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Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection

Creator:
Bellanca, Giuseppe M., 1886-1960  Search this
Names:
Bellanca  Search this
Wright Aeronautical Corporation  Search this
Chamberlin, Clarence  Search this
Extent:
248.5 Cubic feet (245 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Financial records
Newspaper clippings
Drawings
Photographic prints
Date:
1919-1959
Summary:
This collection consists of the archives of Giuseppe M. Bellanca and his company, including the following types of mediums: drawings, stress analysis tests, reports, photographs/negatives, documents, correspondence, patent information, newspaper clippings, business records, and financial statements.
Scope and Contents:
Series I: Mr. Bellanca's professional life

Here, the researcher will find documents regarding the day-to-day operations of the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation. The material is generally divided into core documents of the corporation, correspondence, financial documents, subcontracting pursuits, patents, employee relations, and company history.

Series II: Technical Material

This material is separated into the following subseries: Miscellaneous Handwritten Notes and Sketches, Bellanca Aircraft Technical Data, Bellanca Aircraft Corporation Reports, Technical Research Files, Bellanca Aircraft Drawing Lists, Bellanca Aircraft Drawings, and Bellanca Aircraft Drawing Indexes. The Bellanca Collection is not a complete history of the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation. Over the years, it appears that many items were loaned out by the Bellanca Family to researchers and not returned. Therefore, there are significant gaps in correspondence, formal, numbered reports, and other areas of the collection. For example, the earliest report in the Bellanca Collection is Report #28, the next report which appears is report #45.

The Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection contains over 10,000 drawings. (At the time of processing, not all drawings were entered into the Bellanca Drawings Database. These drawings will be entered as time allows.) The drawings vary in size from 8 x 11 inches to 36 x 185 inches. There are original pencil drawings, blueprints, and blueline drawings. Over 130 models of Bellanca aircraft are represented in the Collection. There are General Arrangement, or Three-View drawings for over 80 of these models. Bellanca drawings are not easy to decipher. Most of the drawings have data blocks which contain only a finite amount of information. Often the aircraft has been identified only by serial number. In some cases the model number of the aircraft is also the drawing number. Other times, the aircraft name would be given, but no model number, i.e. Skyrocket. Also, words were abbreviated and it was left up to the processing archivist to determine their probable meaning. Despite the explanation in the scope and content notes, the Bellanca Corporation was not consistent when assigning model numbers. Letters were sometimes assigned that reflected a United States War Department designation, i.e. the VSO and the VF. By using the Bellanca Drawing indexes, the processing archivist was able to supply model numbers for some of the drawings.

7136 Bellanca Aircraft Company Drawings have been added to the National Air and Space Museum Miscellaneous Drawings Database. As time allows, the remaining Bellanca Drawings will be added to this database. An Archives Staff member will assist researchers in retrieving these materials from the database finding aid.

The Bellanca drawings were stored for over thirty years in less-than-ideal conditions. Many of the drawings were drawn on poor-quality tracing paper, and have become extremely brittle and fragile. Therefore, many of the drawings in the Bellanca Collection may not be available to researchers.

During processing of the collection, the project archivist has gained some insight about how Mr. Bellanca chose the model designations for his aircraft. The earliest system of model designations was based upon letters of the alphabet. No model designations appear for any Bellanca design until his work for Maryland Pressed Steel in 1916. The CD, which he designed for that company, was his fourth aircraft design that was built, and the letter D is the fourth letter of the alphabet. This pattern continues through the Bellanca CF. During 1926, when Mr. Bellanca worked for the Wright Corporation, he already had in mind an improved version of the CF, which was designated the CG. This aircraft received the designation WB-1 from the Wright Corporation.

When Mr. Bellanca formed his own company in 1927, the letter pattern described above reasserted itself for a time with the introduction of the Bellanca CH. It was a common practice of manufacturers of the time to also include the engine horsepower as part of the model number, so the Bellanca CH actually received its Approved Type Certificate (ATC) as the CH-200. When the next model came out, it was the CH-300 with a 300 horsepower Wright Whirlwind engine. This system remained in place through the CH-400. Names were given to some Bellanca aircraft. It appears that the names were a marketing tool meant to appeal to the buying public. With this idea in mind, the CH-300 became the "Pacemaker", the CH-400 became the "Skyrocket", and the P 100 was christened the "Airbus". In the early 1930's, the Bellanca Corporation moved away from the alphabetical designations and moved to numerical designations. Later Bellanca aircraft model designations consist of a series of numbers, such as 31-50. The first number was the wing area, in this case, 310 square feet, divided by 10. The second number was the horsepower of the engine, 500, divided by 10. This resulted in a distinctive system of model designations, which lasted until Mr. Bellanca sold the company.

Series III: Mr. Bellanca's personal material.

In this series, the researcher will find personal correspondence among family members, from both Giuseppe and Dorothy Bellanca's families and personal, legal and financial records for Bellanca family. As the lines between Mr. Bellanca's personal and professional lives were sometimes blurred, a fine line of separation between the two was not always possible. For example, at one time or another, two of Mr. Bellanca's brothers, John and Frank, worked for the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation and Andrew Bellanca, Mr. Bellanca's nephew, was his lawyer throughout his life. Therefore, the processing archivist suggests that the researcher look in the professional series of documents as well as Mr. Bellanca's personal papers for a more complete representation of Mr. Bellanca's correspondence.

After processing was completed, publications which previously had been offered to the NASM Branch Library were returned to the collection. They are listed in an addendum at the end of this finding aid.

Series IV: Photographs.

The researcher will find photographs of Bellanca aircraft, including the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation's Master Photograph Files, photographs of the Bellanca factory and factory workers, and photographs of Giuseppe M. Bellanca, business associates, and family members.

Series V: Miscellaneous and Oversize Materials.

This series contains ephemera of the Bellanca Collection: Scrapbooks, Loose Newspaper Clippings, Artwork, Ephemera and Magazine Clippings.

The Bellanca Collection included 27 motion picture films. In May of 2000, this film was transferred to the NASM Film Archives. Researchers wishing to access this part of the collection should contact the NASM Film Archivist.
Arrangement:
Series I: Mr. Bellanca's Professional Life

Series II: Technical Data

Series III: Personal Papers

Series IV: Photographs

Series V: Miscellaneous and Oversize Materials
Biographical / Historical:
Giuseppe Mario Bellanca was born in 1886 in Sciacca, Sicily. As a young man, he attended the Technical Institute in Milan, graduating with a teaching degree in mathematics in 1908. During his quest for a second mathematics and engineering degree, he became enamoured of aviation, and set out to design and build his own airplane. Bellanca's first aircraft design was a "pusher" aircraft, somewhat similar to the Wright Flyer. Lacking funds for such an endeavor, he joined with two partners, Enea Bossi, and Paolo Invernizzi. The union of the three produced the first flight of a totally Italian-designed and Italian-built aircraft in early December of 1909. The flight was short, but it was a start. Bellanca's second design was a tractor-type aircraft. Although the aircraft was successfully constructed, it was never flown due to insufficient funds for an engine.

At the urging of his brother Carlo, who was already established in Brooklyn, New York, Giuseppe Bellanca immigrated to America in 1911. Before the end of the year, he began construction of his third airplane design, a parasol monoplane. After construction was completed, he took the small craft to Mineola Field on Long Island, NY, and proceeded to teach himself to fly. He began by taxiing. He then, taxied faster, which gave way to short hops. The hops got longer, until, on May 19, 1912, there was not enough room to land straight ahead, and Bellanca had to complete a turn in order land safely. Having successfully taught himself to fly, Bellanca then set about teaching others to fly, and from 1912 to 1916, he operated the Bellanca Flying School. One of his students was a young Fiorello La Guardia, the future mayor of New York City. In return for flying lessons, La Guardia taught Bellanca how to drive a car.

In 1917 the Maryland Pressed Steel Company of Hagerstown, MD hired Bellanca as a consulting engineer. While there, he designed two trainer biplanes, the CD, and an improved version, the CE. With the conclusion of WWI, Maryland Pressed Steel's contracts were cancelled and the company entered into receivership. Thus, the CE never went into production.

In 1921, a group of investors lured Bellanca westward to Omaha, NE, in hopes of establishing that town as a center for aircraft manufacture. Before the aircraft could be built, the company went bankrupt, but construction of the aircraft continued under the financial backing of a local motorcycle dealer named Victor Roos. The resultant aircraft, the Bellanca CF, was called by Janes's All the World's Aircraft "the first up-to-date transport aeroplane that was designed, built, and flown with success in the United States." Among the local people helping to build the aircraft was the daughter of Bellanca's landlord, Dorothy Brown. Giuseppe and she were married on November 18, 1922.

Despite its advanced design, the Bellanca CF could not compete with the economics of the time. In the days just after World War I, a surplus Curtiss Jenny could be purchased for as little as $250.00. A Bellanca CF, with a price tag of $5000.00, was just too expensive and the aircraft never went into production. After the disappointment of the CF, Bellanca designed wings for the Post Office Department's DH-4's. His new wings were a tremendous improvement over the original design, but only a few aircraft were so modified.

In 1925, Bellanca went to work for the Wright Aeronautical Corporation of Paterson, NJ. His assignment there was to develop an aircraft around the new Wright Whirlwind engine. He already had a design in mind, which was an improved version of the CF, called the CG. This design evolved into the Wright-Bellanca WB-1.

The WB-1 enjoyed a short, but successful flying career. The aircraft had already won one race and efficiency contest before an untimely accident destroyed the craft during preparation for an attempt to break the world's non-refueled endurance record. Fortunately, at the time of the crash, Bellanca was already working on an improved version, of the WB-1 designated the WB-2.

During 1926, the WB-2 won two efficiency trophies at the National Air Races in Philadelphia. Wright considered putting the aircraft into production, but decided against it to avoid alienating other aircraft companies that were potential customers for their engines. Disappointed by Wright's decision, Bellanca left the company and joined with a young businessman named Charles Levine to form the Columbia Aircraft Company. Wright sold the WB-2 and all drawings and production rights to the new company. The WB-2 went on to a long and fruitful flying career starting with establishing a new world's non-refueled endurance record of 51 hours, 11 minutes, and 59 seconds in April of 1927.

In the latter half of 1926, Charles Lindbergh wanted to buy the WB-2, now named the 'Columbia', for his proposed flight from New York to Paris. He was rebuffed by Levine who also had designs on the flight and the $25,000 prize money. Lindbergh then went to Ryan for his specially designed NYP. Meanwhile Levine, in choosing the crew, managed to promise two seats to three people. So while the Columbia was grounded by a court order brought by the third party, Lindbergh took off on his successful flight to Paris.

Eventually, the 'Columbia' was cleared of litigation and took off on its successful transatlantic flight on June 4, 1927. In the cockpit were Clarence Chamberlin, one of the pilots of the endurance record and Charles Levine, who became the first transatlantic passenger. The plan was to fly all the way to Berlin, and Chamberlin had vowed to fly until they ran out of fuel. Forty-three hours later, they landed in Eisleben, Germany, the first of two successful Atlantic crossings for Bellanca's most famous aircraft.

Disappointed because the 'Columbia' was not the first aircraft to accomplish the New York to Paris flight, Bellanca severed all relations with Levine, and started his own company, the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation of America, and rented facilities on Staten Island, NY. The new Bellanca model was designated the CH, and was basically a commercial version of the WB-2. The new company also had two other models that were built for special orders, the Bellanca Model J and the Model K.

It was not long before Bellanca caught the attention of the Du Pont family of Delaware. They wanted to start aircraft manufacturing in Delaware, and in late 1927, an agreement was made with Bellanca to locate his factory outside of Wilmington. The site was large enough for a first-class airfield, with a seaplane ramp on the nearby Delaware River.

This was a busy time in Bellanca's life. Along with all that was happening in his professional life, he and Dorothy celebrated the birth of their son August T. Bellanca in March of 1927.

With the exception of a few years immediately before and during the early stages of WWII, Bellanca was President and Chairman of the Board from the corporation's inception on the last day of 1927 until he sold the company to L. Albert and Sons in 1954. After his departure from the company, Giuseppe and his son, August, formed the Bellanca Development Company with the purpose of building a new aircraft. It would have increased performance due to the use of lighter materials for its structure. Work on this aircraft was progressing when Giuseppe Bellanca succumbed to leukemia and died on December 26, 1960. After his father's death, August continued the project, and under his guidance, the aircraft first flew in 1973.

In 1993, August Bellanca donated his father's personal and professional papers to the National Air and Space Museum Archives. Prior to that time, they were kept in the Bellanca home near Galena, MD, and administered by Dorothy and August Bellanca.

1886 -- Born in Sciacca, Sicily

1909 -- Built first airplane. It completed the first flight of an Italian-designed, Italian-built, aircraft on December 8, 1909.

1911 -- Immigrated to America, settled in Brooklyn, NY.

1912 -- Completed construction of parasol monoplane. Successfully learned to fly this aircraft at Mineola, Long Island, NY.

1912 - 1916 -- Taught others to fly the parasol monoplane, including Fiorello LaGuardia.

1917 - 1920 -- Employed as a consulting engineer for Maryland Pressed Steel Company of Hagerstown, MD. While there, Bellanca designed and built the Bellanca CD and CE tractor biplanes.

1921 - 1922 -- Moved to Omaha, NE, and with Victor Roos, formed the Roos-Bellanca Aircraft Company. Bellanca designed and built the Bellanca CF. Married Dorothy Brown on November 18, 1922, in Omaha, NE.

1923 -- Moved back to New York, and designed and built new sets of wings for the Post Office Department's DH-4 mailplanes

1925 -- Employed by the Wright Aeronautical Corporation of Paterson, NJ, designing an aircraft around their new "Whirlwind" engine. The Wright-Bellanca 1, or WB-1, was the result, and was first flown in the latter part of that year.

1926 -- First flight of the WB-2.

1927 -- Bellanca started the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation of America, on Staten Island, NY. Bellanca established the Bellanca Aircraft Corporation of New Castle, DE. Wright decided not to enter into quantity production of the WB-2. Bellanca entered into a partnership with Charles A. Levine, and together, they formed the Columbia Aircraft Corporation. From Tuesday, April 12 to Thursday, April 14, Clarence Chamberlin and Bert Acosta set a new world's non-refueled endurance record in the WB-2, which was shortly thereafter, renamed the "Columbia". On June 4th, the Columbia set off across the Atlantic, and landed in Eisleben, Germany.

1941 - 1943 -- Head of the aviation department at Higgins Industries, Inc., in New Orleans, designing large cargo aircraft for troop movement during the war.

1954 -- Formed the Bellanca Development Company, to conduct research in lightweight aircraft construction materials.

1960 -- Died of leukemia in New York, December 26.
Provenance:
Mr. and Mrs. August Bellanca, Gift, 1993, NASM.1993.0055
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Bellanca WB-2 "Miss Columbia"  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Financial records
Newspaper clippings
Drawings
Photographic prints
Citation:
Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection, Acc. NASM.1993.0055, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1993.0055
See more items in:
Giuseppe M. Bellanca Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1993-0055
Online Media:

American Airlines Scrapbook

Creator:
American Airlines, Inc.  Search this
Extent:
0.68 Cubic feet (One flat box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
October 1945
Summary:
This scrapbook documents the introduction of American Airlines' Boston to London commercial service in October 1945.
Scope and Contents:
This scrapbook contains the following types of material documenting the introduction of American Airlines' Boston to London commercial service in October 1945: newspaper articles; photographs of crew, passengers, and christening speakers; flight memorabilia; and three 78 rpm record son the christening of the aircraft New England on 21 October 1945.
Arrangement:
No arrangement, one scrapbook.
Biographical / Historical:
American Airlines was developed from a conglomeration of 82 small airlines through acquisitions and reorganizations; initially called American Airways, it was a common brand for a number of independent carriers. These included Southern Air Transport in Texas, Southern Air Fast Express (SAFE) in the western US, Universal Aviation in the Midwest (which operated a transcontinental air/rail route in 1929), Thompson Aeronautical Services (which operated a Detroit-Cleveland route beginning in 1929) and Colonial Air Transport in the Northeast. On January 25, 1930, American Airways was incorporated as a single company, based in New York, with routes from Boston, New York and Chicago to Dallas, and from Dallas to Los Angeles. In 1934, American Airways Company was acquired by E. L. Cord, who renamed it "American Air Lines." Cord hired Texas businessman C. R. (Cyrus Rowlett) Smith to run the company. American was one of the four airlines, along with United Eastern, and TWA, that dominated the major transcontinental routes. Today American Airlines, Inc. is the world's third-largest airline in passenger miles transported, passenger fleet size, and operating revenues.
Provenance:
Raymond Leonard, Gift, Unknown, NASM.XXXX.0038
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Airlines  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Citation:
American Airlines Scrapbook, NASM.XXXX.0038, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0038
See more items in:
American Airlines Scrapbook
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0038
Online Media:

Albert Willibald Seypelt Collection

Creator:
Seypelt, Albert Willibald, -1966  Search this
Names:
Fitzmaurice, James C., 1898-  Search this
Kern, George William  Search this
Seypelt, Albert Willibald, -1966  Search this
von Huenefeld, Guenther  Search this
Extent:
0.9 Cubic feet ((2 legal document boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Certificates
Motion pictures (visual works)
Photographs
Clippings
Correspondence
Date:
1892-1941
Summary:
This collection consists of correspondence, newspaper clippings, photographs, and motion picture film documenting the Seypelt-Kern flight. The material also includes Seypelt's aviation licenses and certificates, as well as photographs documenting his enlistment in the German army during World War I. The collection also contains material on the first westward transatlantic flight (1928), from Ireland to Labrador by 'Bremen', a Junkers W-33 monoplane piloted by Hermann Koehl, Baron Guenther von Huenefeld, and James Fitzmaurice. The collection also contains one 16mm film on the flight of the "Yankee Doodle."
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of correspondence, newspaper clippings, photographs, and motion picture film documenting the Seypelt-Kern flight. The material also includes Seypelt's aviation licenses and certificates, as well as photographs documenting his enlistment in the German army during World War I. The collection also contains material on the first westward transatlantic flight (1928), from Ireland to Labrador by 'Bremen', a Junkers W-33 monoplane piloted by Hermann Koehl, Baron Guenther von Huenefeld, and James Fitzmaurice.

Note: The digital images in this finding aid were repurposed from scans made by an outside contractor for a commercial product and may show irregular cropping and orientation in addition to color variations resulting from damage to and deterioration of the original objects.
Arrangement:
Arrangement: 1 - Correspondence; 2 - Newspaper clippings on the flight of the Yankee Doodle; 3 - Aviation certificates, licenses, and other memorabilia; 4 - Photographs; 5 - Clippings and photographs on the flight of the Bremen.
Biographical / Historical:
On October 21, 1927, Albert Willibald [William] Seypelt (d.1966) and George William Kern began a tour of Europe in a lightweight Klemm-Daimler L-20 dubbed the 'Yankee Doodle.' Leaving from Stuttgart, Germany, the duo travelled over 6,000 miles visiting Belgium, France, Italy and Austria before returing to Stuttgart on January 20, 1928.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Gisela S. Enchelmayer, Gift, 1985, 1985-0011, NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Klemm L-20 "Yankee Doodle"  Search this
Junkers W 33 Family  Search this
Junkers W 33b "Bremen"  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Certificates
Motion pictures (visual works)
Photographs
Clippings
Correspondence
Citation:
Albert Willibald Seypelt Collection, Acc. NASM.1985.0011####, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1985.0011
See more items in:
Albert Willibald Seypelt Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1985-0011
Online Media:

Charles Augustus Lindbergh Philatelic Collection [Mensing]

Names:
Lindbergh, Charles A. (Charles Augustus), 1902-1974  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1977
Summary:
This collection consists of nine postal covers commemorating the 50th anniversary of Charles Augustus Lindbergh's historic flight from New York to Paris in 1927 and the following good will tour.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of nine postal covers commemorating the 50th anniversary of Charles Augustus Lindbergh's historic flight from New York to Paris in 1927 and the following good will tour. One is a first day cover and the rest are cacheted covers. All are postmarked with various dates between February and May 1977 from various cities including New York, New York; Brookfield, Illinois; Hammond, Indiana; Rockford, Illinois; Grand Island, Nebraska; Milford, Connecticut; Lansing, Michigan; and Cheyenne, Wyoming. Some are associated with philatelic events or groups including the International Philatelic Exhibit; the Calumet Stamp Club; Central Minnesota Philatelic Exhibition; and the Central Michigan Philatelic Exhibition. All feature images of Lindbergh and/or the Ryan NYP Spirit of St Louis.
Arrangement:
Collection is in chronological order.
Biographical / Historical:
In 1927, Charles Augustus Lindbergh obtained backing to compete for the Raymond Orteig prize of $25,000 offered for the first nonstop flight between New York and Paris. Lindbergh took off on May 20, 1927, flying alone in the Spirit of St Louis. Thirty-three hours and thirty minutes later, he landed at Le Bourget Field, near Paris, where over 100,000 people had gathered to give him an enthusiastic welcome. After the flight, Lindbergh flew to various countries as part of a good will tour. In 1977, numerous philatelic items were released to commemorate the 50th anniversary of this historic flight.
Provenance:
Herman Mensing, Gift, 2016, NASM.2016.0027
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Covers (Philately) -- United States  Search this
Citation:
Charles Augustus Lindbergh Philatelic Collection [Mensing], NASM.2016.0027, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2016.0027
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2016-0027

Curtiss NC-3 (P2N-1) and NC-4 (P2N-1) Photographs

Names:
United States. Navy -- Aviation  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Date:
1919
Summary:
This collection consists of eight black and white photographs, mounted on album pages, documenting the flight of the Curtiss NC-1, the Curtiss NC-3, and the Curtiss NC-4 aircraft in their effort to make the first trans-Atlantic crossing by air.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of eight black and white photographs, each approximately 2.25 x 3 inches, mounted on two 7 x 6 inch pages (four to each page) with caption information. The Curtiss NC-3 is shown anchored to a buoy, landing, and beached with damaged wings at Ponta Delgada, Azores Islands. The Curtiss NC-4 is shown landing, on the water, and taking off for Lisbon, Portugal. There is also an image taken from a ship of Naval personnel watching for an aircraft.
Arrangement:
Collection is in original order.
Biographical / Historical:
In 1917, the United States Navy developed specifications for a flying boat of sufficient range to cross the Atlantic to England. The Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, in conjunction with the Navy, developed a three-engine aircraft. The Navy intended that the flying boat would serve as an anti-submarine patrol aircraft. The first of the new aircraft, the NC-1, flew on October 4, 1918, followed by the NC-2 on April 12, 1919. Even though World War I had ended, the Navy decided to continue the program in an effort to make the first trans-Atlantic crossing by air. As the program progressed, the NC-2 was dismantled to provide parts for the other NC aircraft. On May 16, 1919, the NC-1, the NC-3, and the NC-4 assembled at Trepassey Bay, Newfoundland, to begin the 1200-mile flight to the Azores. The NC-1 was forced down short of the islands and sank, but the Greek vessel, Ionia, rescued the crew. The NC-3 landed two hundred miles short and taxied the remaining distance to the islands. The NC-4 completed the flight successfully, reaching Plymouth, England via Lisbon, Portugal on May 31, 1919. Following publicity tours of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States, the NC-4 was given to the Smithsonian Institution and is a part of the National Air and Space Museum collection.
Provenance:
Frederick M. Thompson, Gift, Unknown, NASM.XXXX.0903
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Curtiss NC-3 (P2N-1)  Search this
Curtiss NC-4 (P2N-1)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Citation:
Curtiss NC-3 and NC-4 Photographs, NASM.XXXX.0903, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0903
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0903

Admiral Albert C. Read, USN (Curtiss NC-4) Collection

Creator:
Read, A. C. (Albert Cushing), 1887-1967  Search this
Names:
Read, A. C. (Albert Cushing), 1887-1967  Search this
Extent:
1.74 Cubic feet (1 legal document box, three oversized boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Biographies
Clippings
Reports
Scrapbooks
Logs (records)
Correspondence
Photographs
Date:
1919-1946
bulk May 1919 to June 1919
Summary:
Rear Admiral Albert C. Read (1887-1967) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1907 and became Naval Aviator #24 in July 1915. In 1919, Read was the commander of the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic. The NC-4 covered 2150 nautical miles, from Nova Scotia to the Azores. The NC-4 was joined in the flight by the Curtiss NC-1 and Curtiss NC-3, but both the NC-1 and NC-3 were forced to land in the open sea.

This collection consists of the following: black scrapbook containing photographs with US Navy numbers; newspaper front pages; reports; cable grams; signals and dispatches; the NC-4 log; biography of Read; and correspondence.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the following: black scrapbook containing photographs with US Navy numbers; newspaper front pages; reports; cable grams; signals and dispatches; the NC-4 log; biography of Read; and correspondence in both Portuguese (with English translations) and English.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged chronologically.
Biographical/Historical note:
Rear Admiral Albert C. Read (1887-1967) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1907 and became Naval Aviator #24 in July 1915. In 1919, Read was the commander of the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic. The NC-4 covered 2150 nautical miles, from Nova Scotia to the Azores. The NC-4 was joined in the flight by the Curtiss NC-1 and Curtiss NC-3, but both the NC-1 and NC-3 were forced to land in the open sea.
Provenance:
Rear Admiral Albert C. Read, gift, 1962, XXXX.0391, NASM
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Curtiss NC-1 (P2N-1)  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Seaplanes  Search this
Curtiss NC-4 (P2N-1)  Search this
Curtiss NC-Boat Family  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Air pilots  Search this
Genre/Form:
Biographies
Clippings
Reports
Scrapbooks
Logs (records)
Correspondence
Photographs
Citation:
Admiral Albert C. Read, USN (Curtiss NC-4) Collection, Acc. XXXX.0391, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0391
See more items in:
Admiral Albert C. Read, USN (Curtiss NC-4) Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0391
Online Media:

50th Anniversary of the NC-4 Transatlantic Flight Collection [Richard K. Smith]

Creator:
Smith, Richard K.  Search this
Names:
Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company  Search this
United States. Navy  Search this
Extent:
1.9 Cubic feet (5 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Maps
Correspondence
Photographs
Diaries
Manuscripts
Microfilms
Publications
Date:
circa 1918-1969
Summary:
The 50th Anniversary of the NC-4 Transatlantic Flight Collection [Smith] Collection contains photocopies of correspondence, published materials, maps, and photographs. The collection also includes photocopies of aircraft logs, naval ship logs, weather reports, progress reports, biographies of the participants, information on the construction of the NC Aircraft and the general planning for the flight, and original material on the thirtieth and fiftieth anniversaries of the flight.
Scope and Content Note:
This collection was gathered by Dr. Richard K. Smith of the National Air and Space Museum, in preparation for the fiftieth anniversary of the NC-4's transatlantic flight. It contains photocopies from microfilm of documents found in the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Record Group 24, Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, and Record Group 72, Records of the Bureau of Aeronautics. The researcher will find photocopies of correspondence, published materials, maps, and photographs. The collection also includes photocopies of aircraft logs, naval ship logs, weather reports, progress reports, biographies of the participants, information on the construction of the NC Aircraft and general planning for the flight, and original material on the thirtieth and fiftieth anniversaries of the flight.

The final box of the collection (Box 5) contains 6 reels of microfilm from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Record Groups 24 and 72 relating to the Trans Atlantic flight of the NC-4. As the processing archivist reviewed the microfilm, it appeared that many of the documents in boxes 1-4 were copied from the microfilm. These reels of microfilm are available for review upon request.
Arrangement:
Materials are arranged by subject and then chronologically.
Historical Note:
In 1917, the United States Navy developed specifications for a flying boat of sufficient range to cross the Atlantic to England. The Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, in conjunction with the Navy, developed a three-engine aircraft. The Navy intended that the flying boat would serve as an anti-submarine patrol aircraft. The first of the new aircraft, the NC-1, flew on October 4, 1918, followed by the NC-2 on April 12, 1919. Even though World War I had ended, the Navy decided to continue the program in an effort to make the first transatlantic crossing by air. As the program progressed, the NC-2 was dismantled for parts for the other NC aircraft. On May 16, 1919, the NC-1, the NC-3, and the NC-4 assembled at Trepassey Bay, Newfoundland, to begin the 1200 nautical-mile flight to the Azores. The NC-1 was forced down short of the islands and sank, but the Greek vessel, Ionia, rescued the crew. The NC-3 landed two hundred miles short and taxied the remaining distance to the islands. The NC-4 completed the flight successfully, reaching Plymouth, England via Lisbon, Portugal, on May 31, 1919. Following publicity tours of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States, the NC-4 was given to the Smithsonian Institution and is a part of the National Air and Space Museum collection.
Provenance:
Aeronautics Division, NASM, transfer, unknown, XXXX-0418, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.

Reels of microfilm are available for review upon request.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to ue NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Curtiss NC-1 (P2N-1)  Search this
Curtiss NC-4 (P2N-1)  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Seaplanes  Search this
Curtiss NC-Boat Family  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Correspondence
Photographs
Diaries
Manuscripts
Microfilms
Publications
Citation:
50th Anniversary of the NC-4 Transatlantic Flight Collection [Smith], Acc. XXXX-0418, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0418
See more items in:
50th Anniversary of the NC-4 Transatlantic Flight Collection [Richard K. Smith]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0418
Online Media:

Carlisle S. Fliedner

Creator:
Fliedner, Carlisle S.  Search this
Names:
Pennsylvania (Battleship)  Search this
United States. Navy. Air Station. Panillac, Gironde, France  Search this
Fliedner, Carlisle S.  Search this
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Cubic feet ((1 flatbox))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1916-1919
Scope and Contents:
This scrapbooks holds photographs of Carlisle S. Fliedner 's personal experiences and eyewitness accounts of World War I. Included in the scrapbook are photographs of construction of the United States Navy Air Station in Panillac, Gironde, France. Also included in this collection are photographs of World War I seaplanes, Curtiss twin flying boats, several de Havilland aircraft, the battleship USS Pennsylvania, the then new flagship for the Atlantic fleet, the 1919 NC-4 transatlantic flight, and candid photographs of the then Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Franklin D. Roosevelt.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
No donor information, Gift, unknown, XXXX-0047, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
World War, 1914-1918 -- Aircraft  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- Aerial operations  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Curtiss NC-4 (P2N-1)  Search this
Aeronautics -- Records  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0047
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0047

American Export Airlines Transatlantic Route Reports

Creator:
Warner, Edward P.  Search this
Names:
American Export Airlines (AEA)  Search this
Extent:
.10t Cubic Feet ((2 folders))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Reports
Correspondence
Maps
Date:
bulk 1937-1938
Scope and Contents:
American Export Airlines (AEA) was established in 1937 by the shipping company, American Export Lines, with the goal of establishing a North Atlantic flying boat route. Dr. Edward P. Warner (1894-1958), an American aviation pioneer and one of the leading figures in world air transport systems, was engaged by AEA to prepare reports on possible North Atlantic routes. Warner produced reports in 1937 and 1938 but AEA was not able to start their New York - Ireland flying boat service until June of 1942, due in part to stiff resistance from Pan American. In 1945 AEA was awarded transatlantic rights covering northern Europe, and the airline cut its strings with the shipping company. In November 1948, AEA merged with American Airlines to become American Overseas Airlines (AOA). AOA and Pan American merged in 1950.
Biographical / Historical:
This collection consists of the following items: a letter to Coverdale & Colpitts from Edward P. Warner, November 9, 1938; a report, "Notes on the Operating Plan of American Export Lines Inc., and especially on the Correlation of the Present Project with that Studies and Reported on by Edward P. Warner in December 1937"; and the report, "Trans-Atlantic Air Line Possibilities and the Selection of Trans-Atlantic Equipment: report prepared by Edward P. Warner for Coverdale & Colpitts, submitted December 13, 1937," with an accompanying notebook of charts and maps of possible route
In August of 2005, the following items were donated to the Museum: "Little Known Facts about the Scheduled Air Transport Industry," April 15, 1941; An Analysis of Project Beacon, November 1961; The Airport and its Neighbors: The Report of the President's Airport Commission, May 16, 1952; "Air Transport" by J. Parker Van Zandt, November 5,1912; Aircraft Record: A Manual of Defense Data, Vol. 1, No. 1, May 1941; "Air Carrier Traffic Study: The Relation of Air Transportation to National Defense," September 9, 1941; Civil Aeronautics Authority Reorganization Plans Press Release, June 30, 1940; memo to Mr. Pogue from Mr. Keyser on the subsidy in mail rates, March 28, 1940; two maps on E. A. L. Instrument approach from NE Atlanta, Georgia, February 26, 1941; CAA "Aircraft Specification, No, 618" (for Douglas Aircraft), January 23, 1941; memo to John Wanner for John Munson on "Approach Zoning of the Washington National Airport," February 6,1940; eight untitled writings relating to the civil aviation and the Civil Aeronautics Board, 1940s.
Provenance:
Alfred S. Rhode, Gift, 2005
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- Freight  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Correspondence
Maps
Citation:
American Export Airlines Transatlantic Route Reports, Accession number 2005-0060, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2005.0060
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2005-0060

Charles Augustus Lindbergh Sheet Music Collection

Names:
Lindbergh, Charles A. (Charles Augustus), 1902-1974  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic Feet ((1 folder))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sheet music
Date:
bulk 1927
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of four pieces of sheet music for songs written in honor of Charles Augustus Lindbergh, all dating from 1927. The details of the sheet music is as follows: "Lindy," words and music by Daniel McLellan, a stylized drawing of an airplane in flight appears on the back cover; "Lucky Lindy!," words by L. Wolfe Gilbert and music by Abel Baer, the cover features a drawing of the Spirit of St. Louis in flight; "Lindbergh (The Eagle of the U.S.A.)," by Howard Johnson and Al Sherman, the front cover shows an image of Lindbergh standing beside the Spirit of St. Louis; "Like an Angel You Flew Into Everyone's Heart (Lindbergh)," words by Harry A. Stone and John McLaughlin, music by Jimmy McHugh and Irving Mills, front cover features an image of Lindbergh. Typewritten pages containing the lyrics to each song have been inserted into each piece of sheet music by an unknown person.
Biographical / Historical:
On May 21, 1927, Charles Augustus Lindbergh completed the first solo nonstop transatlantic flight in history, flying his Ryan NYP Spirit of St. Louis 5,810 kilometers (3,610 miles) between Roosevelt Field on Long Island, New York, and Paris, France, in 33 hours, 30 minutes. With this flight, Lindbergh won the {dollar}25,000 prize offered by New York hotel owner Raymond Orteig to the first aviator to fly an aircraft directly across the Atlantic between New York and Paris. When he landed at Le Bourget Field in Paris, Lindbergh became a world hero who would remain in the public eye for decades.
Provenance:
Unknown, probably various, Gift, Unknown, found in backlog
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sheet music
Citation:
Charles Augustus Lindbergh Sheet Music Collection, Accession XXXX-1135, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.1135
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-1135

Petersen's American Aerial Navigation Company Circular, Stationery, and Stock Certificate

Creator:
Petersen, Carl W.  Search this
Extent:
0.13 Cubic Feet (1 flat box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Correspondence
Stock certificates
Date:
1886
Summary:
This collection consists of a Petersen's American Aerial Navigation company circular, stationery, and stock certificate.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of an 8.5 x 11 inch company circular addressed to Mrs. Elisabeth Bender, Stockholder, dated January 1885; a 9 x 12 inch handwritten letter in German addressed to Governor Frederick Bender, dated 8 January 1886; and a 11 x 7 inch stock certificate for five $2.00 shares dated 3 January 1885 made out to Mrs. Elisabeth Bender.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged at the item level.
Biographical/Historical note:
Captain Carl W. Petersen was a mariner, aviator, explorer, and inventor, who proposed to cross the Atlantic in five aerial tacks (risings and lowerings) in an "oblong, horizontal flat reefable gas-vessel" airship propelled by an electric motor, and promising the stability of a sailing ship. He formed and was president of Petersen's American Aerial Navigation Company and received patents for his airship.
Provenance:
Unknown - found in collection, Unknown, Unknown, NASM.XXXX.1027YEAR.####
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
USA, Petersen's American Aerial Navigation Co  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Stock certificates
Citation:
Petersen's American Aerial Navigation Company Circular, Stationery, and Stock Certificate, NASM.XXXX1027, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.1027
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-1027
Online Media:

Charles Lindbergh Memorabilia [Stanley King] Collection

Creator:
King, Stanley.  Search this
Names:
Ryan NYP "Spirit of St. Louis"  Search this
Lindbergh, Anne Morrow, 1906-2001  Search this
Lindbergh, Charles A. (Charles Augustus), 1902-1974  Search this
Extent:
6.05 Cubic Feet (16 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Scrapbooks
Ephemera
Photograph albums
Sheet music
Date:
1927-1939
Summary:
This collection consists of approximately 6.05 cubic feet of material relating to Charles Lindbergh including photograph albums; scrapbooks; postcards; photographs; philately; sheet music; records; film; CDs (data and audio); videotapes; flyers; articles; advertisements; reception ephemera; magazines; and labels.
Scope and Contents:
The Stanley King collection was donated to the Museum in 2002, and the archival material was later transferred to the Archives. The archival material includes photograph albums; scrapbooks; postcards; photographs; philately; sheet music; records; film; CDs (data and audio); videotapes; flyers; articles; advertisements; reception ephemera; magazines; and labels. The thirteen photo albums, arranged chronologically from 1927-1938, include some lovely photographs of Anne Lindbergh and their flights in the Lockheed Sirius "Tingmissartoq;" Lindbergh's tour through Mexico and South America; and the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh, Jr. and the subsequent trial. The four scrapbooks consists of newspaper clippings (with a few pieces of sheet music) relating mostly to the 1927 flight.
Biographical / Historical:
On May 20-21, 1927, Charles Lindbergh literally flew into history when he crossed the Atlantic Ocean in his Ryan NYP Spirit of St. Louis, thus becoming the first pilot to fly solo and nonstop from New York to Paris. This flight made Lindbergh a household name and catapulted him into fame and celebrity. Composed of more than 400 artifacts and archival items, this collection illustrates the popular culture phenomenon that turned the reserved young pilot from Minnesota into the first media superstar of the 20th century. The colorful assortment of commemorative toys, pins, games, bottles, jewelry, hats and pennants was collected by Lindbergh enthusiast Stanley King over several decades and donated to the museum in 2002. Most of the items were mass-merchandised to the public as Lindbergh toured the United States and Latin America in the years immediately following the New York-to-Paris flight. The artifacts and archival material reflect the public adulation for Lindbergh and the powerful commercial response to his celebrity. More than 75 years after the Spirit's historic flight, Lindbergh's name still has the power help sell manufactured goods
Provenance:
Stanley King, Gift, 2002, NASM.2010.0022
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Collectors and collecting  Search this
Lockheed Model 8 Sirius "Tingmissartoq"  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Ephemera
Photograph albums
Sheet music
Citation:
Charles Lindbergh Memorabilia [Stanley King] Collection, NASM.2010.0022, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2010.0022
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2010-0022

Seadrome Ocean Airways Proposal

Topic:
Seadrome Ocean Airways: Report Covering the Development Program (proposal)
Creator:
Armstrong, Edward R.  Search this
Names:
Armstrong, Edward R.  Search this
Extent:
0.01 Cubic Feet ((1 folder))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Reports
Date:
1930
Scope and Contents:
This is a 1930 commercial proposal, 'Seadrome Ocean Airways: Report covering the Development Program.' The report was written by Edward R. Armstrong and includes text, drawings, images, and maps.
Biographical / Historical:
During the 1920s and 1930s there were proposals to help establish airways over the oceans. One proposal was seadromes (man-made platforms and facilities) which would be placed at strategic intervals across the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. In theory, these platforms would allow commercial transport aircraft to cross the oceans safely and profitably.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Peter K. Baumgarten, gift, 1995, 1995-0034, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Flights around the world  Search this
Airports, Floating  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Identifier:
NASM.1995.0034
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1995-0034

Admiral Gago Coutinho Collection

Names:
Gago Coutinho, Carlos Viegas  Search this
Sacadura Cabral, Artur de (Artur de Sacadura Freire Cabral)  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic Feet ((1 folder))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Place:
Portugal
Date:
bulk 1922
Scope and Contents:
This accession includes a map of the flight and seven photographs. Two photos are of the Fairey IIID Mk. II Seaplane "Lusitânia," Three are of the Fairey IIID Seaplane "Santa Cruz," the airplane which made the flight, and one of those three includes the pilots, Carlos Viegas Gago Coutinho and Artur de Sacadura Cabral. The remaining two photos are of sextants. The first is the original sextant used on the 1922 flight. The second is the commercial version manufactured by C. Plath. Finally, there are the manuscripts on the new sextant: one in English, one in Spanish, and one in German.
Biographical / Historical:
Admiral Gago Coutinho was a pilot for the Portuguese Navy in the 1920s. He is famous for his 1922 flight across the South Atlantic with fellow navigator, Commander Sacadura Cabral, the first flight to use celestial navigation for an oceanic crossing. Admiral Coutinho designed the instrument and developed the methods for the flight. He worked with C. Plath, a German manufacturer of nautical instruments, to improve the sextant over the next 15 years.
Provenance:
Embassy of Portugal, Gift, 1988
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Navigation  Search this
Fairey IIID Seaplane  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Admiral Gago Coutinho Collection, Accession 1988-0091, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1988.0091
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1988-0091

Walter Wellman Photographs

Names:
Vaniman, Melvin  Search this
Wellman, Walter, 1858-1934.  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic Feet ((1 folder))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographic postcards
Date:
bulk 1910
Scope and Contents:
This collection includes two photographs on postcards. The first is of Wellman-Vaniman airship America. The second shows (left to right) Murray Simon (?) - navigator; Walter Wellman - explorer and journalist; Melvin Vaniman - designer of America and chief engineer on flight over Atlantic; Jack Irwin - radio operator on America; and Frederic Aubert and Louis Loud - engineers.
Biographical / Historical:
Walter Wellman (1858-1934) was an American journalist and explorer who attempted unsuccessfully both to reach the North Pole and to cross the Atlantic Ocean by powered airship. Born in Ohio, Wellman founded a weekly newspaper in Sutton, Nebraska, when he was 14, and later founded The Cincinnati Evening Post in 1879. For many years, he was the Washington correspondent for the Chicago Herald. He wrote of his many aerial and exploring adventures for the newspapers, including his 1891 claim that he had identified the exact spot where Christopher Columbus landed in San Salvador. Walter Wellman made his first attempt to reach the North Pole by land in 1894, leaving from base camp at Virgo Harbor, Danes Island. In 1898, Wellman headed north to Franz Joseph Land to search for the missing Swedish balloonist Salomon August Andrée and crew who had disappeared the year before in an attempt on the pole. In the spring of 1899, Wellman tried again to sled to the pole; again he failed. After these two sledding expeditions, Wellman decided that the best approach to the North Pole was by air. By 1906, he had raised the necessary funds to construct an airship, airship hangar, and base camp at Virgo Harbor. Unfortunately, his airship expeditions in search of the geographic North Pole were also unsuccessful; his first airship flight in 1907 only covered twenty miles, while his second attempt in 1909 covered only forty miles. During this latter (and final) attempt, Walter's brother Arthur Wellman managed the expedition's base camp on Dane's Island. After learning that Robert Peary and Frederick Cook both claimed to have reached the North Pole in 1909, Walter Wellman abandoned his own efforts. In 1910, Wellman tried for his last aviation milestone, attempting a transatlantic crossing in his airship America. He was not successful.
Provenance:
Paul Liscomb, Gift, 1986
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Wellman-Vaniman America  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Airships  Search this
Transatlantic flights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic postcards
Citation:
Walter Wellman Photographs, Accession 1986-0157, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1986.0157
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1986-0157

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