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Pamela A. Melroy Papers

Extent:
17.6 Cubic feet (19 containers)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Technical reports
Photographic prints
Newspaper clippings
Correspondence
Date:
1961-2008
bulk 1980s-2000s
Summary:
This collection consists of 17 cubic feet of papers relating to the life and career of astronaut Pamela A. Melroy.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 17 cubic feet of correspondence, memoranda, reports, checklists, manuals, notes, photographs, brochures, pamphlets, programs, newsletters, newspaper and magazine articles, and related training materials created or collected by Pamela A. Melroy over the course of her life and career. This material is particularly rich in materials documenting her NASA astronaut career, but also includes significant insight into her USAF career and material relating to her childhood and college years.
Arrangement:
No final arrangement as collection has not been fully processed; box listing is available.
Biographical / Historical:
Pamela Ann Melroy (Col., USAF, Ret.), had a distinguished 26-year career as a pilot in the US Air Force and NASA's Shuttle-era astronaut corps. Melroy is one of only two women to command spaceflight missions, and she is one of the earliest women to fly combat missions, graduate from USAF Test Pilot School, and serve as a military test pilot. Melroy graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Physics and Astronomy from Wellesley College, 1983 and a Master of Science degree in Earth and Planetary Sciences from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1984. Melroy joined the Air Force ROTC program, becoming Cadet Wing Commander and Top Graduate, in 1983. She entered the US Air Force, completed flight training in 1985, and received assignments to fly the McDonnell Douglas KC-10 refueling tanker aircraft. She flew combat missions and supported combat operations in Operation Just Cause and Operation Desert Storm/Desert Shield (1990-1991). She then graduated from Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards AFB and was assigned to evaluate the C-17 transport aircraft, setting eleven world records in that effort. Rising to the rank of major, serving as aircraft commander and instructor, and flying more than 50 different aircraft, Melroy attained the experience needed to compete for selection as a NASA pilot astronaut. NASA selected Melroy in 1995 in astronaut Class XV. She completed training and technical assignments and flew her first mission as pilot on STS-92 (Discovery) in 2000, attaining the rank of colonel upon completing delivery and installation of the Z1 truss on the International Space Station. Her second flight, STS-112 (Atlantis), occurred in 2002, for delivery and installation of the third ISS truss segment. Melroy then was selected for two very significant roles in the wake of the STS-107 Columbia tragedy in 2003. She first served as Lead for the Crew Module/Crew Equipment recovery and reconstruction effort, and then co-led the subsequent Columbia Crew Survival Investigation Study and resultant published report (NASA SP 2008-565). Melroy's third and final shuttle mission was STS-120 (Discovery) to deliver Node 2 (Harmony) to the International Space Station in 2007. In addition, it included a technically challenging unplanned repair of damaged solar arrays. This mission marked the first time that two spacecraft in orbit simultaneously were commanded by women, Melroy on the shuttle and Peggy Whitson on the space station. Melroy's final assignment before retiring from NASA in 2009 was Chief of the Orion branch of the Astronaut Office, working on development of the next crew vehicle. Upon leaving NASA, she became involved in developing regulations for commercial spaceflight and other pursuits.
Provenance:
Pam Melroy, Gift, 2018, NASM.2018.0034
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
United States Air Force  Search this
Astronauts  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Technical manuals  Search this
McDonnell Douglas KC-10  Search this
International Space Station (ISS)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Technical reports
Photographic prints
Newspaper clippings
Correspondence -- 21st century
Citation:
Pamela A. Melroy Papers, NASM.2018.0034, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2018.0034
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2018-0034

Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers

Creator:
Sullivan, Kathryn  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
11.5 Cubic feet (15 boxes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1970s - 2010s
Summary:
This collection consists of approximately 11.5 cubic feet of papers, photographs, certificates, and video/film, created or collected by Kathryn Sullivan, spanning her lifetime of achievement.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately 11 cubic feet of papers, photographs, certificates, and video/film, created or collected by Kathryn Sullivan. The papers show her myriad contributions to space science and exploration, and spans her lifetime of achievements.
Arrangement:
This collection has not been processed; only a box listing is available.
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan (b. 1951) has had a long career as a distinguished scientist, astronaut, and oceanographer. She was one of the first six women selected into the NASA astronaut corps in 1978 and was the first American female astronaut to walk in space (October 11, 1984.) During her 15-year NASA career, Dr. Sullivan flew on three space shuttle missions, notably the one that deployed the Hubble Space Telescope. In 1993, Dr. Sullivan left NASA to accept the presidential appointment to the post of Chief Scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). From 1996 - 2006, Dr. Sullivan served as President and CEO of the hands-on science center, Central Ohio Science Institute (COSI) in Columbus, Ohio. Dr. Sullivan then served as the Inaugural Director of the Battelle Center for Mathematics and Science Education Policy in the John Glenn School of Public Affairs at the Ohio State University. Dr. Sullivan, a specialist in deep-sea geology, finished her career back at NOAA as the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, where she oversaw a broad portfolio of research and technology programs in such diverse areas as fisheries biology, climate and global change, satellite instrumentation and marine biodiversity. Dr. Sullivan was the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's 2017 Charles A. Lindbergh Chair of Aerospace History; her topic was the development of satellite service of the Hubble Telescope. Dr. Sullivan was also an oceanography officer with the United States Navy Reserve (1988-2006), retiring with the rank of captain.
Provenance:
Kathryn D. Sullivan, Gift, 2018, NASM.2019.0007
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Space sciences  Search this
Hubble (Large) Space Telescope  Search this
Oceanography  Search this
Citation:
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers, NASM.2019.0007, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2019.0007
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2019-0007
Online Media:

Office of Commercial Space Transportation Collection [Johnson]

Creator:
United States. Office of Commercial Space Transportation  Search this
Johnson, Sara Madeline  Search this
Extent:
0.79 Cubic feet (2 letter document boxes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1986
Summary:
This collection consists of documents relating to Madeline Johnson and her role as Director of the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST).
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of documents relating to Madeline Johnson and her role as Director of the OCST, including agendas, memorandums, reports, presentations, her statements in front of Congress, and newspaper articles. Of special interest are the Economic Policy Council's Commercial Space Working Group documents and recommendations to President Reagan on commercializing satellite launches.
Arrangement:
No arrangement.
Biographical / Historical:
President Reagan signed Executive Order 12465 on February 25, 1984, designating the Department of Transportation to be the lead agency for commercial expendable launch vehicles. Later that year, the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST) was established and placed in the Office of the Secretary. Madeline Johnson was selected by then Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Dole to be the Director of OCST in 1986. During her tenure, Johnson worked to build a cross-government coalition to persuade President Reagan to create the opportunity for a private-sector satellite launching industry; this was especially needed as the Challenger accident had grounded Space Shuttle missions. The OCST was moved from the Office of the Secretary and today resides with the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The OCST now gives final approval of any commercial rocket launch operations involving a U.S. launch operator or a launch from the U.S.
Provenance:
Estate of Sara Madeline Johnson, Gift, 2020, NASM.2020.0015
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics and state  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Satellites  Search this
Space industrialization  Search this
Citation:
Office of Commercial Space Transportation Collection [Johnson], NASM.2020.0015, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2020.0015
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2020-0015

Jacques Tiziou Space Collection

Names:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
146 Cubic feet (204 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Moon -- Exploration
Date:
bulk 1960s through 2010
Summary:
Jacques Tiziou (1939-2017) was a professional journalist and photographer, concentrating on aerospace topics. This collection includes materials from Tiziou's archive of historical documents, photography, and ephemera from the space program (both national and international) as well as his own photography and writings.
Scope and Contents:
Always an avid collector, Tiziou amassed an impressive archive of both historical documents and collectible memorabilia from the space program (both national and international), including over 800 cubic feet of press files, films, photography (including autographed crew photographs) and various souvenirs, from Sputnik to the US Space Shuttle Program. This archival collection consists of 146 cubic feet of materials drawn from Tiziou's original collection, including documents, ephemera, photographs, slides, and video/film, created or collected by Jacques Tiziou on space flight history. Much of the material was gathered from various sources such as NASA, but the collection also contains Tiziou's own photographs and writings.
Arrangement:
The material in the "Files" series has been removed from Tiziou's original file boxes and rehoused into new acid-free containers preserving the original order of each box's contents. The collection's boxes have been rearranged into subseries grouped by regional identity (USA, USSR, International, etc.) and then alphabetically by broad subject matter.

The "Photography" series has not yet been processed.
Biographical / Historical:
Jacques Tiziou (1939-2017) was a professional journalist and photographer, concentrating on aerospace topics. Born in Montélimar, France, he began his career while still a teen as a freelance journalist, and even before graduating in 1962 from the French engineering school Estaca he had worked for various European publications, radio, and television. Between 1965 and 1968, he was the Editor in Chief of the first Encyclopedia of Space and in 1969 he published A l'assault de la lune (A Storm of the Moon). Tiziou then moved to Florida, where he closely followed the Apollo and Skylab programs as a correspondent for Aviation Magazine, French TV channels and photo agencies, including Dalmas, Gamma, and Sygma (Corbis). While in Florida, Tiziou became friends with most American astronauts, and entertained them at his home. Tiziou was also interested in space policy affairs, and after the end of the Skylab program, he moved to Washington DC. Jacques Tiziou was awarded the Silver Feathers and Gold of the French Press, was named a correspondent for the Air and Space Academy in 1993, and was elected to the French National Academy of Air and Space in 1993.
Provenance:
Jacques-Jean Tiziou, Gift, 2018, NASM.2018.0078.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Supersonic transport planes  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Ballistic missiles  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Cold War -- 1950-1970  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Mercury Project  Search this
Gemini Project  Search this
Soyuz Program (Russia)  Search this
Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Project Vanguard  Search this
Vostok (manned satellite)  Search this
Citation:
Jacques Tiziou Space Collection, Acc. 2018.0078, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2018.0078
See more items in:
Jacques Tiziou Space Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2018-0078

Robert C. Truax Collection

Creator:
Robert, C. Truax, 1917-2010  Search this
Extent:
11.99 Cubic Feet
12.95 Linear Feet (21 Legal Size Boxes, 1 Slim Legal Size, 3 Shoe Boxes, 1 Flat Box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1929-2005
bulk 1980-2000
Summary:
Robert Truax was one of the great originals of American rocketry and a major proponent and inventor of ultra-low-cost rocket engine and vehicle concepts.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of material relating to the career of Robert Collins Truax including correspondence, photographic material, technical drawings, technical manuals and reports, presentation and conference materials, papers by Truax, news clippings, published materials and business records for Truax Engineering, Inc.

Projects and programs referenced in this collection include the Knievel Rocket Car (Truax X-2 Sky-Cycle); X-3 Volksrocket; amphibious launchers, including the "Sea Dragon," "Sea Horse," and SEALAR (Sea Launched Rocket); the Space Shuttle program; the Gemini and Apollo programs; Rocketdyne LR89 Liquid-Fuel Motors; Rand Project; the Corona Reconnaissance Satellite; and Project Private Enterprise.

The researcher should note that the collection also contains audio-visual material. These items are not included in the finding aid but the NASM audio-visual archivist can assist you regarding access.
Arrangement:
This collection was arranged into series by the processing archivist. There was no original order when the collection was received.

Series 1: Personal & Business Papers

Series 2: Papers Authored by R.C. Truax

Series 3: Drawings

Series 4: Images

4:1 - Slides

4:2 - Photos, Negatives & Floppy Discs
Acronyms:
Numerous acronyms were used by the creator when labeling his file units. Some will be obvious to the researcher but the archivist has identified some acronyms that might be more unclear. Not all acronyms were able to be identified.

AFRL - Air Force Research Lab

ATD - Advanced Technology Development

BAA - possibly Broad Agency Announcement

BMDO - Ballistic Missile Defense Organization

CDRL - Contract Data Requirements List?

CPAI - Chemical Propulsion Information Agency

ITAR - International Traffic in Arms Regulations

KACST - King Abdulaziz City for Science & Technology

MSFC - Marshall Space Flight Center

PMRF - Pacific Missile Range Facility

RSLP - Rocket Systems Launch Program

SEALAR - Sea Launch & Recovery

TEI - Truax Engineering Inc.

TPIPT - Technology Planning Integrated Product Teams
Biographical / Historical:
Robert Truax (1917-2010) was one of the great originals of American rocketry and a major proponent and inventor of ultra-low-cost rocket engine and vehicle concepts. A longtime member of the American Rocket Society (serving as its president in 1957,) He received the Robert H. Goddard award for outstanding work in liquid propellant rockets as well as the Legion of Merit citation for his conceptual work on making the "Polaris" guided-missile submarine a primary naval weapon. Truax was also inducted into the Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers Hall of Fame in 2003.

Inspired by Robert Goddard, Truax began building rockets when he was a teenager in California. From 1936 to 1939, while enrolled at the United States Naval Academy, he tested liquid-fueled rocket motors. During the late 1940s, he organized the US Naval Missile Test Center's propulsion laboratory at Point Mugu, California, and headed rocket development within the Navy's Bureau of Aeronotics where he advanced the concept of a staged combustion system upon which the Space Shuttle's main engines would eventually rely. In 1946, Truax led a team that interrogated the rocket engineer for Nazi Germany, Wernher von Braun.

By 1955, however, his proposal for a submarine-launched ballistic missile had failed to win Navy approval and he joined the Air Force's newly established Western Development Division (WDD) From 1955 to 1958, Captain Truax headed the Thor intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM) development program. Truax studied the sea launching of rockets, such as the Sea Bee and Sea Horse projects. In 1959 he retired as a Captain, and headed the Aerojet-General Advanced Development Division and Aerojet's Sea Dragon project in the Advanced Development Division until leaving in 1967. In 1966 Robert Truax founded Truax Engineering Inc. (TEI,) which studied sea launch concepts similar to the earlier Sea Dragon—the Excalibur, the SEALAR (Sea Launched Rocket,) and the Excalibur S. Here his low-cost booster program plan was elaborated and further studied, but he was again unable to interest NASA or the USAF in the concept of cheap access to space.

In the 70's and early 80's, Truax, heretofore prominent in scientific communities, emerged in popular culture. Literally building rockets from his own backyard in Saratoga, Truax built both of Evel Knievel's "Skycycles" for his 1974 for attempt to jump the Snake River Canyon. He later competed in the original X-prize competition to send a private astronaut into suborbital flight.

Robert Truax, died on September 17 aged 93, as a key figure in the rocket research that took America into the space age, while also being an inspiration to the do-it-yourself, back-yard amateur.
Provenance:
Truax Estate, gift, 2016
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Permissions Requests
Topic:
Truax X-3 Volksrocket  Search this
SEALAR (Sea Launched Rocket)  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Kneival Rocket Car (Truax X-2 Sky-Cycle)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
RAND  Search this
North American Aviation, Inc. Rocketdyne Division  Search this
Citation:
Robert C. Truax Collection, Acc. 2016-0008, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2016.0008
See more items in:
Robert C. Truax Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2016-0008
Online Media:

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