bronze Parade"; a photograph of a plaster bas-relief; and works of art, including a plaster head of a youth, probably by Henry Hudson Kitson for "Music of the Sea," (ca. 1883); a plaster bas-relief and marble bas-relief of "My Mother," by Kitson (1893), and a painted plaster bookend with a bust of an American Indian signed T.(heo) A.(lice) R.(uggles) Kitson.
Biographical / Historical:
Cavanagh: Art historian. Kitson: Sculptor; Lee, Mass.
Provenance:
Donated 1987 by the Dorothy Cavanagh estate, through Paul Bennett, Cavanagh's nephew and executor.
Restrictions:
Unmicrofilmed; use requires an appointment and is limited to Washington, D.C. storage facility.
Occupation:
Sculptors  Search this
Art historians  Search this
Biographers  Search this
Topic:
Sculpture, American  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.cavadoro
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cavadoro

Oral history interview with Faith Ringgold

Interviewee:
Ringgold, Faith  Search this
Interviewer:
Nadelman, Cynthia  Search this
Names:
Gwathmey, Robert, 1903-1988  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Lloyd, Tom, 1929-  Search this
Morris, Robert, 1931-2018  Search this
Tucker, Marcia  Search this
Extent:
349 Pages (Transcript)
15 Items (sound files (10 hr., 49 min.), digital)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1989 September 6-October 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Faith Ringgold conducted 1989 September 6-October 18, by Cynthia Nadelman, for the Archives of American Art.
Ringgold discusses Harlem from the 1930s through the 1970s; her background and education; her art and political activities; feminism; the evolution of her work; her paintings, soft sculpture constructions, quilts, and performance pieces. She recalls Robert Gwathmey, Tom Lloyd, Robert Morris, Marcia Tucker, Lucy Lippard, her mother, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Faith Ringgold (1930- ) is an Afro-American painter, sculptor, and performance artist from New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 8 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 15 digital wav files. Duration is 10 hr., 50 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators. Funding for this interview provided by the Lannan Foundation.
Topic:
Performance art -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
African American artists -- New York (State) -- N.Y. -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Quiltmakers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.ringgo89
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ringgo89

Mary Cassatt correspondence with Emily Sartain

Creator:
Cassatt, Mary, 1844-1926  Search this
Names:
Sartain, Emily, 1841-1927  Search this
Extent:
15 Items ((on 1 partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
[ca. 1872-1874]
Scope and Contents:
Fourteen letters from Cassatt to Emily Sartain and one letter from Sartain to Cassatt, discussing a trip the two were to take to Europe, as well as some mention by Cassatt of her artistic development in Spain and Italy. Dates on the correspondence are by an unknown hand and are questionable.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter; Philadelphia, Pa. and Europe. Emily Sartain was the daughter of John Sartain. She studied both with her father and Christian Schussele at the Pennsylvania Academy. She won several awards at the Academy and taught at the Philadelphia School of Art and Design.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1985, by the PAFA as part of the AAA's documentation project. The source of the letters is unknown, although it is probable that they came through the estate of Harriet Sartain.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Women artists -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.cassmces
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cassmces

Amaylia Castaldo papers

Creator:
Castaldo, Amaylia Chlarina, 1906-1987  Search this
Names:
Fairbanks, Douglas, Jr., 1909-2000  Search this
Extent:
0.3 Linear feet ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
[ca. 1930-1970]
Scope and Contents:
54 photographs of portraits painted 1931-1970 by Castaldo; a clipping picturing Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. posing with their daughter's portrait painted by Castaldo; and Castaldo's resumé.
Biographical / Historical:
Portrait painter; Chicago, Ill. Born 1906. Castaldo studied at the Art Students League, the Academie de la Grande Chaumiere, and privately with Leon Kroll. She was married to painter Paul Trebilcock.
Provenance:
Donated by Amaylia Castaldo Trebilcock, 1982.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Portrait painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Portrait painting -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Women painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.castamay
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-castamay

Margarita Cano papers

Creator:
Cano, Margarita, 1932-  Search this
Names:
Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture (Miami, Fla.)  Search this
Miami-Dade Public Library  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Photographs
Date:
1982-1985
Summary:
Margarita Cano's papers measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1983-1985. The collection primarily concerns the 1983 exhibition The Miami Generation, 9 Cuban-American Artists, an exhibition organized by The Cuban Museum of Art in Culture in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Public Library System and for which Cano served as Project Director. Curated by Guilio V. Blanc, the exhibition included work by Mario Bencomo, Maria Brito-Avellana, Humberto Calzada, Pablo Cano, Emilio Falero, Fernando Garcia, Juan Gonzalez, Carlos Macia, and Cesar Trasobares. The exhibition traveled to Meridian House International in Washington, DC and later to Philadelphia at the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies in 1985. Found are two files of correspondence, exhibition planning and publicity files, a catalog, checklist, and photocopied news clippings. Most of the documents are photocopies. There is also one folder of slides and photographs of works of art in the exhibition.
Scope and Content Note:
Margarita Cano's papers measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1983-1985. The collection primarily concerns the 1983 exhibition The Miami Generation, 9 Cuban-American Artists; an exhibition organized by The Cuban Museum of Art in Culture in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Public Library System for which Cano served as Project Director. Curated by Guilio V. Blanc, the exhibition included work by Mario Bencomo, Maria Brito-Avellana, Humberto Calzada, Pablo Cano, Emilio Falero, Fernando Garcia, Juan Gonzalez, Carlos Macia, and Cesar Trasobares. The exhibition traveled to Meridian House International in Washington, DC and, later, to Philadelphia at the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies in 1985. Found are two files of correspondence, exhibition planning and publicity files, a catalog, checklist, and photocopied news clippings. Most of the documents are photocopies. There is also one folder of slides and photographs of works of art in the exhibition.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series:

Series 1: Exhibition Files, 1983-1985 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Born in 1932 in Havana, Cuba, Margarita Cano began her studies at the University of Havana. She left Cuba in 1962 to settle in Miami and later became director of arts for the Miami-Dade County Public Library. The arts programs she initiated focused on the work of African-American and Cuban-American artists and eventually led to the establishment of a permanent collection at the library. An artist herself, Cano's artwork focuses on Cuban scenes painted on wood in a miniature style. In 1983 she served as project director for the exhibition The Miami Generation: Nine Cuban-American Artists (La Generacion de Miami: Nueve Artistas Cubano Americanos), curated by Latin American curator and scholar, Guilio Blanc.
Provenance:
Margarita Cano donated her papers in 1997 to the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Restrictions:
Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Margarita Cano papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Expatriate artists -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Art, Cuban -- Florida -- Miami -- Exhibitions  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Florida -- Miami -- Exhibitions  Search this
Cuban American art -- Florida -- Miami -- Exhibitions  Search this
Artists -- Cuba  Search this
Cuban American artists -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Photographs
Citation:
Margarita Cano papers, 1982-1985. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.canomarg
See more items in:
Margarita Cano papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-canomarg

Rimer Cardillo printed materials

Creator:
Cardillo, Rimer  Search this
Extent:
0.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1989-2012
Summary:
The printed materials of artist Rimer Cardillo measure 0.4 linear feet and date from 1985 to 2012. The collection is comprised of clippings including reviews of the exhibition Revelaciones / Revelations: Hispanic Art of Evanescence, exhibition announcements and catalogs, and newsletters relating to Cardillo's career as a printmaker and graphic artist.
Scope and Contents:
The printed materials of artist Rimer Cardillo measure 0.4 linear feet and date from 1985 to 2012. The collection is comprised of clippings including reviews of the exhibition Revelaciones / Revelations: Hispanic Art of Evanescence, exhibition announcements and catalogs, and newsletters relating to Cardillo's career as a printmaker and graphic artist.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as one series.

Series 1: Rimer Cardillo Printed Materials, 1985-2012 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Rimer Cardillo (1944-) is a printmaker and graphic artist in Wallkill, N.Y.

Cardillo was born in Montevideo, Uruguay. He attended the National Institute of Fine Arts in Montevideo graduating in 1968. He continued his art studies in Germany at the Weissenssee School of Art and Architecture and the Leipzig School of Graphic Arts. In 1979, Cardillo immigrated to the United States. He became a professor of printmaking at the State University of New York, New Paltz.

Cardillo has won a Guggenheim Fellowship and Figari Award among others. He has exhibited his work throughout the United States, South America, and Europe. His work can also be found in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura of Mexico, Museum of Modern Art, Art Museum of the Americas, and in various private collections.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Rimer Cardillo in 2015.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Topic:
Graphic artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Hispanic American art  Search this
Hispanic American artists--New York (State)--New York  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Citation:
Rimer Cardillo printed materials, 1985-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cardrime
See more items in:
Rimer Cardillo printed materials
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cardrime

Castano Galleries records

Creator:
Castano Galleries (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Names:
Beam, Philip C.  Search this
Castano, Giovanni, 1896-1978  Search this
Chrysler, Walter P. (Walter Percy), 1909-1988, Jr.  Search this
Danes, Gibson A.  Search this
Denghausen, Franz H., 1911-  Search this
Goodrich, Lloyd, 1897-1987  Search this
Grandin, Isabella  Search this
Hale, Lilian Westcott, 1880-1963  Search this
Hofer, Philip, 1898-1984  Search this
Rathbone, Perry Townsend, 1911-2000  Search this
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Sachs, Paul J. (Paul Joseph), 1878-1965  Search this
Venturi, Lionello, 1885-1961  Search this
Extent:
30 microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
1907-1983
Scope and Contents:
20 feet, chiefly gallery records and some personal papers of gallery owner, Giovanni (John) Castano, including correspondence, legal material, subject files, notes, writings, financial material, photographs, a scrapbook, and printed material.
Included are biographical information about Castano, business correspondence with dealers, museums, clients, collectors, artists, art historians, and others, and some personal correspondence, including a letter from Rome, 1876, from an unidentified writer to an unidentified woman containing a detailed description of a painting in the Barberini, and correspondence related to Castano's work as a scenic artist, 1924-1931. Subject files contain mainly correspondence and lists of work, and relate to Italian Renaissance exhibition, 1938, the Heeramaneck Collection of Persian and Indian Art, a Boldini exhibition, Arthur C. Goodwin, 1945-1952, and a Mancini-Sargent exhibition, 1951.
Financial material includes records of expenses and income; account books; employees' weekly wage book; records of purchases and sales of art work, including part of a bill for a painting by Diaz paid by Knoedler and Co., 1890; appraisals done for individuals, estates and institutions, including the Gorham Corporation, Harvard University murals, the Mrs. T. Morris Murray estate, furnishings of William M. Paxton's studio, ca. 1941, and paintings by Edmund Tarbell, and others; consignments; priced auction catalogs of the Henry F. Sears estate, the Mary A.H. Traiser estate, and miscellaneous price lists.
Also included are a card file on paintings; lists of paintings; inventories; client cards; address and appointment books; mailing lists; gallery journals, 1936-1927; descriptions and notes on paintings and authentications; biographies of artists; writings by and about Castano; and notes by Churchill Wyman on Philip Hale's anatomy lectures.
Photographs are of Castano, his work, artists at work, and various works of art. Original art work consists of sketches for a logo designed by Suzanne Chapman. Included in the exhibition related material is a catalog for Castano's posthumous exhibition.
Also included is a scrapbook containing announcements, clippings on the gallery and Castano, exhibition catalogs, and biographical material compiled by Castano's longtime secretary.
Among the correspondents are: Philip Beam, Walter P. Chrysler, Jr., Gibson Danes, Franz Denghasusen, Lloyd Goodrich (Whitney Museum of American Art), Isabella Grandin, Lilian W. Hale, Philip Hofer (Fogg Art Museum), Perry T. Rathbone (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston), Edgar P. Richardson (Detroit Institute of Arts), Paul J. Sachs (Fogg), and Lionello Venturi.
Biographical / Historical:
Art gallery, Boston, Mass. Founded in 1931 by Giovanni Castano, also known as John Castano. Castano attended the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where he was an assistant to Philip Hale. He was a scenic artist for the Boston Opera Company and for the Grand Opera in Cincinnati, Ohio. During the Depression, he returned to Boston where he opened a gallery on Newbury Street specializing in European and American paintings, acted as an agent for Wildenstein and Co., and restored paintings. The gallery had numerous exhibitions of the "Boston School," including A.C. Goodwin, Winslow Homer, Philip Hale, Edmund C. Tarbell, William Paxton and others. The gallery occupied several Newbury St. locations. From 1975 until his death, Castano operated it from his home in Needham.
Other Title:
Giovanni Castano Galleries records, 1907-1983.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming by Elvira Castano Palmerio, Castano's daughter, 1988.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art appraisers  Search this
Restorers  Search this
Set decorators  Search this
Gallery owners  Search this
Art dealers -- Massachusetts  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Identifier:
AAA.castgall
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-castgall

George Catlin papers

Creator:
Catlin, George, 1796-1872  Search this
Names:
Clay, Henry, 1777-1852  Search this
Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872  Search this
Sully, Thomas, 1783-1872  Search this
Extent:
2.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photogravures
Date:
undated
1821-1904
Summary:
The collection comprises 2.3 feet of papers concerning George Catlin's creation and promotion of his famed "Indian Gallery" of paintings, drawings, and artifacts of North American Indians. Dating from 1821 through 1904, with one item dated 1946, the papers include letters, notebooks and journals, receipt books and loose receipts, printed materials, and other documentation. The bulk of the collection focuses on Catlin's efforts to promote the sale of his gallery to the United States government through tours, including London and Paris, and petitions to various governments to purchase the Gallery. Among the rare printed catalogs and petitions in the collection are exhibition catalogs for the U.S., London, and Paris tours, the earliest dating from 1837. Letters and other documents include letters dating from the 1830s from Henry Clay, Thomas Sully, and William Henry Seward commending Catlin's work, as well as Catlin family correspondence and papers dating from 1821 through the 1870s.
Scope and Contents note:
The collection comprises 2.3 feet of papers concerning George Catlin's creation and promotion of his famed "Indian Gallery" of paintings, drawings, and artifacts of North American Indians. Dating from 1821 through 1904, with one item dated 1946, the papers include letters, notebooks and journals, receipt books and loose receipts, printed materials, and other documentation. The bulk of the collection focuses on Catlin's efforts to promote the sale of his gallery to the United States government through tours, including London and Paris, and petitions to various governments to purchase the Gallery. Among the rare printed catalogs and petitions in the collection are exhibition catalogs for the U.S., London, and Paris tours, the earliest dating from 1837. Letters and other documents include letters dating from the 1830s from Henry Clay, Thomas Sully, and William Henry Seward commending Catlin's work, as well as Catlin family correspondence and papers dating from 1821 through the 1870s.

Of particular interest in the collection are letters to and from Catlin, including two written by Catlin during his early travels to the west in the 1830s. Other letters include ones from Henry Clay, John Adams Dix, Ralph Randolph Gurley, James Hall, William Henry Seward, Thomas Sully (illustrated), and Baron Friederich von Humbolt, among others. Most wish Catlin well and offer support in his endeavors to sell his collection.

Also found within the collection are several notebooks and notes describing Native American ceremonies, name translations, customs, and other information pertinent to Catlin's catalog, two volume book, and exhibitions of the "Indian Gallery." There are also numerous loose receipts and account and receipt books documenting the 1840s London and Paris venues of the "Indian Gallery" exhibition. The collection also houses printed catalogs for the exhibitions, including a rare 1837 catalog for the first show in New York.

Additional materials include certificates of authenticity testifying to the authenticity of Catlin's paintings from life of Native American sitters, announcements relating to exhibition openings, printed memorials and petitions to Congress, printed letters of support, envelopes and name cards, and handwritten tickets to Catlin lectures. Also found are a handwritten journal of Theodore B. Catlin, photogravures of Catlin, obituaries for Catlin, and printed reviews of the exhibitions.
Arrangement note:
The George Catlin papers are arranged into five series based primarily on document type. Within each series, materials are arranged in chronological order.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1821-1885 (Boxes 1, 6; Reel 5824; 12 folders)

Series 2: Writings, 1825-circa 1872 (Boxes 1, 6; Reel 5824; 9 folders)

Series 3: Financial Records, 1826-1848 (Boxes 2, 6; Reels 5824-5825; 13 folders, 3 bound volumes)

Series 4: Catalogs, 1837-1871 (Boxes 3-5; Reel 5825; 1 linear foot)

Series 5: Ephemera and Miscellaneous Printed Material, 1832-1904, 1946 (Boxes 5-6, OV 7; Reel 5825; 14 folders)
Biographical/Historical note:
George Catlin was born in 1796 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Although trained as a lawyer, Catlin quit his law practice and moved to Philadelphia in 1823 to begin a career as a portrait painter. He gained membership in the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 1824, but his career in formal portraiture met with little success. In 1830, Catlin embarked upon his lifetime achievement of documenting the lives, customs, and culture of the declining native American population of the Plains. He spent the next six years traveling, drawing, painting, and writing about the Plains Indians. By 1837, he had amassed enough documentation to hold a major exhibition in New York of Catlin's Indian Gallery of Portraits, Landscapes, Manners and Customs, Costumes, etc. The same exhibition, with an added live show, traveled to London in 1842 and Paris in 1845, where it was met with rave reviews.

Catlin spent the remainder of his life gathering support for the sale of the Indian Gallery to the U.S. Congress. Between 1841 and 1842, at his own expense, Catlin wrote and published his two volume set Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians. He also wrote numerous petitions and "memorials" to Congress, often including statements from national and international reputable supporters, such as Daniel Webster, General Lewis Cass, the Joint Committee on the Library (of Congress), and the American Ambassador to France. The Smithsonian Institution's first Secretary Joseph Henry strongly supported congressional acquisition of Catlin's work and even provided Catlin with a small studio in the Castle building. All of the appeals to the government for the purchase of the collection were, in the end, unsuccessful and Catlin died almost penniless in 1872.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Archives holds several related collections of differing provenances related to George Catlin, including a small collection of manuscripts and drawings microfilmed on reel 1191 related to Catlin's work in marine art and documentation. A microfilmed loan of circa 500 items is also available on reel 3277 of letters between Catlin and Sir Thomas Phillipps, 1840-1860, writings by Catlin and material on Catlin's Indian Gallery, including clippings, catalogs, handbills, invitations, drawings and portrait sketches of native Americans, and printed material; a watercolor sketchbook; a list of paintings; and miscellany. Also found within the Archives is one undated letter microfilmed on reel D8 from Catlin, and a collection of art historian William Truettner's research papers on George Catlin.
Provenance:
The papers of George Catlin were transferred to the Archives of American Art by the Library of the Smithsonian's National Collection of Fine Arts, now the Smithsonian's American Art Museum. Accession records indicate that the papers were once maintained by the Smithsonian's Bureau of Ethnology and were probably part of the orginal 1879 acquisition of Catlin's Indian Gallery by the Smithsonian. Businessman Joseph Harrison rescued the "Indian Gallery" from Catlin's creditors in the 1850s and stored the collection in a Philadelphia warehouse, where it suffered damage from at least two fires before Harrison's widow donated the collection to the Smithsonian.
Restrictions:
A digitized version of the microfilm of this collection is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Rights:
The George Catlin papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Portrait painters  Search this
Miniature painters  Search this
Indians of North America -- Portraits  Search this
Illustrators  Search this
Ethnological painters  Search this
Ethnological illustrators  Search this
Art and race  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photogravures
Citation:
George Catlin papers, 1821-1946. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.catlgeor
See more items in:
George Catlin papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-catlgeor
Online Media:

Carlen Galleries, Inc., records

Creator:
Carlen Galleries  Search this
Names:
Peale family  Search this
Davies, Albert Webster, 1889-1967  Search this
Feuillate, Raymond, 1901-1971  Search this
Gainsborough, Lee  Search this
Hicks, Edward, 1780-1849  Search this
Kollwitz, Käthe, 1867-1945  Search this
Pippin, Horace, 1888-1946  Search this
Prendergast, Maurice Brazil, 1858-1924  Search this
Extent:
10.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1775-1997
bulk 1940-1986
Summary:
The Carlen Galleries, Inc., records measure 10.4 linear feet (gift portions) and date from 1775 to 1997 (bulk 1940-1986). Correspondence, business records, subject files, a scrapbook, printed matter, and photographs document the operation and activities of Carlen Galleries, Inc., and its founder Robert Carlen.
Scope and Content Note:
The Carlen Galleries, Inc., records measure 10.4 linear feet (gift portions, Parts 1 and 3) and date from 1775-1998 (bulk 1940-1986). Correspondence, business records, subject files, a scrapbook, printed matter, and photographs document the operation and activities of Carlen Galleries, Inc., and its founder Robert Carlen.

Part 1: Received in 1986 as a gift from Robert Carlen, these records document the activities of Carlen Galleries and its founder, 1937-1986. Correspondence mainly concerns the sale and purchase of works of art. Also included are artist files containing correspondence, receipts, and printed matter regarding Albert Davies, Edward Hicks, Käthe Kollwitz, Horace Pippin, and Maurice Prendergast. Subject files concern African American artists, Raphael Peale, Raymond Feuillate, and the French Moderns. Business records consist of loan forms, documentation of exhibitions at Carlen Galleries, inventories, a scrapbook and clippings concerning the gallery, conservation reports, appraisals (not microfilmed), and financial records.

Part 2: Additional records documenting the activities of Carlen Galleries and its founder, 1937-1986, were loaned by Robert Carlen for microfilming in 1988. Included are letters about Horace Pippin and rare letters from the artist. Other correspondence concerns Carlen's search for paintings by Edward Hicks, and there is also a small selection of letters regarding more routine gallery business. Among the business records are and account book and receipts. Printed matter consists of exhibition catalogs, announcements, and clippings; a scrapbook contains printed matter about Horace Pippin. Photographs are of Allan Freelon and works of art.

Part 3: Received in 2002 as a gift from Robert Carlen's daughter Nancy Carlen, this portion of the Carlen Galleries, Inc., Records consists of two letters, business records, photographs, and selections from the galleries' library. Letters are from Joan Baez, circa 1960 and Charles M. Mount, 1968. Previously sealed letters from Charles M. Mount, undated, and 1962-1975, relating to John Singer Sargent have been integrated into this portion.

Part 4: Additional records borrowed for microfilming from Nancy Carlen in 2002 include documents dated 1775-1997 (bulk 1940s-1990). Correspondence concerns gallery business, but a small amount of personal correspondence is also included. Business records consist of appraisal reports, receipts for sales and purchases, and the contract and program for the 1964 University [of Pennsylvania] Hospital Antiques Show in which Carlen Galleries exhibited. Subject files document Edward Hicks, Anatol Jal, the Captain James Lawrence Goblet, Horace Pippin, and Antoine Roux. Five notebooks, containing material similar to that in the subject files, are about Horace Pippin (vols. 1-3), Edward Hicks (vol. 4), and chronicle the career of Robert Carlen (vol. 5).

Printed matter consists of clippings and other items concerning art and antiques, Robert Carlen and Carlen Galleries, Inc., and the Diplomatic Reception Rooms of the State Department where two Hicks paintings owned by Carlen were on extended loan. Among the miscellaneous records are biographical documents, personal financial records, business and research notes (including original documents and photocopies of archival materials), and four prints. Photographs are mostly of antiques and art work; also included are a few pictures of people, places, and miscellaneous subjects.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into four parts, representing gift and loan accessions received and microfilmed at various times. The two loans for microfilming (Parts 2 and 4) overlap and partially duplicate one another-particularly records relating to Horace Pippin and Edward Hicks-but are far from identical. Some of the Pippin and Hicks material was significantly rearranged in the interim between the first loan (1988) and the second (2002).

Part 1: Gift (1986), 1906-1986 (Boxes 1-7; 7.0 linear feet; Reels 4166-4175)

Part 2: Loan (1988), 1937-1986 (Reel 4175)

Part 3: Gift (2002), 1835-1992 (Boxes 8-12; 3.4 linear feet; Reel 5745)

Part 4: Loan (2002), 1775-1997 (Reels 5746-5748)
Historical Note:
Robert Carlen (1906-1990) worked as a secretary and attended evening classes at the Graphic Sketch Club in Philadelphia right after graduating from high school. He studied painting full-time at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts during the academic year 1928/29, and from 1929-1936 he continued to study painting in the evenings while employed at a brokerage firm.

Since he wanted to be associated with the art world and needed to earn a living, Carlen decided to establish an art gallery that would show the works of young artists. In 1937, he opened in Carlen Galleries in his home at 323 South 16th Street, Philadelphia; the galleries operated in the same location for the remainder of Carlen's life. In its earliest years, Carlen Galleries housed exhibitions of the Associated American Artists' Group and featured prints by Wanda Gag, Käthe Kollwitz, Louis Lozowick, Lynd Ward, and other print makers.

In 1941, paintings by Horace Pippin were exhibited at Carlen Galleries. Carlen soon befriended the artist and began providing him with art supplies. He remained Pippin's agent for many years following the artist's death in 1946, and was a sought-after authority on the artist's work and life.

By the mid-1940s, Carlen had discovered a painting by Edward Hicks in Bucks County, Pa. He began researching the then-obscure Quaker artist. Through contacting descendants of Hicks's patrons, Carlen was able to acquire many of Hicks's paintings and Carlen Galleries became known for handling important early American folk paintings and antiques. Among his clients were Edward W. and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch, Winterthur Museum, Winterthur, Del., Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, Williamsburg, Va., and the Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, Vt.

During the course of his long career, Robert Carlen served as an advisor to many Philadelphia collectors and developed an extensive knowledge of the genealogies and heirlooms of the city's prominent families. Because of his extensive experience and expertise, Carlen's opinion was widely valued and his services as an appraiser of art and antiques were in great demand.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reels 4175 and 5746-5748) including material relating to Horace Pippin. Loaned material was returned to the lender and is described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The collection was acquired in various accessions of gifts and loans. Part 1: gift of Robert Carlen, 1986; Part 2: loaned by Robert Carlen for microfilming, 1988; Part 3: gift of Nancy Carlen, 2002 (previously sealed letters and appraisals received with Part 1 are housed with Part 3 and integrated for microfilming); Part 4: loaned by Nancy Carlen for microfilming, 2002.
Restrictions:
Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Rights:
Parts 1 and 3 of the Carlen Galleries, Inc. records are owned by the Archives of American Art. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. Parts 2 and 4 were loaned for microfilming and the originals returned to the donor. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Decorative arts -- United States  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Folk art -- United States  Search this
Art appraisers  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art dealers  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Art -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Carlen Galleries, Inc., records, 1775-1997, bulk 1940-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.carlgall
See more items in:
Carlen Galleries, Inc., records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carlgall
Online Media:

Tim and Elise Ott Casper papers

Creator:
Casper, Tim F., 1943-1964  Search this
Casper, Elise Ott  Search this
Extent:
3.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1945-1969
Scope and Contents:
Papers of artist Tim Casper, whose artistic ability was detected at a young age and whose life was cut short in a tragic car accident at the age of 21, and those of his mother, Elise Ott Casper, regarding her son's artistic background and his work. Included are biographical information; letters from Casper to his mother; school art work; exhibition files and printed materials from Putney School, Vermont; family photographs and albums (mostly from travels); correspondence between Elise Ott Casper and Gerard Willem van Loon regarding Casper's artwork, his education, and personal matters, 1950-1969; and memorabilia.
Biographical / Historical:
Draughtsman, printmaker. Born May 23, 1943, Milwaukee, Wisc. Casper enrolled in art classes in Milwaukee from a young age. He attended the Putney School in Vermont for his high school years. He died in a car accident in 1963 after completing his freshman year studying art at NYU.
Provenance:
Bequest of Elise Ott Casper, mother of Tim Casper, in 1998.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Identifier:
AAA.casptim
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-casptim

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